COLOR by dffhrtcv3

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									 Color
It’s Magic!
         Color Experiment
• Work with a partner
• Complete the handout
             COLOR
• A ray of light is the source of all color
• Color is light broken into rays of varying
  wavelengths, which causes the viewer to see
  different colors.
• A prism, soap bubble, oil spill, or a rainbow
  demonstrates this division of color
• Red is the longest and Violet is the shortest
  wavelength
                    HUE
• Hue:
  – the specific name for a color.
  – The feature, individual nature that makes
    each color different.
  – Each color on the color wheel is a hue
  – Black, white, and grey do not have a hue.
       THE COLOR WHEEL
• Is the most commonly   Color each type

  used tool to
  understand the basis
  of all color
  relationships.
• It consists of three
  types of colors:
  primary, secondary,
  and intermediate
  (tertiary)
PRIMARY COLORS
       • Yellow, Red, & Blue.
       • By mixing, lightening,
         or darkening the
         primary colors, all
         other colors can be
         made.
       • No other colors can
         be combined to
         create the primary
blue     colors. They occur
         naturally.
     SECONDARY COLORS
• Orange, Green, and        orange
  Violet.
• Are produced by
  mixing EQUAL
  amounts of two
  primary colors.
  – Red + Yellow = Orange
  – Blue + Yellow = Green
  – Red + Blue = Violet
INTERMEDIATE (TERTIARY)
       COLORS
 Yellow-    • Yellow-Green, Blue-
 Orange       Green, Blue-Violet,
              Red-Violet, Red-
              Orange, and Yellow-
              Orange
            • Made by mixing a
              primary color with a
              secondary color.
  Blue-
  Violet    • Note: The primary
              color is always listed
              first.
 YELLOW




         e




violet
                    INTENSITY
• The Brightness or Dullness of a color
  created by adding its compliment.
  – Color’s are brightest in their natural form. (i.e.
    pure yellow, pure red, pure blue)
• Objects with Bright high intensity colors
  seem larger. Rooms feel larger.
  – Bold and intense colors are best used sparingly or as accents
• Objects with Dull low intensity colors
  seem smaller. Rooms feel smaller.
        VALUE
• The lightness or darkness of a hue.
  – The value of a hue can be made lighter by
    adding white, creating a TINT of that hue.
       – Appearance of greater room size or height.
       – Pink is a tint of red, Peach is a tint of orange
  – The value of a hue can be made darker by
    adding black, creating a SHADE of that hue.
       – Maroon is shade of red. Rust is shade of orange
       – Appearance of smaller room size or height
  – The intensity (bright/dull) of a hue may be
    lowered by adding some of its complement, or
    gray – creating a TONE.
                                    WARM COLORS
                                                                          Separate these colored pencils



                             Blue     Blue-violet

         Blue-green                                 Violet




       Green                                                 Red-violet




Yellow-green                                                 Red




               Yellow                                Red-orange

                    Yellow-orange     Orange
                   WARM COLORS
• Are considered “warm”
  because of their association
  with warm objects of the
  same color, such as the sun
  and fire.
• Also called advancing
  colors because they make
  objects appear larger or
  closer than they really are.
   –   Makes a room appear smaller

• They can make a room feel
  active, exciting, warmer and
  cozy.
                                    COOL COLORS
                                                                         Separate these colored pencils




                             Blue    Blue-violet

         Blue-green                                Violet




       Green                                                Red-violet




Yellow-green                                                Red




               Yellow                               Red-orange

                    Yellow-orange    Orange
COOL COLORS
     • Associate with water,
       grass, and trees.
     • Are called receding
       colors because they
       make objects seem
       smaller and farther
       away.
        –   Makes a room appear larger

     • Make a room feel
       restful, peaceful, and
       cooler.
        NEUTRAL COLORS
                          Separate these colored pencils

• White, Black, and
  Gray.
• Not considered colors
  because they do not
  have a hue.
• Brown, tan, and beige
  are considered
  neutral colors, but
  based on the hues
  red, orange, and
  yellow.
    Color Can…..
• BE SYMBOLIC
• CHANGE OUR MOODS
• AFFECT OUR PERFORMANCE AND
  ABILITIES
• ALTER THE APPEARANCE OF FORM
  AND SPACE
          Choosing the Right Color
• Mood
   – What mood do you want to create
• People
   – Think about the people who will be in the area
• Style
   – The style may influence the color choice(s). Spanish style = rust colored walls
• Items in the room
   – Choose an item in the room, and one of it’s colors as the main color for your
     room. Then choose accent colors based on your knowledge of color schemes.
• Time
   – The amount of time that will be spent in the room
• Existing Colors
   – Some room components can’t be changed so incorporate them.
• Adjacent Rooms
   – Create a unified look with rooms that you can see.
• Lighting
   – Natural light shows objects in true colors. Artificial lights make color
     appear blue or yellow
          Using Color Correctly
• Colors seem more intense when applied to large
  areas. Choose a color several tints lighter than the
  color actually desired.
• Using contrasting colors draws attention.
  Remember, too many strong contrast values in a
  room can be confusing and tiring.
• Choosing colors that have similar values will create
  a restful mood in the room.
• Color schemes/harmonies look better when one
  color, the base color, dominates. When you use
  equal amounts of two or more colors, your eyes
  become confused and your color selection seems
  cluttered
• The value of a hue changes the apparent size of a room.
   – Dark ceiling (dull) appears lower and closer and light
      (bright) colored walls appear further away.
• If a room is small, choose colors that will make the room
  appear larger. (tints, low-intensity colors, and cool hues)
   – Lighter walls makes it appear larger
• If a room is very large, choose colors that will make it look
  smaller. (Shades, high-intensity colors, and warm hues)
   – Darker walls make a room appear smaller
• Bright colors convey an informal environment
• Use High-intensity colors in small amounts such as accent
  colors in accessories or small pieces of furniture.
• Black unifies when a number of colors are used.
           Color Assignments
• Color Experiment with a partner
  – (turn in separately)
• Creating Effects with Color
  – Create a solution for the room design challenge.
     • Homes and Interiors Textbook page 410-411
• Many Looks of Color
  – Color each square based on its label
• Paint
  – Color Wheel
  – Value: Tint, Tone, Shade
  – Intensity

								
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