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					                                    2009 - 2010
                                Catalog of Courses
                                     CEEB CODE 331655

                               Dryden High School
                                        PO Box 88
                                  Dryden, New York 13053
                                       607-844-8694



Dear Students, Parents, and/or Guardians:

This course guide will serve as a resource for students as well as parents in the crucial planning of
course selection. One will find important information such as graduation requirements, all course
offerings and Regents mandates. Parental involvement is imperative for the student to reach
maximum success during the high school experience.

Counselors are available to assist each student and parent in educational and vocational planning.
Planning well will translate into the optimum educational experience for your child.

All electives are subject to staff and funding availability. All courses must have a minimum
number of students requesting it, in order for any course to be offered. In order to adequately
address this “unknown factor”, students will choose a first course and an alternate course
during their scheduling meeting with their counselor.

Thank you for your continued support and involvement in your child's education.




Mr. Richard During                                               Counselors
High School Principal                                            Mrs. Lisa Bustamante (A-G)
                                                                 Ms. Cassie Sullivan (H-P)
                                                                 Mr. Laszlo Engel (Q-Z)
Mr. Dale Sweet
High School Asst. Principal
                                                                 Counseling Secretary
                                                                 Ms. Linda Quinlan
                                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS



                                                                                                                                PAGE

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................... 1

WEIGHTED RANK ........................................................................................................... 2

SPECIAL PROGRAMMING OPTIONS ............................................................................ 2

AP COURSE OFFERINGS ........................................................................................ 3

ART .................................................................................................................................. 4-12

BUSINESS ...................................................................................................................... 13-20

ENGLISH ......................................................................................................................... 21-25

SECOND LANGUAGE ..................................................................................................... 26

MATHEMATICS ............................................................................................................... 27-30

MUSIC ............................................................................................................................. 31

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................. 32

HEALTH .......................................................................................................................... 32

SCIENCE ......................................................................................................................... 33-36

SOCIAL STUDIES ........................................................................................................... 37-40

TECHNOLOGY ................................................................................................................ 41-44

VOCATIONAL COURSES ................................................................................................ 45-52

NEW VISIONS ................................................................................................................. 53

WORLD OF WORK PROGRAMS ..................................................................................... 54

COUNSELING STAFF/PHONE DIRECTORY/BOARD OF EDUCATION ...........................55
                                   Graduation Requirements


Regents Diploma                            Regents w/Advanced Designation
                                                       Diploma

Required Courses                 Credit          Required Courses                    Credit
 English                           4              English                              4
 Social Studies                    4              Social Studies                       4
 Math (a)                          3              Math                                 3
 Science (a)                       3              Science (a)                          3
 LOTE (b)                          1              LOTE (c)                             3
 Art/Music                         1              Art/Music                            1
 Health                            0 .5           Health                               0 .5
 Physical Education                2              Physical Education                   2
 Electives (Art, Business, Tech)   3.5            Electives (Art, Business, Tech)      1.5
   TOTAL                           22              TOTAL                               22



Required Exams                             Required Exams
   (All exams require a score of 65 or above)

English Comprehensive Exam                 English Comprehensive Exam
Integrated Algebra                         Regents Math A Exam, Regents Math B Exam
Regents Global Studies Exam                Integrated Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2/Trigonometry
Regents U.S. History Exam                  Regents Global Studies Exam
Regents Science Exam                       Regents U.S. History Exam
                                           2 Regents Science Exams
                                           Regents LOTE Exam (c)


Local Diplomas will be available for anyone who scores between a 55 and 64 on a Regents Exam.
    2006 Freshman – must pass three exams with a 65
    2007 Freshman – must pass four exams with a 65
    2008 Freshman – must pass all five exams with a 65
    2009 Freshman – must pass all five exams with a 65


   (a)     An integrated course in mathematics/science/technology may be used to satisfy the
           requirement for a third credit in mathematics or science.

   (b)     One credit is required and can be earned either by passing the LOTE proficiency or earning
           commencement level credit in a LOTE.

   (c)     Students acquiring 5 credits in one of the following may be exempt from the Language
           Other Than English requirement: Art, Business, Technology, or Career and Technical
           Education but, must still earn one credit as described in (b).




                                                1
                                          WEIGHTED RANK


During the 2004-05 school year, the Dryden High School began weighting each student’s class rank.
What this means is, if a student takes a college-level, concurrent credit course, an Advanced
Placement course, an Honors level course or participates in a New Visions Program, then their rank
will be weighted according to the following weight factor criteria:


      College-level, concurrent credit     weighted at 1.1
      Advanced Placement                   weighted at 1.1
      New Visions                          weighted at 1.1
      Honors                               weighted at 1.05



This weighted system does benefit those students who accept the additional challenges of advanced
level coursework. Please note that the GPA is not weighted, only the class rank. Please see our most
up-to-date courses listed below. If your child is interested in these courses, please be sure to contact
your child’s counselor.



                            SPECIAL PROGRAMMING OPTIONS
           THESE COURSES MAY NOT BE OFFERED EVERY YEAR SO PLEASE
                  WORK WITH YOUR COUNSELOR TO PLAN AHEAD

College-Level, Concurrent Credit Courses                            AP Courses

   - Accounting 101          -College Keyboarding                   - AP Biology
   - Business Law            -Keyboarding/Bus. Comm.                - AP Economics
   - PreCalculus 132         -Business Math                         - AP European History
   - PreCalculus 135         -INVEST in Business I                  - AP Government & Politics
   - Calculus 201            -INVEST in Business II                 - AP US History
   - Calculus 202            -Digital Electronics                   - AP Music Theory
   - English 101             -Marketing                             - AP Studio Art
   - English 102             -College & Career Prep I & II
   - Physics 104             -Civil Engineering
   - Physics 105             -Personal Health
   - Computer Applications

Honors Courses                                               New Visions Courses

   - Biology Honors                                          - Health Science*
   - Chemistry Honors                                        - Life Sciences*
   - Earth Science Honors
   - English 11 Honors                                        *Both programs include credit in
                                                               Economics, English 101/102 and
                                                               Government


                                                 2
      AP Course Offerings for 2009-10
                                         Disclaimer:
  The College Board has created a process of Auditing all Advance Placement Courses
  across the country. Each new teacher assigned an AP course at Dryden High School is
  required to submit the appropriate documentation required by College Board for approval
  of each course they teach. The College Board wants to ensure that AP courses across the
  country have the same curricular and resource guidelines. There is no guarantee that all
  courses will be approved as an AP course. Only approved courses can carry AP Credit
  designation to be recorded on the High School Transcript for each student. Enrolled
  students will be eligible for course credit regardless.




 AP European History*
 AP United States History
 AP US Government and Politics
 AP Economics
 AP Biology
 AP Studio Art
 AP Music Theory


*At time of printing, this course was being developed by teacher and will then be sent
for audit approval by the College Board

Students are responsible for AP Testing Fees (approximately $86)
See counselor for Fee Waiver eligibility


                                           3
                             Courtroom Sketcher      Floral Designer   Motion Picture Scenic Designer    Topographer
Bank Note Designer




                                                                                                                       Video Production
                                                         New York State
                                            Regents Diploma Graduation Requirement
                                                                  One Unit of Art
Cinematographer




                                                  Courses that May be taken to meet the




                                                                                                                       Culinary Arts
                                                  NYS Regents Diploma Art Requirement
                                                                  are
                                                  Studio In Art, Creative Crafts A & B
                                                                       OR
                                                                   Media Arts
CD /Record Cover Designer




                                                                                                                       Newspaper Artist
                                Note: Students already meeting the 1 Unit Art/Music requirement for a
                                  Regents Diploma may take any art course which does not have a
                                             prerequisite noted in the course description.




                                                                                                                       Mechanical & Production Artist
                                       Dryden High School Art Department Course Offerings:
Catalog Illustrator




                               Studio in Art (1 Unit of Credit)
                               Creative Crafts A&B (1/2-2 Units of Credit)
                               Media Arts (1 Unit of Credit)
                               Sculpture A&B (1/2-2 Units of Credit)
                               Ceramics A&B (1/2-2 Units of Credit)
                               Drawing & Painting (1 Unit of Credit)
Engraver




                               Advanced Drawing & Painting (1-2 Units of Credit)
                               Advanced Placement Studio Art:
                                                                                                                       Greeting Card Artist

                               2-D, Drawing or 3-D Design (1 Unit of Credit/3 College credits)
Urban Designer




                               Graphic Design (1 Unit of Credit)
                               Intro to Video Production (1/2 Unit of Credit)
                               Advanced Video Production (1/2 Unit of Credit)
                               Flash Animation (1/2 Unit of Credit)
                               Intro to Printmaking (1/2 Unit of Credit)
 Art Buyer




                                                                                                                       YOU!




                            Animator      Glass Blower    Video Art and Game Design       CAD Designer     Photojournalist
                                                                       4
  Art Education       Graphic Design Printmaking Architecture Interior Design Book Design Animation




                                                                                                                             Medical Illus-
                                  5–Unit Visual Art Sequence for Advanced
                                  Designation Regents Diploma W/O LOTE
  Fashion Design




                                                                                                                             Surface Pattern Design Exhibition Design
                              Below are suggestions to course selection and planning your Art sequence by grade level.
                              You may take any combination of classes as long as prerequisites or foundation classes are
                                                                         met.


                                        Option I                                            Option II
Cartooning




                             9th Grade: Studio in Art (1 Unit)               9th Grade: Creative Crafts A&B (1 Unit)
                             10th Grade: 1 Art Class (1 Unit)                               or Media Arts (1 Unit)
                             11th Grade: 1 Art Class (1 Unit)                10th Grade: Studio in Art (1 Unit)*
                             12th Grade: 2 Art Classes (2 Units)             11th Grade: 1 Art Class (1 Unit)
                                                                             12th Grade: 2 Art Classes (2 Units)
                             Total: 5 Units of Credit in Art                 Total: 5 Units of Credit in Art
 Set/Stage Design




                                                                             Note: Studio in Art foundation must be taken
                                                                                      no later than Junior year



                                Option I : Strongly recommended for those considering going to
                                                  Art Colleges and Universities.




                                                                                                                                 Art Conservator
                             Art-based career fields including: architecture, graphic design, interior
                               design, landscape architecture, fashion design, and industrial design
Jewelry Design




                              require a strong observational based portfolio for college admittance.

                                    * Option I maximizes your portfolio development potential*

                                  Student Art Sequence NYS Regents Graduation Requirements:
                                                                                                                                 Art Therapist
Fine Arts




                                 5 Units of art must be successfully accomplished by students’ 12th
                                  grade year.
                                 Students are required to maintain a digital portfolio and will be
                                  required to submit digital portfolio documentation in June of Senior
Advertising Design




                                  year to demonstrate competency in coursework.
                                                                                                                             Landscape Design




                                 The final portfolio shall consist of at least 15-20 works demonstrating
                                  student’s best 3 to 5 works per class, at least 4 pieces demonstration
                                  competency in drawing skills.



                     Art Critic   Package Design     Corporate Curator       Product Design      Museum Docent Coordinator

                                                                         5
STUDIO IN ART – Grades 9 – 12

This course is the foundation for students considering careers in architecture, interior design,
industrial design, graphic design, fashion design, fine arts, animation and other fields related to
the arts. Completion of the course is recommended by the sophomore year but required by
junior year for art majors. It is a basic foundation course focusing on the element and principles
of design, aesthetic awareness, problem solving and developing observation and technical
skills in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and ceramics. The course offers study of the
basic design fundamentals necessary for any further experience in art, with a major emphasis
on observational drawing, drawing primarily from life. Research and reflective analysis of
works created and of those created by master artists of various cultures and media is required.
The creation of a digital art portfolio is required for the midterm and final exams to meet NYS
Learning Standards.
Studio In Art is the prerequisite for Drawing & Painting and Graphic Design.

Requirement for 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR
This course fulfills the one unit Art/Music requirement.
1 credit




CREATIVE CRAFTS A & B – Grades 9 – 12

Creative Crafts A students will explore applied two-dimensional crafts. Projects may include
bound fabric resist (tie dye), fabric painting, embroidery and appliqué, metal work
(embossing), printmaking, surface pattern design, decorative papers, papermaking, mixed
media art journals and bookmaking. Creative Crafts B students explore functional three-
dimensional craft forms. These may include beadwork and jewelry design, weaving, basketry,
folk are sculpture, mosaics, stained glass, and clay work. Both A & B will introduce students
to historical, cultural, and contemporary craft movements.              Students will gain an
understanding of the Elements and Principles of a well-designed work of art while gaining
practice and skill in technique and materials. Students will create a digital portfolio of the work
that is created throughout each semester for the final exams to meet NYS Learning
Standards. There will be supplemental work outside of class that is expected of each student.
Students interested in fashion design or surface pattern/textile design careers can begin to
develop a portfolio by taking Creative Crafts A & B.
Crafts A & B taken together fulfill the one unit art/music requirement.
Course A is not a requirement of Course B.

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR
This course fulfills the one unit Art/Music requirement 1 credit OR An elective
1/2 – 2 credits




                                               6
STUDIO IN SCULPTURE A & B – Grades 9 – 12

This course is designed to develop skills of three-dimensional problem solving and allows
students to work with a variety of media. Materials to be explored may include resistant
materials: plaster, stone, wood and metal, as well as, plastic materials: clay, plasticine, Paris
Craft, wire, papier maché, fabric and fibers. The student is introduced to basic techniques in
mask making, figure sculpture, installation/site specific sculpture, low and high-relief work,
assemblage, and mixed media constructions. The student will have the opportunity to do
individual research on sculptors, sculpture directions in art history, art careers, specific media
and techniques that are of particular interest to him or her. Research and reflective analysis of
works created by master artists from diverse cultures and media is required. Students
interested in a career in 3-D art fields: industrial design, architecture, interior design, ceramics,
special effects, stage craft or set design, may begin building a portfolio for continuing study in
the arts from this course. An additional requirement is the digital art portfolio creation for the
final exams each semester to meet NYS Learning Standards.
Prerequisite: Sculpture A is a prerequisite for Sculpture B
Studio In Art by junior year for Art majors (SEE OPTION II)

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR An Elective
(This course does NOT meet the graduation requirements for one Unit of Art/Music)
½ - 2 credits




MEDIA ARTS – Grades 9 – 12

Students will work with the design fundamentals used in the fields of advertising, new media,
graphic design, and illustration. Skills in designing and combining text and images will be
studied along with their impact on the viewer. Possible areas of exploration or design work
may include: calligraphy, printmaking, logo design, cartooning, print advertising including
shopping bag design, poster and pamphlet design, book design, layout, and illustration, as well
as, an introduction to some computer graphic design techniques, which combine computer
assisted image making and digital photography. Additional course requirements beyond class
hours include image and design research as well as the creation of a digital art portfolio for the
midterm and final exams to meet NYS Learning Standards.
Studio In Art by junior year for Art majors (SEE OPTION II)

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR
This course fulfills the one unit Art/Music requirement.
1 credit


                                               7
CERAMICS A & B – Grades 9 – 12

In Ceramics A, students will learn basic skills and technical knowledge of traditional hand
building methods: pinched forms, coil and slab construction and wheel throwing and will use a
range of surface decoration and firing techniques. Students must successfully complete A
before continuing in B. Students taking A in one year and B in another year must have
approval from Instructor.
In Ceramics B, students will apply the knowledge and skills gained in Ceramics A. Students
are expected to demonstrate growth in problem solving, controlling the properties of clay to
develop complex forms, strengthening artistic expression and critical thinking.
In Both A & B, historical and contemporary trends in ceramics are studied through research
and in-class presentations. Students are expected to express themselves through visual,
verbal and written formats. A digital portfolio is required for the midterm and final exams to
meet NYS Learning Standards. Students interested in a career in ceramics, industrial design,
architecture, sculpture, or set design may begin building a portfolio for continuing study in the
arts. Students taking Ceramics A in one year & B in another year must have prior approval
from the instructor.
Prerequisite: Ceramics A is a prerequisite for Ceramics B.
Studio In Art by junior year for Art majors (SEE OPTION II)

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR An Elective
(This course does NOT meet the graduation requirements for one Unit of Art/Music)
½ - 2 credit




GRAPHIC DESIGN – Grades 10 – 12

Graphic Design is the art of visual communication through two-dimensional works. Students
considering a career in the design fields such as book design/publishing, advertising,
presentation design, packaging design, magazine layout, corporate design, motion graphics,
animation or web design should enroll in this course. Students will apply their knowledge of the
elements and principles of design to strengthen their visual literacy. We will explore a range of
design techniques using various media and software programs and study the design work of
contemporary and historical designers. Possible projects include symbol development, poster
design, CD covers, book arts, Flash animation and web design. Students will maintain a digital
portfolio of their work as a midterm and final exam to meet NYS Learning Standards. Written,
visual and research-based journal assignments are given regularly as independent work.
Students are expected to strengthen their verbal, written and visual communication based
deeply in the elements and principles of design.
Prerequisite: Studio In Art

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence
1 credit

                                              8
DRAWING & PAINTING – Grades 10 – 12

Drawing and Painting is designed for students in their first year of Drawing and Painting.
Drawing skills from direct observation of the figure, still-life, landscape, and architectural forms
will be emphasized along with further understanding of design principles, color theory, critical
thinking and problem solving. These concepts will be introduced and illustrated throughout the
course through the exposure and analysis of movements associated in art history. A variety of
drawing and painting techniques and media will be explored, including pencil, ink, charcoal,
pastel, acrylic, collage, watercolor, oil paint and mixed media. Sketchbooks assignments will
be given alternate weeks and account for 1/3 of the grade. Students will create a digital
portfolio of the work that is created throughout each semester for the final exams to meet NYS
Learning Standards.
Prerequisite: Studio In Art

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence
1 credit




ADVANCED DRAWING & PAINTING – Grades 11 – 12
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Students will expand skills acquired in Drawing and Painting with strong emphasis on
observational skills. Students will explore new mediums and techniques while focusing on
compositional elements of design and strengthening problem solving skills. Opportunities will
be given to students for experimentation of specific mediums as well as subject matter more in
depth as development of personal style evolves throughout the course. Contemporary trends
in Art will be integrated within the course to enrich student knowledge and awareness.
Sketchbook assignments are due biweekly and account for 1/3 of marking period grade. This
class is HIGHLY recommended for students who are planning to attend college to major or
minor in art. Portfolio development will be emphasized. Students will create a digital portfolio
of the work that is created throughout each semester for the final exam to meet NYS Learning
Standards
Prerequisite: Studio In Art and Drawing & Painting

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence
1 -2 credits sequence




                                               9
INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING – Grades 11 – 12
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Introduction to Printmaking is a half-year art course that explores a variety of approaches to
materials and techniques in the making of prints or multiple images. This course is
recommended for those students who enjoy drawing or designing, for those who wish to
further explore a wide variety of visual art techniques to develop an art portfolio. Upon
successful completion of this course students will be familiar with relief and intaglio printing
processes including the following techniques:           collagraph, linocut, woodcut, drypoint,
monoprint, solar plate etching, multi-media and experimental printmaking, which combine
computer assisted image making and digital photography with more traditional printmaking
techniques. Students will learn how to print single and multiple plate images, create an edition,
mat and exhibit prints, and the creation of a digital art portfolio is required for the midterm and
final exams to meet NYS Learning Standards. A survey of the work of both traditional and
contemporary printmakers and basic guidelines for creating well-designed images will create a
solid foundation upon which students can develop new techniques and ideas.

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR An Elective
(This course does NOT meet the graduation requirements for one Unit of Art/Music)
½ - 1 credit



FLASH ANIMATION – Grades 11 – 12

Flash Animation is a computer-based art course designed to teach basic concepts of using the
Macromedia Flash software. It is designed as part of the New Media Sequence for the visual
arts. Students will learn to apply their knowledge of the elements and principles of art through
the creation of short animated pieces. Students will learn sequential storytelling and
storyboarding in addition to basic understanding of how to manipulate the software. Students
interested in film, editing, creative writing, television graphics, web animations, gaming, web
page design, graphic design, advertising and other interactive media will enjoy this course.
Students will maintain a digital portfolio as a final exam to meet NYS Learning Standards.
Through this course, students will strengthen their visual literacy and ability to communicate
through visual means.
Studio In Art by junior year for Art majors (SEE OPTION II)

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR An Elective
(This course does NOT meet the graduation requirements for one Unit of Art/Music)
½ - 1 credit




                                              10
INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION – Grades 11 – 12

In this semester elective course, juniors and seniors will study film as a visual art. Students
will learn how to operate a video camera, and they will learn how to create and edit videos,
using Pinnacle Editing software. Students will write process papers on their own productions
and engage in verbal critiques of their work as well as provide feedback to their classmates.
Some of the projects covered during the semester are as follows: in-camera editing, an
autobiography, a documentary, and a free-choice piece. Students interested in a career in
film, television, animation, gaming, graphic design, advertising, creative writing, journalism
and photography will enjoy this class. Students will maintain a digital video portfolio as a final
exam to meet NYS Learning Standards.
Studio In Art by junior year for Art majors (SEE OPTION II)

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR Independent Art Elective
OR Senior English course option.
(This course does NOT meet the graduation requirements for one unit of Art/Music or NCAA
English Credit Requirement)
½ credit




ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION – Grade 12

This is a semester course open to seniors who have successfully completed the Introduction
to Video Production course in their junior or senior year and have a desire to continue
developing their video production skills. Students will apply the concepts learned in the
introductory course to develop their own body of work. Students will decide on the focus of
the body of work based on personal interests and on consultations with the course instructors
and classmates. Students will write process papers on their own productions and engage in
verbal critiques of their work as well as provide feedback to their classmates. Students will
learn to use Adobe Premiere, an advanced video editing software. This course is designed
for the serious student who plans to pursue a career in video/film. Students will maintain a
digital video portfolio as a final exam to meet NYS Learning Standards as well as organize
and implement a showing of their films.
Art Credit Prerequisite: Introduction to Video Production
Studio In Art by junior year for Art majors (SEE OPTION II)

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR Independent Art Elective
OR Senior English course option.
(This course does not meet the NCAA English Credit Requirement)
½ credit

                                             11
ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDIO ART – Grade 12
(OPTIONS INCLUDE 2-D DESIGN, DRAWING, & 3-D DESIGN)


AP 2-D DESIGN OR AP DRAWING
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

The student will spend a yearlong quest of one subject or concentration focus with an in-depth
approach through media exploration and technique. A minimum of 20 original works will be
completed by April. Students will also create a variety of pieces exhibiting experiences in the
formal, technical and expressive means available to show expertise and exploration. Students
will be responsible for bi-weekly sketchbook entries and artist research. A portfolio, including
slides and a body of work will be evaluated at the culmination of the study. The student will
submit slides and actual works of art to a review panel of seven College Board members in
Pennsylvania for scoring in early May. Each student will receive a score of 1 through 5 based
on the course curriculum and how successful the finished work is. The student is expected to
create original work in a provided sketchbook with assignments to prepare for the rigorous self-
direction that occurs with this class. Students will be prepared the first day of class with
completed assignments.
Prerequisite: Studio Art and Drawing & Painting

AP 3-D DESIGN
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

The AP 3-D Design course offers the opportunity to explore in-depth sculptural issues of form
and space culminating in an AP Studio 3-D Design Portfolio having quality, concentration, and
breadth development. The AP 3-D Design students must have taken one full year or more of
Sculpture or Ceramics following the foundation level Studio in Art course to be enrolled. Each
student’s best work from previous coursework must be saved for possible inclusion in his or
her AP 3-D Design Portfolio. 18 pieces minimum are required to complete the Quality,
Concentration and Breadth, sections of the portfolio. All works explored require thoughtful,
focused and informed decision-making in the fundamental, functional use of the elements of
art and principles of design. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the relationship
between intent and content in 3-D Design solutions with an increased awareness of
composition: formal design, expressive qualities, conceptual ideas, concerns related to form
and space (i.e. issues of scale, presentation or environmental placement, etc.) and technical
considerations as they make informed decisions in the 3-D Design process.
Prerequisite: Studio Art, Sculpture or Ceramics

Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence
1 credit/Potential 3 College Credits

Associated Fees:

$86.00 (approximate fee for exam)
$10.00 - $30.00 (for digital storage devices, if electing to digitally submit a portfolio in May) or
$150.00 (approximately cost for 2 slide sets)
                                              12
           BUSINESS, FINANCE, &
         COMPUTER DEPARTMENT
Graduation


          Earn Regents or a Regents with Advanced Designation Diploma
             □ Achieve a 5-Unit Business, Finance, & Computer
                 major(see list of majors on next page)
             □ Explore a 3-Unit Business, Finance, & Computer
                 concentration
             □ Use Business Math as third unit for math requirement
             □ Obtain elective credits toward graduation

Career

         Acquire employment qualities
            □ Obtain job knowledge, work skills, computer abilities
            □ Develop professional qualities
            □ Create resumes, write cover letters, compile portfolios
            □ Participate in job shadows, internships, and job
                 interviews
College

         Plan for college
             □ Take college credit courses while in high school
             □ Earn college credits toward many majors
                  (see list of college credits on following pages)
             □    Begin a college major or minor (transferable credits)
             □    Experience College & Career Preparation (research,
                  essays, applications, scholarships, financial aid, and
                  budgeting)
Hands-On Learning

         Explore computer software programs and Internet applications
         Build teamwork and leadership skills
         Interact and network with college and business professionals

Skills For Life

         Computer abilities, software knowledge, Internet navigation
         Typing by touch, proper document formatting, creative thinking
         Organization, time management, record keeping, communication
         Professionalism

            Business skills are readily marketable and transferable
       to a variety of jobs throughout the United States and the world


                      13
                                       Business Majors
                                    *BUSINESS CORE                   3*
                       1. Keyboarding & Business Communications
                       2. Career & Financial Management
                       3. Computer Applications            “Business Analysis/Business Computer Applications”

                  *Must take the 3 courses above in order to complete one of the majors below.

                                              MAJORS
              Choose any additional 2 units to complete the major of your choice


            ACCOUNTING                                                 MARKETING
   Accounting (required)                                  Marketing (required)
   Business Law                                           Sport & Entertainment Marketing
   Business Math                                          Fashion Marketing
   College & Career Prep I                                Accounting
    “Career Pathways--Tech Prep Business”                  Business Law
                                                           Business Math
                                                           College & Career Prep I

              BUSINESS &                                        CAREER PATHWAYS -
         COMPUTER TECH                                                    BUSINESS
   INVEST in Business I                                   College & Career Prep I (required)
    “Electronic Information Processing” (required)         College & Career Prep II
   INVEST in Business II                                  Marketing
   Business Law                                           Business Law
   Accounting                                             Accounting
   College & Career Prep I


                   LEGAL                                                  FINANCE
   Business Law (required)                                Business Math
   Accounting                                             Accounting
   Business Math                                          Business Law
   College & Career Prep I                                INVEST in Business
                                                           College & Career Prep I


                                                     14
              COLLEGE CREDIT

                   TC3
      COLLEGE CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES
               Available to Qualifying Students
                                                          Possible
                    DHS Course
                                                          Credits

              Computer Applications
                                                                4
  “Business Analysis/Bus. Computer Applications“

                    Business Law                                3
                   Business Math                                3

              InVEST in Business I
                                                                6
   “Electronic Information Processing/InVEST”

             InVEST in Business II
                                                                4
“Adv. Electronic Information Processing/InVEST”

     Keyboarding & Business Communications                      3
                     Marketing                                  3
             College & Career Prep I
                                                                8
     “Career Pathways --Tech Prep Business 1”
            College & Career Prep II
                                                                4
     “Career Pathways --Tech Prep Business 2”



           BRYANT & STRATTON
      COLLEGE CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES
Available only to qualifying students accepted at Bryant & Stratton
                   DHS Course                            Credits
            Computer Applications
                                                            3
  “Bus. Analysis/Bus. Computer Applications “
                  Business Law                              3
   Keyboarding & Business Communications                    3


                              15
                                       COURSES
(ALL MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

              KEYBOARDING & BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
                                             Grades: 9-10
                                 Credits: HS = 1 and College = 3

     Learn how to apply communications theory to business and daily life
     Increase keyboarding speed and accuracy to help you with school, college, and work
     Properly format letters, memos, essays, reports, resumes and professional e-mails
     Practice verbal and non-verbal communication skills
     Develop the basic skills in Word, Excel and PowerPoint
     Keyboarding & Business Communications is required for all Business majors


                     CAREER & FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
                                            Grades: 10-11
                                           Credits: HS = 1

     Acquire knowledge to make, save and invest your money
     Learn about career opportunities, budgeting your money, car and home buying, and filing income
      taxes
     Complete job shadows and internships with local businesses and host business professionals
     Career & Financial Management is required for all Business majors


                              COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
                    “Business Analysis / Business Computer Applications”
                                            Grades: 10-12
                                 Credits: HS = 1 and College = 3

     Learn basic to advanced skills in Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and Publisher

     Design creative storyboards, certificates, flyers, brochures; use spreadsheet formulas; create charts;
      format business documents and more

     Produce your own business plan complete with calling card, brochure, and financial statements; share
      your proposed plan with business professionals

     Host guest presentations; attend a “green” business fair, tour a local financial institution

                                                 16
Computer Applications is required for all Business majors

                                    ACCOUNTING
                                        Grades 10-12
                                      Credits: HS = 1

Learn how to follow bookkeeping procedures for different types of businesses

Discuss the basic accounting cycle and create proper financial statements

Apply accounting concepts to managing your personal spending

Participate in computerized accounting simulations that teach personal financial responsibility and
  accuracy in record keeping




                                   BUSINESS LAW
                                        Grades: 10-12
                             Credits: HS = 1 and College = 3



  Learn how to protect yourself and your business against illegal practices


  Gain knowledge about creating valid contracts, wills, and negotiable instruments


  Understand torts, landlord-tenant law, and your rights and responsibilities as a U.S. citizen


  Participate in the mock trial at Cornell Law School with students from local schools




                                 BUSINESS MATH
                                        Grades: 10-12
                             Credits: HS = 1 and College = 3

See how math can be used in your daily life to help you handle money wisely so you avoid common
  problems
Learn math for retailing, payroll, loans, credit cards banking, and investing
Experience the math that you will continue to use throughout your life

                                             17
Use Business Math as the third unit of math required for graduation (or as a Business elective)
Must have successful completion of Geometry and Math A

                      COLLEGE & CAREER PREP I & II*
                           “Tech Prep-Career Pathways I & II”
                                       Grades: 11-12
                            Credits: HS = 1 and College = 3

Take control of your future and prepare for college and work

Become college-savvy through research, establishing your criteria, personal interviews with college
  students

Create a college resume, write a college essay, and compile a college portfolio

Find and apply for scholarships, learn about financial aid, create a college budget, qualify for a local
  scholarship

Network with college and business professionals, prepare job applications, get published,
  experience paid internships, and practice professional etiquette

Participate in college and career seminars at local venues, participate in an online course segment,
  organize events including the Recognition Dinner Ceremony



                           INVEST in BUSINESS I & II*
                        “Electronic Information Processing I & II”
                                       Grades: 10-12
                             Credits: HS = 1 and College =3

Host guest speakers on biweekly basis including CEO’s, COO’s, VP’s and Mangers of local
  businesses

Interact with business professionals through class presentations, business tours, job shadowing, paid
  internships, “mock” job interviews, and podcasts

Participate in events with students from area INVEST programs

Attend a “real” insurance conference, network with business professionals, enjoy a luncheon, and
  listen to well-known keynote speakers like the host of CNN’s Cross-Fire, the Ragin’ Cajun –
  James Carville.

Qualify for local scholarships ($100-$1,000) and apply for National INVEST scholarships
  ($500-$5,000)

                                             18
Plan and host the INVEST Award Ceremony, receive National INVEST certification

                                    MARKETING
                                      Grades: 10-12
                          Credits: HS = 1/2 and College = 3

Apply marketing concepts to plan school events, such as the fall pep rally and more

Compete against your classmates to create, promote and sell your product to make the most profit

Design advertising campaigns including flyers, brochures, audio and video commercials

Explore consumer behaviors, conduct market research, and identify target markets

Attend a Green Collar Career Fair to learn how businesses apply green marketing in their
 campaigns



            SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING
                                      Grades: 10-12
                                   Credits: HS = 1/2

Analyze the world of sports and entertainment from a marketing perspective

Explore strategies used in sports and entertainment industries to promote teams, celebrities, and
 products

Design a marketing strategy for a sport and/or entertainment school function

Practice event management skills to plan, organize and run a school event incorporating sports and
 entertainment



                            FASHION MARKETING
                                      Grades: 10-12
                                   Credits: HS = 1/2

See how from the runway to the real world, fashion is a part of our everyday lives; know how the
 industry applies marketing strategies to develop, distribute & showcase today’s fashion

Discover how consumer tastes and designer influences create fashion trends in the world

Learn fashion terminology, labor issues, ethics and career opportunities available



                                           19
Host guest speakers; analyze current fashion shows and productions; create your own product line;
  and plan, organize and run a fashion show

         YEARBOOK & COMPUTER PUBLICATIONS I & II*
                                       Grades: 11-12
                                      Credits: HS =1

Create, plan, and produce your school’s yearbook

Learn about theme creation, photography, Photoshop editing, and layout design

Use high-tech digital cameras, scanners, and online software programs

Practice sales techniques and interpersonal skills, file organization, accurate record keeping, and time
  management skills




*Second year students have higher expectations and more leadership responsibilities



Completion of Keyboarding & Business Communications is highly recommended for
 all upper level courses.

                                 ===============


College credits from SUNY TC3 for dual credit Business, Finance, & Computer
 courses are available to students earning 85% or higher each marking period.

                                  ==============


Graduation scholarships from local businesses are awarded to Business, Finance, &
 Computer students demonstrating exemplary performance.

                                  ==============


Business skills are readily marketable and transferable to a variety of jobs
 throughout the United States and the world.


                                            20
                                         ENGLISH

ENGLISH 9

The English 9 course is built upon reading from the major genres: short stories, novels, drama,
poetry, and non-fiction. Grammar is reviewed and reinforced work is done to expand
vocabulary. A research paper/project is introduced. The New York State Regents exam is
comprehensive and given in the junior year. English 9 introduces Regents preparation.
1 credit

ENGLISH 9 SEMINAR
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Seminar provides for enrichment and exploration beyond the required English 9 curriculum. It
is taken in addition to English 9 and is structured around the study of the different genres in
literature. The course is oriented toward discussions, projects, writing and presentations.
Extensive reading is required.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 8.
½ credit

ENGLISH 10

English 10 is a survey course of British Literature, from its origins in Beowulf to the 20th
century. Emphasis is placed upon interpretation and analysis skills, spelling and vocabulary,
as well as expository writing. A research paper is required. Additionally, Regents preparation
builds and continues from English 9.
1 credit

ENGLISH 10 SEMINAR
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Seminar provides for enrichment and exploration beyond the regular English 10 curriculum and
is taken in addition to English 10. This course is designed for the avid, mature reader. It is
oriented strongly towards discussions, projects, writing and presentations, with extensive
reading required.
Prerequisite: successful completion of English 9.
½ credit

ENGLISH 11

American Literature is the focus of this course. Students read a variety of American novels,
stories, poems, and other works. Both American classics and modern, popular works are
taught. Emphasis is placed upon reading comprehension and analytical skills, listening skills,
spelling and vocabulary, and expository writing. Instruction also focuses on skills needed for
the New York State Comprehensive Regents Exam, which is given in January. A research
paper is required.
1 credit

                                            21
ENGLISH 11 HONORS

This program is an intensive course in analysis of American literature. Students write from
literature and from personal experience. Students are expected to read from a list of classic
novels throughout the year in addition to regularly assigned literature from an anthology.
Opportunities for public speaking and problem solving are provided. A term paper is also
required. Instruction also focuses on skills needed for the New York State Comprehensive
Regents Exam, which is given in January.
1 credit

SENIOR LEVEL ENGLISH COURSES

INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION – Grades 11 – 12

In this semester elective course, juniors and seniors will study film as a visual art. Students
will learn how to operate a video camera, and they will learn how to create and edit videos,
using Pinnacle Editing software. Students will write process papers on their own productions
and engage in verbal critiques of their work as well as provide feedback to their classmates.
Some of the projects covered during the semester are as follows: in-camera editing, an
autobiography, a documentary, and a free-choice piece. Students interested in a career in
film, television, animation, gaming, graphic design, advertising, creative writing, journalism
and photography will enjoy this class. Students will maintain a digital video portfolio as a final
exam to meet NYS Learning Standards. This course does not meet the NCAA English Credit
requirement
Prerequisite: English 9 & 10
This course does not meet the NCAA English requirement
½ credit

ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION – Grade 12

This is a semester course open to seniors who have successfully completed the Introduction
to Video Production course in their junior or senior year and have a desire to continue
developing their video production skills. Students will apply the concepts learned in the
introductory course to develop their own body of work. Students will decide on the focus of
the body of work based on personal interests and on consultations with the course instructors
and classmates. Students will write process papers on their own productions and engage in
verbal critiques of their work as well as provide feedback to their classmates. Students will
learn to use Adobe Premiere, an advanced video editing software. This course is designed
for the serious student who plans to pursue a career in media arts. Students will maintain a
digital video portfolio as a final exam to meet NYS Learning Standards as well as organize
and implement a showing of their films. This course does not meet the NCAA English Credit
requirement.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Video Production
Option in 5 Unit Advanced Designation Diploma Sequence OR Independent Elective
(This course does NOT meet the graduation requirements for one Unit of Art/Music)
½ credit
                                             22
FILM APPRECIATION

Students will study film as an art form, learning how films are produced. We will watch films,
current and classic ones, analyzing shots, lighting, sound, editing, acting and directing.
Students will write film reviews. In addition, students will choose a director to research to make
a class presentation on his/her style. This course does not meet the NCAA English Credit
requirement.
½ credit


MYTHOLOGY

Students will study Greek and Roman mythology and Arthurian legends with an option to study
modern mythology. We will discuss similarities among myths and evaluate modern adaptations
of myths. Students will be required to complete an extended research paper using MLA
documentation, several essays, and group and individual projects.
½ credit

CREATIVE WRITING

Students will write poetry, fiction, song, autobiography, and drama. We will work on
developing right-brained, imagistic thinking. Each student is encouraged to explore different
genres, but he/she will be allowed to develop his/her own strengths in a chosen genre.
Journal writing is a requirement. Students will publish a class magazine of writings.
½ credit

COMMUNICATION

This course is designed to connect communicative theory with practice. We will explore
different aspects of effective communication including sending messages and active listening.
We will study communication as a process. Topics include interpersonal communication, non-
verbal communication, body language, listening, small group communication and public
speaking.
½ credit

DRAMA

All the World's a Stage - In this course, students will read a wide variety of plays, from ancient
Greek drama to Shakespeare to the modern Broadway musical. Though reading aloud may
be important to the course, this is not an acting/performing class.
½ credit




                                             23
WORLD LITERATURE

The course will include some of the most important authors and writing from across the globe,
from ancient times to the present. American and British authors will be included, but the focus
is on foreign literature read in English.
½ credit

SENIOR COMPOSITION – “GETTING READY FOR COLLEGE ENGLISH”

This course prepares students for the world of work and the world of college. The curriculum
emphasizes composition, grammar, speech, and non-fiction literature. Throughout the
semester, students will write a variety of expository essays. In addition, students will learn
research methods and MLA documentation to write an extended research paper.
½ credit

PUBLIC SPEAKING/PUBLIC COMMUNICATION

This course is designed to introduce students to the art of public speaking and help them
become more effective communicators. We will cover introductory, informative, persuasive,
special occasion and impromptu speeches, with the potential for more if time allows. Students
will discover how to research, organize, and prepare information for a variety of
communicative purposes. Focus is on performance and analysis.
½ credit

MASS MEDIA

This course is designed to analyze mass media and the influence of media on our lives. We
will explore photojournalism, digital photography, pod casting, magazine and newspaper
journalism, power point presentations and multi-media news production.              Television
documentaries, National Public Radio broadcasts, and the production of music videos are
examples of media used in this course. Our thoughts, feelings, society and culture are all
affected by mass media. Students will produce a portfolio of work suitable for publication in a
magazine or newspaper.
½ credit

ENGLISH 101 – Academic Writing II
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This semester course provides an opportunity for high school students to earn 3 college credits
from TC-3 while they are still in high school. Students must possess superior English skills
to succeed in this course. This course involves the study of the rhetorical modes of writing:
definition, process, narration, description, compare/contrast, cause/effect, and argumentation.
Another facet of the course concerns mastering the standard forms of the language. Students
will write a number of short, researched essays, and one extended research paper using MLA
documentation. If a student attains a grade of 75 or better, he or she will receive 3 college
credits, which transfer to many colleges around the country. Prerequisite: Student must
score at least an 85 on the Comprehensive English Regents exam and an English 11
final course grade of at least 85.
½ credit       (Possible 3 college credits)
                                              24
ENGLISH 102 – Intro to Literature
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Unlike English 101, which focuses on non-fiction from a variety of disciplines, English 102,
which focuses on literature as a fine art, analyzes novels, short stories, drama, and poetry from
world literature, emphasizing modern literature. Students write analytical essays discussing
various techniques that writers use in the pieces of literature studied. If a student attains a 75
or better, he or she will receive 3 college credits, which transfer to many colleges.
Prerequisite for this course is English 101 with a minimum final average of 75.
½ credit       (Possible 3 college credits)




                                             25
                                        LANGUAGES

 All students will be required to have at least one credit in a second language. They may attain
that credit by passing the Second Language Proficiency Exam upon completion of the required
Middle School second language study or by passing a High School Level I course in a second
language.

SPANISH I

Students will master basic communicative skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading,
and writing of Spanish necessary to be successful at Check Point A of the New York State
Syllabus. Spanish 7/8 is equivalent to the completion of the Regents High School Spanish I
course. A passing grade on the Second Language Proficiency Exam, first offered at the
completion of the second year of study, or credit for Spanish I, satisfies the New York State
Foreign Language graduation requirement.
1 credit

SPANISH II

This is the second year of the sequence that leads to a Regents examination at the end of the
third year and Check Point B of the New York State Syllabus. Emphasis is placed on basic
verb tenses and vocabulary. Students will be exposed to authentic reading and listening
passages and will be expected to weave the grammar, vocabulary and aspects of the culture
into meaningful dialogues and mini-essays. Students will begin to speak more frequently in
the target language during the second semester.
Prerequisite: Students must have scored 85 or better on the SLP exam to go directly to
this course.
1 credit

SPANISH III
This course completes the New York State Regents LOTE (Language Other Than English)
sequence. The students will be exposed to complex grammatical structures in both the
indicative mood as well as the subjunctive mood. Writing, reading, speaking and listening are
components of this course. Students will be expected to converse in the target language with
the (language) instructor and their classmates on a regular basis. Successful completion of the
three-year program is necessary to the attainment of a Regents diploma with Advanced
Designation.
1 credit

SPANISH IV & FRENCH IV

Spanish IV will continue to develop and enrich the students’ proficiency of the language in the
areas of conversation, culture, history, and literature. Special emphasis is placed on the
fostering of oral communication, yet not excluding the skills of comprehension, reading, and
writing. Students will be exposed to an array of readings, current events, and cultural
experiences.
1 credit


                                            26
Mathematics Sequences 09-10

                 Sequence 1
                 Pre-Algebra
            Integrated Algebra (R)
                Geometry (R)
            Math Elective (optional)

                 Sequence 2
            Integrated Algebra (R)
                Geometry (R)
                Math Elective
            Math Elective (optional)

                  Sequence 3
             Integrated Algebra (R)
                 Geometry (R)
                    Algebra 2
                Trigonometry (R)

                  Sequence 4
             Integrated Algebra (R)
                 Geometry (R)
     Algebra 2 and Trigonometry Honors (R)
              Pre-calculus 132/135

           Sequence 5 (Accelerated)
        Integrated Algebra (R) (8th grade)
                  Geometry (R)
     Algebra 2 and Trigonometry Honors (R)
              Pre-Calculus 132/135
                Calculus 201/202

          (R) indicates Regents Course

     Sequence 6 (Last year – Seniors only)
                   Math 1
                   Math 2
                  Math B-1
                 Math B-2 (R)




                     27
PRE-ALGEBRA
This course contains a general introduction to algebra, geometry, and other areas of basic
skills in mathematics. Problem solving topics and techniques are introduced. Emphasis is
given to preparation for the Integrated Algebra Regents Exam the following year.
● Meets daily in an L-block 80/40 format.
● Prerequisite: Math 8
● 1 credit


INTEGRATED ALGEBRA
This is an algebraic course studying such topics as functions (linear, quadratic, absolute value, and
exponential), probability, statistics, measurement, and the rectangular coordinate system. Emphasis is
given in preparation for the Integrated Algebra Regents Exam given in June.
● Meets in a block every other day, or daily in an L-block 80/40 format.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Math 8 and/or Pre-algebra.
● These students will take the Integrated Algebra Regents in June.
● 1 credit


GEOMETRY
This mathematics course stresses geometric relationships and links to Algebra. Topics
include development of reasoning skills with about 50% of the course focusing on informal
and formal proofs. Additional topics include techniques for solving real world problems,
coordinate plane graphing, quadratic equations, constructions, transformational geometry and
locus. Emphasis is given to preparation for the Geometry Regents administered in June.
● Meets in a block period every other day, or daily in an L-Block 80/40 format.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Integrated Algebra.
● These students will take the Geometry Regents in June.
● 1 credit


ALGEBRA 2
This course extends algebraic concepts started in Integrated Algebra. The study of functions
begins with first, second, and higher degree algebraic functions, culminating with exponential
and logarithmic functions. Additional topics include sequences and series. This is the 1 st year
course in a 2 year sequence toward the Algebra 2/Trigonomety Regents.
● Meets in a block every other day.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Geometry.


MATH B-2
This course continues the study of functions, including first and second degree algebraic,
exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.
● Meets in a block every other day.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Math B-12.
● These students will take the Math B Regents in June.
● 1 credit


                                               28
ALGEBRA 2 & TRIGONOMETRY HONORS
This course stresses the study of functions including first and second degree algebraic,
exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Additional topics include sequences,
series, statistics, probability, and the Binomial Theorem.
● Meets in a block every other day.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Geometry with teacher recommendation.
● These students will take the Algebra 2/Trigonometry Regents in June.
● 1 credit

MODERN MATHEMATICS
This course is designed as a third or fourth year of mathematics for students who have already passed
a mathematics regents exam. Topics may include scheduling, voting, networking, symmetry, consumer
mathematics, intermediate algebra, geometry, logic, number systems, statistics, and probability.
● Meets in a block every other day.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in at least 2 mathematics courses, and a passing score on 1
  mathematics Regents exam.
● 1 credit

PRE-CALCULUS 132
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)
This course covers fundamental algebra and trigonometry topics, including equations and inequalities,
functions and graphing, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and
trigonometric functions. Students who complete this course may receive 3 credits from TC3.
● Meets in a block every other day for the first half of the school year.
● Prerequisite: Course credit for Math B or Math B-2, and a minimum of 65% on the Math B Regents exam.
● ½ credit

PRE-CALCULUS 135
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)
This course continues the study of fundamental algebra and trigonometry topics, including
trigonometric identities and applications, analytic geometry, systems of equations, matrices,
probability and statistics. Students who complete this course may receive 3 credits from TC3.
● Meets in a block every other day for the second half of the school year.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Pre-calculus 132
● ½ credit


CALCULUS 201
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)
This course deals with the mathematics of change and motion, and is designed for the
advanced high school mathematics student. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives of
algebraic and trigonometric functions, anti-derivatives, and the definite integral. Applications
include curve sketching, optimization problems, related rates, area under and between curves,
and volumes of revolution. Students who successfully complete this course may receive 4
credits from TC3.
● Meets in a block every other day for the first half of the school year.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Pre-calculus 132 and Pre-calculus 135.
● ½ credit


                                               29
CALCULUS 202
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)
This course deals with the mathematics of change and motion, and is designed for the
advanced high school mathematics student. Topics include differentiation and integration of
elementary functions, parametric equations, polar coordinates, are length, curvature,
L’Hôpital’s Rule, and improper integrals. Students who successfully complete this course may
receive 4 credits from TC3.
● Meets in a block every other day for the second half of the school year.
● Prerequisite: Course credit in Calculus 201.
● ½ credit




                                           30
                                           MUSIC
HS WIND ENSEMBLE

The Wind Ensemble is Dryden’s High School Band. This ensemble is open to all HS students
who play a standard band instrument at an intermediate or higher level, subject to director
approval. Members also participate in weekly pull out small group lessons. Those studying
privately on their band instruments may opt out of pull out lessons. Students forming instructor
approved NYSSMA standard small ensembles and holding weekly rehearsals may also, at the
director’s discretion, opt out of pull out lessons. The Wind Ensemble performs four to six
public performances per year. These occur outside of the regular school day.
1 credit

SENIOR HIGH CHORUS

The Senior Chorus is open to all interested 9th through 12th grade students. Group lessons are
offered and attendance is required at all scheduled rehearsals and concerts. Instructor
approval or prior membership in chorus is required.
½ credit

MUSIC THEORY

Students are instructed in basic music theory which will develop their understanding of, and
skill in, recognizing and notating all major and minor scales, rhythms in simple and compound
meters, and triadic chord structures. Composition written in standard notation of simple
melodies, with accompanying chords and keyboard performance of simple tunes, may also be
included. Students will become acquainted with appropriate musical terms. Course availability
is subject to a minimum of 10 students.
1 credit

MUSIC THEORY II AP
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This course will complete a two year sequence in High School music theory, preparing
students for the spring Music Theory AP exam. Students will be trained in 18th century voice
leading, part writing, ear training and harmonic analysis. Students not taking the AP exam will
complete a final exam during Regents week. Prerequisite: Passing grade in Music theory I
or by special permission from the instructor following placement assessment.
1 credit / possible 3 college credits




                                            31
                                       PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical education is a requirement for all students. The program is geared to instill all
participants an attitude of good health and physical fitness. Students in grades 9, 10, 11 and
12 take physical education three days out of each six-day cycle. The program includes a
variety of lifetime leisure activities, cooperative games, competitive team and individual sports
in exercise and fitness related activities. The student successfully completing the program will
earn 1/2 credit of school credit each year. Physical education grades are averaged in to the
students' overall GPA. Two credits in PE are required for graduation.
½ credit per year


                                            HEALTH

HEALTH 10

This course is discussion-oriented, dealing with individual and community health. The course
is divided into three components: You, Your Body, and Your Choices. Community resources
and films are essential aspects of the topics discussed. Health 10 is a graduation requirement
for all students. Typically, this course is taken in the sophomore year.
½ credit




PERSONAL HEALTH/HLTH 206
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Seniors who take this course will discuss and assess a wide range of health topics. College
level course work will include in depth analysis on nutrition, fitness, human sexuality, drug use,
consumer health, and environmental health. An ability to work independently will be needed for
successful completion of this course.
Prerequisite: Health 10
½ credit / 3 TC3 credits




                                             32
                                            SCIENCE

EARTH SCIENCE

This Regents course is laboratory oriented in the basic earth sciences such as geology,
astronomy, environmental science, oceanography, and meteorology. Labs are required. Earth
Science is offered as either Regents or Honors. Students are recommended for the honors
section based on past performance in science and teacher recommendation. Successful
completion of the Regents exam fulfills a graduation requirement.
1 credit

BIOLOGY – LIVING ENVIRONMENT
This course teaches the basic concepts and skills needed to understand modern biology.
Students learn about key biological concepts and have extensive laboratory experiences to
learn about the process of scientific investigation. Students study the unity and diversity of life.
Topics include ecology, biochemistry, cell structure and function, evolution, taxonomy,
genetics, and anatomy and physiology. Biology is offered as either Regents or Honors.
Students are recommended for the honors section based on past performance in science and
teacher recommendation. Successful completion of the Regents exam fulfills a graduation
requirement.
1 credit

CHEMISTRY
This course covers the same basic principles as the college prep course and integrates most
of the same features. It is somewhat less rigorous, particularly with respect to mathematical
applications. It is designed to prepare students for the New York State Regents Chemistry
exam, but is not recommended for those students considering a career in the sciences. Read
the course description for college prep chemistry to decide whether or not you are interested in
Regents Chemistry. A Regents exam is given in June.
1 credit

CHEMISTRY HONORS (College Prep)

This chemistry course gives the students the solid grounding in basic chemical principles and
skills that they need for college. It meets all requirements for New York State Regents
Chemistry. Add to that foundation, a strategic problem solving strand and an innovative
laboratory strand and students will leave with a mastery of content objectives, experiences in
scientific inquiry, mathematical relationships, and connections to the real world and other
content areas. The textbook is readable, interesting, engaging and relevant to real life with
many applications of the chemistry concepts being studied. Examples of these applications
include: reading food labels, recycling codes for plastic products, essential elements, generic
medicines, hard water testing, flameless ration heaters used by the military, energy and low
emission cars, airbags, the “ozone hole” and many more. The laboratory portion of the course
integrates technology, business, finance and technical report writing with a hands-on approach
to chemistry. The course is rigorous with plenty of work in and out of class. Anyone who is
interested in careers such as oceanography, veterinary practice, pharmacy, medicine,
nutrition, waste management, environmental or health-related fields will find this course
necessary. A Regents exam is given in June.
1 credit
                                             33
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Environmental Science is the course for you if you have an interest in learning about the many
ways all of us interact with the natural environment. By increasing your knowledge, you can
have a more positive impact on your immediate environment and your community! You will
learn the science behind real-life issues and problems that affect the environment. A
balanced view of each environmental issue will be presented, along with valuable scientific
content. The philosophy driving this course is that informed citizens can make better
decisions about how to build a sustainable society. When you take this course you will be
expected to spend time inside & outside designing experiments, collecting data, building
equipment, working on projects, listening to guest speakers, planting gardens, cleaning up
and improving our school grounds. This course is for those students that don’t mind getting
dirty, thinking creatively, and being outside! You are invited to come and learn more about the
biological, chemical and physical aspects of our environment and walk away with a set of
skills to help you solve everyday problems.
Prerequisite: Biology (Living Environment)
1 credit

NON-REGENTS PHYSICS
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Explore the mechanical workings of the natural world with a minimum of math skills. Learn
about the science behind what makes a tower or bridge stand up, observe and explore how
strobe lighting freezes motion, make kaleidoscopes, build and ride a hovercraft. This hands-
on science course will make physics concepts understandable as you build and experiment
with everything from simple hot air balloons to weird transformers and radio transmitters.
Become familiar with how to connect DVD and VCR players, home stereo equipment, and
computer peripherals; practical skills with the science that goes on behind the scenes. The
class will meet for 80 minutes every other day, and be filled with stimulating demonstrations,
hair-raising activities, and shocking discoveries. Target Audience: STUDENTS NEEDING A
3RD YEAR OF NON-LAB SCIENCE TO FULFILL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
1 credit

PHYSICS

This course is the recommended foundation and preparatory course for most college level
introductory physics courses. It is a comprehensive program in integrated lab activities,
demonstrations and lectures developed over many years of classroom instruction. It is the
same course that has successfully prepared Dryden graduates for study in some of the top
universities in the country, including Princeton, Cornell, Yale, M.I.T., Alfred, R.I.T., the U.S.
Naval Academy, West Point, SUNY and many more. This course has traditionally been the
fourth science course taken in the Regents sequence for academic students. The course is
fairly mathematical but does not involve any advanced math. A working knowledge of basic
trigonometry and algebra are required, but no calculus will be included. Students should have
completed or at least be taking Math B. The topics of study are the same as those in advanced
physics (described below), but emphasis may vary. A Regents exam is given in June.
1 credit


                                             34
PHYSICS 104/105
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This offering is a laboratory-based program in introductory physics designed to meet the needs
of advanced students planning college level study in any science or engineering program. The
course is rigorous and emphasizes quantitative methods using computer interfacing for data
collection and analysis. Applications of calculus to problem solving will be introduced as they
relate to individual topics of study. Students who take this course must have a strong working
knowledge of Math B mathematics, be fluent in using a scientific calculator, and should be
taking an advanced math (calculus) along with physics. Students who successfully complete
this course can receive both Regents and college credit through the TC-3 dual-credit program.
Topics of study include, but are not limited to, Newtonian mechanics, waves and sound, light
and optics, electricity and magnetism, nuclear and modern physics. Enrollment will be limited
to 24 students.
1 credit       (Possible 7 TC3 credits)


MARINE BIOLOGY
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Come and explore the great world of the sea in an introductory course into the marine
sciences. The course of study will focus on marine organisms, their behaviors and their
interactions with the environment. Other topics to be covered will be: oceanic zones and their
biodiversity, marine ecology and oceanography. This course is intended to provide students
with the opportunity to obtain .5 science credit to help meet graduation requirements and may
be paired with another .5 science credit to complete a third year of science.

Prerequisite: Biology
½ credit

ASTRONOMY
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This Astronomy course encompasses the study of Earth, the planets, our solar system, stars,
galaxies and the evolution of the universe. We may also explore the possibility that life exists
elsewhere in the universe. Experiments and activities will emphasize how we know what we
know about places we’ve never been, a long-term project will get you intimately acquainted
with the planets and important moons in our solar system, star gazing with your classmates will
help you recognize the stars and their constellations in the night sky - we may even view a
planet or two through our school’s telescope. This course is intended to provide students with
the opportunity to obtain .5 science credit to help meet graduation requirements and may be
paired with another .5 science credit to complete a third year of science.

Prerequisite: Earth Science and Algebra
½ credit


                                            35
FOOD SCIENCE
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Explore ice cream and other foods! Food science will offer juniors or seniors the opportunity to
explore career options in the food industry. There will be scientific investigations in the
laboratory where students will study some of the effects and properties of food additives,
preservatives and preparation techniques. Safe handling techniques will be stressed. Much of
the course will be hands-on learning. There will be several projects students must complete at
home. Students should expect to prepare reports and discuss their results. Tasting of
laboratory products and other sensory evaluations of products may be included. This course is
intended to provide students with the opportunity to obtain .5 science credit to help meet
graduation requirements and may be paired with another .5 science credit to complete a third
year of science.
½ credit



AP BIOLOGY
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This course will follow the outline of the Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance
Examination Board. Topics will include cell structure and function, biochemical basis of life,
genetics, evolution, anatomy and physiology of plant and animals, and ecology. Lab activities
include genetic engineering, DNA fingerprinting, fruit fly culture and lots more. It will be
assumed that students taking the course have already taken college prep chemistry. This
course is designed for students who have taken three years of math and three years of
science. AP Biology should not be taken in lieu of physics. Students who are considering
a career in science or a science-related field should take both courses. The AP exam is offered
in May. Students are expected to pay the cost of the examination (currently about $86).
Whether or not a college awards credit for the course will be based on the exam score and the
college’s policy. Students should consult with the college they plan to attend for more
information on this.
1 credit




                                            36
                                            SOCIAL STUDIES



GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY I

This course focuses on the five New York State Social Studies Standards, which are common
themes that reoccur across time and place and historical eras. The credits of study will include
Early Civilizations, Empire of the Ancient World, Regional Civilization and Early Modern times.
Successful completion of course fulfills a graduation requirement.
1 credit

GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY II

This course will be continuation of Global History & Geography I. The credits of study to be
covered will include Enlightenment and Revolution, Industrialism and a New Global Age, World
Wars and Revolutions, and The World Today. Students must take the Regents encompassing
Global History and Geography I and II. Successful completion of course and passing the
Regents exam fulfills a graduation requirement.
1 credit

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

Advance Placement European History places attention upon understandings equivalent to
those gained in a college-level introductory course. The emphasis is on the general narrative
of European History from approximately 1450 - 1990, that is from the High Renaissance to the
present. The course includes an examination of the political and diplomatic, intellectual and
cultural, and social and economic history of Europe. In addition to providing a basic narrative of
events and movements, the goals of the Advanced Placement Course in European History are
to develop: a) an understanding of some of the principle themes in modern European history,
b) an ability to analyze historical evidence, and c) an ability to express that understanding and
analysis in writing. Students are expected to pay the cost for the Advanced Placement
examination (currently $86) as well as purchase their own supplemental books (usually 5-9 at
an approximate cost of $5 each). Students taking this course must have an 85 average during
each marking period and on the ninth grade Global I final exam.
1 credit


                                            Disclaimer:
The College Board is in the process of Auditing all Advance Placement Courses across the
country. Dryden High School is submitting the appropriate documentation required by College
Board for approval of each course. The College Board wants to ensure that AP courses across the
country have the same curricular and resource guidelines. There is no guarantee that all courses
will be accepted for the 2008-09 school year so that AP Credit can be recorded on the High School
Transcript for each student. Enrolled students will be eligible for course credit regardless.




                                                   37
UNITED STATES HISTORY & GOVERNMENT

This course continues the effort of the Social Studies Program to insure that students develop
an understanding of and appreciation for the American tradition rooted in history and adapted
by contemporary society. Objectives include:
   o Cultural heritage - events and people
   o The constitution and its principles as persistent themes in national development
   o The impact of technology on culture and the economy
   o The development and effects of cultural diversity
   o The operation of the Federal Government
   o The development of democratic values
   o The development of foreign policy and contemporary role in world affairs
   o The formation of public policy
Successful completion of course and passing the Regents exam fulfills a graduation
requirement.
1 credit

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY & GOVERNMENT
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

The course is an in-depth examination of United States history with an orientation towards
preparation for the National Advanced Placement Examination. The course places particular
emphasis on reading, interpreting and analyzing primary sources. Textbook, supplementary
readings, and Internet resources form the course materials. Students are expected to pay the
cost for the examination (currently $86) as well as purchase their own supplemental books
(usually 5-9 at an approximate cost of $5 each). Students who took Global Studies and
Geography must have earned at least an 85 on the NYS Regents and maintain at least an 85
during the academic year to enroll in AP US History.
1 credit


ECONOMICS – Grade 12

 This course is designed to provide the students with economic knowledge and skills
necessary to function as informed and economically literate citizens in U.S. society and the
world. Elements of study include:
   o Economic systems
   o Supply, demand and prices
   o Consumers, businesses, labor and agriculture
   o Public goods and services
   o Money
   o Unemployment, inflation and distribution of income
   o Fiscal and monetary policy
   o International trade
   o Economic problems of developing nations
   o Population growth, scarcity and economic growth
Successful completion of course fulfills a graduation requirement.
½ credit

                                           38
AP ECONOMICS – Grade 12
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

AP Microeconomics is a one-semester course that focuses on how economic decisions are
made by individuals, firms, and organizational structures. Demand and supply analysis is
developed to demonstrate how market prices are determined, how those prices determine an
economy’s allocation of goods and services, how factors of production are allocated in the
production process, and how goods and services are distributed throughout the economy.
Students evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of economic decision makers by using the
concepts of efficiency and equity. Students also analyze and evaluate the effects of
government intervention. In May, students will be expected to take an Advanced Placement
exam at their own expense, costing approximately $86.
½ credit



PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT – Grade 12

This course is designed to assist students in becoming effective participants in government.
Elements of study include:
   o Identifying and analyzing public policy issues
   o Using the library, surveying, and interviewing
   o Identifying alternative public policies and assessing changes of success
   o Applying public policy skills in a policy process
Successful completion of course fulfills a graduation requirement.
½ credit




AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS – Grade 12
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This course is to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the
United States, which includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics
and the analysis of specific examples. The course also looks at the various institutions, groups,
beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics with a focus oriented toward preparation for the
Advanced Placement Examination. Students will also take an in-depth look at current
controversial political issues. In May, students will be expected to take the Advanced
Placement exam at their own expense, costing approximately $86.
½ credit




                                             39
THE HOLOCAUST
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This course is offered as a Social Studies elective. The course will examine the historical
events preceding the Holocaust, the road to the destruction of selected groups of people, and
the aftermath.
½ credit

PSYCHOLOGY
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This is a general survey of the major elements of modern Psychology to include but not be
limited to; the brain and its system; brain chemistry; brain research; cognition; development;
personality theories; abnormal psychology; and schools of therapy.
½ credit




                                           40
                        2009-2010
              5 Credit Technology Sequence
         Recommended Sequence for maximum student achievement


                   First Course
         Design & Drawing for Production
                         HS (1) PLTW




                       Second Course

                     Principles of Engineering
                         HS (1) PLTW


                     Upper Level Courses


                               CAD
                              HS (1/2)


Civil Engineering                                Digital
& Architecture (1)       Engineering             Electronics
Concurrent Credit        Graphics                Concurrent
 HS (1) PLTW             Concurrent Credit       Credit
                         HS (1/2)                HS(1) PLTW

                         Capstone Course


                        Engineering Design &
                         Development EDD
                               HS (1)
                         PLTW CAPSTONE
                                   41
                             COURSE
                                          TECHNOLOGY

DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR PRODUCTION - (DDP)
(sequence or non-sequence)
This is an introductory course, which develops student problem solving skills, with emphasis
placed upon the concept of developing a 3-D model or solid rendering of an object. Students
focus on the application of visualization processes and tools provided by modern, state of the
art computer hardware and software. The course will emphasize the design development
process of a product and how a model of that product is produced, analyzed and evaluated,
using a Computer Aided Design System. The techniques learned are equally applicable to
areas such as garment design, archaeological or accident reconstruction, simulated surgery,
advertising or animated films. DDP is the first course in the Project Lead the Way Pre-
Engineering sequence.
This course is a Technology Education course and can be used as a substitute for the
Art/Music requirement for graduation.
1 credit

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS – (DE)
(sequence or non-sequence)
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

DE is a course of study in applied digital logic. The course is patterned after the first
semester course in Digital Electronics taught in two and four year colleges. Students will
learn how digital electronics is used in modern devices by learning digital concepts like
computer numbering systems, logic gate operation, Boolean algebra, and integrated circuit
connections. Students will learn how to analyze and build digital circuits using circuit
simulation software, digital multi-meters and 5 – 12 volt power supplies. Such circuits are
found in watches, calculators, video games, computers and thousands of other devices. The
use of small circuits is present in virtually all aspects of our lives and its use is increasing
rapidly, making digital electronics an important course of study for a student exploring a
career in engineering or engineering technology. Students may qualify for concurrent credit
through TC3 (3 credit hours) by passing their final exam with a 75 or better. This exam
covers 8 chapters in the textbook: Number systems and codes; Digital electronic signals and
switches; Basic logic gates; Programmable logic devices; Boolean algebra and reduction
techniques; Exclusive-OR and exclusive-NOR gates; Arithmetic operations and circuits; Code
converters, multiplexers, and demultiplexers. Digital Electronics is also part of the Project
Lead the Way Pre-Engineering sequence. Special scholarship awards at top 4-year schools
such as R.I.T., Clarkson and SUNY Alfred have been awarded to Dryden graduates who
have PLTW courses on their high school transcript.
1 credit / 3 TC3 credits

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN – (CAD)
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This is a continuation of the use of computer application software for creating engineering
drawings developed in DDP. The course is project-oriented with all drawings being produced
using industry standard CAD software. Students will explore design related topics and
present their findings using PowerPoint and written reports.
½ credit
                                              42
CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE – (CEA)
(sequence or non-sequence)
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This course is open to students who have successfully completed DDP with a grade of 75 or
better. Students will be introduced to building project planning which will include an
introduction to the roles of the architect, civil engineer, construction manager, contractors,
owners and others involved in a construction of a residential or commercial project. Topics
include site selection, construction principles such as foundations, structural members,
framing and roofing, interior elements, architectural details, energy systems and landscaping.
An emphasis will be placed on the building arrangement of spaces, interior design and
structural needs. Students may qualify for concurrent credit through TC3 (3 credit hours) by
passing their final exam with a 75 or better. Civil Engineering and Architecture is also part of
the Project Lead the Way Pre-Engineering sequence. Special scholarship awards at top 4-
year schools such as R.I.T., Clarkson and SUNY Alfred have been awarded to Dryden
graduates who have PLTW courses on their high school transcript.
1 credit / 3 TC3 credits



ENGINEERING GRAPHICS
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

This course is open to students who have successfully completed CAD and are confident
taking a rigorous course. The purpose of this course is to continue developing the “language
of the engineer” which was introduced in the previous courses. Students will use design
skills, engineering software knowledge, creative thinking and graphic techniques to solve
design problems. This course is recommended for students who have an interest in exploring
engineering and architecture professions.
½ credit / 3 TC3 credits



PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING – (POE)
(sequence or non-sequence)

This course is open to students who have successfully completed DDP with a grade of 75 or
better. POE is a course that helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering
technology. Exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes help
students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an
engineering problem solving process to benefit people. The course also includes concerns
about social and political consequences of technological change. Topics include: Definition
and Types of Engineering; Communication & Documentation; Design Process; Engineering
Systems; Statics & Strengths of Materials; Materials & Strength of Materials; Engineering for
Reliability; Kinematics.
1 credit

                                               43
ENGINEERING DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT – (EDD)
(sequence only)
(MAY NOT BE OFFERED EACH YEAR. CONTINGENT ON STAFFING & FUNDING)

In this ‘Capstone’ students design, engineer and build a product. The major emphases are on
the design and problem solving process; the writing process; engineering skills; evaluating
websites; patent presentations; speech presentations and presentation guidelines. Bi-weekly
assessment of final project progress includes: meeting established time constraints (as set
by the instructor); making significant progress towards (the development of problem
statement and support; finding current solutions; brainstorming ideas; developing product);
recording work appropriately and completely in the journal/notebook; spending sufficient time
working on the topic at hand; expending satisfactory effort in the engineering process. The
culmination of the final project product in the Engineering Design and Development course is
threefold: 1) the creation of a product that solves a specific problem; 2) a written product
report that outlines the work done on the pathway to developing the product; and 3) a
portfolio that includes the engineering journal, product report, drawings, data, meeting notes,
etc. This handout outlines the requirements for the product report.
1 credit




                                               44
                                    2009 - 2010

AREA VOCATIONAL CENTER CAREER TECH EDUCATION COURSES


Auto Body                                       1 or 2 years
Auto Tech                                       1 or 2 years
Carpentry                                       1 or 2 years
Certified Nursing Assistant I                   1 year
Certified Nursing Assistant II/Home Hlth Aide   1 year
Computer Technology                             1 or 2 years
Cosmetology                                     1 or 2 years
Criminal Justice                                1 or 2 years
Culinary Arts                                   1 or 2 years
Digital Media Technology                        1 or 2 years
Early Childhood                                 1 or 2 years
Electrician                                     1 or 2 years
Heavy Equipment/Nat. Res. Cons.                 1 or 2 years
Welding                                         1 or 2 years



Offerings subject to change by Area Vocational Center

Students receive three (3 - 4) credits for each year of a vocational program. These
courses may be used to meet sequence requirements for graduation.

Students may also be able to take their third year of math or science at the Career and
Tech Center.




                                         45
                      TST BOCES Career and Tech Programs


Career and Tech Center (607) 257-1551
Director: Mr. Anthony DiLucci



TST BOCES Career and Tech Programs instruct students in a variety of technical
areas, preparing them for entering the work force with a marketable skill and for
continuing on to higher education. Classes are conducted at the TST BOCES Career
and Tech Center on Warren Road in Ithaca. These programs are taught for a minimum
of 2 hours during the AM or PM session each day, and all courses provide an internship
experience over the course of the their completed curriculum. Bus transportation is
provided to and from the Career and Tech Center. Students continue their major
academic subjects in the remaining three or four periods at the home school district.
Courses may yield three or four credits, depending on individual students’ situations.

In addition to the Career and Tech Programs, the Center offers classes in Physical
Education, Business Math and Environmental Science for those students who may
need them to meet graduation requirements.

All Career and Tech classes are currently New York State Approved. To be approved,
courses must meet rigorous guidelines related to assessment, an academically strong
curriculum that is aligned with the New York State Learning Standards and relevance to
industry practices. Due to the success of our Career and Tech programs, many
students have successfully competed at the regional, state and national levels for
scholarships and other prizes. Some courses offer concurrent enrollment opportunities
through TC3, and all programs have at least one articulation agreement with colleges
that have a related program, which include, but are not limited to: SUNY Delhi, SUNY
Cobleskill, SUNY Alfred, TC3, Pennsylvania College of Technology, and the Art Institute
of Pittsburgh.




  For more information on these and other Career and Tech Programs, visit the
                                  website at:
                              www.tstboces.org




                                        46
AUTO BODY
1st Year – PM Session              2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: This program focuses on collision repair skills for national
certification. Practical experience is acquired by working on customers’ cars. Students
learn the used of hand, power and special auto body tools and equipment. Areas
include frame and auto body repair, auto refinishing and replacement of parts and
sections of panels. Welding skills are also taught. In addition, there are opportunities to
do customized paint graphics, airbrushing, and restoration work on high performance
and show quality vehicles.

Can Lead To: Students may pursue entry level work as a body shop assistant, painter,
sander or polisher or self-employment as a shop owner. Two-year college or technical
degree in Auto Body Technology can lead to collision service worker, welder, insurance
adjuster, parts manager or automobile painter.

AUTO TECHNOLOGY
1st Year – PM Session              2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: This is a nationally certified program (NATEF). Students learn to
repair foreign and domestic cars and light trucks using the latest techniques and
computerized diagnostic equipment. Successful graduates are eligible to take the
certification examinations offered by Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) and the New
York State Department of Motor Vehicles Inspector License Examination. Throughout
the two-year program, students gain daily practical experience working on vehicles
donated by major auto manufacturers and/or customers’ cars. Students who qualify
may be eligible for clinical experience at local repair facilities.

Can Lead To: Students may be eligible for an entry-level job as a brake mechanic,
general mechanics assistant, tune-up specialist or parts salesperson. Post secondary
opportunities include an associate degree in Auto Technology or specialized training at
technical schools. Advanced students may pursue mechanical engineering.

CARPENTRY
1st Year – PM Session              2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: In this course, students learn the basics of residential and
commercial construction techniques, including introductions to framing, roofing, new
construction, remodeling, interior and exterior finishes, door and window installation,
siding and masonry. Students also learn to safely operate hand and power tools.
There is some work on plan and blueprint reading as well as learning the meaning of
symbols and building specifications. From the ground up, this class will teach students
the full scope of the construction industry. Students also build sheds of all shapes and
sizes for the public. The skills learned in this class will provide students with the basic
skills needed to perform required maintenance in a residential or commercial setting.

Can Lead To: Students may enroll in a two-year college in the construction field, or
pursue a career as a roofer, contractor, project manager, form builder, lumber yard
worker or architectural technician.
                                          47
CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT I /      1st Year – AM and PM Session
CERT NURSING ASST II / HOME HEALTH AIDE     2nd Year – PM Session

Course Description: For the student interested in the health field as a supportive care
giver, these classes give training for patient care in nursing homes, hospitals and
private homes. Students will participate in a supervised clinical experience to give
textbook learning a practical application. Students perform personal care procedures
such as bathing, dressing and feeding patients, and assist them with mobility using
crutches, canes, walkers and wheelchairs. In addition, they learn how to take vital signs
and perform First Aid and CPR. All students must complete a physical exam and be
updated on their immunizations to enroll in this program, and they must purchase a
uniform, white shoes and a watch. During the second year of the program, students will
further their experience by working towards certification in Home Health Aide/Personal
Care Aide in order to work with patients and professionals in a variety of health care
settings. This program will allow students to gain additional clinical hours within a
hospital setting and participate in a variety of internships to explore areas of health care
in our community. All students are required to purchase a uniform, white shoes, and a
stethoscope.

Can Lead To: This program prepares students for entry into the workforce. Many
students pursue nursing or other health care related majors at the post-secondary level.
Eligible students can take the NYS certification exam each May for $115.00 to
potentially become a licensed certified nursing assistant.


COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
1st Year – PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: During the first year, students will experience an overview of the
major components of Computer Technology, which include: Website Design, Computer
Programming, Hardware Maintenance and Troubleshooting, Operating System
Administration (Windows, Linux and DOS), 3D Animation and Design, Digital Video, and
Basic Game Design. There is a strong emphasis on problem-solving skills and working
independently. Students do not need any previous computer background for this class.
The second year of the program is the internationally recognized CISCO Academy.
Students learn both the theory and practice of network administration. The curriculum
involves hands-on programming of network devices like routers and switches. In
addition to theoretical components, this program provides practical experience with all
aspects of network design, including: making cables, server management, security,
wireless administration, backup technologies and computer forensics.

Can Lead To: This program will prepare students for the CISCO Network Associated
INTRO exam and the Comp TIA Network + exam. Students are also likely to pursue
post-secondary education at the two year or four year college level in computer
technology or computer information systems.

                                           48
COSMETOLOGY
1st Year – PM Session              2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with marketable skills
to enter the field of cosmetology. From manicuring to hair coloring, perms to styling,
students get the full range of skills and hours to prepare them for the NYS Licensing
Exam. The program consists of practical hands-on training and theory work, field trips
to beauty and styling shows, and presentations by guest speakers from the
cosmetology field. Instruction in shop management and communication skills prepares
students to handle the business portion of working in a salon. Note: 1st year students
are required to purchase a kit costing $175.00, and students will need additional money
for advanced supplies and a nail kit. Students are required to complete 1000 hours of
training to qualify for a New York License as a cosmetologist.

Can Lead To: 1st Year students may find positions as a receptionist at local salons.
Students completing the 2nd year and who have passed the NYS Licensing test may
become a hair stylist, color and nail technician, salon owner or manager.



CRIMINAL JUSTICE
1st Year – PM Session              2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: The first year of academic instruction focuses on criminal and civil
law, vehicle and traffic law, arrest and court procedures, report writing and
communication skills. Additional areas include interviewing skills, patrol techniques,
self-defense, security, fingerprinting, civil rights, applied math, and Internet research.
Class time is split between lecture, physical activities, field trips, and interaction with
special guests. The second year will be more career-centered, with a focus on:
patrolling, criminal investigation, and police-community relations. Subjects include:
forensics, accident and crime scene illustration, digital photography, life skills, and
applied science, professional and career development. Class time includes
discussions, team-based lab work, and hands-on field activities.

Can Lead To: This program of study is an excellent tool for preparation for college,
military service, or direct employment in law enforcement or security fields.




                                          49
CULINARY ARTS
1st Year – PM Session              2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: In the 1st year, students learn fundamentals of safety and
sanitation as well as how to prepare both short order and quantity cooking. Breads,
pastries, entrees, soups, etc. are included in menus selected and prepared by students.
Equipment operation and safety are also taught. There is a great deal of emphasis on
building social skills, working as team members, following directions and exhibiting
positive work attitudes. 2nd Year students are responsible for the complete operation of
the Sun Room, the on-campus restaurant. Capable students may also do internships in
culinary arts related businesses. There is a $30 fee for a mandatory uniform.

Can Lead To: This course prepares students for entry level positions in the local job
market or students may choose to attend a two-year or four-year college in this field.




DIGITAL MEDIA TECHNOLOGY
1st Year – AM or PM Session 2009-2010 School Year
2nd Year – AM Session       2010 and Beyond

Course Description: Students will experience an overview of commercial design, video
game development, and video production. Initially, students will develop web-based
and business-oriented media through a general exploration of digital editing tools.
Building on this foundation and working with industry standard software and hardware,
students will investigate both 2D and 3D animation techniques with a focus on website
integration and video game design. Students will create complex animations and
working video games using a variety of tools, including Adobe Flash and Autodesk 3ds
Max. Finally, moving quickly from simple digital video creation to complex movies,
students will explore advanced pre- and post-production methods using Adobe
Premiere Pro, Encore and After Effects. Throughout the course, there is a strong
emphasis on problem-solving and working independently.

Can Lead To: Students are likely to pursue post-secondary education at the two year or
four year college level in a variety of disciplines including: video production, advertising
design, game design and website development. Potential careers are: software
engineer, flash designer, web developer, game developer, graphic designer, digital
artist, game art and animation designer, animation system programmer, video editor,
video systems technician, video production coordinator, and digital video analyst.




                                          50
EARLY CHILDHOOD
1st Year – AM or PM Session        2nd Year – AM or PM Session

Course Description: Early Childhood education provides students who want to work
with young children an understanding of the physical, emotional and intellectual
development of children. Students learn about the characteristics and behavioral needs
of three and four-year-olds and learn how to care for them in a nursery school setting by
operating a nursery school program three days a week. During the 2 nd year, students
gain hands-on experience through internships at local nursery schools, childcare
settings and elementary schools. Good communication skills, both written and verbal,
are critical to success in this program, along with a genuine interest in working with
children.

Can Lead To: Students may pursue a two or four-year college for Early Childhood
and/or Elementary Education. This course also provides entry level skills to work as a
nanny, preschool teacher aide or a home day care provider.



ELECTRICIAN
1st Year – PM Session              2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: This program is designed to expose and excite students to the
world of electricity and how it works. Students learn and apply skills towards electrical
construction and electrical maintenance by designing and installing circuit layouts for
residential and commercial applications. This is achieved through a mix of classroom
instruction, practical applications in the lab, and a “Real Work” project that focuses on
the construction of a modular home on campus by the Electrical Construction and
Carpentry classes. In addition, students develop and wire industrial electrical control
circuits that are then used to energize motors, heaters, and lighting loads. A full set of
hand tools is provided, and students are instructed on the various pieces of electrical
test equipment as well as many of the primary power tools used in the trade. Other
opportunities include field trips and internships with prospective employers. A
partnership with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 241
presents various opportunities to students that results in local recognition and prizes for
challenge winners.

Can Lead To: Entry level Electrician, Electrical Apprenticeship upon completion of the
two year program. With further education, a student can use this course as a solid
foundation to acquire a two year degree in Electrical Technology, work as a
Maintenance Electrician, Machine and Appliance Repair, Utility Worker, Network
Technician, Communications Technician, HVAC Technician, Security and Fire Controls
Technician, or Elevator Repair Technician.




                                          51
HEAVY EQUIP / NAT RES CONS
1st Year - AM or PM Session 2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: This program is designed to meet the growing demand for
technicians in the transportation, marine, agricultural and construction fields. The
course provides training in the diagnosis and repair of heavy equipment, medium and
heavy trucks. Students learn the principles of the diesel engine, drive train, brakes,
suspension and steering, electrical/electronic systems, hydraulics, welding, and
preventive maintenance inspection. Students receive classroom instruction that they
will apply to hands-on lab work in the shop or outdoors. Specialty areas include
maintenance and heavy equipment operation of tractors and diesel engines. Students
who are interested in bio diesel engines, working with alternative fuel sources,
landscaping and conservation should join this course. Select students have the
opportunity to job-shadow and intern with professionals in the area.

Can Lead To: This course prepares students for entry level employment positions, such
as: heavy equipment technician, truck marine, agricultural, construction and diesel
fields, or to continue into post-secondary education.



WELDING
1st Year – PM Session            2nd Year – AM Session

Course Description: Students learn to construct and repair equipment, machinery,
parts and piping by fusing metal parts together using oxyacetylene, MIG, TIG or arc
welding apparatus and plasma-arc cutters. Instruction is balanced by the opportunity to
build practical projects or metal sculpture.

Can Lead To: Students may pursue a two or four-year degree in Welding Technology
or employment as a production or construction welder. With experience and further
training, a student may become a blacksmith, instrument maker or pipe welder.
Possible employers are heavy construction contractors, machine tool shops, shipyards,
the aerospace industry and fabricating shops.




                                         52
                         TST BOCES New Visions Programs

Career and Tech Center (607) 257-1551
Director: Mr. Anthony DiLucci

New Visions is a full year program that offers seniors a non-traditional challenging
senior year. Accepted students attend this full-day program off-site at Cornell University
or Cayuga Medical Center. Students are expected to be professional, courteous and to
strictly adhere to the guidelines set by their teachers and mentors. Seniors receive high
school credit for English 12 Honors, Government and Economics, as well as two
electives, for a total of four credits.

Acceptance into a New Visions Program is very competitive. The selection process is
based on grades, recommendations, an interview and an essay, among other criteria.
These programs are taught at the honors level, provide dual credit through TC3 for the
core academic program, and are personally and academically challenging.


     For more information on the New Visions Programs, visit the website at:
                               www.tstboces.org



NEW VISIONS: HEALTH SCIENCES
Course Description: This program allows students to explore a variety of health career
professions that meets daily at the Cayuga Medical Center in Ithaca. Medical
terminology along with anatomy and physiology are key health science modules
integrated throughout the New Visions curriculum. Students learn the relevance of
government, economics and English to this profession and return to class with real-life
questions, dilemmas and a greater understanding of the role each student wants to fulfill
as a profession in this field. The class work is demanding, but extremely rewarding.
The New Visions Health Careers exploration program is for the highly motivated,
academically capable student.


NEW VISIONS: LIFE SCIENCES
Course Description: This program is located at the Guterman Lab at Cornell
University. Students will be able to explore and experience first hand some of the many
career opportunities in the agriculture and environmental science field, which include:
horticulture, veterinary medicine, forestry, land and water conservation, agricultural and
environmental education, food science, agricultural business and fishery-wildlife
management. The course is designed to attract students who are interested in
environmental and agricultural issues, animals, plants, greenhouses, lakes, rivers and
streams, who like to work with technical equipment, and who are not afraid of working
hard, both independently and with others. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of
experiences varying from field trips to local businesses, guest speakers employed in
these fields, to job shadowing and career internships.

                                          53
                        TST BOCES World of Work Programs


Career and Tech Center (607) 257-1551
Director: Mr. Anthony DiLucci

The World of Work classes serve high school students with a variety of instructional
needs. Classes promote positive self-esteem and socialization as well as cognitive and
motor skills development through a progressive curriculum. The classes integrate
students into the most appropriate and least restrictive Career and Tech setting, offering
instruction in both generic and job-specific skills important for competitive employment
and independent living.

Please refer to the World of Work Program: Learning for Life brochure for descriptions
of these courses. Listed below are the WOW courses and the times that the courses
will be offered next fall:


AUTO SERVICES                                                 AM or PM Session

CAREER EXPLORATION PROGRAM                                    AM or PM Session

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY                                       AM or PM Session

FOOD SERVICE                                                  PM Session

HUMAN and HOSPITALITY SERVICES                                AM Session

PERSONAL SERVICE                                              AM Session




                                          54
                          DRYDEN CEEB CODE
                               331-655
Sandra R. Sherwood, Superintendant of Schools

Board of Education:
Anderson Young, President                   Kathy Zahler
Russ Kowalski, Vice President               Jennifer Davis
Christen Gibbons                            Brad Rauch
Brian June                                  Perry Dewey
Karen LaMotte

High School Counseling Office
Ms. Linda Quinlan, Counseling Secretary ext. 5226
(lquinla1@dryden.k12.ny.us)
Mrs. Lisa Bustamante, School Counselor “A– G” ext. 5282
(lbustam1@dryden.k12.ny.us)
Ms. Cassie Sullivan, School Counselor “H – P” ext. 5225
(csulliv1@dryden.k12.ny.us)
Mr. Laszlo Engel, School Counselor “Q – Z ” ext. 5275
(lengel1@dryden.k12.ny.us)

Middle School Counseling Office
Mrs. BJ Nelson, School Counselor “A – L” ext. 4228
(bnelson1@dryden.k12.ny.us)
Mrs. Tara Buckman, School Counselor “M – Z” ext. 4242
(tbuckma1@dryden.k12.ny.us)

Elementary School Counselor
Ms. Mary Ellen Bossack, School Counselor, Dept. Chair ext. 1446
(mbossac1@dryden.k12.ny.us)

Department Chairs
ART                             Kathleen Hall
BUSINESS                        Linda Bruno
ENGLISH                         Margaret Grace
FOREIGN LANGUAGE                Rebecca Tice
MATH                            Patricia VanEvery
MUSIC                           Richard Huyge
PHYSICAL EDUCATION              Vicky Alexander, Kathleen Deyo
TECHNOLOGY                      Gary Shelhamer
SCIENCE                         Mary Kay Hickey
SOCIAL STUDIES                  Teresa Spitzer
SPECIAL EDUCATION               Beth Sannerud




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