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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

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					                      DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

AGENCY: Office on Women’s Health, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the
Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY TITLE: Announcement of Availability of Funds for Phase II of the
Coalition for a Healthier Community Program

ANNOUNCEMENT TYPE: Limited Competitive Cooperative Agreement

CFDA NUMBER: The OMB Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance number 93.290


DATES: To receive consideration, applications must be received by the Office of Grants
Management, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), Department of Health and
Human Services (DHHS) c/o Grant Operation Center, 1400 Key Boulevard, Suite 910, Arlington,
VA 22209, no later than 9:00 pm Eastern Standard Time for electronic applications submitted via
Grants.gov Website Portal or the GrantSolutions System on . Hardcopy applications are due no
later than 6:00 pm Eastern Standard Time on June 28, 2011. Applications will not be accepted by
fax, nor will the submission deadline be extended. Please refer to the Applicant and Submission
Information section of the announcement for the full application submission requirements.


OVERVIEW:
    For the past two decades, scientific research on women’s health has made significant progress
in understanding the biological conditions that affect women. However, differences in disease
incidence and prevalence do not always reflect a biological origin. Studies have shown that with
certain common diseases, morbidity and mortality rates still disproportionately affect women in
comparison to men. Only recently have researchers realized not only that manifestations and
incidence of disease differ for men and women, but that it is important to integrate gender roles in
data analysis to truly assess health outcomes. For the purposes of this funding announcement,
gender is defined as the socially constructed roles, behaviors and attributes assigned to a man and
a woman.1 There has been limited research conducted within the U.S, in regards to gender, that
examines how socio-cultural roles and expectations for men and women affect symptoms, access
to care, and treatment.1
    In 2007, approximately 1 million women died in the U.S. and half of those deaths were
preventable.2 A large proportion of women die each year from preventable diseases that are
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attributed to socio-cultural factors.3 In spite of these alarming figures, the socio-cultural etiologies
of most diseases that affect women are frequently overlooked. Nationally, there is a lack of gender-
specific data to understand the factors and barriers that result in health disparities between men
and women.
    Viewing women’s health exclusively as a function of sex differences is too narrow. It frames
women’s health and well-being as a function only of biological factors and how they differ in men
and women and ignores the role of gender, which is affected by broader social and community
factors that, along with biologic risk factors, influence women’s health. Although progress has been
made in identifying behavioral determinants of women’s health; such as smoking, diet, and
physical activities, few studies have tested ways to modify these determinants in women or
examined the effects of social and community factors in specific groups of women.
    While investments in women’s health research have led to decreased rates of female mortality
from some diseases that progress has not been enjoyed equally by women from all population
groups in the U.S. Women who are socially disadvantaged because of their race or ethnicity,
income level, or educational attainment have been underrepresented in many studies and have not
benefitted as much from the progress in women’s health research.
    The Office on Women’s Health (OWH) announces the availability of funds through a limited
competitive cooperative agreement grant to improve overall community health policies and gender-
based health care programs for women. In September of 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services (DHHS) launched a new gender-based national initiative titled the Coalition for a
Healthier Community (CHC), which builds upon past OWH programs such as the 48
Multidisciplinary Health Models for Women sites throughout the US (1996-2007) and Advancing
System Improvements to Support Targets for Healthy People 2010 (ASIST2010: 2007-2010).
    In 2010, OWH funded 16 organizations throughout the U.S. to implement Phase I of the CHC
initiative. During the planning phase, each coalition was expected to conduct a needs assessment,
a gender-based analysis and identify gender constraints, which adversely impact the health of
women and/or girls in their community. In addition, grantees were required to develop a strategic
plan to address these health issue(s) using an evidence-based approach.
    For Phase II, each awardee may be approved for funding up to five years at a total cost of
$300,000 per budget period to enable communities to implement and evaluate gender-based
wellness interventions. Applicants are expected to link their implementation plan to Healthy People
(HP) 2020. Funding for Phase II is contingent upon satisfactory performance during Phase I, the
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quality of the application submitted for Phase II funding and the availability of Federal funds. Phase
II funding will be awarded through a limited competition among Phase I grantees.

BACKGROUND:

       The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office on Women’s Health (OWH)
was established in 1991 to improve the health and well-being of all women and girls in the United
States (U.S.). To achieve this long-term goal, the OWH focuses on reducing health disparities
between women and men, girls and boys and among populations of women by supporting gender-
specific health programs. The OWH is the nation’s leader in promoting the health of women and
girls. The office serves as the focal point for women's health activities within the U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services through its leadership and collaboration efforts. The overall mission
of the Office on Women’s Health is to provide leadership to promote health equity for women and
girls through sex and gender-specific approaches. OWH has established public and private
partnerships to address critical women’s health issues nationwide. These include supporting
collaborative efforts among Federal, State and local governments, hospitals, community and faith-
based organizations and academic institutions, which identifies and addresses critical health issues
of women and girls.
    As a leader in women’s health, the OWH supports the development of model programs and
public health systems that reach women across their lifespan and provides comprehensive
integrated care that prevents injuries, delays the onset of disease and improves their health status
through compliance. The populations of women served by OWH funded programs have behavioral,
social, dental and medical conditions, including multiple chronic conditions, which are ideally
managed effectively with outreach, comprehensive care, appropriate referrals, education and
follow up. Since its establishment, the OWH has taken the lessons learned from its model program
to guide and improve the development of future programs. From its preliminary models of women’s
health programs, the OWH has learned that broader sex and gender-based approaches to a
problem addressed by a coalition working collaboratively have proven to be most effective.
Additionally, communities have demonstrated that they have the knowledge and skills to solve their
own problems. However, few have the resources to sustain their programs, build effective
coalitions, conduct assessments and analyze data to identify the problems that have the most
adverse impact on its citizens.


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    The Coalition for a Healthier Community builds upon programs such as the 48 Multidisciplinary
Health Models for Women sites throughout the US (1996-2007) and Advancing System
Improvements to Support Targets for Healthy People 2010 (ASIST2010: 2007-2010). These 48
Multidisciplinary Health Models for Women sites each implemented their own paradigm and blend
of services to meet the needs of their community. The program included the National Centers of
Excellence in Women’s Health (CoEs), the National Community Centers of Excellence in Women’s
Health (CCOEs), and the Ambassadors for Change (AFCs). These programs served as leaders
and change agents in the area of women’s health. Their pioneering efforts led to changes in the
way women’s health services are delivered, changes in women’s health curricula, acceptance of
community health workers and allied health professionals as key members of the care delivery
team, development of leadership and empowerment programs for women and the establishment of
partnership to deliver comprehensive one-stop services. The Advancing System Improvements to
Support Targets for Healthy People 2010 (ASIST2010) was a three-year initiative, which funded
existing public health systems/collaborative partnerships to enhance their preventive health
program systems by incorporating a gender focus and using evidence-based strategies and
S.M.A.R.T. objectives to achieve Healthy People 2010 targets.
    The Coalition for a Healthier Community provides an opportunity to combine the strengths of
ASIST2010 and the multidisciplinary model sites with the strengths, knowledge, skills and
resources of the community to improve the health of women and girls. This initiative will enable
communities to expand and enhance existing public health systems to address gender-based
health disparities and, ultimately, produce community-wide behavior change that will improve the
health and safety of women and girls living in these communities.


I. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION:
  AUTHORITY: This program is authorized by 42 U.S.C. 300u-2(a).
  1. Purpose

  The purpose of this funding announcement is to support the implementation of evidence-based
health strategies targeting women and girls through a public health system approach which is
gender-based, cost beneficial and sustainable. This limited competitive cooperative agreement
seeks applications from Coalition for Healthier Community grantees to implement an evidence-
based intervention to address a health problem identified through their needs assessment and

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gender analysis as having an adverse impact on the health of women and/or girls. Phase II
funding is contingent upon satisfactory completion of Phase I, an application that addresses the
requirements of this announcement as determined by an objective review panel and availability of
Federal funds.
    Support for this cooperative agreement was divided into two phases: a) Phase I Planning and
b) Phase II Implementation. In Phase I, the planning stage was supported for a one-year period
and required a needs assessment to identify the health needs of the community, the development
of a strategic action plan and accompanying implementation plan to address identified needs. For
Phase II, awardees will be required to implement their proposed intervention model, which must
address the health condition(s) identified by the needs assessment as having the most adverse
effect on the health and well being of women and/or girls in the community.

  2. Goals and Objectives

    The vision of Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) is to have, “A society in which all people live long,
healthy lives.” For Healthy People 2020, the overarching goals are to:
       Attain high quality, longer lives free of preventable disease, disability, injury, and
        premature death.
       Achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups.
       Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all.
       Promote quality of life, healthy development, and healthy behaviors across all life stages.

    To support these overarching goals, HP2020 has developed 42 Topic Area(s) and over 500
objectives, which all aim to improve the health of Americans. All applicants must link their
implementation plan to a minimum of two HP2020 Topic Areas and at least one objective within
each Topic Area(s) for consideration for Phase II funding. Each applicant must explicitly state how
their proposed intervention goals and objectives support HP2020 Topic Areas/objectives.
Applicants will be required to establish S.M.A.R.T. objectives based on HP2020 targets, which
adequately correspond to their proposed intervention. Proposed interventions must have a gender
focus and address identified gender constraints within their communities. In the application,
grantees are required to describe the activities planned for their targeted area that address their
proposed intervention and HP2020 objectives.
    All objectives must be described in terms that are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic
and timely (S.M.A.R.T.). The objectives should be clearly aligned with intervention activities and
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programmatic outcomes, which link to HP2020. At a minimum, outcomes should be reported
inclusive of sex, age, race, ethnicity, education level, insurance coverage, income level, disability
status and other relevant and appropriate socio-demographic variables. Prevalence and incidence
data should also be reported. The applicant should include a mix of gender-specific indicators
which capture changes in gender constraints, which occur through the intervention. Indicators
should be able to address performance based on community baseline data and HP2020 targets.
    All grantees will be responsible for reporting on their program goals and objectives, which
should be supported with several process and outcome objectives. Objectives should map to short-
term, mid-term and long-term goals of the proposed intervention. The application should include a
clear documented statement of the need, its prevalence and impact on the women and/or girls in
the targeted community and the baseline data that will be used to evaluate the progress on
program objectives.


PHASE II: Implementation

    The implementation phase provides an opportunity for grantees to implement the evidence-
based strategies identified by the coalition to achieve their gender-specific program goals. To
successfully achieve the purpose of this cooperative agreement, the grantee will:

        (1)      Implement the comprehensive strategic action plan developed in Phase I;

        (2)      Enter into a contract with at least two community-based organizations to support
                 tasks identified in the implementation plan;

        (3)      Include a minimum of two community-based organizations as voting members on
                 the advisory board;

        (4)      Host annual site visits between OWH staff, coalition members and other key
                 stakeholders;

        (5)      Conduct a local evaluation;

        (6)      Participate in a national evaluation to be conducted by a contractor selected by the
                 OWH;

        (7)      Disseminate program and evaluation findings via publications and presentations;

        (8)      Describe plans to document systems change;


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        (9)      Conduct an economic evaluation to determine return on investment for the
                 program and/or specific aspects of the program.

In assessing the proposed intervention, all grantees are expected to collect and report on gender-
specific program objectives, which directly link to Healthy People 2020. To assist grantees in
achieving the requirements of the grant, the Federal Government will:

        1. Conduct site visits in Phase II;

        2. Review coalition membership matrix complete with roles and responsibilities;

        3. Review timeline and budget;

        4. Review all quarterly, annual and final progress reports;

        5. Conduct bimonthly conference calls;

        6. Provide technical assistance as needed;

        7. Participate in telephone conferences and other activities supporting project
            performance improvements and evaluation;

        8. Review strategic action, implementation and evaluation plans.



  3. Operational, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

    All funded recipients are expected to conduct a local evaluation of their program and to
participate in a national program evaluation. A statement of willingness to participate in a national
evaluation of the CHC program should be included in the evaluation section of the application.
Applicants are expected to identify HP2020 Topic Area(s) and objectives that their proposed
intervention will support. Furthermore, applicants will identify and describe specific activities that
will be accomplished to meet each selected HP 2020 objectives complete with a timeline and
responsible individual(s) for each activity. Applicants are expected to provide plans for rigorous
evaluations for this initiative. The evaluations will be used for determining accountability and for
measuring the overall effectiveness of the accomplishment of program objectives.
    Applications submitted under this announcement are expected to include a clear and fully
developed summary of the needs assessment, findings from the gender-based analysis and a
discussion of the findings determining the Phase II focus area(s). The needs assessment

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summation should include a discussion of the collection of data on gender relations, identification
of gender-based opportunities and constraints that will be addressed through proposed
interventions. The gender-based analysis should demonstrate an understanding of the
epidemiology of health problems and highlight the differences of the social-cultural causes, which
affect the root causes of such problems.
    Additionally, a successful application should include an evaluation plan, which demonstrates a
commitment and a description of capacity to monitor and evaluate strategies for addressing
gender-based health disparities. A strong evaluation plan will be able to measure the process and
outcomes of the program on health and gender equity goals. Operational monitoring and
evaluation plans should include gender-specific indicators that track and measure progress. The
evaluation plan should be able to document the progress on program goals, discern the
effectiveness of strategies in producing progress, demonstrate accountability and evaluate findings
to make informed decisions about the program. Data collection, program management protocols
and procedures should be explained in the narrative. The applicant should demonstrate their ability
to conduct an intensive rigorous evaluation design. All awardees of this limited competitive
cooperative agreement grant will be expected to fully participate in a national evaluation of the
CHC initiative.
    Applicants should include a clear description of a process and outcome evaluation that
corresponds to their implementation plan. Process evaluations determine the extent to which the
program was able to achieve implementation fidelity. The goals of a process evaluation are to
assess what level of resources are being provided to the program, the elements of the program
which are being implemented and identify barriers to program implementation. To that end, the
process evaluation discussion should provide a clear description of all process objectives and
goals. The process evaluation should report on the status of each of the process objectives.
Evaluation plans will also be required to include a clear description of outcome evaluations. The
discussion should include how the coalition will assess the effectiveness of the intervention. The
outcome evaluation should make clear what data will be collected to measure program impact and
what types of data analyses will be done.
    The evaluation plan should also include a clear description of the data collection and analysis
strategy. Each process and outcome objective should be presented in a S.M.A.R.T. format; and
should be linked to the inputs, outputs and goals. A requirement of this grant will be to report on


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short-term, mid-term and long-term goals respective of budget period. Program goals stated
beyond 2017, will serve as HP2020 impact goals for the initiative.
    A local evaluation will be conducted each year to examine the progress of goals of the
proposed intervention. The local evaluation should be designed to assess achievements of the
intervention. The evaluation plan should include a clear description of the logic model. The logic
model should address the following: need, activities, inputs, outputs, short-term, mid-term and
long-term outcomes, which link to the overall impact of the initiative. In general, the evaluation plan
should provide a thorough explanation of how the intervention’s inputs, activities and outputs are
related to the expected results. Additionally, each applicant will be required to discuss a plan
conduct an economic evaluation to assess the resources and costs associated with the
intervention relative to its outcomes.


II. AWARD INFORMATION:

    Approximately $3 million dollars is available to support Phase II of the Coalition for a Healthier
Community demonstration grants. The OWH Coalition for a Healthier Community grant will be
supported through a cooperative agreement mechanism. A cooperative agreement facilitates
“substantial involvement” between the awarding agency and the recipient during the period of
performance. The anticipated date for continuation awards is September 1, 2011 and the
anticipated period of performance is September 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016. The amount of
the award will be a maximum of $300,000 dollars total cost (direct and indirect) per budget year, to
be awarded for five years. Awarded recipients will be responsible for the implementation of the
strategic action plan. Current sources of funding (in-kind) that help support the existing coalition
and advisory committee should be listed in the application.
    During Phase II, grantees will be required to implement the approved strategic plan and
evaluate the effectiveness of their programs. The OWH recommends each coalition to contract with
at least two community-based organizations, with a minimum of five years experience whose
annual operating budget is $500,000 or less, to be a viable and contributing member to the
coalition. OWH expects a minimum of 30% of the overall budget to be allocated in contracts with
at least a minimum of two community-based organizations to enable them to assist in providing
gender-based health interventions.



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III. ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION

    1. Eligibility
    Phase II eligible applicants under this announcement are limited to current Coalition for a
Healthier Community grantees which are the following: Brandywine Counseling and Community
Services, Domestic Violence Action Center, Drexel University, East of the River Action for
Substance Abuse Elimination, Family League of Baltimore, University of Illinois at Chicago,
University of Minnesota, National Kidney Foundation of Michigan, Northern Manhattan
Perinatal Partnership, Rockingham Memorial Hospital, St. Vincent Healthcare Foundation,
Thurston County Public Health and Social Services Department, University of Utah, Virginia
Commonwealth University, Women’s Health Services and Yale University. This
announcement provides an opportunity for current CHC grantees to compete for a Phase II
cooperative agreement grant in order to implement their strategic plan.


    2. Cost Sharing or Matching
    Cost sharing or matching of Federal funds is not required. While there is no cost-sharing
requirement included in this RFA, applicant institutions, including any collaborating institutions, are
encouraged to devote resources to this effort. Any indication of institutional support from the
applicant and its collaborators indicates a greater potential of success and sustainability of the
project. Examples of institutional support could include: donated equipment and space, institutional
funded staff time and efforts, or other investments. Applicant organizations that plan to provide
support should indicate institutional support by outlining specific contributions to the project.
Additionally, applicants should provide assurances that their organization and any collaborators are
committed to providing resources to meet intervention goals. Successful applicants should build
on, but not duplicate existing Federal programs as well as State, local or community programs and
coordinate with existing resources in the community.



IV. APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION

    1. Address to Request Application Package

    Application Kits may be obtained by accessing Grants.Gov at http://www.grants.gov or the
Grant Solutions system at http://www.grantsolutions.gov. To obtain a hard copy of the application
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kit, contact the Grant Operation Center at 1-888-203-6161. Applications must be prepared using
the Application Kit, which can be obtained at the websites noted above.



    2. Content and Form of Application Submission

    In preparing the application, it is important to follow all instructions and public policy
requirements provided in the Application Kit. Applications must be submitted in the Application Kit
form and in the manner prescribed in the narrative enclosed and other components of the
Application Kit provided by OWH. Applicants are required to submit an application signed by an
individual authorized to act for the applicant agency or organization and to assume for the
organization the obligations imposed by the terms and conditions of the grant award. The program
narrative must be printed on 8 1/2 X 11-inch white paper, with one inch margins all around, double-
spaced with an easily readable 12-point font. All pages must be numbered sequentially not
including appendices and required forms. The application should not exceed 25 double-spaced
pages, not including appendices and required forms.
    As part of the application form, a budget narrative is required. This narrative should thoroughly
describe how the proposed categorical costs are derived. Discuss the necessity, reasonableness
and allocation of the proposed costs. For in-kind contributions, the source of the contribution and a
justification of how that contribution was determined must also be described. The narrative
description of the project must contain the following:


Summary: Briefly describe the proposed intervention model. Indicate whether it is a local or
statewide project, type of organization applying, geographic area to be served (urban, rural,
suburban) description of the target population to be served.


Description of Applicant Organization: Describe the decision-making authority and structure, its
resources and experience. This description should cover personnel, time and facilities for all
proposed intervention sites and outside resources/partners and contain evidence of the coalition’s
capacity to conduct the proposed gender integrated intervention.


Needs Assessment: Describe the need for the proposed gender integrated intervention in the
proposed target areas to be served. Provide a clear and concise overview of the community
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geographic area to be served and description of target population. Describe specifically how the
gender-based intervention will benefit the target population. Discuss the process for the
identification of gender health inequities, method developed to identify health concerns of the
community, and health priorities established. Document the incidence and prevalence of disease,
provide baseline data for target population/area, the socioeconomic conditions including income
levels and demographics. Additionally, discuss existing services and unmet needs in the selected
geographic area. If the proposed target population has unique challenges and barriers, these
should be addressed as well.


Rationale: Describe the rationale for choosing the proposed intervention and evidence-based
approach based upon a review of the literature, needs assessment and gender based analysis.
Describe why the intervention should be implemented and evaluated.


Program Outcome Objectives: Describe the proposed program intervention and list the program
goals and objectives. Describe how the objectives will be achieved. Identify and discuss which
HP2020 Topic Area(s) and objectives were selected to support the proposed intervention. Program
objectives should be S.M.A.R.T. and indicators to measure progress of objectives must be gender-
specific. Program objectives and gender-specific indicators should link to programmatic outcome
measures and HP2020 Topic Area(s)/objectives.

Proposed Intervention Model: Thoroughly describe the proposed program intervention model. It
should include a clear plan for recruitment and retention of outside resources, partners and
program participants. The description should connect to program objectives and should address
the intensity of services using evidence-based approaches. The description should discuss how
gender-based health disparities will be addressed, the intensity of services, types of activities for
the intervention and program cycle. Use S.M.A.R.T. objectives to describe how the intervention will
alleviate disease burden and achieve HP2020 targets set for the nation. Describe the baseline data
from the Needs Assessment, Gender-Based Analyses and other data sources which documents
the prevalence of the disease in the community.


Workplan and Timetable: Provide a detailed workplan and timetable for the first year of Phase II
implementation. Within this plan, include each program activity associated with the intervention of
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the project and the proposed period for the start and completion of each activity. Please note the
first six months of the project period could be used for planning and further development of the
program model.


Target Population: Provide estimates of the overall number of program participants and the
numbers participating in the intervention. Please describe how many participants are expected to
participate in the intervention throughout the duration of the project period. Describe the type of
participants (e.g. women, men, girls, boys and/or adolescents), including the race and ethnicity of
participants to be served.


Sustainability Plan: Describe the plans and resources in place to support the continuation of the
program when this Federal funding opportunity ends. Please include a brief description of
leadership competence, effective collaboration and coalition building efforts, strategic funding and
approach to addressing the needs of the community systematically. The OWH cannot guarantee
that funding will be available annually or until the end of the five-year grant cycle.


Evaluation Plan: Discuss the evaluation of the intervention’s process and outcomes measures.
Process measures should address program operations and program activity to assess quality of
intervention. Outcome measures will need to assess what intervention activities are both effective
and/or ineffective and level of impact on target groups to determine achievement level.
Applications should include gender-specific indicators that are linked to programmatic
goals/objectives and selected HP2020 Topic Area(s)/objectives. Applicants should also describe
plans for assessing their progress in meeting program goals/objectives and selected HP2020 Topic
Area (s)/objectives. Provide a discussion of the economic evaluation plan for the proposed
intervention. Include a Memorandum of Agreement and curriculum vitae from an evaluator in the
Appendices.


Dissemination Plan: In an effort to contribute to women’s health research, propose a plan to
develop draft articles describing public health systems approaches and other aspects of the
initiative that contribute to the women's health literature. Draft articles may include effective
utilization of community partnerships, program design, the evaluation model, the development
and/or validation of instrumentation, methodological design, effective or ineffective strategies,
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recruitment and retention of program participants and/or implementation of measurement tools to
evaluate the processes, outcomes and/or economics of gender-based programs. In the fifth year,
successful applicants are expected to submit at least one abstract and article for consideration for
publication in a peer reviewed journal.
 Appendices:
                a. Resumes (Director, Program Coordinator, Evaluator and Key Coalition
                   Members)
                b. Memorandums of Agreements from all required entities and partners
                c. Charts/Tables (Implementation Plan Table, Organizational Charts, Federal
                   Wide Assurance, Logic Models)
                d. Required Forms
                e. Other Attachments
                f. Workplan and Timetable


    3. Submission Dates and Times
        The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH) provides multiple mechanisms for
    the submission of applications, as described in the following sections. Applicants will receive
    notification from the OASH Office of Grants Management confirming the receipt of applications
    submitted using any of these mechanisms. Applications submitted to the OASH Office of
    Grants Management after the deadlines described below will not be accepted for review.
    Applications, which do not conform, to the requirements of the grant announcement will not be
    accepted for review and will be returned to the applicant.
        While applications are accepted in hard copy, the use of the electronic application
    submission capabilities provided by the Grants.gov and GrantSolutions.gov systems is
    encouraged. Applications may only be submitted electronically via the electronic submission
    mechanisms specified below. Any applications submitted via any other means of electronic
    communication, including facsimile or electronic mail, will not be accepted for review.
        In order to apply for new funding opportunities that are open to the public for competition,
    you may access the Grants.gov website portal. All OASH funding opportunities and
    Application Kits are made available on Grants.gov. If your organization has/had a grantee
    business relationship with a grant program serviced by the OASH Office of Grants
    Management and you are applying as part of ongoing grantee related activities, please access
    GrantSolutions.gov.


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    Electronic grant application submissions must be submitted no later than 9:00p.m. Eastern
Time on the deadline date specified in the DATES section of the announcement using one of
the electronic submission mechanisms specified below. All required hardcopy original
signatures and mail-in items must be received by the Office of Grants Management, Office of
the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
c/o Grant Operation Center, 1400 Key Blvd., Suite 910, Arlington, VA 22209, no later than 6:00
p.m. Eastern Time on the next business day after the deadline date specified in the DATES
section of the announcement. Applications will not be considered valid until all electronic
application components, hardcopy original signatures, and mail-in items are received by the
OASH Office of Grants Management according to the deadlines specified above.
    Paper grant application submissions must be submitted no later than 6:00 p.m. Eastern
Time on the deadline date specified in the DATES section of the announcement. The address
to be used for paper application submissions is Office of Grants Management, Office of the
Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) c/o
Grant Operation Center, 1400 Key Blvd., Suite 910, Arlington, VA 22209. Application
submissions that do not adhere to the due date requirements will be considered late and will be
deemed ineligible and may be returned to the applicant unread.
    Applicants are encouraged to initiate electronic applications early in the application
development process and to submit early on the due date or before. This will aid in addressing
any problems with submissions prior to the application deadline.



a. Electronic Submissions via the Grants.gov Website Portal

  The Grants.gov Website Portal provides organizations with the ability to submit applications
for OASH grant opportunities. Organizations must successfully complete the necessary
registration processes in order to submit an application. Information about this system as well
as the required registration process is available on the Grants.gov website,
http://www.grants.gov.
  In addition to electronically submitted materials, applicants may be required to submit hard
copy signatures for certain Program related forms, or original materials as required by the
announcement. It is imperative that the applicant review both the grant announcement, as well
as the application guidance provided within the Grants.gov application package, to determine
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such requirements. Any required hard copy materials, or documents that require a signature,
must be submitted separately via mail to the Office of Grants Management at the address
specified above, and if required, must contain the original signature of an individual authorized
to act for the applicant agency and the obligations imposed by the terms and conditions of the
grant award. When submitting the required forms, do not send the entire application.
Complete hard copy applications submitted after the electronic submission will not be
considered for review.
  Electronic applications submitted via the Grants.gov Website Portal must contain all
completed online forms required by the Application Kit, the Program Narrative, Budget
Narrative and any appendices or exhibits. Any files uploaded or attached to the Grants.gov
application must be of the following file formats - Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint, Corel
WordPerfect, ASCII Text, Adobe PDF, or image formats (JPG, GIF, TIFF, or BMP only). Even
though Grants.gov allows applicants to attach any file format as part of their application, OASH
restricts this practice and only accepts the file formats identified above. Any file submitted as
part of the Grants.gov application that is not in a file format identified above will not be
accepted for processing and will be excluded from the application during the review process.
    All required mail-in items must be received by the due date requirements specified above.
Mail-In items may only include publications, resumes, or organizational documentation. When
submitting the required forms, do not send the entire application. Complete hard copy
applications submitted after the electronic submission will not be considered for review.
    Upon completion of a successful electronic application submission via the Grants.gov
Website Portal, the applicant will be provided with a confirmation page from Grants.gov
indicating the date and time (Eastern Time) of the electronic application submission, as well as
the Grants.gov Receipt Number. It is critical that the applicant print and retain this confirmation
for their records, as well as a copy of the entire application package.
    All applications submitted via the Grants.gov Website Portal will be validated by
Grants.gov. Any applications deemed "Invalid" by the Grants.gov Website Portal will not be
transferred to the Grant Solutions system, and OASH has no responsibility for any application
that is not validated and transferred to OASH from the Grants.gov Website Portal. Grants.gov
will notify the applicant regarding the application validation status. Once the application is
successfully validated by the Grants.gov Website Portal, applicants should immediately mail all
required hard copy materials to the OASH Office of Grants Management, c/o Grant Operation
                                                                                        16
Center, 1400 Key Blvd., Suite 910, Arlington, VA 22209, to be received by the deadlines
specified above. It is critical that the applicant clearly identify the Organization name and
Grants.gov Application Receipt Number on all hard copy materials.
    Once the application is validated by Grants.gov, it will be electronically transferred to the
Grant Solutions system for processing. Upon receipt of both the electronic application from the
Grants.gov Website Portal, and the required hardcopy mail-in items, applicants will receive
notification via mail from the OASH Office of Grants Management confirming the receipt of the
application submitted using the Grants.gov Website Portal. Applicants should contact
Grants.gov regarding any questions or concerns regarding the electronic application process
conducted through the Grants.gov Website Portal.
b. Electronic Submissions via the Grant Solutions System

    OASH is a managing partner of the GrantSolutions.gov system. Grant Solutions is a full
life-cycle grants management system managed by the Administration for Children and
Families, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and is designated by the Office of
Management and Budget (OMB) as one of the three Government-wide grants management
systems under the Grants Management Line of Business initiative (GMLoB). OASH uses
Grant Solutions for the electronic processing of all grant applications, as well as the electronic
management of its entire Grant portfolio.
    When submitting applications via the Grant Solutions system, applicants are still required
to submit a hard copy of the application face page (Standard Form 424) with the original
signature of an individual authorized to act for the applicant agency and assume the obligations
imposed by the terms and conditions of the grant award. If required, applicants will also need to
submit a hard copy of the Standard Form LLL and/or certain Program related forms (e.g.,
Program Certifications) with the original signature of an individual authorized to act for the
applicant agency. When submitting the required hardcopy forms, do not send the entire
application. Complete hard copy applications submitted after the electronic submission will not
be considered for review. Hard copy materials should be submitted to the OASH Office of
Grants Management at the address specified above.
    Electronic applications submitted via the Grant Solutions system must contain all
completed online forms required by the Application Kit, the Program Narrative, Budget
Narrative and any appendices or exhibits. The applicant may identify specific mail-in items to

                                                                                                    17
be sent to the Office of Grants Management (see mailing address above) separate from the
electronic submission; however, these mail-in items must be entered on the GrantSolutions
Application Checklist at the time of electronic submission, and must be received by the due
date requirements specified above. Mail-In items may only include publications, resumes, or
organizational documentation.
    Upon completion of a successful electronic application submission, the GrantSolutions
system will provide the applicant with a confirmation page indicating the date and time (Eastern
Time) of the electronic application submission. This confirmation page will also provide a listing
of all items that constitute the final application submission including all electronic application
components, required hardcopy original signatures, and mail-in items.
    As items are received by the OASH Office of Grants Management, the electronic
application status will be updated to reflect the receipt of mail-in items. It is expected that the
applicant monitor the status of their application in the Grant Solutions system to ensure that all
signatures and mail-in items are received.



c. Mailed or Hand-Delivered Hard Copy Applications

    Applicants who submit applications in hard copy (via mail or hand-delivered) are required
to submit an original and two copies of the application. The original application must be signed
by an individual authorized to act for the applicant agency or organization and to assume for
the organization the obligations imposed by the terms and conditions of the grant award.
    Mailed or hand-delivered applications will be considered as meeting the deadline if they
are received by the Office of Grants Management, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health
(OASH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) c/o Grant Operation Center, 1400
Key Blvd., Suite 910, Arlington, VA 22209, on or before 6:00 p.m. Eastern Time on the
deadline date specified in the DATES section of the announcement.



4. Intergovernmental Review
    This program is subject to the Public Health Systems Reporting Requirements. Applicants
shall submit a copy of the application face page (SF-424) and a one-page summary of the
project, called the Public Health System Impact Statement. The PHSIS is intended to provide
information to State and local health officials to keep them apprised of proposed health
                                                                                                     18
    services grant applications submitted by community-based, non-governmental organizations
    within their jurisdictions.


    5. Funding Restrictions
        Funds may not be used for construction, building alterations, renovations, equipment
    purchase, medical treatment, to purchase food or pre-award cost. Funds may be used for
    personnel, consultants, supplies (including screening, education, and outreach supplies), and
    grant related travel. Funds may be utilized to support direct expenses that are essential to the
    implementation process such as the hiring for personnel and consultants in areas such as
    community organizing, implementation, facilitation, evaluation and technical writing. Funds may
    also be used for space to host community meetings. In addition, funds may be used for training
    and educational opportunities such as capacity building, social marketing and implementation.
    All budget requests must be justified fully in terms of the proposed goals and objectives and
    include an itemized computational explanation/breakout of how costs were determined.




    6. Other Submission Requirements

        A Dun and Bradstreet Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number is required for all
    applications for Federal assistance. Organizations should verify that they have a DUNS
    number or take the steps needed to obtain one. Instructions for obtaining a DUNS number are
    included in the application package, or may be downloaded from the grants.gov website.
New DUNS Requirement:
        Grantee: If you are authorized to make sub-awards under this award, you:
            Must notify potential sub-recipients that no entity may receive a sub-award from you
             unless the entity has provided its DUNS number to you.
            May not make a sub-award to an entity unless the entity has provided its DUNS
             number to you.

CCR Requirement:

Grantees unless your entity is exempt from this requirement under 2 CFR 25.110, it is incumbent
upon you, as the recipient, to maintain the accuracy/currency of your information in the CCR until
the end of the project. Additionally, this term requires your entity to review and update the

                                                                                                    19
information at least annually after the initial registration, and more frequently if required by changes
in your information or another award term.

Transparency Act Disclaimer Language:


Awards issued with a start date after October 1, 2010 may be subject to the following award term.
 All HHS Grants, Cooperative Agreements, Loans, and other forms of Federal Financial Assistance
are subject to the Transparency Act sub-award and executive compensation reporting
requirements of 2 CFR Part 170, as defined in §170.320. For further guidance and award
applicability information, see http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-
idx?c=ecfr&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title02/2cfr170_main_02.tpl




V. APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION

    1. Criteria

        Eligible competing grant applications will be externally reviewed and scored by an
    independent objective review panel according to the following Phase II criteria:
                        a.        Needs Assessment: The applicant’s discussion of their gender-
                                  based analysis should include a clear and concise overview of the
                                  community, geographic area to be served (urban, suburban, rural)
                                  a description of socio-economic conditions and description of
                                  target population served. Discuss the process for the identification
                                  of gender -based health disparities, methods developed to identify
                                  health concerns of the community, and health priorities
                                  established. A description of the incidence and prevalence of
                                  disease, baseline data, existing services and unmet needs in the
                                  proposed target area should also be included in this section (25
                                  points).

                        b.        Proposed Intervention Model: The applicant’s description of
                                  proposed program intervention activities. The gender-based
                                  health intervention should be thoroughly described. This section
                                  should include a description of the gender-based health
                                  disparities identified, curricula and other supportive activities for
                                  the intervention. It should also include a clear plan for recruitment
                                  and retention of program participants. The description should
                                  clearly relate to program goals/objectives as well as HP2020
                                  Topic Area(s)/objectives. This section should also address the
                                  intensity of programming provided (25 points).
                                                                                                     20
c.   Target Population: The applicant's clear description of the target
     population at each site, an estimate of the number of participants
     and type of participants in the intervention sites over a period of
     five years. The applicant should demonstrate the ability of the
     program staff to effectively serve the target population, including
     staff training on gender constraints (10 points).

e.   Sustainability Plan: The applicant’s presentation of a detailed plan
     to maintain the benefits achieved through the coalition, to
     institutionalize the coalition within the parent-grant organization
     and among the partners and to keep component(s) of the
     program operational after the OWH funding ends. At a minimum,
     the sustainability plan should describe how the coalition will be
     maintained after OWH funding ends and the benefit of the
     program to the target population. The plan should also address
     anticipated long-range benefits to the community, tribe, region,
     State, and/or county. Thoughtful succession planning and cross
     training of responsibilities could contribute to the sustainability of
     the program. Please include a brief description of leadership
     competence, effective collaboration, coalition building efforts,
     strategic funding and approach to addressing the needs of the
     community systematically. Discuss how required community-
     based organizations will utilize appropriated funds (15 points).

f.   Evaluation Plan: A successful evaluation plan should include a
     succinct process and outcome evaluation that include a list of
     goals and S.M.A.R.T. objectives related to the program
     intervention. In general, a successful evaluation plan is one that is
     directly tied to program objectives and includes a process
     evaluation; a clear outcome evaluation; a clear economic
     evaluation; process and outcome logic models; an adequate data
     collection and analysis plan and a detailed recruitment plan.
     Additionally, the evaluation plan should describe how instruments
     will be developed and included to assess baseline and follow up
     data. Additional points will be provided for applications that
     propose measures of program effects on gender integrated
     designs and propose a portion of the budget to evaluation
     activities. The evaluation plan should discuss the expertise and
     resources available to assess and analyze the evidence-based
     intervention and its impact on the targeted community and
     population. The applicant should demonstrate appropriate
     experience with similar projects (25 points).




                                                                        21
    2. Review and Selection Process

        Accepted applications will be reviewed for technical merit in accordance with DHHS
    policies. Applications will be evaluated by an objective/technical review panel composed of
    experts in the fields of public health systems, program management, academic/community
    service delivery, outreach, gender-based health education, women’s health, evaluation and
    coalition building. Consideration will be given to applicants that meet the goals and review
    criteria of the Coalition for Healthier Communities. Funding decisions will be made by the
    OWH, and will take into consideration the recommendations and ratings of the review panel,
    program needs, stated preferences, the recommendations made based on site visits and the
    availability of Federal funds.



VI. AWARD ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION

    1. Award Notices

    Successful applicants will receive a notification letter from the Deputy Assistant Secretary for
Health (Women’s Health) and/or Deputy Director, Office on Women’s Health (OWH) and a Notice
of Grant Award (NGA), signed by the OASH Grants Management Officer. The NGA shall be the
only binding, authorizing document between the recipient and the OWH. Notification will be
mailed to the Program Director identified in the application. Unsuccessful applicants will
receive notification letters with results of their review of their application from the Deputy Assistant
Secretary for Health (Women’s Health) and/or Deputy Director, Office on Women’s Health (OWH).


    2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

    The regulations set out at 45 CFR parts 74 and 92 are the Department of Health and Human
Services (HHS) rules and requirements that govern the administration of grants. Part 74 is
applicable to all recipients except those covered by part 92, which governs awards to State and
local governments. Applicants funded under this announcement must be aware of and comply with
these regulations. The CFR volume that includes parts 74 and 92 may be downloaded from
http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/45cfrv1_03.html.



                                                                                                      22
       The DHHS Appropriations Act requires that, when issuing statements, press releases, requests
for proposals, bid solicitations, and other documents describing projects or programs funded in
whole or in part with Federal money, all grantees shall clearly state the percentage and dollar
amount of the total costs of the program or project which will be financed with Federal money and
the percentage and dollar amount of the total costs of the project or program that will be financed
by non-governmental sources.


       3. Reporting Requirements

           For Phase II, the grantee will submit quarterly progress reports on January 10, March 6
       and June 5, 2012. The Quarterly Federal Financial Report will be due 30 days after the close
       of each calendar quarter. The final program report is due 30 days after the close of the project
       period (November 30, 2016). The purpose of the progress reports is to provide accurate and
       timely program information to program managers and to respond to Congressional,
       Departmental and public requests for information about the program. If a submission date falls
       on a Saturday or Sunday, then the report will be due the following Monday. A Federal
       Financial Status Report (FFR) SF-425 is due 30 days after the close of the calendar quarter. A
       copy of the form is available at: http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/forminfo.htm


VII.     AGENCY CONTACTS

       1. Administrative and Budgetary Contacts Requirements

               For Application Kit information, submission of applications and information on budget
               and business aspects of the application please contact: The Grant Operation Center at
               1-888-203-6161, for specific grant questions contact The Office of Grants
               Management at 240-453-8822.

       2. Program Contacts Requirements

               For information related to OWH program requirements, contact Stephanie Alexander
               or Martha Bond at 1-888-203-6161 to answer questions and provide technical
               assistance on the preparation of grant applications.




                                                                                                     23
VIII. OTHER INFORMATION

    1. Protection of Human Subjects Regulations
        The applicant must comply with the HHS Protection of Human Subjects regulations, set
    out in 45 CFR part 46, if applicable. General information about Human Subjects regulations
    can be obtained through the Office of Human Research Protections (OHRP) at
    http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp, or toll free at (866) 447- 4777.

    2. Applicant Technical Assistance
        The OWH is committed to providing technical assistance to help prospective applicants at
    no cost. The OWH anticipates offering technical assistance workshops. The OWH
    recommends that key staff personnel and advisory/planning committee members participate in
    these workshops. Participants will be able to ask questions and receive pertinent feedback
    during the workshops via the computer. Members of the coalition will participate, at a
    minimum, in one local gender-based training per year, which should be planned in
    partnership with the OWH. All participants must pre-register for the workshops. The program
    coordinator, Evaluator and Chairs/Co-chair(s) of the advisory committee are expected to
    participate in the OWH sponsored technical assistance workshops.


    3. Annual Grantee Conference
       OWH will host an annual conference and evaluators meeting for CHC grantees. The
    Director, Program Coordinator and Evaluator are required to attend and participate in the
    annual conference. Evaluators are required to attend the evaluators meeting. Further,
    grantees are required to set aside grantee funds to cover all costs attending the OWH CHC
    Annual Conference including transportation and lodging at conference site. Budget requests
    should include travel funds for staff members to participate in meetings and conferences. The
    Program Coordinator, Evaluator, Chairs and Co-Chairs of the advisory committee are expected
    to participate in CHC sponsored conferences.
1



i
  IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2010. Women’s Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The
National Academies Press.
ii
    Xu JQ, Kochanek KD, Murphy SL, Tejada-Vera B. Deaths: Final data for 2007. National vital statistics reports; vol
58 no 19. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2010.
iii
   CDC. Prevalence and Most Common Causes of Disability Among Adults --- United States, 2005. MMWR.
2009;58(16);421-426.
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