COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN

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					                CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                           COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN




JUNE 15, 2006                                                       1
                 CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                            COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN




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                                                                       CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                                                  COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN



                                             COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN
                                   The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, Florida
                                                  Including the municipalities of:
                                Atlantic Beach, Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Baldwin



TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................................................................................................................................. 1
    LIST OF FIGURES & TABLES                     ........................................................................................................................................... 6
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY................................................................................................................................................ 9
BASIC PLAN.................................................................................................................................................................. 11
    INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................................ 11
       Basic Plan.............................................................................................................................................................. 11
       Hazard Specific Plans (HSP’s)........................................................................................................................... 11
       Interagency Coordinating Procedures (ICPs) .................................................................................................. 13
             Toolkit ICPs ......................................................................................................................................................................... 13
             EOC ICPs ............................................................................................................................................................................ 13
      Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) ........................................................................................................... 13
    PURPOSE ..................................................................................................................................................................... 14
    SCOPE ......................................................................................................................................................................... 14
    METHODOLOGY. .......................................................................................................................................................... 16
    PROMULGATION ........................................................................................................................................................... 18
SITUATION .................................................................................................................................................................... 19
    HAZARDS ANALYSIS .................................................................................................................................................... 19
      Winds from Tropical Cyclones............................................................................................................................ 19
      Storm Surge .......................................................................................................................................................... 22
      Floods .................................................................................................................................................................... 24
      Hazardous Materials Spills ................................................................................................................................. 28
      Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Incidents..................................................................................................... 28
      Civil Disturbance .................................................................................................................................................. 29
      Mass Immigration ................................................................................................................................................. 29
      Coastal Oil Spills .................................................................................................................................................. 29
      Extreme Temperatures........................................................................................................................................ 29
      Brush, Wildfires and Forest Fires ...................................................................................................................... 30
      Thunderstorms and Tornadoes.......................................................................................................................... 30
      Drought .................................................................................................................................................................. 31
      Sinkholes ............................................................................................................................................................... 31
      Terrorism ............................................................................................................................................................... 31
      Exotic Pests & Diseases ..................................................................................................................................... 31
      Disease and Pandemic Outbreaks .................................................................................................................... 31
      Critical Infrastructure Disruption......................................................................................................................... 32
      Special Events ...................................................................................................................................................... 32
      Major Transportation Incidents........................................................................................................................... 32
      Hazard Prioritization Process ............................................................................................................................. 32
    GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION........................................................................................................................................ 34
      Geographic Characteristics ................................................................................................................................ 34
      Existing Land Use Characteristics ..................................................................................................................... 35
      Surface Water System......................................................................................................................................... 36


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                                                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                                                COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


           Flood Plain Areas ............................................................................................................................................................... 37
           Flood Hazard Areas ........................................................................................................................................................... 37
     Transportation Network ....................................................................................................................................... 38
   DEMOGRAPHICS .......................................................................................................................................................... 38
     Duval County farm worker population ............................................................................................................... 42
     Duval County annual/seasonal tourist population ........................................................................................... 42
     Duval County Special Needs Population.......................................................................................................... 43
     Duval County hearing loss/impairment population.......................................................................................... 44
     Duval County transient population..................................................................................................................... 44
     Geographic mobility ............................................................................................................................................. 47
     Education............................................................................................................................................................... 48
     Manufactured homes ........................................................................................................................................... 49
   ECONOMIC PROFILE .................................................................................................................................................... 52
     Industries ............................................................................................................................................................... 55
     Occupational characteristics............................................................................................................................... 55
     Commuting ............................................................................................................................................................ 55
     Poverty rates in Duval County............................................................................................................................ 56
     Housing characteristics ....................................................................................................................................... 57
     Occupied housing units ....................................................................................................................................... 57
     Housing costs ....................................................................................................................................................... 57
     Potential economic impacts of hazards ............................................................................................................ 58
   EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SUPPORT FACILITIES ..................................................................................................... 59
     Public Works/Parks and Recreation Disaster Equipment Staging Areas .................................................... 59
CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS .................................................................................................................................... 68
   NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM .............................................................................................................. 68
     NIMS Components............................................................................................................................................... 69
           Command and Management. ........................................................................................................................................... 69
           Preparedness...................................................................................................................................................................... 69
           Resource Management ..................................................................................................................................................... 70
           Communications and Information Management. ........................................................................................................... 70
           Supporting Technologies................................................................................................................................................... 71
           Ongoing Management and Maintenance........................................................................................................................ 71
   INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM ..................................................................................................................................... 71
      Concepts and Principles. .................................................................................................................................... 71
           Most Incidents Are Managed Locally............................................................................................................................... 71
           ICS Is Modular and Scalable ............................................................................................................................................ 72
           ICS Has Interactive Management Components............................................................................................................. 72
           ICS Establishes Common Terminology........................................................................................................................... 72
           ICS Incorporates Measurable Objectives ....................................................................................................................... 72
           ICS Should Be User Friendly............................................................................................................................................ 72
       Management Characteristics.............................................................................................................................. 73
           Common Terminology ....................................................................................................................................................... 73
           Modular Organization......................................................................................................................................................... 73
           Management by Objectives .............................................................................................................................................. 73
           Reliance on an Incident Action Plan ................................................................................................................................ 74
           Manageable Span of Control ............................................................................................................................................ 74
           Pre-designated Incident Locations and Facilities........................................................................................................... 74
           Comprehensive Resource Management......................................................................................................................... 74
           Integrated Communications .............................................................................................................................................. 74
           Establishment and Transfer of Command ...................................................................................................................... 74
           Chain of Command and Unity of Command................................................................................................................... 75
           Unified Command............................................................................................................................................................... 75
           Accountability ...................................................................................................................................................................... 75
           Deployment ......................................................................................................................................................................... 75
           Information and Intelligence Management...................................................................................................................... 75
   ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEM .......................................................................................................................................... 76
   NORMAL, NON-EMERGENCY OPERATIONS ................................................................................................................. 78


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                                                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                                                COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


     Emergency Preparedness Division Organization Structure........................................................................... 78
  INCREASED READINESS PROCEDURES ....................................................................................................................... 78
  EMERGENCY OPERATIONS .......................................................................................................................................... 81
     Structure ................................................................................................................................................................ 83
     Emergency Operations Center Activation Levels............................................................................................ 86
  OPERATIONS RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................................................................................. 86
     General .................................................................................................................................................................. 86
     Role of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County ......................................................................... 87
     Specific Responsibilities of the Mayor............................................................................................................... 87
     Emergency Response Organization.................................................................................................................. 90
          Executive Group ................................................................................................................................................................. 91
          Operations Group ............................................................................................................................................................... 93
      Lead agencies ...................................................................................................................................................... 93
          Participating role or agency .............................................................................................................................................. 94
      EOC/Area Command Functional Groups/Units ............................................................................................... 98
          Operations Section Overview ........................................................................................................................................... 98
          Law Enforcement Group.................................................................................................................................................... 98
          Firefighting Group............................................................................................................................................................... 99
          HAZMAT Group .................................................................................................................................................................. 99
          Health & Medical Group .................................................................................................................................................. 100
          Sheltering Group .............................................................................................................................................................. 101
          Bulk Distribution Group.................................................................................................................................................... 101
          Mass Care Group ............................................................................................................................................................. 102
          Temporary Housing Group.............................................................................................................................................. 103
          Animal Issues Group........................................................................................................................................................ 103
          Public Works Group ......................................................................................................................................................... 104
          Utilities Group.................................................................................................................................................................... 104
          Telecommunications Group ............................................................................................................................................ 105
          Corporate Recovery Group ............................................................................................................................................. 105
          Transportation Group....................................................................................................................................................... 106
          Logistics Section Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 107
          Food Unit ........................................................................................................................................................................... 107
          Ground Support Unit ........................................................................................................................................................ 108
          Communications Unit....................................................................................................................................................... 108
          Fuel Unit............................................................................................................................................................................. 108
          Facilities Unit..................................................................................................................................................................... 109
          Donations Unit .................................................................................................................................................................. 109
          Supply Unit ........................................................................................................................................................................ 109
          Procurement Unit.............................................................................................................................................................. 110
          Reception Center Unit ..................................................................................................................................................... 110
          Planning Section Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 110
          Technical Specialists ....................................................................................................................................................... 111
          Documentation Unit.......................................................................................................................................................... 111
          Resources Unit ................................................................................................................................................................. 111
          Situation Unit..................................................................................................................................................................... 112
          Damage Assessment Unit............................................................................................................................................... 112
          GIS Unit ............................................................................................................................................................................. 113
          Finance/Administration Section Overview .................................................................................................................... 113
          Time Unit ........................................................................................................................................................................... 113
          Cost Unit ............................................................................................................................................................................ 114
          Compensation/Claims Unit.............................................................................................................................................. 114
          Public Information Officer ................................................................................................................................................ 114
          Liaison Officer ................................................................................................................................................................... 115
          Safety Officer .................................................................................................................................................................... 116
      Complexes and Divisions.................................................................................................................................. 116
      Response ............................................................................................................................................................ 117
          Notification and warning .................................................................................................................................................. 118
          Issuance of Executive Orders and Proclamations ....................................................................................................... 118
          The Planning Process...................................................................................................................................................... 118
          Logistics ............................................................................................................................................................................. 123


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                                                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                                                COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


           Evacuation......................................................................................................................................................................... 124
           Sheltering........................................................................................................................................................................... 125
           Emergency Evacuation Assistance................................................................................................................................ 125
           Transportation................................................................................................................................................................... 126
           Needs Assessment/Incident Management System ..................................................................................................... 126
           Citizen Corps..................................................................................................................................................................... 127
       Mutual Aid Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding........................................................................ 128
           Mutual Aid Requests........................................................................................................................................................ 128
           Responding to a Mutual Aid Request ............................................................................................................................ 129
       Recovery.............................................................................................................................................................. 130
           Introduction........................................................................................................................................................................ 130
           Transition from Response to Recovery ......................................................................................................................... 131
           Recovery Functions ......................................................................................................................................................... 132
           Damage Assessment....................................................................................................................................................... 132
           Infrastructure & Public Assistance ................................................................................................................................. 136
           Individual Assistance ....................................................................................................................................................... 141
           Emergency/Disaster Support Other Than Public Assistance or Individual Assistance .......................................... 144
       Hazard Mitigation ............................................................................................................................................... 145
           Introduction........................................................................................................................................................................ 145
           Lead Agency ..................................................................................................................................................................... 145
           City of Jacksonville Business Plan................................................................................................................................. 145
           2010 Comprehensive Plan.............................................................................................................................................. 146
           Community Emergency Preparedness Initiatives ........................................................................................................ 146
           Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Activities ...................................................................................................................... 147
           Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Functions .................................................................................................................... 148
           Post-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Activities .................................................................................................................... 149
           Post-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Functions................................................................................................................... 150
           Concept of Operations..................................................................................................................................................... 150
           Planning Assumptions ..................................................................................................................................................... 154
           Coordination of Mitigation Activities ............................................................................................................................... 154
           Coordination of Mitigation Activities with Municipalities and the State ..................................................................... 155
           Mitigation Assessment..................................................................................................................................................... 155
           Equipment and Resources Necessary for Mitigation Assessment............................................................................ 155
           Local Agencies with Supporting Roles in Mitigation Assessment ............................................................................. 155
           Training Procedures for Mitigation Personnel .............................................................................................................. 156
           Structural Hazard Mitigation Initiatives .......................................................................................................................... 156
           Non-Structural Mitigation Activities ................................................................................................................................ 157
           Mitigation Memoranda of Understanding, Mutual Aid Agreements, or Inter-Local Agreements ........................... 158
           Local Government Status in the National Flood Insurance Program........................................................................ 158
           Process for Identifying Mitigation Opportunities in the Post-Disaster Environment................................................ 159
           Process to Manage Mitigation Assistance Funds ........................................................................................................ 159
   PREPAREDNESS ACTIVITIES ...................................................................................................................................... 159
     General issues.................................................................................................................................................... 159
           CEMP Development and Maintenance ......................................................................................................................... 159
           Preservation of Vital Records and Databases.............................................................................................................. 159
           Registration of Persons with Special Needs................................................................................................................. 160
       Public Awareness & Education ........................................................................................................................ 160
           Public Service Announcements...................................................................................................................................... 161
           Recovery Information....................................................................................................................................................... 161
           Mitigation Opportunities................................................................................................................................................... 162
           Maps of Evacuation Zones and Routes ........................................................................................................................ 162
       Exercises ............................................................................................................................................................. 165
       Training ................................................................................................................................................................ 166
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................................................... 170
   INTERAGENCY AGREEMENTS .................................................................................................................................... 171
   OTHER FINANCIAL AGREEMENTS .............................................................................................................................. 172
REFERENCES & AUTHORITIES............................................................................................................................. 174



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                                                                  CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                                             COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


    STATE OF FLORIDA .................................................................................................................................................... 174
    CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY ....................................................................................... 174
    STATUTORY FISCAL PROCEDURES ........................................................................................................................... 175
      Ordinance Code 674.209 – Compensation, Reimbursement...................................................................... 175
    STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES REFERENCES APPLYING TO THE CEMP.................................................... 176
    POLICIES .................................................................................................................................................................... 176
    ORDINANCES AND ADMINISTRATIVE RULES.............................................................................................................. 179
      State of Florida Statutes.................................................................................................................................... 179
      Federal................................................................................................................................................................. 180
      Administrative Rules, State of Florida ............................................................................................................. 181
      Administrative Rules, Federal .......................................................................................................................... 181
      Presidential Directives, Federal ....................................................................................................................... 181
      Duval County Ordinances ................................................................................................................................. 181
RECORD OF CHANGES OR REVISIONS ............................................................................................................. 184
DISTRIBUTION LIST.................................................................................................................................................. 186
ATTACHMENT 1: ORDINANCE CODE, CHAPTER 674..................................................................................... 188
ATTACHMENT 2: RESOLUTION/PROMULGATION LETTER .......................................................................... 208




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                                                              CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                                         COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN




LIST OF FIGURES & TABLES


FIGURE 1. STRUCTURE OF CEMP .................................................................................................................................. 12
FIGURE 2. DUVAL COUNTY WIND SPEED ZONES ............................................................................................................ 20
FIGURE 3. ALL MAJOR HURRICANES WITHIN 65 NM OF DUVAL CO. 1851-2004 ............................................................ 21
FIGURE 4. ALL HURRICANES WITHIN 65 NM OF DUVAL CO. 1851-2004 ........................................................................ 21
FIGURE 5. POPULATION VS. HURRICANES ....................................................................................................................... 22
FIGURE 6. NORTHEAST FLORIDA HURRICANES 1565-1899 ........................................................................................... 23
FIGURE 7. 100-YEAR FLOODPLAIN .................................................................................................................................. 25
FIGURE 8. COASTAL HIGH HAZARD AREAS ...................................................................................................................... 26
FIGURE 9. EVACUATION ZONES ....................................................................................................................................... 27
FIGURE 10. JACKSONVILLE DAILY TEMPERATURES ......................................................................................................... 30
FIGURE 11. AGE DISTRIBUTION OF PEOPLE IN DUVAL COUNTY ...................................................................................... 39
FIGURE 12. DUVAL COUNTY POPULATION DENSITY & DISTRIBUTION ............................................................................. 40
FIGURE 13. DUVAL COUNTY POPULATION DISTRIBUTION BY AGE/GENDER .................................................................... 41
FIGURE 14. DUVAL COUNTY SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION DISTRIBUTION .................................................................... 43
FIGURE 15. TYPES OF HOUSEHOLDS IN DUVAL COUNTY ................................................................................................ 46
FIGURE 16. GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY OF RESIDENT .......................................................................................................... 47
FIGURE 17. EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT .......................................................................................................................... 48
FIGURE 18. MANUFACTURED HOME PARKS IN DUVAL COUNTY ...................................................................................... 49
FIGURE 19. CORRECTIONAL FACILITY POPULATION ........................................................................................................ 51
FIGURE 20. EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY ......................................................................................................................... 55
FIGURE 21. POVERTY RATES IN DUVAL COUNTY ............................................................................................................ 56
FIGURE 22. TYPES OF HOUSING UNITS IN DUVAL COUNTY ............................................................................................. 57
FIGURE 23. OCCUPANTS WITH A HOUSING COST BURDEN IN DUVAL COUNTY ............................................................... 58
FIGURE 24. EMERGENCY HELICOPTER LANDING ZONES................................................................................................ 60
FIGURE 25. DUVAL COUNTY HURRICANE SHELTERS...................................................................................................... 61
FIGURE 26. DUVAL COUNTY FIRE STATIONS .................................................................................................................. 62
FIGURE 27. DUVAL COUNTY MILITARY BASES ................................................................................................................ 63
FIGURE 28. DUVAL COUNTY HOSPITALS ......................................................................................................................... 64
FIGURE 29. DUVAL COUNTY EVACUATION ROUTES ....................................................................................................... 65
FIGURE 30. DUVAL COUNTY POINTS-OF-DISTRIBUTION (PODS) .................................................................................. 66
FIGURE 31. CITY OF JACKSONVILLE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE ............................................................................. 77
FIGURE 32. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS DIVISION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART ............................................................. 79
FIGURE 33. EOC/AREA COMMAND ORGANIZATIONAL CHART ....................................................................................... 85
FIGURE 34. LEAD AGENCY MATRIX ................................................................................................................................. 95
FIGURE 35. COMPLEXES ................................................................................................................................................ 117
FIGURE 36. ICS PLANNING ROLES................................................................................................................................ 119
FIGURE 37. THE PLANNING "P" ..................................................................................................................................... 121
FIGURE 38. RESOURCE ORDERING PROCESS .............................................................................................................. 124
FIGURE 39. RESPONSE TO RECOVERY CURVE ............................................................................................................. 132
FIGURE 40. LMS PLANNING PROCESS ......................................................................................................................... 148
FIGURE 41. POST-DISASTER MITIGATION PROCESS ..................................................................................................... 150
FIGURE 42. MITIGATION ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE .............................................................................................. 152
FIGURE 43. EVACUATION ROUTES NORTH OF ATLANTIC BOULEVARD ........................................................................ 162
FIGURE 44. EVACUATION ROUTES BETWEEN ATLANTIC AND BEACH BOULEVARD ..................................................... 163
FIGURE 45. EVACUATION ROUTES BETWEEN BEACH AND J.T. BUTLER BOULEVARD ................................................. 164




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                                                            CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                                       COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN



TABLE 1. SAFFIR-SIMPSON SCALE .................................................................................................................................. 19
TABLE 2. DUVAL COUNTY HAZARD ANALYSIS ................................................................................................................. 34
TABLE 3. DUVAL COUNTY FARM WORKER POPULATION .................................................................................................. 42
TABLE 4. DUVAL COUNTY NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING POPULATION ................................................................................. 43
TABLE 5. DEMOGRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF DUVAL COUNTY'S POPULATION ................................................................... 44
TABLE 6. ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS ......................................................................................................................... 52
TABLE 7. DISASTER EQUIPMENT STAGING AREAS.......................................................................................................... 59
TABLE 8. PLANNING ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ..................................................................................................... 120
TABLE 9. AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES FOR HAZARD MITIGATION.................................................................................. 153
TABLE 10. MITIGATION ASSESSMENT TEAM MATRIX .................................................................................................... 156
TABLE 11. DUVAL COUNTY STRUCTURAL MITIGATION INITIATIVES .............................................................................. 157
TABLE 12. DUVAL COUNTY NON-STRUCTURAL MITIGATION INITIATIVES ..................................................................... 157
TABLE 13. RECOMMENDED TRAINING ........................................................................................................................... 167




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                 CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY



The Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP) establishes the organizational and
procedural framework to ensure that the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County will be
adequately prepared to deal with all hazards threatening the lives and property of Duval County
citizens. The CEMP outlines the responsibilities and coordination mechanisms of County agencies,
municipalities, and other taxing districts in a disaster. The CEMP also coordinates response and
recovery activities with voluntary organizations active in disasters and the business community.
The plan unifies the efforts of these groups for a comprehensive approach to reducing the effects
of a disaster.

The Plan addresses the four phases of emergency management (i.e., preparedness, response,
recovery, and mitigation), parallels state activities outlined in the State of Florida CEMP, federal
activities set forth in the “National Response Plan,” and describes how local, state, and national
resources will be coordinated to supplement local response and recovery capability. The CEMP is
in compliance with the criteria issued by the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management
(FDEM), Chapter 9G-20, F.A.C., pursuant to F.S. §252.

The CEMP is both a planning and an operations-based document that provides guidance for all
aspects of emergency management. The CEMP is organized into four essential elements: The
Basic Plan including a mitigation component and three (3) annexes that address Hazard Specific
Plans (HSP’s), and Interagency Coordinating Procedures (ICP’s).

The City of Jacksonville/Duval County Fire & Rescue Department Emergency Preparedness
Division extends its appreciation to all partner organizations who participated in the planning effort
to create this document.



Robert “Chip” Patterson, Chief
Emergency Preparedness Division
Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department
515 No. Julia Street, Suite #400
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 630-2472




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                 CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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BASIC PLAN
INTRODUCTION
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is vulnerable to a variety of hazards that
threaten our population, businesses and the environment. The Comprehensive Emergency
Management Plan (CEMP) establishes the framework, as authorized by Chapter 252, Florida
Statutes, to ensure that City of Jacksonville/Duval County is prepared to deal with “all hazards.”
The CEMP emphasizes action within the four phases of the Emergency Management cycle:
Preparedness, Response, Recovery and Mitigation.
The CEMP defines the functional roles and responsibilities of each government entity that partners
in City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s disaster organization and their relationship to each other. In
addition, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s CEMP provides a comprehensive
approach to reducing the effects of disasters on its population and physical environment.
As outlined in Figure 1 on the next page, the CEMP is divided into three sections: The Basic Plan
including a mitigation component and two (2) annexes that address Hazard Specific Plans (HSP’s),
and Interagency Coordinating Procedures (ICP’s). The following describes each section:


Basic Plan
The Basic Plan outlines the general purpose, scope and methodology of the plan; coordination,
control and organizational structure; concept of operations, and identifies responsibilities of all
agencies and resources mobilized by the county to assist in recovering from a disaster. The
CEMP enables the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County to discharge its responsibility
for providing direction and control during any large-scale disaster.


Hazard Specific Plans (HSP’s)
This section of the CEMP includes plans that are specific to unique hazards or risks that will be
utilized by all agencies. Hazard specific plans are based on the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County’s vulnerability to specific hazards discussed in the situation section of
the basic plan. These hazard specific plans identify only specific elements unique to the hazard:


        •    Civil Unrest HSP                          •   Tornado HSP
        •    Flood HSP                                 •   Wildfire HSP
        •    HAZMAT HSP                                •   Terrorism Response HSP
        •    Hurricane HSP                             •   BioWatch
        •    Infectious Disease Pandemic HSP           •   Radiological Plan
        •    Mass Casualty Incident HSP                •   Biological Response
        •    Severe Weather HSP                        •   Chemical Response
        •    Special Event HSP                         •   MMRS


Specific responsibilities, tasks or functions that will be carried out before, during and after a
disaster or emergency are addressed in the hazard specific plans.



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                              CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                         COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


Figure 1. Structure of CEMP




                                                                                Approved by responsible
                                                                                     agency head




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                                                CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                           COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


Interagency Coordinating Procedures (ICPs)
This section of the CEMP includes numerous interagency coordinating procedures (ICPs).
Interagency coordinating procedures detail by name and organization the lead, participating, and
coordinating entities and their roles and responsibilities in the four phases of an emergency or
disaster. Each interagency coordinating procedure outlines specific tasks or “functional”
procedures that are generic to all agencies regardless of the hazard. These tasks utilize the
Incident Command System (ICS) concept of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
These interagency coordinating procedures may also include job aids where specific tasks for
coordinating entities are described in detail. For the purposes of simplicity, the ICP section has
been subdivided into two sections:


Toolkit ICPs
These ICPs are clearly functional interagency coordinating procedures; they address a specific
function1:
                •   Bridge Closure ICP
                •   Debris Management ICP
                •   Evacuation ICP
                •   Facilities Management ICP
                •   Fuel Plan ICP
                •   Human Needs Assessment ICP
                •   Interoperable Communications ICP
                •   Logistical Staging Area ICP
                •   Mass Fatality ICP
                •   Mass Feeding ICP
                •   Recovery Plan ICP
                •   Resource Management ICP
                •   Search & Rescue ICP
                •   Sheltering ICP
                •   Special Needs & Adopt-a-Shelter ICP
                •   Strategic National Stockpile ICP
                •   Traffic Management ICP

EOC ICPs
These ICPs are interagency coordinating procedures that are assigned to each function of the ICS
structure within the Emergency Operation Center/Area Command (see Figures 1 and 33).


Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs)
Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) are procedures or guidelines that are agency-specific and
utilized by that agency to accomplish the functions, missions, or activities outlined by
corresponding HSPs or ICPs. SOGs typically include job aids where specific tasks for individual
positions are described in detail.


1
    This list of ICPs, as well as the list of EOC ICPs, may be subject to change.


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                                      CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                 COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


PURPOSE


The CEMP is both a planning and an operations-based document that provides guidance for all
aspects of emergency management including, disaster preparedness; evacuation and sheltering;
warning and notification; public education and information; resource management; mutual aid;
Special Needs Program; impact and damage assessment; debris management; training and
exercises; and post-disaster recovery programs. The CEMP establishes official emergency
management policy for all county agencies and municipalities in response to, and recovery from,
and mitigation of emergencies and disasters within the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County. The CEMP initiates a temporary re-organization of government intended to provide the
most efficient response and recovery system possible through the coordination and maximum
utilization of all available resources.


The CEMP establishes a framework for an effective system of comprehensive emergency
management, for the purpose of:
           •    Reducing loss of life, injury, and property damage and loss resulting from natural or
                man-made emergencies.

           •    Preparing for prompt and efficient response and recovery activities to protect lives
                and property impacted by emergencies.

           •    Responding to emergencies with the effective use of all relevant plans and
                resources deemed appropriate.

           •    Recovering from emergencies by providing for the rapid and orderly implementation
                of restoration and rehabilitation programs for persons and properties affected by
                emergencies.

           •    Assisting in awareness, recognition, education, prevention and mitigation of
                emergencies that may be caused or aggravated by inadequate planning for, and
                regulation of, public and private facilities and land use.

           •    Implementing the Incident Command System (ICS) regardless of the magnitude of
                any given incident or disaster.

SCOPE


1. The CEMP establishes the basic policies, assumptions and strategies for a comprehensive all-
hazards countywide Emergency Management Program.


2. The CEMP prioritizes protection of citizens as a first priority, with the preservation and protection
of property being the second priority.




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3. The CEMP is applicable to minor, major or catastrophic disasters. It is flexible and expandable,
depending on the emergency situation and needs. Any part or section of the plan may be utilized
separately if required by the situation.


4. The CEMP establishes the procedures to coordinate with local, regional, state and federal
emergency management agencies, organizations and programs.


5. A unified direction and control structure is described. The CEMP identifies staff roles and
resource allocation, as well as decision-making criteria.     It delineates lines of authority,
responsibilities and working relations of various entities.


6. The CEMP brings together County and municipal resources in a unified approach to manage the
disaster. In addition, it identifies a cooperative process for coordination of private sector and
volunteer resources.


7. The CEMP addresses management and prioritization of local resources and establishes the
procedure to request immediate assistance for resources, if needed. State and/or federal
resources will be requested and drawn from when local resources have been exhausted.


8. The CEMP provides a format for the shift of focus of the EOC/Area Command from Response to
Recovery and Mitigation. Long-range recovery and mitigation is addressed by the ability of the
EOC/Area Command to continue operations in a modified form, after the response phase has been
terminated.


9. The CEMP establishes an effective format for emergency management by:


a. Identifying the types of hazards that can occur within the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County.


b. Determining the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s vulnerability to various types
of disasters and identifying the most threatening so that appropriate preparedness, mitigation and
planning steps can be taken.


c. Addressing each phase of the Emergency Management cycle:


i. Preparedness: Utilizes lessons learned from previous disasters, locally and elsewhere, to
determine what is likely to occur during any particular type and intensity of disaster. Likely
community needs can be identified and prioritized. Adequate planning pre-determines the best
utilization of resources in responding to needs. Identification and training of personnel for roles
and responsibilities during the disaster is included in this phase. It involves working with the


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private sector, residents and volunteer organizations to assist them in pre-disaster education and
planning activities to lessen the impact of disasters.
ii. Response: The implementation of the CEMP. Government responds to emergencies by
activating its plan, incrementally increasing response as needed, giving direction and control to the
emergency management effort, and looking ahead to recovery.                 Individuals respond by
implementing their own disaster plans, whether it means evacuating the area or remaining in place.
Private businesses and volunteer organizations implement their plans to secure and protect their
assets, and if capable, make available resources to help the community.
iii. Recovery: Begins as soon as possible, sometimes during the response phase. The emergency
management organization initiates procedures to assess needs and resources, establish priorities,
reviews state and federal aid criteria and coordinates with representatives from both levels of
government. Once the extent of the recovery effort is determined, the appointed recovery team
members determine how best to manage the specific activities, what resources and personnel will
be required and what other actions are needed to return the impacted areas to normal operations
as quickly as possible. Assessment of both short and long-term mitigation measures takes place
during this phase and the “after action” evaluation process is conducted.
iv. Mitigation: This phase involves identifying preventative and/or corrective measures and actions
to prevent or limit bodily injury, loss or life or property damage from disasters. It includes policy
issues as well as structural projects within government and the private sector. A separate Local
Mitigation Strategy (LMS) serves as the guidance document for both pre-disaster mitigation
planning and post-disaster recovery.


METHODOLOGY.


This plan was formulated via several processes:
           •    EPD staff reviewed after-action reports from disasters.
           •    EPD staff reviewed list of unresolved deficiencies.
           •    The Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Council (SEPPC) heard
                Hurricane Katrina after-action lessons learned and NIMS compliance requirements.
           •    Training sessions were provided to stakeholders (i.e., all lead and participating
                agencies) in March, 2006 informing them of the general changes of the CEMP.
           •    Planning was formulated through the delivery of ICS-300 and ICS-400 courses to
                numerous responder groups and personnel.
           •    Meetings were held with each functional component to review their respective
                function within the CEMP.
           •    Several EOC functional and tabletop exercises were held in the Spring of 2006 to
                test and evaluate initial drafts and concepts of the revised CEMP.
           •    Drafts were distributed and comments collected among selected agency and
                responder representatives.
           •    National Incident Management System (NIMS) and National Response Plan (NRP)
                concepts were integrated into the revised plan.

The CEMP is a dynamic “NIMS compliant” document that adapts to changes in policy, priorities
and needs. State and federal statutes, regulations, and priorities guide development of the
document. Public and private entities participating in the development of this plan include:


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          •     Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
          •     Amateur Radio Emergency Service
          •     American Red Cross, Northeast Florida Chapter
          •     Association of Contingency Planners, Northeast Florida Chapter
          •     Atlantic Beach Animal Control
          •     Atlantic Beach Police Department
          •     Beaches Energy Services
          •     BellSouth
          •     Civil Air Patrol
          •     Duval County Emergency Communications Group
          •     Duval County Health Department
          •     Duval County Medical Examiner’s Office
          •     Duval County Property Appraiser
          •     Duval County School Board
          •     Emergency Services Homeless Coalition
          •     First Coast Disaster Council
          •     Florida Division of Emergency Management - Area 3 Coordinator
          •     Jacksonville Airport Authority
          •     Jacksonville Beach Animal Control
          •     Jacksonville Beach Fire Department
          •     Jacksonville Beach Police Department
          •     Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
          •     Jacksonville Economic Development Commission
          •     Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
          •     Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department
          •     Jacksonville Transportation Authority
          •     Jacksonville Port Authority
          •     Jacksonville Sheriff's Office
          •     Jacksonville Veterinary Medical Society
          •     Jacksonville Zoological Gardens
          •     JEA Utilities
          •     Neptune Beach Animal Control
          •     Neptune Beach Police Department
          •     Northeast Florida Crisis Response Team
          •     Northeast Florida Regional Council
          •     Second Harvest Food Bank/Lutheran Social Services
          •     The Salvation Army
          •     U.S. Coast Guard
          •     U.S. Naval Air Station Jacksonville
          •     United Way of Northeast Florida
          •     Volunteer Jacksonville

Local planning involvement includes:
          •     A promulgation letter from the Mayor displayed at the end of this document.
          •     Multi-agency exercises each year.
          •     Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Council (SEPPC) meetings.
          •     Emergency Coordinating Office Program.

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           •    Deficiency Measuring/Resolution Process.
           •    Disaster Planning Quality Process.
           •    Local Mitigation Strategy meetings.

The Emergency Preparedness Division (EPD) Chief is responsible for ensuring that all changes
have been distributed to recipients of the CEMP. The distribution list, displayed at the end of this
document is used to verify that all appropriate persons/offices are copied (see page 186).


A Record of Changes Log, found at the end of this document (see page 184) is used to record all
major published changes of the CEMP. The holder of the copy is responsible for making the
appropriate changes and updating the Log.


A master copy of the CEMP, with a master Record of Changes Log, is maintained in the
Emergency Preparedness Division’s office. A comparison of the master copy with any other will
allow a determination to be made as to whether or not the copy in question has been posted to it
with all appropriate changes.


PROMULGATION
As discussed above, this CEMP is divided into four sections: The Basic Plan including a mitigation
component and two (2) annexes that address Hazard Specific Plans (HSP’s), and Interagency
Coordinating Procedures (ICP’s). For the purposes of Chapter 252.38, F.S., and 9G-6.0023,
F.A.C., the Basic Plan and the mitigation component shall be considered the Duval County
Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP), and shall be approved by the Jacksonville
City Council. The Basic Plan and the mitigation component provide an overview of the emergency
management system; its primary audience is executives, emergency managers, departmental
mangers, and anyone interested in reviewing or learning about broad concepts of emergency
operations in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. It is expected that the content
within these sections will change infrequently.


On the other hand, by their very nature, the content within the two (2) annexes that address
Hazard Specific Plans (HSP’s), and Interagency Coordinating Procedures (ICP’s), will likely
change frequently. As such, in order to remain timely and accurate, the HSPs and “toolkit” ICPs
are approved by the Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Council (SEPPC) and the
EOC-related ICPs are approved by the Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Emergency Preparedness
Division Chief.




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SITUATION
This section of the CEMP describes the potential hazard considerations, geographic
characteristics, support facilities, land use patterns, economic profiles and demographics of the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. It also describes specific planning assumptions
regarding preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation that were taken into consideration
during the development of this plan.


HAZARDS ANALYSIS
This section details the man-made and natural hazards to which the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County is vulnerable. Following this section, Table 2 presents hazard
information including the types of hazards, vulnerable populations, impact of damage and an
assessment of the probability of frequency and potential severity of each hazard.


Winds from Tropical Cyclones
As a general hazard, hurricanes have historically caused a great deal of damage in the State of
Florida. They usually have a regional multi-county impact, affecting the lives of thousands of
citizens.


Hurricanes, the most dangerous and destructive storms on earth, are tropical cyclones that consist
of high velocity winds blowing counter-clockwise around a moving low-pressure center. Hurricanes
are commonly classified according to wind velocity, using what is known as the Saffir/Simpson
Hurricane Scale (1 through 5) (see Table 1)2. In addition, mobile homes and unsafe structures
throughout the county will be vulnerable to winds emanating from all categories of hurricanes.


Table 1. Saffir-Simpson Scale
             Saffir-Simpson Scale
                     Cat.            Pressure      Winds       Surge
                                       (mb)        (mph)         (ft)
                      TD                --          < 39          --
                      TS                --          39-73         --
                       1               980 >        74-95       4-5 ft
                       2              965-980      96-110       6-8 ft
                       3              945-965      111-130     9-12 ft
                       4              920-945      131-155     13-18 ft
                       5               < 920        155 >       18> ft




Wind is the second ranked of the lethal components of a hurricane's destructive force, yet may
affect far more persons than storm-surge. Strong winds can be a very dangerous element of a
hurricane, reaching up to more than one hundred miles inland. The impact of the wind on

2
 Note that whenever the severity or intensity of a hurricane is referenced throughout this Plan, the classification scale
used is the Saffir-Simpson scale, even if not directly referenced.


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structures, plus wind borne debris, can result in injury or death for those far from the coast. Gale
force winds and tornadoes associated with hurricanes are very hazardous to mobile homes. High
winds often lead to downed power lines and trees thus inhibiting mobility during and after the
storm. The Emergency Operations Center coordinates the response for hurricanes, the details of
this plan can be found in the Hurricane Hazard Specific Plan.


Unlike the effects of the storm surge, the high winds associated with a hurricane will have an
impact on inland as well as coastal areas. Therefore, inland areas must plan for the impacts of
high winds (downed trees and power lines) on their road system and, perhaps more importantly, on
the health and welfare of their citizens living in mobile homes or in substandard homes which may
not be resistant to these high winds.


All of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is at risk from high winds; however, the
threat is exacerbated by the large number of residents who reside in our coastal areas. The wind
velocity zones established through the statewide building code establishes five zones across the
County.


Figure 2. Duval County Wind Speed Zones




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Roughly, 100,000 people live in the 120 MPH zone, 250,000 in the 119 MPH zone, another
250,000 in the 115 MPH zone, 150,000 in the 110 MPH zone and 50,000 furthest west in the 105
MPH Zone.
Figure 3. All major hurricanes within 65 nm of Duval Co. 1851-2004




Figure 4. All hurricanes within 65 nm of Duval Co. 1851-2004




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Figure 5. Population vs. hurricanes




Note the above graph compares the rising population to hurricanes that came near the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County.


Storm Surge
Storm surge is considered the most destructive of the forces related to hurricanes. The surge is
caused by the frictional forces of hurricane winds on the surface which, when over a large body of
water such as the Atlantic Ocean, results in a high dome of wind-driven water. This surge of water
contains immense, destructive power. At times the effects of the moving water can be likened to a
bulldozer clearing everything in its path. Debris propelled by the storm surge can act as a battering
ram destroying objects in its way.


Secondary destructive forces resulting from storm surge include beach erosion and inlet formation
described above. Studies have shown that the impact of storm surge can be expected along the
entire St. Johns River and its tributaries within the borders of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County. Storm surge and wind emanating from Category 1 or 2 hurricanes can
destroy or heavily damage beachfront homes and commercial establishments, piers, seawalls,
boardwalks, etc. Storm surge and wind emanating from Category 3, 4, or 5 hurricanes are
expected to cause massive destruction on coastal barrier islands, and particularly in coastal
municipalities including the cities of Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, and Jacksonville Beach. In

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addition, the Mayport Naval Station is expected to encounter such destruction. Based on past
history, beach erosion, usually the result of the stress placed on the shore from the storm surge, is
a problem in the Northeast region. In the event of a hurricane either striking or passing near this
coast, the potential of beach erosion that can undermine both houses and roads must be seriously
considered.


Effects of beach erosion on coastal roads should also be considered in relation to late evacuations,
recovery from storms, and in planning future roadways.


Inlet formation can be caused by water flowing across the barrier island with enough force to break
through the island. During such an occurrence, there is danger to life and property, as well as a
potential for severe restrictions in mobility, due to breaks in the transportation system. If inlet
formation were to occur, it would most likely be at storm-water outfalls and designed storm-water
infrastructure. However, inlet formation could be a factor north of the mouth of the St. Johns River,
where Highway A1A crosses undeveloped Little Talbot Island.


Areas most at risk from storm surge are those zones designated for category 1, 2 and 3 hurricanes
as shown on the map in Figure 9. Estimates from the Regional Planning Council for expected
numbers of people evacuating those areas are in the neighborhood of 214,000 persons.


Figure 6. Northeast Florida hurricanes 1565-1899




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Although the evacuation of 859,361 (2005 census bureau projection) residents and visitors is
achievable, the clearance times for a fast moving Category 4 or 5 could require evacuation start
times which are beyond our current ability to accurately predict a storm’s actual landfall and
intensity. The clearance time situation becomes even worse if the size of the storm, or its predicted
landfall, requires the evacuation of adjacent counties. The problems that arise from merging the
evacuees from Duval and neighboring counties may extend clearance times beyond reasonable
limits. As a result, residents of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County are discouraged
from evacuating out of the county unless they are utilizing air transportation or evacuate very early.
The threat from storm surge represents a serious hazard to the barrier island communities and the
entire eastern half of the county. In addition, flooding due to torrential rainfall (inundation) could
pose a serious threat in portions of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County.

Pre-landfall hazards associated with a hurricane also pose a significant threat to a successful
evacuation. The natural tendency to delay evacuation until the last minute may trap residents on
roadways due to traffic jams or flooded evacuation routes. The torrential rains and tropical storm
force winds associated with the outer bands of a hurricane frequently render evacuation routes
impassable long before the predicted landfall of the storm. In accordance with a wind effects report
distributed by the Florida Institute of Technology, Tropical Storm Force Winds (TSFW) can down
trees and power lines, blow out windows, blow down signs, cause flying debris, structural collapse
and cause vehicles to overturn and deviate from their course3. It is the policy of the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County to plan for the affects of TSFWs on preparedness activities and
evacuation procedures.

When TSFWs (i.e., one minute sustained 34 knots or 39 mph winds) arrive, overall countywide
evacuation and pre-storm preparatory activities will cease. At this time, all response agencies,
including the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County EOC/Area Command, should “lock
down,” and all on-duty personnel should report to a secure duty station, and vehicular traffic should
cease. However, weather conditions may not deteriorate uniformly across the county. Therefore,
county departments and response agencies may make exceptions to extend preparedness
activities beyond the “lock down” time but such exceptions must be specified in their disaster
response plans, or SOGs. These plans/SOGs must specify the conditions, identify those
classifications that may authorize, and the criteria used to determine, the need for an extension.
The Emergency Preparedness Division strongly recommends that the safety of first responders
and county employees be the chief concern when drafting extension procedures.


Floods
All of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is vulnerable to damage from wind driven
rain and flooding from rain. The Regional Hurricane Evacuation Study also provided data on
vulnerable population for the year 2005, for each storm category. Included in the vulnerable
population is a section on special needs population, hospitals and nursing homes. The
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is divided into evacuation zones. This is done in
order to provide sufficient division of the total population at risk in accordance with predicted
flooding levels associated with storm surge. These areas and the population estimates provided in
this chapter are also used for estimating evacuation clearance times in the transportation analysis.
Clearance times for both 2005 and 2010 have also been estimated in later sections.


3
 Pinelli, Jean-Paul, Subramanian, & Chelakara. “Wind Effects on Emergency Vehicles.” Report prepared for the Division
of Emergency Management, Florida Division of Community Affairs. August 31, 2003


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Rain ranks third in the order of a hurricane’s destructive force. During the average 24-hour period
that it normally takes a hurricane to pass over an area, an average rainfall of between 5 and 10
inches may occur. Normally, this happens concurrently with the arrival of gale force winds.
However, in Florida, there have been hurricane-related rainfalls ranging from 12 to 20 inches.
These excessive rains that accompany hurricanes can cause excessive flooding in low lying areas
that will need to evacuate. It is very important to consider roads which are rendered impassable
during heavy rains and which may affect the evacuation of the vulnerable population. The
Emergency Operations Center is the central point for managing a flood incident in Duval County.
The details of this plan can be found in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Flood
Hazard Specific Plan.


Figure 7. 100-year Floodplain




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Figure 8. Coastal high hazard areas




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Figure 9. Evacuation zones




There are three ways the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County residents can be flooded:
storm surge, creeks and river or natural flooding, and finally neighborhood or localized flooding
caused by poor drainage. Areas at risk are shown in the 100-year Flood Plain Map above, as well
as areas subject to storm surge for category 1 and 2 storms called Coastal High Hazard Areas and
finally, isolated neighborhoods with drainage issues. Due to the low-lying nature of much of the
Consolidated City, localized flooding often accompanies heavy thunderstorms. This localized
flooding rarely presents more than an inconvenience, but occasionally results in severe flooding
that, including one instance that resulted in a Presidential Declaration of Natural Disaster. Many
homes located along the banks of the St. Johns River and its tributaries will be subject to river
flooding, particularly that (flooding) which is related to severe hurricanes which strike the coastline
from the ocean at any angle ranging from 30 degrees to 150 degrees (relative to the coastline).
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County evacuation details are addressed in the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Evacuation ICP.




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Hazardous Materials Spills
Residents of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County are vulnerable to the harmful
effects of the accidental release of hazardous materials. Hazardous materials are transported
throughout the county by air, sea, and land transportation.             The Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County's position as a major crossroads for both rail and highway traffic into
Florida creates a high potential for a hazardous materials accident. Interstate 95, one of two major
north/south highways for the state, runs the entire length of the county and right through the
downtown business district. Interstate 10, the major east-west route for north Florida and the Gulf
states, terminates at its intersection with I-95, less than two miles from the downtown business
district. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County contains a major railroad intersection
and loading/off-loading point. In addition, ocean-going ships load and off-load material at the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County's port facilities, and many barges transport
petroleum products along the St. Johns River. Within the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County there are a number of private and public facilities that produce, store or use hazardous
materials. Emergencies involving hazardous materials can be postulated as ranging from a minor
emergency with no offsite effects to a major emergency that may result in an offsite release of
hazardous and toxic materials. The overall objective of chemical emergency response planning
and preparedness is to minimize exposure for a spectrum of emergencies that could produce
offsite levels of contamination in excess of levels of concern (LOCs) established by the
Environmental Protection Agency. Minimizing this exposure will reduce the consequences of a
hazardous materials incident.


No specific emergency sequence can be isolated as the model for which to plan because each
emergency could have different consequences, both in nature and degree. As an alternative to
defining a specific emergency, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Hazardous
Materials Hazard Specific Plan identifies various parameters for planning which are based upon
knowledge of the possible consequences, timing and release characteristics of a spectrum of
emergencies. This plan establishes the appropriate response for each level of threat.


The design arcs used for hazardous materials can easily reach 5 miles from the incident. When
that distance is drawn from all of the potential locations of events, along the river and rail and major
roadways, there is hardly any area or population in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County not at risk. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s additional efforts are
described in detail in the HAZMAT Hazard Specific Plan.


Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Incidents
The nearest commercial nuclear power plants to the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County are 120 miles to the north in Savannah, Georgia; 200 miles to the west near Dothan
Alabama; 100 miles to the southwest at Crystal River; and 150 miles to the South in St. Lucie
County. This locates the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County outside of any 10-mile
radius for a plume exposure pathway and outside of any 50-mile radius for an ingestion exposure
pathway in accordance with guidelines outlined in the document entitled, “Criteria for Preparation
and Evaluation of Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness in Support of
Nuclear Power Plants.”




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Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is located approximately 40 miles from Jacksonville in Kings
Bay, Georgia. There have been no incidents at Kings Bay Base since its commissioning in 1978.
The City of Jacksonville participated in the “Dingo King” full-scale exercise in 2005, which
exercised the response to a nuclear missile accident at Kings Bay Base.


Radiological incidents can occur in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County due to the
fact that several facilities stockpile radiological material and radiological material is transported via
our interstate thoroughfares. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Radiological
Hazard Specific Plan addresses the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s risk and
response to a radiological incident.


Civil Disturbance
According to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office (JSO) only 3 incidents have warranted activation of
law enforcement personnel since the 1960’s. Activation occurred once in the 60’s, once in the 70’s
(both times for riots) and once as a precaution in 1996. JSO has Field Force Units with a number
of officers each and “perimeter teams” each with additional officers, trained for such incidents.
This hazard is rarely geographic specific but is addressed in the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County Civil Unrest Hazard Specific Plan.


Mass Immigration
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County has never experienced immigration in mass
numbers. No particular geographic area would be subject to such a risk.


Coastal Oil Spills
According to the DARP/EA (Damage Assessment & Restoration Plan / Environmental
Assessment) for Northeast Florida, there have been 4 spills in the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County primarily in the St. Johns River resulting in limited impacts and no injury
or death. The areas at risk are all residential areas along both banks of the river as well as the
miles of coastline along the beaches communities. It is estimated that about 150,000 people are at
some risk from this rare hazard.


Extreme Temperatures
According to data provided by the National Weather Service – Jacksonville Office, temperatures
rarely rise above 100 degrees or fall below 20 degrees. Despite Florida’s normally mild climate,
temperature-related deaths in Florida exceed those caused by hurricanes and tornadoes
combined. Extreme high temperatures (105° heat index and above) may pose a threat of heat
stress to the County’s elderly and infant populations. In the event of an electrical service
interruption, the lack of air conditioning may pose a particular danger to at-risk populations.
Extreme cold temperatures are also a potential threat. The elderly and people with medical
conditions, such as diabetes, are especially at risk to extreme temperatures and cannot tolerate
intense cold. Cold weather-related medical conditions, such as hypothermia, can become a danger
to those who are not physically prepared or sheltered adequately, such as the homeless.


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Figure 10. Jacksonville daily temperatures




Brush, Wildfires and Forest Fires
This kind of event is common (99 times per year) in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County but not large in scope (average 16 acres). The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County does not have great numbers of residents living in urban interface zones with forests. The
rapid western development of Duval County increases the vulnerability of the population to
wildfires. Due to new construction the fires can spread rapidly from traditionally rural and
unpopulated regions of west Duval County into new high density residential neighborhoods. More
details on this hazard can be found in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Wildfire
Hazard Specific Plan.


Thunderstorms and Tornadoes
According to the National Weather Service Jacksonville Office, an average of 26 severe
thunderstorm warnings are issued each year and 5.5 tornado warnings. The entire population is at
risk, however not every warning results in death, injury or even property damage. Tornadoes may
be spawned by land-falling hurricanes, especially in the right-front quadrant of the storm.
Hurricane-related tornadoes are not usually accompanied by hail or lightning, the usual warning
signs of tornadoes. No particular area or population in the County is especially at risk from this
hazard.     The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County protects citizens via the
implementation of the Severe Weather Hazard Specific Plan and the Tornado Hazard Specific
Plan.



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Drought
On April 15 though the 29th of 1999, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County was part of
a Major Disaster Declaration by the President of the United States for Fire and Drought for
Emergency Protective Measures under FEMA Public Assistance Category B. No particular area or
population in the county is especially at risk from this hazard.


Sinkholes
According to the Florida Department of Natural Resources Bureau of Geology, the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County falls within an Area IV designation indicative of land cover 200
feet thick with cohesive sediments inter-layered with discontinuous carbonate beds where
sinkholes are very few in number. No particular area or population in the county is especially at risk
from this hazard.


Terrorism
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is near the bottom on the national list of the
top 30 terrorist-targeted cities. The County was affected indirectly by the attacks on New York and
Washington on September 11, 2001 along with the rest of the nation. No event before or after,
related to terrorism, has impacted the County directly outside of hijacked planes in the 70’s. No
particular area or population in the County is especially at risk from this hazard. Please refer to the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Terrorism Response Hazard Specific Plan.


Exotic Pests & Diseases
Due to its warm climate, unique animal and plant life, and multi-million dollar agriculture industry,
Duval County is inherently susceptible to the introduction of foreign plant and animal pests and
diseases. 26.2% of Duval County’s land use is devoted to agriculture. Exotic pests and diseases
can be introduced through agricultural smuggling and both legal and illegal importation of
agricultural products. Anthrax, in its most common form, is a naturally occurring animal disease
that can affect herbivores, such as cattle, sheep and goats. Occupational exposure to infected
dead animals or their products is the most common route of exposure for humans. Avian influenza
is another exotic disease that can attack farm animals and may be transferable to humans. The
frequency or location of occurrences of exotic pests and diseases affecting agricultural areas
cannot be predicted.

Duval County Health Department specialists estimate this type of threat to humans can be planned
for about once every 20 years and only has to reach 5 human cases before an emergency is
triggered although it would depend on the severity of the disease. Even though no case has been
identified with small pox as weapon of terror, the emergency worker small pox immunization
activation in 2003 would fall in this category. No particular area or population in the County is
especially at risk from this hazard. In response to this hazard, the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County has the Bio-Watch and Biological Hazard Specific Plans.


Disease and Pandemic Outbreaks

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                                    CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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Duval County Health Department Specialists estimate this type of threat can be planned for about
once every 30 years and would probably need to reach about 100 cases before triggering an
emergency. An example of this kind of event would be for response to an unknown virus causing
critical illness and having no known treatment. No particular area or population in the County is
especially at risk from this hazard. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Infectious
Disease Pandemic Plan Hazard Specific Plan addresses Duval County’s risk and response to a
pandemic outbreak.


Critical Infrastructure Disruption
On April 29, 2002, a series of combined random events lead to an emergency shutdown of the
electric grid serving all of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. Power remained
disrupted for 12 to 18 hours causing major failures of many communication, electronic and even
water and sewer systems. Such an event is only expected to occur once every 10 years, but
causes a wide (but not very deep) impact. Generally these kinds of events are not life-threatening
and cause little permanent wide-spread damage but are very costly for their short durations. No
particular area or population in the county is especially at risk from this hazard.


Special Events
Jacksonville hosted the National Football League’s Super Bowl event in February of 2005 and the
NCAA National Basketball Tournament in March 2006. Jacksonville is scheduled to host annual
Florida – Georgia football games and the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Championship game
for the next several years, which attracts many thousands of visitors for 1 to 2 days of many events
including the game. Every fall, Jacksonville hosts an air show featuring military aircraft and some
naval vessels. This event, which alternates yearly between Jacksonville NAS and Jacksonville
Beach, attracts about 100,000 people. Alltel Stadium holds approximately 70,000 people and the
Jacksonville Veteran’s Memorial Arena is a venue with about an 18,000-person-capacity. This
hazard poses a threat mainly to people attending such events. The Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County has a Special Events Hazard Specific Plan.


Major Transportation Incidents
Although the potential exists for ocean-going ships to collide with any one of several major bridges
across the St. Johns River, no major accident has ever occurred resulting in either loss of the
channel or the vehicular highway traffic. Florida Highway Patrol statistics compiled through 2001
indicate that the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County experiences nearly 15,000 traffic
accidents every year resulting in nearly 120 deaths and 11,000 injuries. No statistics have been
uncovered indicating how often either of the two major interstate highways is closed due to
incidents but the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is planning as if it could occur as
often as once a year. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s Traffic Management
ICP addresses the management of transportation incidents and the Bridge Closure ICP details
bridge closure procedures.




Hazard Prioritization Process



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                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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Twenty-two hazards were identified and their vulnerabilities analyzed as required between the
State of Florida CEMP Guideline Criteria and the Local Mitigation Strategy requirements. Each
local government has different priorities based on the outcome of this hazard analysis for particular
jurisdictions. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County used the Local Mitigation
Strategy Risk Assessment sub-committee and the Duval Prepares organization to determine those
priority hazards that call for the development of standard operating guidelines, resource
identification, impact analysis, mitigation strategies, performance objectives, hazard elimination
and mitigation activities.


Local Mitigation Strategy sub-committee members (subject matter experts in planning, public works
etc.) reviewed the nineteen-hazard analyses and then used a normative group process to rank
order hazards based on frequency, severity, damage estimates and other professional knowledge.

That prioritization process yielded the top hazards to be:
           •    Wind from Tropical Cyclone
           •    Floods
           •    Storm Surge from Tropical Cyclone
           •    Terrorism
           •    Hazardous Materials Accidents
           •    Thunderstorms and Tornadoes
           •    Wildfires
           •    Critical Facilities Disruption

A follow-up meeting further narrowed the top hazards list to 6 by combining wind and storm surge
from Tropical Cyclone into one hazard, and by dropping critical facilities disruption as a hazard
usually resulting from other hazards. Therefore, the final list of the top hazards that can affect
Duval County and its municipalities is:
           •    Wind and Storm Surge from Tropical Cyclones
           •    Floods
           •    Terrorism
           •    Hazards Materials Spills
           •    Wildfires in the Urban Interface
           •    Tornadoes from Thunderstorms




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                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN




Table 2. Duval County Hazard Analysis




GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
The analysis of potential hazards is the basic component of any community's comprehensive
emergency management plan. A complete understanding of the community's geography,
demographics, and land use trends is essential to be able to minimize the possible loss of life,
human suffering, and damage to public and private property associated with major natural or man-
made incidents. The information developed can provide Duval County's emergency managers with
a tool, which can be used to identify those hazards that require an organized response to properly
manage related activities, so that needed priorities and actions can be established.


The hazards analysis involves not only knowledge of the kinds of hazards to which the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is subjected, but also specific estimates of people
and property at risk from a particular hazard. When this measure of vulnerability, reflecting a
worst-case situation, is combined with available hazard information, the community can estimate
the frequency and extent of damage and the areas and persons affected. This combination of
factors is the key to determining if present capabilities are adequate for mitigating, preparing for,
and responding to an emergency, and if found inadequate, identifying procedures needed to
upgrade these capabilities.


Geographic Characteristics
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is located in the northeast corner of the State
of Florida, approximately 10 miles from the State of Georgia. The Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County comprises 850.27 square miles (i.e., 544,175 acres). It measures
approximately 40 miles from east to west at its widest extent, and 33 miles from south to north.
(Source: Jacksonville Planning and Development Department, JPDD).


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                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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The highest elevation in the City of Jacksonville/Duval County is 199 feet above sea level. This
elevation is found in the ancient ocean ridges located in the extreme southwest corner of the
County. From that point, the land surfaces gently slope eastward toward the ocean. The County is
characterized by low level coastal plains, interrupted by a series of ancient marine terraces. These
terraces, or ridges, have been modified by stream erosion.


The major geographical feature of the county is the St. Johns River, which splits the County into 2
unequal parts. The St. Johns, its tributaries, and the Nassau River control drainage in the western,
northern, and central portions of the County. The eastern part of the County is dominated by
numerous brackish streams that empty into Pablo Creek (the Intracoastal Waterway) or directly
into the Atlantic Ocean. 47,535 acres of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County's
area, or almost 9%, is inland water (JPDD).


A considerable amount of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is comprised of
freshwater marshes and swamps along with salt marshes. The freshwater wetlands are found in
conjunction with the creeks and stream valleys in the southeastern, western, and northern portions
of the county and in isolated pockets in the western sector. Salt marshes are found in the St.
Johns and Nassau River valleys in northeast Duval County.


Existing Land Use Characteristics
Historically, Duval County has developed over the past 200 years from a crossing at the St. Johns
River on the Kings Road from Georgia to St. Augustine into a sprawling, diversified community.
Urban development originated in 1822 when the site of Jacksonville was first surveyed and
formally organized. Duval County was created in the same year, with Jacksonville designated as
the county seat. The settlement was originally established to service the traffic crossing the river,
but soon became a center of river-borne traffic into the state's interior.


Developments spreading along the St. Johns, such as Chaseville, New Berlin, Mayport, and
Mandarin, were linked by the river. The advent of railroads into this area spurred further
development, especially with the crossing of the St. Johns.           The Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County became a tourist destination in the late 1800's, as well as a terminus for
tourists proceeding up river to interior resorts, such as Green Cove Springs and Switzerland. A
railroad line was built to Pablo Beach (now Jacksonville Beach), establishing a new corridor of
development from the South Jacksonville area to the beach.


As Jacksonville became a railroad and water traffic hub, commercial and industrial development
spread along these avenues of commerce. Major commercial and industrial activity are now found
radiating from the original center of Jacksonville along major railroads and highways as well as
northward along the St. Johns towards the Atlantic Ocean.


Residential development often followed this commercial and industrial growth, but not entirely
unique to our area, major residential satellite developments grew up in remote areas of the county.
Areas such as Arlington, Mandarin, Ortega and the Beaches grew, attracting supporting



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                                              CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                         COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


commercial uses, and have grown to where today these and numerous other once-outlying areas
now make up the unified urban fabric of Duval County.


Although close to 859,3614 persons live in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, the
pattern of development has left large, mostly undeveloped quarters of the County. While some
areas contain scattered development of farms and large lot residential uses, large parts of the
County, notably the southwest portion, is largely untouched, mostly held in large tracts of land
devoted to tree farming.


The following list summarizes the existing land use of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County:


                            Residential                                        15.4%
                            Commercial                                          1.4%
                            Industrial                                          2.1%
                            Open Space/Recreation                               1.1%
                            Public Facilities                                  11.5%
                            Conservation/Historic Pres.                         1.7%
                            Agricultural                                       26.2%
                            Vacant/Undeveloped                                 40.8%


Surface Water System
Headwaters of the St. Johns River are located in a marsh area west of Fort Pierce in St. Lucie
County, more than 300 miles from the river's mouth at Mayport. Over these 300 miles, the drop in
elevation is only about 25 feet. Of this 25 foot drop in elevation, approximately 20 feet occur during
the river's first 90 miles. For this reason, the river has the appearance of a vast lake often with
indiscernible flow.


Tidal conditions are clearly evident near the river's mouth in the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County. Due to the extremely flat terrain, high evapo-transpiration rates, and
variable freshwater flows, these tidal variations are also experienced as far upriver as Lake
George, 115 miles from the river's mouth. Tidal effects have been recorded as far as 161 miles
upstream at Lake Monroe under combined conditions of extreme drought and high tide conditions.
From Lake George north to the Atlantic, the river's flow normally reverses with the change in the
tide.


The average discharge of the St. Johns River at its mouth is estimated at 8,300 cubic feet per
second (cfs). Reversal of flow by tidal action causes upstream and downstream flow at
Jacksonville to reach 130,000 cfs. At the St. Johns River entrance, flood tides (incoming tides)
with average velocities of 1.9 knots and ebb tides (outgoing tides) with average velocities of 2.3
knots occur. This changing direction of flow in the St. Johns River occurs throughout the county
area. However, at Mandarin Point, essentially opposite Orange Park (Clay County), average flood
tide and ebb tide velocities are diminished to 0.6 and 0.7 knots, respectively.

4
    Population figure is an estimated projection of Duval County population for 2005 reported by U.S. Census Bureau.


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                                      CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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The capacity of the main stem of the St. Johns River to store water is tremendous owing to: (1) the
great width of channel in the reach between Palatka and Jacksonville, (2) low hydraulic gradients,
flood plain which in places is more than 10 miles wide. Storm water is held in storage for long
periods before being discharged to the sea.


Flood Plain Areas
Extensive flood plain areas exist in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County due to the
slight elevations of land above sea level and the relatively flat topographic relief of the land surface.
Flood plain areas exist around the St. Johns River and its tributaries as well as around the coastal
lagoon and saltmarsh system.


In addition to flood plains surrounding large water bodies and their tributaries, there are large areas
within the county's interior which experience periodic flooding. These flood prone areas are
generally the result of flat, poorly drained land where accumulated rainfall runs in a sheetflow or
ponds on the surface.


The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County experiences its most severe flooding when
heavy rainfall is accompanied by a rise in sea level due to a storm surge or wind and wave set-up.
Hurricanes and prolonged or severe northeasters are the predominant causes of such flooding
which can be greatly exaggerated when occurring during one or more periods of high tide.
However, even in less severe events such as tropical storms or localized thunderstorms, rainfall
alone can and has caused flooding.


Flood Hazard Areas
Major flood hazard areas exist along the Intracoastal Waterway and adjoining creeks and salt
marshes. Inland to the west, a flood zone of similar size and shape exists from just above
McCormick Road south of Fort Caroline to past Beach Boulevard. Although large portions of land
east of the Intracoastal Waterway are outside of the 100-year flood zone, the entire Beaches area
is susceptible to flooding from coastal storms due to the nature of barrier islands acting as
overwash plains for storm surges. Low-lying areas adjacent to water bodies or areas of high
surface runoff are generally at risk. Most of the areas along these waterways are developed in
residential uses.


The majority of the land bounded by Southside Boulevard on the west, Hodges Boulevard to the
east, J. Turner Butler Boulevard to the south, and Beach Boulevard on the north, is within the flood
hazard area. Much of this area is wetlands. An extensive 100 year flood hazard area exists south
of J. Turner Butler Boulevard, west of Southside Boulevard and northeast of U. S. 1.


Another large flood hazard area exists between Hood and Losco Roads in Mandarin. Perhaps the
largest continuous flood hazard area occurs in the relatively undeveloped southeast corner of the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. The large wetland area drains southwestward
toward Durbin Creek and northeastward toward Pablo Creek. Pablo Creek has an extensive flood
plain area that drains much of the land surrounding the University of North Florida, from Mill Dam
Branch to Cedar Swamp Creek.

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                                     CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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Julington Creek forms a major flood plain area in conjunction with its tributaries. Several low areas
along the St. Johns River in the Southeast District would be flooded by a 100 year flood. The
northern part of Duval County is heavily influenced by the St. Johns River, Nassau River, and
Atlantic Ocean, being heavily dissected by many tributaries and branching creeks along which
flood hazard zones exist. Aside from the highest uplands and barrier island ridges, a majority of all
land east of Dames Point falls within the 100 Year Flood Hazard Zone.


The Nassau River and Intracoastal Waterway are surrounded by extensive marsh lands which are
all at risk of flooding. Thomas Creek's flood plain borders the county boundary on the northwest.
Flood hazard zones of irregular size and shape are scattered over the entire district.


The Cedar River, Sawmill Creek, and Ribault River comprise the main flood plain area in northwest
Duval County. Isolated patches of flood hazard area can be found; however, most of western
Duval County is of relatively high elevation.


Southwest Duval County contains some of the highest elevations in the county, yet there are
extensive flood hazard zones west of Yellow Water Creek. McGirts Creek and the Ortega River
form a major flood plain area that extends from Old Plank Road southeast to the Clay County line
then curves toward the northeast where it meets the Cedar River and then enters the St. Johns
River.


Transportation Network
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is well-connected to its region, the state and
nation by several interstate and other federal highways, an international airport, two municipal
airports, extensive rail service provided by three major railroads (Southern, Florida East Coast, and
CSX) and a major port for ocean and river traffic.


The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County contains approximately 142 miles of highways,
487 miles of arterial, and 492 miles of collector streets.


DEMOGRAPHICS
The population of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is distributed primarily along
the St. Johns River radiating out from the downtown area. In the last 10 to 15 years, the area
between Southside Boulevard and the beaches has been developed with residential land uses
averaging 3 to 4 dwelling units to the acre. The beaches are nearly built out and combine to a total
of close to 50,000 people.


The overall distribution of population by planning district can be seen on the following table. The
age distribution chart that follows shows that by far the majority of the population is less than 45
years old. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County has an average of 1.429 persons
per acre or 915 people per square mile.



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                                 CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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The population of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County in 2004 was 805,000;
417,000 (52 percent) females and 388,000 (48 percent) males. The median age was 35.1 years.
Twenty-seven percent of the population were under 18 years and 10 percent were 65 years and
older.




Figure 11. Age distribution of people in Duval County




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                                 CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                            COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN




Figure 12. Duval County population density & distribution




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                                 CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                            COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN




Figure 13. Duval County population distribution by age/gender




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                                              CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                         COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN


Duval County farm worker population
Analysis by the Jacksonville Planning and Development Department’s May 2000 Housing Element
of the 2010 Comprehensive Plan indicates that farm worker housing is not a need in the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County.


Table 3. Duval County farm worker population

                 Male:
                       Farmers and farm managers                                    152
                       Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations                   779
                 Female:
                       Farmers and farm managers                                    52
                       Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations                   217
                Total:                                                              1,200

       Source: 2000 U.S. Census Summary File
       NOTE: Data based on a sample except in P3, P4, H3, and H4. For information on confidentiality protection, sampling
       error, non-sampling error, and definitions see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/expsf3.htm.




Duval County annual/seasonal tourist population
According to Jacksonville and the Jacksonville Beaches Convention & Visitors Bureau, there were
6.2 million visiting the Jacksonville area during 2004. The number of tourists and visitors to this
area increased from 5.14 million in 2002.


The average hotel occupancy in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County in 2005 was
69.1%. With approximately 15,200 hotel rooms in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County, on any given day, there are approximately 10,000 to 15,000 visitors in Jacksonville.




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                                                          CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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Duval County Special Needs Population
Figure 14. Duval County Special Needs Population distribution



                                         2005 DUVAL COUNTY SPECIAL MEDICAL NEEDS
                                            TOTAL NUMBER OF REGISTRANTS = 1,365

                           400

                           350
   VULNERABLE POPULATION




                           300

                           250

                           200

                           150

                           100

                            50

                             0
                                 32201
                                 32202
                                 32204
                                 32205
                                 32206
                                 32207
                                 32208
                                 32209
                                 32210
                                 32211
                                 32212
                                 32215
                                 32216
                                 32217
                                 32218
                                 32219
                                 32220
                                 32221
                                 32222
                                 32223
                                 32224
                                 32225
                                 32226
                                 32227
                                 32233
                                 32234
                                 32244
                                 32246
                                 32250
                                 32254
                                 32256
                                 32257
                                 32258
                                 32266
                                 32277
                                                                       ZIP CODES




Table 4. Duval County Non-English speaking population


                                 Duval County, Florida                             Estimate
                                 Spanish:                                            16,728
                                   Linguistically isolated                            3,885
                                   Not linguistically isolated                       12,843
                                 Other Indo-European languages:                       6,281
                                   Linguistically isolated                            1,209
                                   Not linguistically isolated                        5,072
                                 Asian and Pacific Island languages:                  9,995
                                   Linguistically isolated                            1,356
                                   Not linguistically isolated                        8,639
                                 Other languages:                                     2,245
                                   Linguistically isolated                              748
                                   Not linguistically isolated                        1,497
                                 Total:                                              70,498




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                                          CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
                                                     COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN




                 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2004 American Community Survey


Duval County hearing loss/impairment population
As per Jacksonville Community Services, Individual Living Resource (part of the Jacksonville
Disabled/ Deaf Consumers Services) quoted from 65,000 to 127,000 hearing impaired citizens
living in the Jacksonville area. All of this population is at risk during times of disaster, as
appropriate communication and understanding of impending situations is paramount to the safety
of our citizens.


Duval County transient population
According to the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Hotels
and Restaurants, and the Florida Department of Health, transients constitute customers, seasonal
visitors and employees who live/work in the area for less than 60 days per year. From the U.S.
Census 2000 for Jacksonville Population and Demographics, we find that housing occupancy for
seasonal, recreational, or occasional use numbered 917 transients.


Table 5 below, describes in detail the demographics of the population of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County.


Table 5. Demographic description of Duval County's population


Characteristic                                                   Estimate     Percent   U.S. avg.
Total population                                                  805,002      N/A        N/A
Male                                                              388,043      48.2     48.90%
Female                                                            416,959      51.8     51.10%
Median age (years)                                                  35.1       N/A        36.2
Under 5 years                                                      63,234       7.9      7.00%
18 years and over                                                 585,847      72.8     74.50%


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                                               CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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Characteristic                                                   Estimate       Percent      U.S. avg.
65 years and over                                                 82,146          10.2       12.00%
White                                                             519,608         64.5       75.60%
Black or African American                                         233,200         29         12.20%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race)                                  41,124          5.1        14.20%
American Indian and Alaska Native                                  2,923          0.4         0.80%
Asian                                                             27,432          3.4         4.20%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander                         636            0.1         0.10%
Some other race                                                    8,617          1.1         5.20%
Two or more races                                                 12,586          1.6         1.90%
Social characteristics
Population 25 years and over                                      513,622         N/A          N/A
High school graduate or higher                                     N/A            88.4       83.90%
Bachelor's degree or higher                                        N/A            24.3       27.00%
Civilian veterans (civilian pop. 18 yrs. and over)                106,225         18.3       11.20%
Disability status (population 5 years and over)                   110,420         15         14.30%
Foreign born                                                      55,664          6.9        12.00%
Male, Now married, except separated (population 15 years
and over)                                                         159,070         53.8       56.40%
Female, Now married, except separated (population 15 years
and over)                                                         151,195         46.5       51.40%
Speak a language other than English at home (population 5
years and over)                                                   64,386          8.7        18.70%
Economic Characteristics
In labor force (population 16 years and over)                     421,901         69.4       65.90%
Mean travel time to work in minutes (workers 16 years and
over)                                                              23.4           N/A          24.7
Median household income (in 2004 inflation-adjusted dollars)      42,161          N/A        44,684
Median family income (in 2004 inflation-adjusted dollars)         52,235          N/A        53,692
Per capita income (in 2004 inflation-adjusted dollars)            22,760          N/A        24,020
Families below poverty level                                       N/A             10        10.10%
Individuals below poverty level                                    N/A            13.2       13.10%
Housing Characteristics
Average household size                                             2.49           N/A           2.6
Average family size                                                 3.1           N/A          3.18
Total housing units                                               357,721         N/A          N/A
Occupied housing units                                            323,166         90.3       89.60%
Owner-occupied housing units                                      205,122         63.5       67.10%
Renter-occupied housing units                                     118,044         36.5       32.90%
Vacant housing units                                              34,555          9.7        10.40%
Owner-occupied homes                                              205,122         N/A          N/A
Median value (dollars)                                            126,739         N/A        151,366
Median of selected monthly owner costs                              N/A           N/A          N/A
With a mortgage (dollars)                                          1,058          N/A         1,212
Not mortgaged (dollars)                                             292           N/A          345
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2004 American


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                                   CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY, FLORIDA
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Characteristic                                          Estimate         Percent       U.S. avg.
Community Survey




In 2004 there were 323,000 households in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. The
average household size was 2.5 people. Families made up 66 percent of the households in the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. This figure includes both married-couple families
(44 percent) and other families (22 percent). Non-family households made up 34 percent of all
households in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. Most of the non-family
households were people living alone, but some were comprised of people living in households in
which no one was related to the householder.




Figure 15. Types of households in Duval County




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Geographic mobility
In 2004, 77 percent of the people at least one year old living in the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County were living in the same residence one year earlier; 15 percent had
moved during the past year from another residence in the same county, 3 percent from another
county in the same state, 4 percent from another state, and 1 percent from abroad.




Figure 16. Geographic mobility of resident




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Education
In 2004, 88 percent of people 25 years and over had at least graduated from high school and 24
percent had a bachelor's degree or higher. Among people 16 to 19 years old, 8 percent were
dropouts; they were not enrolled in school and had not graduated from high school. The total
school enrollment in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County was 223,000 in 2004.
Preprimary school enrollment was 24,000 and elementary or high school enrollment was 147,000
children. College enrollment was 51,000.




Figure 17. Educational attainment




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Manufactured homes


There are approximately 32 mobile home parks within the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County, comprising of over 988 acres of land, nearly 5,000 manufactured homes, and housing
approximately 12,400 individuals.         All mobile home parks in Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County are strongly urged to evacuate during all tropical storm events
regardless of whether or not they are located in any of the storm surge evacuation zones.




Figure 18. Manufactured home parks in Duval County


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Figure 19. Correctional facility population




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ECONOMIC PROFILE
Table 6 below shows a variety of selected economic characteristics of Duval County.


Table 6. Economic Characteristics
           Characteristic                                           Estimate
           Population 16 years and over                              607,685
           In labor force                                            421,901
           Civilian labor force                                      417,163
              Employed                                               383,383
              Unemployed                                              33,780
           Armed Forces                                                4,738
           Not in labor force                                        185,784
           Civilian labor force                                      417,163
           Unemployed                                                  8.1%
           Females 16 years and over                                 319,387
           In labor force                                            199,443
           Civilian labor force                                      198,452
              Employed                                               176,933
           Children under 6 years                                     67,513
           All parents in family in labor force                       41,926
           Children 6 to 17 years                                    131,650
           All parents in family in labor force                       97,439
           Population 16 to 19 years                                  41,720
           Not enrolled in school and not a H.S. graduate              3,541
           Unemployed or not in the labor force                        2,968
           COMMUTING TO WORK
           Workers 16 years and over                                 377,706
           Car, truck, or van -- drove alone                         306,611
           Car, truck, or van -- carpooled                            40,421
           Public transportation (excluding taxicab)                   6,812
           Walked                                                      9,128
           Other means                                                 7,157
           Worked at home                                              7,577
           Mean travel time to work (minutes)                           23.4
           Employed civilian population 16 years and over            383,383
           OCCUPATION
           Management, professional, and related occupations         124,956
           Service occupations                                        59,728
           Sales and office occupations                              115,955
           Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations                      0
           Construction, extraction, maintenance and repair
           occupations                                                41,469
           Production, transportation, and material moving
           occupations                                                41,275
           INDUSTRY
           Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining      1,813
           Construction                                               29,641


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           Characteristic                                            Estimate
           Manufacturing                                               24,180
           Wholesale trade                                             17,634
           Retail trade                                                41,793
           Transportation and warehousing, and utilities               28,072
           Information                                                  9,262
           Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and
           leasing                                                     44,162
           Professional, scientific, and management, and
           administrative and waste management services                48,885
           Educational services, and health care, and social
           assistance                                                  59,088
           Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation,
           and food services                                           32,238
           Other services, except public administration                22,908
           Public administration                                       23,707
           CLASS OF WORKER
           Private wage and salary workers                            307,862
           Government workers                                          57,034
           Self-employed workers in own not incorporated business      18,125
           Unpaid family workers                                          362
           INCOME AND BENEFITS (IN 2004 INFLATION-ADJUSTED DOLLARS)
           Total households                                     323,166
           Less than $10,000                                     30,114
           $10,000 to $14,999                                    20,063
           $15,000 to $24,999                                    41,219
           $25,000 to $34,999                                    43,994
           $35,000 to $49,999                                    47,457
           $50,000 to $74,999                                    68,032
           $75,000 to $99,999                                    33,452
           $100,000 to $149,999                                  26,695
           $150,000 to $199,999                                   7,287
           $200,000 or more                                       4,853
           Median household income (dollars)                     42,161
           Mean household income (dollars)                       54,779
           With earnings                                        271,680
           Mean earnings (dollars)                               52,989
           With Social Security                                  75,263
           Mean Social Security income (dollars)                 12,912
           With retirement income                                58,611
           Mean retirement income (dollars)                      15,846
           With Supplemental Security Income                     12,142
           Mean Supplemental Security Income (dollars)            7,727
           With cash public assistance income                     4,636
           Mean cash public assistance income (dollars)           1,641
           With Food Stamp benefits in the past 12 months        22,194
           Families                                             212,105
           Less than $10,000                                     12,412
           $10,000 to $14,999                                    10,698


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           Characteristic                                               Estimate
           $15,000 to $24,999                                             21,195
           $25,000 to $34,999                                             22,428
           $35,000 to $49,999                                             33,490
           $50,000 to $74,999                                             51,220
           $75,000 to $99,999                                             26,313
           $100,000 to $149,999                                           23,398
           $150,000 to $199,999                                            6,293
           $200,000 or more                                                4,658
           Median family income (dollars)                                 52,235
           Mean family income (dollars)                                   64,471
           Per capita income (dollars)                                    22,760
           Non-family households                                         111,061
           Median non-family income (dollars)                             29,089
           Mean non-family income (dollars)                               34,990
           Median earnings:                                               27,008
           Male full-time, year-round workers (dollars)                   38,620
           Female full-time, year-round workers (dollars)                 31,303
           PERCENTAGE OF FAMILIES AND PEOPLE WHOSE INCOME IN THE
           PAST 12 MONTHS IS BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL
           All families                                                      10
           With related children under 18 years                             14.9
              With related children under 5 years only                      17.4
           Married couple families                                           3.9
           With related children under 18 years                              4.4
              With related children under 5 years only                       9.5
           Families with female householder, no husband present             26.4
           With related children under 18 years                             33.5
              With related children under 5 years only                      40.1
           All people                                                       13.2
           Under 18 years                                                     19
           Related children under 18 years                                  18.7
              Related children under 5 years                                21.3
              Related children 5 to 17 years                                17.7
           18 years and over                                                11.1
           18 to 64 years                                                   11.2
           65 years and over                                                10.9
           People in families                                               11.9
           Unrelated individuals 15 years and over                          21.5
           Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2004 American Community Survey




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Industries
In 2004, for the employed population 16 years and older, the leading industries in the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County were educational, health, and social services, totaling 15
percent, closely followed by professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste
management services, at 13 percent. As demonstrated by Figure 20 below, agriculture made up
less than 1 percent.


Figure 20. Employment by industry




Occupational characteristics
Among the most common occupations were: Management, professional, and related occupations,
33 percent; Sales and office occupations, 30 percent; Service occupations, 16 percent;
Construction, extraction, and maintenance occupations, 11 percent; and Production,
transportation, and material moving occupations, 11 percent. Seventy-four percent of the people
employed were private wage and salary workers; 15 percent were federal, state, or local
government workers; and 5 percent were self-employed.


Commuting
Eighty-one percent of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County workers drove to work
alone in 2004, 11 percent carpooled, 2 percent took public transportation, and 4 percent used other
means. The remaining 2 percent worked at home. Among those who commuted to work, it took
them on average 23.4 minutes to get to work.




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Poverty rates in Duval County
In 2004, on average 13 percent of of the population were in poverty. Figure 21 demonstrates that
19% of related children under 18 were below the poverty level, compared with 11% of people 65
years old and over. Ten percent of all families and 26 percent of families with a female
householder and no husband present had incomes below the poverty level.




Figure 21. Poverty rates in Duval County




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Figure 22. Types of housing units in Duval County




Housing characteristics
In 2004, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County had a total of 358,000 housing units,
10 percent of which were vacant. Of the total housing units, 66 percent were in single-unit
structures, 27 percent were in multi-unit structures, and 7 percent were mobile homes. Twenty-
seven percent of the housing units were built since 1990.


Occupied housing units
In 2004, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County had 323,000 occupied housing units -
205,000 (63 percent) owner occupied and 118,000 (37 percent) renter occupied. Eight percent of
the households did not have telephone service and 9 percent of the households did not have
access to a car, truck, or van for private use. Multi Vehicle households were not rare. Thirty-nine
percent had two vehicles and another 12 percent had three or more.


Housing costs
The median monthly housing costs for mortgaged owners was $1,058, non-mortgaged owners
$292, and renters $691. Figure 23 shows that 29% of occupants have mortgages, 10 percent of
occupants do not have mortgages, and 52% of renters in the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County spent 30% or more of their household income on housing.




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Figure 23. Occupants with a housing cost burden in Duval County




Potential economic impacts of hazards

Employment and per capita income

The effects of the hazards that will have an impact on employment levels and per capita income in
Duval County are dependent upon the type and magnitude of the disaster. The effects of a direct
hurricane strike and associated phenomena can be expected to have a major temporary negative
impact on employment and income in Duval County. All of the County’s industries will be disrupted
in the aftermath of a storm, but large-scale economic disruptions will probably be short-lived.
According to research, there will be a short-term spike in unemployment claims. This will be
tempered when employment increases as workers are added in emergency services, cleanup, and
construction. Tourism and industries in the beach municipalities, coastal areas and along the river
may face more long-term economic challenges, having faced the full impact of a tropical storm’s
forces.


Brush fires, large terrorism events and critical infrastructure/transportation disruptions may also
have a widespread, temporary negative effect on employment and wages. The effects of most
other hazards on employment levels can be expected to have more of a localized impact. For
example: a hazardous materials spill will only have an effect on employment at the actual site


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where the event occurs; a tree disease outbreak will only affect timber workers. Other hazards
such as a critical infrastructure disruption may have a widespread but temporary effect.


Average property values

Hazards with widespread effects, such as hurricanes and its associated storm surge, will cause a
short-term County-wide devaluation in property values. A large portion of the homes in the County
will be destroyed or damaged. However, redevelopment may spur a long-term escalation in
property values. As with the impacts on employment, most other hazards will probably only affect a
small number of homeowners in a localized area.



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT SUPPORT FACILITIES


Public Works/Parks and Recreation Disaster Equipment Staging Areas


Table 7. Disaster Equipment Staging Areas




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Figure 24. Emergency Helicopter Landing Zones




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Figure 25. Duval County Hurricane Shelters




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Figure 26. Duval County Fire Stations




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Figure 27. Duval County Military Bases




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Figure 28. Duval County Hospitals




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Figure 29. Duval County Evacuation Routes




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Figure 30. Duval County Points-Of-Distribution (PODs)




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CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS

NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Since the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, much has
been done to improve prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation capabilities
and coordination processes across the country. A comprehensive national approach to incident
management, applicable at all jurisdictional levels and across functional disciplines, has worked to
improve the effectiveness of emergency response providers and incident management
organizations across a full spectrum of potential incidents and hazard scenarios. Such an
approach has also improved coordination and cooperation between public and private entities in a
variety of domestic incident management activities. On February 28, 2003, the President issued
Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)-5, which directed the Secretary of Homeland
Security to develop and administer a National Incident Management System (NIMS). According to
HSPD-5:

       “This system will provide a consistent nationwide approach for federal, state, and local
       governments to work effectively and efficiently together to prepare for, respond to, and
       recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. To provide for
       interoperability and compatibility among federal, state, and local capabilities, the NIMS will
       include a core set of concepts, principles, terminology, and technologies covering the
       incident command system; multi-agency coordination systems; unified command; training;
       identification and management of resources (including systems for classifying types of
       resources); qualifications and certification; and the collection, tracking, and reporting of
       incident information and incident resources.”

While most incidents are generally handled on a daily basis by a single jurisdiction at the local
level, there are important instances in which successful incident management operations depend
on the involvement of multiple jurisdictions, functional agencies, and emergency responder
disciplines. These instances require effective and efficient coordination across this broad spectrum
of organizations and activities. The NIMS uses a systems approach to integrate the best of existing
processes and methods into a unified national framework for incident management. This
framework forms the basis for interoperability and compatibility that, in turn, enables a diverse set
of public and private organizations to conduct well-integrated and effective incident management
operations. It does this through a core set of concepts, principles, procedures, organizational
processes, terminology, and standards requirements applicable to a broad community of NIMS
users.


To provide this framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on an
appropriate balance of flexibility and standardization. NIMS provides a consistent, flexible, and
adjustable national framework within which government and private entities at all levels can work
together to manage domestic incidents, regardless of their cause, size, location, or complexity.
This flexibility applies across all phases of incident management: prevention, preparedness,
response, recovery, and mitigation. NIMS also provides a set of standardized organizational
structures – such as the Incident Command System (ICS), multi-agency coordination systems, and
public information systems – as well as requirements for processes, procedures, and systems
designed to improve interoperability among jurisdictions and disciplines in various areas, including:
training; resource management; personnel qualification and certification; equipment certification;


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communications and information management; technology support; and continuous system
improvement.
NIMS Components
The NIMS integrates existing best practices into a consistent, nationwide approach to incident
management that is applicable at all jurisdictional levels and across functional disciplines in an all-
hazards context. Six major components make up this systems approach. The following discussion
provides a brief synopsis of each major component of the NIMS, as well as how these components
work together as a system to provide the national framework for preparing for, preventing,
responding to, and recovering from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity. A
more detailed discussion of each component can be found in a variety of sources, particularly the
NIMS Integration Center (http://www.fema.gov/nims/index.shtm).


Command and Management.
NIMS standard incident command structures are based on three key organizational systems:


The Incident Command System (ICS)
The ICS defines the operating characteristics, interactive management components, and structure
of incident management and emergency response organizations engaged throughout the life cycle
of an incident;


Multi-agency Coordination Systems.
These define the operating characteristics, interactive management components, and
organizational structure of supporting incident management entities engaged at the federal, state,
local, and regional levels through mutual-aid agreements and other assistance arrangements; and


Public Information Systems.
These refer to processes, procedures, and systems for communicating timely and accurate
information to the public during crisis or emergency situations.


Preparedness
Effective incident management begins with a host of preparedness activities conducted on a
“steady-state” basis, well in advance of any potential incident. Preparedness involves an
integrated combination of planning, training, exercises, personnel qualification and certification
standards, equipment acquisition and certification standards, and publication management
processes and activities.

           •    Planning – Plans describe how personnel, equipment, and other resources are
                used to support incident management and emergency response activities. Plans
                provide mechanisms and systems for setting priorities, integrating multiple entities
                and functions, and ensuring that communications and other systems are available
                and integrated in support of a full spectrum of incident management requirements.



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          •     Training – Training includes standard courses on multi-agency incident command
                and management, organizational structure, and operational procedures; discipline-
                specific and agency-specific incident management courses; and courses on the
                integration and use of supporting technologies.
          •     Exercises – Incident management organizations and personnel must participate in
                realistic exercises – including multidisciplinary, multi-jurisdictional, and multi-sector
                interaction – to improve integration and interoperability and optimize resource
                utilization during incident operations.
          •     Qualification and Certification – Qualification and certification activities are
                undertaken to identify and publish national-level standards and measure
                performance against these standards to ensure that incident management and
                emergency responder personnel are appropriately qualified and officially certified to
                perform NIMS-related functions.
          •     Equipment Acquisition and Certification – Incident management organizations
                and emergency responders at all levels rely on various types of equipment to
                perform mission essential tasks. A critical component of operational preparedness
                is the acquisition of equipment that will perform to certain standards, including the
                capability to be interoperable with similar equipment used by other jurisdictions.
          •     Publications Management – Publications management refers to forms and forms
                standardization, developing publication materials, administering publications –
                including establishing naming and numbering conventions, managing the publication
                and promulgation of documents, and exercising control over sensitive documents –
                and revising publications when necessary.

Resource Management
The NIMS defines standardized mechanisms and establishes requirements for processes to
describe, inventory, mobilize, dispatch, track, and recover resources over the life cycle of an
incident. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County coordinates a Resource
Management ICP to perform this function.

Communications and Information Management.
The NIMS identifies the requirement for a standardized framework for communications, information
management (collection, analysis, and dissemination), and information-sharing at all levels of
incident management. These elements are briefly described as follows:

          •     Incident Management Communications – Incident management organizations
                must ensure that effective, interoperable communications processes, procedures,
                and systems exist to support a wide variety of incident management activities
                across agencies and jurisdictions.
          •     Information Management – Information management processes, procedures, and
                systems help ensure that information, including communications and data, flows
                efficiently through a commonly accepted architecture supporting numerous agencies
                and jurisdictions responsible for managing or directing domestic incidents, those
                impacted by the incident, and those contributing resources to the incident
                management effort. Effective information management enhances incident
                management and response and helps insure that crisis decision-making is better
                informed.



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Supporting Technologies
Technology and technological systems provide supporting capabilities essential to implementing
and continuously refining the NIMS. These include voice and data communications systems,
information management systems (i.e., record keeping and resource tracking), and data display
systems. Also included are specialized technologies that facilitate ongoing operations and incident
management activities in situations that call for unique technology-based capabilities.


Ongoing Management and Maintenance
This component establishes an activity to provide strategic direction for and oversight of the NIMS,
supporting both routine review and the continuous refinement of the system and its components
over the long term.


INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM
The incident command system (ICS) is a management system designed to enable effective and
efficient domestic incident management by integrating a combination of facilities, equipment,
personnel, procedures, and communications operating within a common organizational structure,
designed to enable effective and efficient incident management. A basic premise of ICS is that it is
widely applicable. It is used to organize both near-term and long-term field-level operations for a
broad spectrum of emergencies, from small to complex incidents, both natural and manmade. ICS
is used by all levels of government – federal, state, and local – as well as by many private-sector
and nongovernmental organizations. ICS is also applicable across disciplines. It is normally
structured to facilitate activities in five major functional areas: command, operations, planning,
logistics, and finance and administration. Acts of biological, chemical, radiological, and nuclear
terrorism represent particular challenges for the traditional ICS structure. Events that are not site
specific, are geographically dispersed, or evolve over longer periods of time will require
extraordinary coordination between federal, state, local, private-sector, and nongovernmental
organizations. An area command may be established to oversee the management of such
incidents.


Concepts and Principles.
Most Incidents Are Managed Locally
The initial response to most incidents is typically handled by local “911” dispatch centers,
emergency responders within a single jurisdiction, and direct supporters of emergency responders.
Most responses need go no further. In other instances, incidents that begin with a single response
discipline within a single jurisdiction may rapidly expand to multidiscipline, multi-jurisdictional
incidents requiring significant additional resources and operational support. Whether for incidents
in which additional resources are required or are provided from different organizations within a
single jurisdiction or outside the jurisdiction, or for complex incidents with national-level implications
(such as an emerging infectious disease or a bio-terror attack), the ICS provides a flexible core
mechanism for coordinated and collaborative incident management. When a single incident
covers a large geographical area, multiple local ICS organizations may be required. Effective
cross-jurisdictional coordination using processes and systems described in the NIMS is absolutely
critical in this instance.


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NIMS requires that field command and management functions be performed in accordance with a
standard set of ICS organizations, doctrine, and procedures. However, Incident Commanders
generally retain the flexibility to modify procedures or organizational structure to align as necessary
with the operating characteristics of their specific jurisdictions or to accomplish the mission in the
context of a particular hazard scenario.


ICS Is Modular and Scalable
ICS is designed to have the following operating characteristics; it should be
           •    suitable for operations within a single jurisdiction or single agency, a single
                jurisdiction with multi-agency involvement, or multiple jurisdictions with multi-agency
                involvement;
           •    applicable and acceptable to users throughout the country;
           •    readily adaptable to new technology;
           •    adaptable to any emergency or incident to which domestic incident
           •    management agencies would be expected to respond; and
           •    have a scalable organizational structure that is based on the size and complexity of
                the incident.

ICS Has Interactive Management Components
These set the stage for effective and efficient incident management and emergency response.


ICS Establishes Common Terminology
These include a standard set of pre-designated organizational elements and functions, common
names for resources used to support incident operations, common “typing” for resources to reflect
specific capabilities, and common identifiers for facilities and operational locations used to support
incident operations. These standards and procedures enable diverse organizations to work
together effectively.


ICS Incorporates Measurable Objectives
Measurable objectives ensure fulfillment of incident management goals. Objective-setting begins
at the top and is communicated throughout the entire organization.


ICS Should Be User Friendly
Its implementation of should have the least possible disruption on existing systems and processes.
This will facilitate its acceptance across a nationwide user community and to insure continuity in
the transition process from normal operations. Additionally, ICS should be applicable across a
wide spectrum of emergency response and incident management disciplines. This will enable the
communication, coordination, and integration critical to effective and efficient NIMS.




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Management Characteristics
ICS is based on proven management characteristics.          Each contributes to the strength and
efficiency of the overall system.


Common Terminology
ICS establishes common terminology that allows diverse incident management and support
entities to work together across a wide variety of incident management functions and hazard
scenarios. This common terminology covers the following:
          •     Organizational Functions – Major functions and functional units with domestic
                incident management responsibilities are named and defined. Terminology for the
                organizational elements involved is standard and consistent.
          •     Resource Descriptions – Major resources – including personnel, facilities, and
                major equipment and supply items – used to support incident management activities
                are given common names and are “typed” with respect to their capabilities, to help
                avoid confusion and to enhance interoperability. The process for accomplishing this
                task is specified in Chapter IV.
          •     Incident Facilities – Common terminology is used to designate the facilities in the
                vicinity of the incident area that will be used in the course of incident management
                activities.

Modular Organization
The incident command organizational structure develops in a top-down, modular fashion that is
based on the size and complexity of the incident, as well as the specifics of the hazard
environment created by the incident. When needed, separate functional elements can be
established, each of which may be further subdivided to enhance internal organizational
management and external coordination. Responsibility for the establishment and expansion of the
ICS modular organization ultimately rests with the Incident Commander (IC), who bases these on
the requirements of the situation. As incident complexity increases, the organization expands from
the top down as functional responsibilities are delegated. Concurrently with structural expansion,
the number of management positions expands to adequately address the requirements of the
incident.


Management by Objectives
Management by objectives represents an approach that is communicated throughout the entire
ICS organization. This approach includes the following:
          • establishing overarching objectives;
          • developing and issuing assignments, plans, procedures, and protocols;
          • establishing specific, measurable objectives for various incident management
              functional activities, and directing efforts to attain them, in support of defined
              strategic objectives; and
          • documenting results to measure performance and facilitate corrective action.




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Reliance on an Incident Action Plan
Incident action plans (IAPs) provide a coherent means of communicating the overall incident
objectives in the contexts of both operational and support activities.


Manageable Span of Control
Span of control is key to effective and efficient incident management. Within ICS, the span of
control of any individual with incident management supervisory responsibility should range from
three to seven subordinates. The type of incident, nature of the task, hazards and safety factors,
and distances between personnel and resources all influence span-of-control considerations.


Pre-designated Incident Locations and Facilities
Various types of operational locations and support facilities are established in the vicinity of an
incident to accomplish a variety of purposes, such as decontamination, donated goods processing,
mass care, and evacuation. The IC will direct the identification and location of facilities based on
the requirements of the situation at hand. Typical pre-designated facilities include incident
command posts, bases, camps, staging areas, mass casualty triage areas, and others, as
required.


Comprehensive Resource Management
Maintaining an accurate and up-to-date picture of resource utilization is a critical component of
domestic incident management. Resource management includes processes for categorizing,
ordering, dispatching, tracking, and recovering resources. It also includes processes for
reimbursement for resources, as appropriate. Resources are defined as personnel, teams,
equipment, supplies, and facilities available or potentially available for assignment or allocation in
support of incident management and emergency response activities. Procedural details for
resource management can be found in the Resource Management ICP.


Integrated Communications
Incident communications are facilitated through the development and use of a common
communications plan and interoperable communications processes and architectures. This
integrated approach links the operational and support units of the various agencies involved and is
necessary to maintain communications connectivity and discipline and enable common situational
awareness and interaction. Preparedness planning must address the equipment, systems, and
protocols necessary to achieve integrated voice and data incident management communications.


Establishment and Transfer of Command
The command function must be clearly established from the beginning of incident operations. The
agency with primary jurisdictional authority over the incident designates the individual at the scene
responsible for establishing command. When command is transferred, the process must include a
briefing that captures all essential information for continuing safe and effective operations.




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Chain of Command and Unity of Command
Chain of command refers to the orderly line of authority within the ranks of the incident
management organization. Unity of command means that every individual has a designated
supervisor to whom they report at the scene of the incident. These principles clarify reporting
relationships and eliminate the confusion caused by multiple, conflicting directives. Incident
managers at all levels must be able to control the actions of all personnel under their supervision.


Unified Command
In incidents involving multiple jurisdictions, a single jurisdiction with multi-agency involvement, or
multiple jurisdictions with multi-agency involvement, unified command allows agencies with
different legal, geographic, and functional authorities and responsibilities to work together
effectively without affecting individual agency authority, responsibility, or accountability.


Accountability
Effective accountability at all jurisdictional levels and within individual functional areas during
incident operations is essential. To that end, the following principles must be adhered to:
           •    Check-In – All responders, regardless of agency affiliation, must report in to receive
                an assignment in accordance with the procedures established by the IC.
           •    Incident Action Plan – Response operations must be directed and coordinated as
                outlined in the IAP.
           •    Unity of Command – Each individual involved in incident operations will be
                assigned to only one supervisor.
           •    Span of Control – Supervisors must be able to adequately supervise and control
                their subordinates, as well as communicate with and manage all resources under
                their supervision.
           •    Resource Tracking – Supervisors must record and report resource status changes
                as they occur.

Deployment
Personnel and equipment should respond only when requested or when dispatched by an
appropriate authority.


Information and Intelligence Management
The incident management organization must establish a process for gathering, sharing, and
managing incident-related information and intelligence.


Additional, more detailed information on the incident command system can be found in a variety of
sources, particularly the NIMS Integration Center (http://www.fema.gov/nims/index.shtm) and the
National Interagency Coordination Center (http://www.nifc.gov/fireinfo/ics_disc.html).




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ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEM
The governmental structure of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is unique in
Florida. The county government of Duval County and the municipal government of the City of
Jacksonville are consolidated into a single body politic, which has jurisdiction as a chartered county
government throughout Duval County, and has jurisdiction as a municipality throughout Duval
County except in the cities of Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach and the Town of
Baldwin. The executive power of the consolidated government (except as retained by the Beach
municipalities and Baldwin) is vested in the Mayor of Jacksonville, who is chief executive and
administrative officer of the consolidated government. This system is depicted in Figure 31 on the
next page.




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Figure 31. City of Jacksonville Organizational Structure




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NORMAL, NON-EMERGENCY OPERATIONS
During the time when the emergency preparedness organization is in routine or non-emergency
operational status, the Emergency Preparedness Division Chief and the Division is responsible for
maintaining the records, files and other papers pertaining to the various services of the emergency
preparedness organization and for keeping, and as necessary, revising an accurate, adequate
record of personnel assignments to the emergency preparedness positions authorized by the
CEMP and subordinate plans. The Division also provides the headquarters services for the
emergency preparedness organization and Emergency Operations Center, and performs such
functions as authorized by the CEMP to be performed while in non-emergency status. In addition
the Division shall:


1) Keep persons through the General Services District well informed by establishing and
maintaining a comprehensive educational program that focuses on emergency preparedness; such
programs shall be responsive to identified needs and shall involve, to the extent practicable, all
aspects of the community including but not limited to the media, retailers, banks, utilities,
independent agencies of the city and other public sector and private sector entities.


2) Keep the Emergency Preparedness Planning Council and the City Council well informed by
preparing and submitting an annual emergency preparedness report.


3) Identify, record and update, on an annual basis, persons with special needs residing in the
General Services District and also facilitate the development and implementation of a means
designed to pick up and return such persons to designated locations.


4) Be the central repository for all mutual aid agreements, concerning emergency preparedness,
which have been approved and authorized by the City Council.


5) Maintain a state of readiness posture by conducting exercise programs each calendar year.


Emergency Preparedness Division Organization Structure
The day-to-day management structure and line of authority of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville
and Emergency Preparedness Organization are illustrated in Figure 32 on the next page.


INCREASED READINESS PROCEDURES


The Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division is responsible for monitoring all significant
incidents and for placing on alert, those agencies that may be required to assist in the response.
To reduce the effects of disasters, a system for reacting to various warnings of impending local
disasters and emergencies of regional significance, such as hurricanes is established by
Emergency Operations Center Standard Operating Guideline (SOG) #003. This SOG recognizes



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certain conditions that trigger precautionary and response actions, either by the Emergency
Preparedness Division Staff or larger elements of the emergency response organization.


Local Disaster - In most cases, localized disasters occur without warning. In such cases where a
warning is received from the National Weather Service or other such source, the information will be
disseminated to those agencies within the County with emergency response and warning duties.
The staff of the Emergency Preparedness Division will monitor weather conditions, and if practical,
issue warning statements for the affected areas.


Figure 32. Emergency Preparedness Division organizational chart




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Hurricanes - No natural disaster has the potential for sheer destructive power as a hurricane, nor
poses a greater threat to the people of northeast Florida. Such a threat warrants special
consideration and attention during the months from June to November. However, other weather
systems also have the potential of inflicting extensive damage to our community, damage that
could easily outstrip local emergency response and recovery resources. Modern weather
monitoring equipment provides an early warning of the appearance of hurricanes in the tropics, or
other significant weather patterns, which have the potential of inflicting severe weather on
northeast Florida, such as the "Storm of the Century" winter storm of 1993 and the "Ice Storm" of
1989. These slowly developing threats normally, but obviously not always, allow preparation time.
Preparation activities by local personnel and associated disaster agencies will be governed by the
following readiness conditions:


Hurricane Season (June 1 - November 30)/Winter Storm Season (December 1 - March 1): Normal
operating procedures, monitor hemispheric weather patterns for developing weather systems.


Monitoring Conditions/Hurricane or Severe Weather Alert - Issuance of 72-Hour Hurricane/Severe
Weather Advisory. Emergency Preparedness Division staff alerts county emergency response
network of weather conditions, including likelihood of striking this area. Emergency Preparedness
Division staff will leave the EOC/Area Command in shifts to prepare their homes and families for
storm and their extended absence.


Hurricane Watch/Partial Activation - Approximately 48-hours prior to landfall and prior to an official
Hurricane Watch (36 hours till landfall) established by National Weather Service, the Emergency
Preparedness Division (EPD) staff implements readiness and response procedures, including
equipment checks, 24-hour staffing of the EOC/Area Command (likely a Level II activation), regular
reports to response agencies, etc, American Red Cross, in coordination with EPD staff, begins
identification of specific shelters to be staffed and opened.


Hurricane Warning/Full Activation - Minimum 24-hours before projected landfall of gale force winds,
and before Duval County is placed under a hurricane warning by National Hurricane Center, but
has been advised by the National Weather Service that such status is expected, the EOC/Area
Command goes to a Level I activation, evacuation order prepared.


Evacuation - A Level I EOC/Area Command activation will be implemented immediately prior to the
issuance of an evacuation order. It includes the convening of the Executive Group and the final
placement of resources to respond to and recover from a natural disaster. The goal is that during
the twelve hours prior to projected landfall, evacuation will be completed, shelters will be open and
receiving clients, advanced preparedness measures and pre-staging of response equipment will be
complete. Relocation of Beaches' governments to pre-designated inland positions will be
completed.


Re-Entry/Recovery - Threat passed. Search and rescue, damage assessment, initiation of
recovery. Levels of EOC/Area Command manning will be determined by the amount of damage,



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population displacement, and other factors. The details of these functions can be found in the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Recovery Plan ICP.


The EOC/Area Command staff will monitor weather conditions as received from the National
Weather Service and other sources. The Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division will
establish and announce increased readiness conditions as necessary prior to the full activation of
the EOC/Area Command, at which time the Mayor will assume this duty.


Prior to the activation of the EOC/Area Command, general and restricted information can be
distributed to those agencies with emergency responsibilities via Emergency Preparedness
Division FAX. Once the EOC/Area Command is active, this information will be distributed to field
personnel at outlying locations and to other activated groups within the area on a regular basis.


Throughout the developing threat of an approaching hurricane, restricted information will also be
provided by telephone to key officials, disaster organizations and medical facilities.


EMERGENCY OPERATIONS
Authorization - The Mayor of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is authorized to
activate the Emergency Preparedness Organization that shall in turn proceed to execute the
Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan, or so much thereof as is necessary. This plan is
based on the principle that the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County authorities bear the
initial responsibility for disaster response and relief. As a corollary to the principle, each agency of
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County government will accomplish the functions for which
it is responsible. This requires that each agency be aware of the functions they will have to
perform during a disaster, the agency personnel will be trained in these disaster response
functions, and that agency personnel will report to work prior to, during, and following a disaster.


During any absence of the Mayor from the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, the
president of the Jacksonville City Council shall automatically become acting mayor, with
emergency powers to act only when the public interest requires and with such additional powers as
the mayor may designate. If the mayor and the president of the Council are simultaneously absent
or incapable of acting as mayor, then the president pro tempore of the council shall automatically
become acting mayor with the same powers, as the president of the council would have had in like
circumstances. If the mayor, council president and pro tempore of the council are simultaneously
absent or incapable of acting as mayor, then the chairman of the Committee on Rules of the
council and then the Chairman of the Committee on Finance of the Council shall become acting
mayor.


State and federal governments are prepared to supplement the efforts of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County when it becomes clearly evident that the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County is unable to cope with the effects of the disaster. Jacksonville will
handle most emergencies in accordance with Chapter 674 of the Ordinance Code, which provides
for emergency continuity of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County government in the
event of any man-made or natural disasters or emergencies and creates the framework of the


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emergency response organization, establishes the need for disaster preparedness to deal with
natural and civil emergencies. Executive Order number 96-201 was issued by the Mayor to
promulgate the intent and instructions of Chapter 674, and further establishes administrative
regulations, procedures and requirements of the local emergency response organization. When
local resources are clearly inadequate to handle the situation, assistance will be requested from
higher levels of government, both state and federal.

Chapter 674.203 of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Ordinance essentially
outlines a re-organization of government when a disaster is declared and the Emergency
Preparedness Organization is activated. Chapter 674.206 paragraphs (a) and (b) outline the
Mayor’s responsibility to declare a disaster with a proclamation indicating the nature of the
disaster, the area or areas of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County threatened by it,
and the conditions, which have brought it about, and then to terminate it. It states that the Mayor
shall convene the Council at the time of declaration and report all the facts and circumstances and
recommendations in connection therewith. Authorizes the emergency preparedness organization
and the structure is described in paragraph b.


Specialized assistance for specific needs may be requested from various federal agencies.
Procedures for requesting aid from federal programs are included in the Emergency Operations
Center Standard Operating Guidelines (SOG) manual. The DEM will be kept informed of such
requests in case state coordination is later required.


Requests for local assistance will be made to the Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division
through the appropriate Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County agency. After an
evaluation of the situation has been made by the Emergency Preparedness Division based on
agency reports and reports from Damage Assessment Teams with the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County, the Mayor may direct the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County resources into the affected area and/or declare a State of Local Emergency to exist in the
area. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County CEMP will be implemented, the
Emergency Operations Center activated, and the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
resources made available for special assistance as requested by the Emergency Preparedness
Division. The Emergency Operations Center/Area Command (EOC) staffing assignments shall be
as shown in the Emergency Operations SOG. Activation of the EOC/Area Command will activate
the Emergency Preparedness Organization, which is organized using the incident command
system (ICS), similar to the organization of state and federal disaster response organizations.


The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County agencies will provide resources to assist these
designated areas according to the functional responsibilities outlined in this document and within
the Standard Operating Guideline (SOG) of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
Emergency Operations Center/Area Command (EOC). For each ICS unit or function, one agency
has lead responsibility and other agencies are assigned participating roles. The lead agency will
provide both resources and leadership relating to that unit or function, with participating agencies
providing resources as requested by the agency with lead responsibility.


When local resources are determined to be inadequate to cope with the disaster, the Mayor will
request state and/or federal assistance through the Governor. The Emergency Preparedness


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Division will coordinate with the Florida Division of Emergency Management to assure the most
effective management of such assistance.


The Mayor or his authorized designee will initiate, execute, and direct the operation. The Mayor or
his authorized designee will control the operation, either personally and or through delegation of
tasks.


Structure
The Emergency Preparedness Organization of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
shall be organized as follows:


Pursuant to Chapter 674, Ordinance Code, the head of the Emergency Preparedness Organization
shall be the Mayor, assisted by the Jacksonville Security Coordinator, an Executive Group and an
Operations Group. Control and direction of the emergency preparedness organization shall be
vested in the Mayor, who shall be responsible for the prompt, efficient execution of the emergency
management plan, or so much thereof as is necessary to:


1) Reduce the vulnerability of the people and of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
to damage, injury and loss of life and property.


2) Prepare for and execute rescue, care and treatment of persons victimized or threatened by
disaster; and


3) Provide a setting conducive to the rapid and orderly start of restoration and rehabilitation of
persons and property affected by a disaster.


The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County personnel responding to the County
Emergency Operations Center are separated into two basic working groups. This organization
separates functional areas of responsibility and facilitates the coordination of member's actions
during a disaster. Separation also reflects the space limitations and constraints of the Emergency
Operations Center.


1) The Executive Group is comprised of the Jacksonville Security Coordinator and appropriate
department heads and other key individuals identified by the Mayor. This group is the governing
authority over the others within the EOC/Area Command and elsewhere. A staff Advisory Group
composed of senior technical advisors whose expertise is vital to the successful execution of
disaster operations accompanies the Executive Policy Group.


2) The Operations Group is comprised of representatives of the many governmental and non-
governmental agencies necessary to ensure a complete and functional response to disaster
situations, and is responsible for the coordination of efforts to deal with a disaster or emergency.


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Present within the Operations Group will be the managers of those city/county agencies that are
relied on by the other representatives for support in such areas as transportation, communication
and supply. The Operations Group is divided into sections, branches, groups and units in
accordance with ICS principles. Each branch/group/unit is responsible for an element or elements
of the preparedness, response, and recovery operation.                 Branch/group/unit staffing,
responsibilities, and other information are further outlined in the Emergency Operations Center
inter-agency coordination procedures (ICPs) and standard operating guidelines (SOGs).




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Figure 33. EOC/Area Command Organizational Chart




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Emergency Operations Center Activation Levels
The Emergency Operations Center can be activated to three (3) levels, depending on the nature of
the disaster. The Mayor, through the Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division, shall
designate what level of activation is required in response to a given situation, and shall ensure all
steps for notification and operation are completed for the that level of activation:


           •    Level III – Monitoring Activation – Level III is typically a “monitoring” phase.
                Notification will be made to those agencies and branches/groups/units that would
                need to act as part of their everyday responsibilities. This activation will typically
                involve only the Emergency Preparedness Division’s staff and other members of the
                Fire and Rescue Department. This level is established to perform regular situation
                analysis functions utilizing the best information available for decision-making
                purposes.

           •    Level II – Partial Activation – All primary branches/groups/units are notified. The
                Emergency Preparedness Division personnel and the necessary
                branches/groups/units will staff the Emergency Operations Center. Includes the
                staff working at a Level III activation and representatives of those
                branches/groups/units, city/county or non-city/county agencies, EOC/Area
                Command units, or individuals as may be designated by the Chief of the Emergency
                Preparedness Division as required to address an emergency situation. The Chief of
                the Emergency Preparedness Division may activate portions of this plan in
                preparation of an anticipated major disaster, such as a hurricane or tropical storm.

           •    Level 1 – Full-Scale Activation – 24-hour staffing of the Emergency Operations
                Center. All lead and participating agencies are notified. Requires the involvement of
                the entire local emergency response organization, and would result in the full
                activation of each unit of the Emergency Operations Center.



OPERATIONS RESPONSIBILITIES
General
Officials at all levels of government share responsibility for the necessary planning needed to
minimize losses and provide relief from possible natural disasters. This shared responsibility
includes the disaster preparedness and response capabilities of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County government, municipal governments, districts and independent
authorities, volunteer agencies, and state and federal government.


Initial response will provide for an immediate reaction to alleviate human suffering, prevent loss of
life, protect property, and to return the area to normalcy in the least possible time. Operational
plans shall be developed for accomplishment of various program goals and objectives designed to
effectively reduce hazards and to bring long-range recovery to distressed areas.



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Role of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County


1. Be prepared to direct and control local response to a majority of emergencies in accordance with
local laws and mutual aid arrangements with adjacent communities, special districts and voluntary
organizations.


2. Provide immediate response through local police, fire/rescue and public facilities.


3. Establish readiness procedures to ensure proper training of personnel and the availability of
appropriate personnel and equipment in time of emergency. Readiness procedures must also
provide for notification of personnel when a warning is received from DEM.


4. Request activation of mutual aid arrangements when specific aid coordination in such
agreements is required.


5. Request assistance from other governments, either other members of the Florida Statewide
Mutual Aid Agreement, or higher levels of government, state and federal agencies, through the
Florida Division of Emergency Management.


6. Local resources are fully committed and found to be inadequate to cope with the situation.


7. A particular capability is required and is not otherwise available.


Specific Responsibilities of the Mayor
The following specific responsibilities apply to the Mayor of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County as established by Chapter 674 of the Ordinance Code. Expanded
functional responsibilities of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County agencies are
found in the Response Section of this Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan and the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Operations Center/Area Command
(EOC) Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs).


1) The Mayor is responsible for meeting the dangers presented to the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County and its people by a natural disaster. The Mayor may issue executive
orders, proclamations and regulations and amend or rescind them in the fulfillment of this
responsibility, and such executive orders, proclamations and regulations shall have the force and
effect of law during the period for which they are effective. During the continuance of a natural
disaster emergency, the Mayor is commander-in-chief of the emergency management forces
available for emergency duty. To the greatest extent possible, the Mayor shall delegate or assign
command authority by prior arrangement embodied in the emergency management plan or in
appropriate executive orders or regulations, but this shall not restrict his authority to do so by
orders issued at the time of and during the disaster emergency.


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2) The Mayor of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is the director of the
Executive/Policy Group of the Emergency Operations Center. As such, he is head of the elected
and appointed officials that have the executive authority to establish the policies that will direct
EOC/Area Command operations and emergency response actions.


3) Declaration; Termination - A natural disaster emergency shall be declared by proclamation of
the Mayor if he finds that a disaster has occurred or that the occurrence or the threat thereof is
imminent. The state of disaster emergency shall continue until the Mayor finds that the threat or
danger has been dealt with to the extent that the emergency conditions no longer exist and he
terminates the state of disaster emergency by proclamation; but no state of disaster emergency
may continue for longer than thirty days unless renewed by the Mayor. At the same time as the
state of disaster emergency is declared, the Mayor shall convene the Council in special meeting, at
which he shall report to the Council all the facts and circumstances concerning the disaster and his
recommendations in connection therewith. The Council by resolution may terminate a state of
disaster emergency at any time, whereupon the Mayor shall issue proclamation ending the state of
disaster emergency. All proclamations issued under this subsection shall indicate the nature of the
disaster, the area or areas of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County threatened by it
and the conditions which have brought it about or which make possible the termination of the state
of disaster emergency.       A proclamation issued under this subsection shall be promptly
disseminated by means calculated to bring it to the attention of the general public and, unless the
circumstances attendant upon the disaster prevent or impede, it shall be promptly filed with the
Council Secretary.


4) Suspend the provisions of any ordinance prescribing procedures for the conduct of Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County business or the rules, regulations or orders of any Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County agency, if strict compliance with such ordinance, rule, regulation
or order would in any way prevent, hinder or delay necessary action in coping with the disaster.


5) Utilize all available resources of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County government
as reasonably necessary to cope with the disaster.


6) Transfer the direction, personnel or functions of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County agencies, or units thereof, for the purpose of performing or facilitating emergency services.


7) Request the assistance and cooperation of the independent agencies, or such of them as are
reasonably necessary to implement the emergency management plan, and, in the event that an
independent agency fails or refuses to provide the requested assistance and cooperation or that
there is no one available to order such assistance and cooperation, commandeer or utilize such
independent agency's personnel and equipment as reasonably necessary to cope with the
disaster.


8) Subject to the provisions of Section 674.211 of this Ordinance Code, commandeer or utilize any
private property if he finds this necessary to cope with the disaster.



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9) Direct and compel by any necessary and reasonable force the evacuation of all or part of the
population from any stricken or threatened area within the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County if he deems this action necessary for the preservation of life or other disaster mitigation,
response or recovery.


10) Prescribe routes, modes of transportation and destinations in connection with an evacuation.


11) Control ingress to and egress from a disaster area, the movement of persons within the area
and the occupancy of premises therein.


12) Suspend or limit the sale, dispensing or transportation of alcoholic beverages, firearms,
explosives and combustibles.


13) Make provision for the availability and use of temporary emergency housing.


14) Take or direct measures for limiting or suspending lighting devises and appliances, gas and
water mains, electric power distribution and other utility services in the general public interest.


15) Take or direct measures concerning the conduct of civilians, the movement and cessation of
movement of pedestrian and vehicular traffic prior to, during and subsequent to drills and actual or
threatened disasters, the calling of public meetings and gatherings and the evacuation and
reception of the civilian population, as provided in the emergency management plan.


16) Authorize the use of forces already activated or mobilized to assist private citizens of the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County in cleanup and recovery operations during a
natural disaster when permission to enter onto or into private property has been obtained from the
property owner.


17) Enforce and utilize the provisions of mutual aid plans and inter-jurisdictional agreements and,
in connection therewith:


a) Organize and dispatch Emergency Preparedness support forces, including personnel, supplies
and equipment as necessary, to other counties, transfer operational command of such forces to
the other jurisdiction and resume operational command of such forces when they are no longer
needed outside of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County.


b) Request and assume operational command of Emergency Preparedness support forces,
including personnel, supplies and equipment as necessary, dispatched from other jurisdictions into
the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County and transfer operational command of such
forces to the original jurisdiction when they are no longer needed in the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County; and loan, lease or transfer, on such terms and conditions as he deems

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necessary to promote the public welfare and protect the interests of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County, any property of the Jacksonville government required or useful to
effectuate the mutual aid plan or inter-jurisdictional agreement, and receive and utilize any property
of another jurisdiction, by loan, lease or transfer on such terms and conditions as he deems
advisable, pursuant to a mutual aid or inter-jurisdictional agreement.


18) Waive procedures and formalities otherwise required by the Charter or bylaw pertaining to:


a) The performance of public work.


b) The entering into of contracts.


c) The incurring of obligations.


d) The employment of permanent and temporary workers.


e) The utilization of volunteer workers.


f) The rental of equipment.


g) The purchase and distribution, with or without compensation, of supplies, materials and facilities.


h) The appropriation and expenditure of public funds.


Emergency Response Organization


The Direction and Control of major disaster preparation, response and recovery is centered on the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Operations Center. The Chief of the
Emergency Preparedness Division can activate the Emergency Operations Center/Area
Command5 at any time in response to the approach of a hurricane, other severe weather
occurrence, or in the event of a technological accident. When the Chief of the Emergency
Preparedness Division is notified by the National Hurricane Center that the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County will probably be placed under a Hurricane Warning, he will recommend
to the Mayor that the County Emergency Operations Center be activated. The Director may
activate the EOC/Area Command prior to formal activation by the Mayor, in preparation of the


5
 For the purposes of this CEMP, the terms “EOC” and “Area Command” will be synonymous. Area Command is an
expansion of the incident command function primarily designed to manage a very large incident that has multiple incident
management teams assigned.


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formal activation, or at any time he feels it necessary to do so in response to an approaching storm
or other anticipated emergency event.


The organization of the Emergency Operations Center will depend upon the emergency
responsible for activation. When fully activated, the EOC/Area Command will be organized into
two (2) primary functional groups, the Executive Group and the Operations Group. The Executive
Group is composed of the primary decision makers of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County and its independent municipalities. It is supported by the Staff Advisory Group, which
includes key personnel whose individual expertise may be needed to make the broad policy
decisions necessary to direct the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County's response to a
major catastrophe. The Executive Committee, and its supporting Staff Advisory Group are located
in Room 420, the Executive Center of the Emergency Operations Center. The Mayor of the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, as the Chief Elected Official of Duval County, is
the Executive Director of the Emergency Operations Center, and is Chairman of the Executive
Committee.


The Operations Group, under the Executive Group, is located in Room 410, the Operations Room,
of the EOC/Area Command, and serves as the actual center for emergency response activity. The
Jacksonville Security Coordinator of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County serves as
the Operations Director. The Operations Group is supported by the County Warning Point, and
other auxiliary functions located within the EOC/Area Command.


The Media Briefing Room (MBR) is located on the first floor of the Fire and Rescue Administration
Building.


Personnel of the EOC/Area Command are identified as belonging to one of two groups, in order to
separate functional areas of responsibility and to take advantage of the spatial arrangements of the
physical facilities provided in the Emergency Operations Center. The groups are the Executive
Group and the Operations Group.


Each group is specially identified in the accompanying organization rosters. Their principle tasks
and actions to be at the different stages of response are also outlined. In addition to the attached
group task outlines, each of the principle participants, including the Mayors of the different
jurisdictions, the Chief of Staff for the Mayor of Jacksonville, head of the Northeast Chapter of the
American Red Cross, are provided with specific outlines of their duties and responsibilities, so that
they understand their roles within the EOC/Area Command and what is expected of them during an
emergency.


Executive Group
The Executive Group is comprised of the following individuals:

           •    Mayor, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
           •    Chief, Emergency Preparedness Division (Emergency Manager)
           •    Director/Fire Chief, Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department

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           •    Director, Jacksonville Public Works Department
           •    Duval County Sheriff, Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
           •    Chief Operating Officer, City of Jacksonville
           •    Chief Administrative Officer, City of Jacksonville
           •    Chief of Staff, Mayor’s Office
           •    President, Jacksonville City Council
           •    Director, Duval County Health Department
           •    As the scenario dictates, other county leaders will be activated for the Executive
                Group.

The responsibilities of the Executive Group are as follows:


a) Authorize issuance of public evacuation recommendations, notice of school and government
office closures, and related actions at appropriate time. Bridge closures procedures are found in
the Bridge Closure ICP.


b) Promulgate emergency policy decisions.


c) Oversee “Watch/Warning/Landfall/Recovery” operations.


d) Issue necessary proclamations and ordinances.


The activities of the Executive Group are as follows:


a) Alert Actions: Upon recommendation of Jacksonville Security Coordinator, review plan and
procedures, brief staffs, and verify personnel assignments.


b) Watch Actions: Maintain continuous liaison with Operating Group.


c) Warning Actions: Convene at Emergency Operations Center; Authorize Evacuation Order; Make
other emergency-related decisions.


d) Landfall Actions: Direct agencies performing emergency activities.


e) Recovery Actions: Direct recovery as the Recovery Task Force.




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Operations Group
In order to be consistent with federal and state agencies, and to facilitate the coordination of its
response to a natural or man-made disaster, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County's
Emergency Preparedness Division adopted the ICS concept for its emergency management
operations.


Each member of the Operations Group, as a senior administrator of the local government or other
entity, must be prepared to respond to a disaster situation in an orderly, precise manner. As a
situation develops prior to the activation of the EOC/Area Command, the EPD will constantly
update the EOC/Area Command staff. Besides the specific actions required by their position, the
following general actions will be taken by EOC/Area Command staff members and other senior
administrators whom are not required to report to the EOC/Area Command.


The Operations Group is responsible for managing tactical operations directed toward reducing the
immediate hazard, saving lives and property, establishing situation control, and restoring normal
conditions. Because of its functional unit management structure, the ICS is applicable across a
spectrum of incidents differing in size, scope, and complexity. Numerous county agencies are
included in the Operations Group, such as fire, law enforcement, public health, public works, and
emergency services, work together as a unit or in combinations, depending on the situation. Many
incidents may involve private individuals, companies, or nongovernmental organizations, some of
which may be fully trained and qualified to participate as partners in the Operations Section.


Lead agencies
As required by 9G-6.0023 (FAC), the CEMP assigns lead and support responsibilities for agencies
and personnel that coordinate with the emergency support functions outlined in the State Plan.
The lead agencies are designated because they either have a statutory responsibility to perform
that function, or through its programmatic or regulatory responsibilities, the agency may have
developed the necessary expertise to lead the group or unit. In some agencies, a portion of the
agency's mission is very similar to the mission of the group/unit; therefore, the skills to respond in a
disaster can be immediately translated from the daily business of that agency.


Figure 34 on the following pages lists lead, participating, and coordinating responsibilities of each
partner organization.


The lead agency has the responsibility of coordinating all participating agencies to ensure that
missions are accomplished and resources are maximized. The lead agencies report to their
respective branch or section leader. All lead agency staff must fulfill both administrative
responsibilities and operational responsibilities to ensure proper coordination among all
participating agencies. The operational responsibilities of each lead and participating agency are
outlined in the individual inter-agency coordinating procedures (ICPs).




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Administrative responsibilities for lead agency staff include the following:
           •    Staff the EOC/Area Command upon activation and ensure 24 hour staffing coverage
                based on the level of activation.
           •    Maintain a roster of all participating agency contact persons, make necessary
                notifications, activate participating agencies as necessary, and maintain ongoing
                communications to support mission assignments.
           •    Maintain a listing of all available resources.
           •    Develop, maintain, and review participating agency ICPs/SOGs to allow for the
                efficient and effective implementation of the group/unit mission.
           •    Prioritize missions in coordination with the EPG based on life safety and protection
                of property and in accordance with the IAP.
           •    Once local resource capabilities have been exhausted, coordinate mutual aid and
                private vendor resource needs to requesting parties within the county, through the
                proper resource request procedure. Documentation shall be maintained for
                operational accountability and for purposes of financial reimbursement.
           •    Coordinate for the provision of all mutual aid resources to requesting parties outside
                of the county in accordance with appropriate resource request procedures and
                based on available assets.
           •    Documentation shall be maintained for operational accountability and for purposes
                of financial reimbursement.
           •    Train all staff responsible for implementing the plan, including participating agency
                staff, on ICPs/SOGs.

Participating role or agency
A participating agency has the following responsibilities:
           •    Provide appropriate personnel, equipment, facilities, technical assistance and other
                support as required, in order to assist the lead agency in accomplishing the goals,
                objectives and missions assigned;
           •    Provide technical and subject-matter expertise, data, advice, and staff support for
                operations that fall within the domain of the respective agency;
           •    Assist the lead agency in staffing the EOC/Area Command, as needed;
           •    Maintain and review applicable ICPs/SOGs to allow for the efficient and effective
                implementation of the group/unit mission(s); and
           •    Train all agency staff responsible for implementing the plan, ICPs and SOGs.




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Figure 34. Lead Agency Matrix




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Lead Agency Matrix continued




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Lead Agency Matrix continued




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EOC/Area Command Functional Groups/Units

As depicted in Figure 33, the EOC/Area Command is a compilation of various relevant
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County agencies/departments and other entities
collaborating to prepare for, respond to, and recover from, a disaster situation. The Emergency
Operations Center is somewhat a misnomer; it is actually more of a ‘multi-agency coordination
center’ [with jurisdictional authority] than an ‘operations center’ since it has limited capability for
actual operations. Each responding agency has its own agency or departmental operational center
that is off-site. The individual(s) that is present at the EOC/Area Command is actually the liaison to
the agency or departmental operational or command center. As missions or assignments are
generated from the EOC/Area Command, they are passed to the agency or departmental
operations or command center to be implemented. Likewise, few, if any field units communicate
directly with the EOC/Area Command, rather they communicate with their agency or departmental
operational or command center. The following section briefly outlines the major roles and
responsibilities of the functional groups/units of the EOC/Area Command. A more detailed
description can be found in the respective group/unit ICP.


Operations Section Overview
The Operations Section is responsible for coordination of all response elements applied to the
incident. The Operations Section carries out the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident
Action Plan and requests additional resources as needed. In order to maintain effective span of
control, the Operations Section is organized into the following three branches:


           •    Emergency Services Branch
           •    Human Services Branch
           •    Infrastructure Branch

Responsibilities:
           •    Coordinate support for field operations
           •    In conjunction with the Mayor, Executive Group and Emergency Manager, establish
                response priorities
           •    Ensure cross-functional communications and coordination
           •    Ensure effective resource sharing between responding departments
           •    Establish and coordinate EOC/Area Command situation management activities
           •    Supervise implementation of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan
           •    Coordinate response activities with state and federal agencies

Law Enforcement Group
Law Enforcement Group commands, controls and coordinates law enforcement resources and
activities. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office shall serve as the lead agency for the Law Enforcement
Group and is responsible for linking the EOC/Area Command to law enforcement agencies (state
and federal) and appropriate dispatch centers. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office will complete and
maintain status reports for major incidents, implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command


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Incident Action Plan assigned to the Law Enforcement Group and assist and serve as an advisor to
the Operations Section Chief, as required.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office

Participating Agencies:
           •    Florida Department of Law Enforcement
           •    Florida Highway Patrol
           •    Florida National Guard, North Area Command
           •    Atlantic Beach Police Department
           •    Jacksonville Beach Police Department
           •    Medical Examiner’s Office
           •    Neptune Beach Police Department

Firefighting Group
The Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department is the lead agency for the Firefighting Group and shall
coordinate all fire, EMS, hazardous materials, and urban search and rescue operations within the
boundaries of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County and assist neighboring
communities if called upon. The Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department will complete and
maintain status reports for major incidents, implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command
Incident Action Plan assigned to the Firefighting Group and assist and serve as an advisor to the
Operations Section Chief, as required.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department

Participating Agencies:
           •    Atlantic Beach Police Department
           •    Jacksonville Beach Fire Department
           •    Jacksonville Beach Police Department
           •    Jacksonville Public Works Department
           •    Neptune Beach Police Department
           •    Civil Air Patrol (search)
           •    Jacksonville CERT
           •    Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department Volunteer Reserves
           •    Jacksonville Emergency Medical Auxiliary

HAZMAT Group
The Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department is the lead agency for the HAZMAT Group and shall
coordinate all hazardous material response operations within the boundaries of the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County. The Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department will complete and


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maintain status reports for major incidents, implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command
Incident Action Plan assigned to the HAZMAT Group and implement the Chemical Response
Hazard Specific Plan if incident involves a chemical release.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department

Participating Agencies:
           •    Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission
           •    Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
           •    Jacksonville Environmental Resource Management Department
           •    Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
           •    U.S. Coast Guard

Health & Medical Group
The Health & Medical Group is responsible for coordinating the provision of medical, mental, and
public health care for the residents and visitors of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County.    This includes providing accurate information on where individuals may receive
appropriate care. Responsibilities include:


           •    Minimize loss of life, subsequent disability and human suffering by ensuring timely
                and coordinated medical and public health assistance;
           •    Coordinate activities of medical care facilities and the procurement, allocation, and
                distribution of medical personnel, supplies, communications, and other resources;
           •    Provide a system for receipt and dissemination of health related information
                required for effective response and recovery from a major disaster;
           •    Assist in the implementation of public health actions ordered;
           •    Coordinate with the Public Information Officer (PIO) to inform the public of health
                precautions or health related safety instructions for the general public;
           •    Coordinate and prioritize requests for health services support from local responders
                and obtains medical/health personnel, supplies and equipment through mutual aid
                or requests for state or federal support; and
           •    Complete and maintain status reports for major incidents, implement the objectives
                of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Health & Medical
                Group.
           •    Implementing the Strategic National Stockpile ICP in response to an incident
                requiring mass immunization or treatment.
           •    Implementing the Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) Hazard
                Specific Plan.
           •    Implementing the Mass Casualty Hazard Specific Plan.

Lead Agency:
           •    Duval County Health Department



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Participating Agencies:
           •    First Coast Disaster Council
           •    Florida Department of Health - Bureau of Laboratories
           •    Florida Department of Health – Office of Vital Statistics
           •    Florida Poison Information Center
           •    Florida-Georgia Blood Alliance
           •    Jacksonville Community Services - Adult Services Division
           •    Jacksonville Community Services - Mental Health & Welfare Div.
           •    Jacksonville Disabled Services Division
           •    Jacksonville Environmental Resource Management Dept.
           •    Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department
           •    Medical Examiner Office
           •    Northeast Florida Crisis Response Team
           •    Medical Reserve Corps

Sheltering Group
The Sheltering Group is responsible for coordinating the provision of basic temporary shelter for
the residents, special needs clients and visitors of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County. This includes refuge from severe weather or a disaster event, immediate (short-term)
post-disaster sheltering.
           •    Determine the operational status of all facilities listed as potential shelters, including;
           •    Structural soundness
           •    Utility services
           •    Adequate sanitation facilities, including showers
           •    Capacity for cooking and serving food
           •    Housing capacity
           •    Access for people with disabilities

Pet-friendly sheltering is addressed in the Animal Issues Group, and longer-term
sheltering/housing is addressing in the Temporary Housing Group. The Sheltering Group will
complete and maintain status reports for major issues and incidents and implement the objectives
of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Sheltering Group.


Lead Agency:
           •    American Red Cross, Northeast Florida Chapter

Participating Agencies:
           •    Duval County School Board
           •    Duval County Health Department

Bulk Distribution Group
The Bulk Distribution Group is responsible for coordinating the bulk distribution of basic supplies to
the residents of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. The Bulk Distribution Group
will complete and maintain status reports for major issues or incidents and implement the

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objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Bulk Distribution
Group.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Parks & Recreation Department

Participating Agencies:
           •    United Way of Northeast Florida
           •    Second Harvest Food Bank/Lutheran Social Services
           •    American Red Cross, Northeast Florida Chapter

Mass Care Group
The Mass Care Group is responsible for providing basic human services, including: food, potable
water, clothing, emotional support and other basic necessities to persons impacted by a disaster.
The Mass Care Group also provides a central disaster registration and inquiry service to reunite
families and respond to outside welfare inquiries. The Mass Care Group collaborates closely with
other agencies within the Human Service Branch (i.e., Sheltering Group, Temporary Housing
Group, etc.) to ensure close coordination and support for their mass care activities.
Responsibilities include:


           •    Ensure effective integration of voluntary agency mass care activities;
           •    Estimate the number of people who will require mass care services (i.e., feeding,
                clothing, distribution of relief supplies, etc.);
           •    Ensure that mass care service delivery programs are designed to address the
                needs of all segments of the affected population, including people with special
                needs;
           •    Coordinate the provision of shelters, feeding, distribution of water, ice and other
                relief supplies, and disaster welfare inquiries;
           •    Assist the American Red Cross with inquiries and registration services to reunite
                families or respond to inquiries from other relatives;
           •    Ensure that physical and mental health services are available at shelters and other
                mass care service delivery sites;
           •    Coordinate the collection and distribution of mass care service delivery statistics;
           •    Mass feeding function is addressed in the Mass Feeding ICP.

Lead Agency:
           •    The American Red Cross, Northeast Florida Chapter

Participating Agencies:
           •    Amateur Radio Emergency Service
           •    Duval County Health Department
           •    Duval County School Board (Shelter Sites)
           •    Emergency Services Homeless Coalition


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           •    First Coast Disaster Council
           •    Florida Department of Children and Families, District 4
           •    Jacksonville Community Services/Adult Services Division
           •    Jacksonville Community Services/Mental Health & Welfare Div.
           •    Jacksonville Disabled Services Division
           •    Jacksonville Housing & Neighborhoods Department
           •    Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office (Security)
           •    JTA Connexion
           •    The Salvation Army

Temporary Housing Group
The Temporary Housing Group is responsible for coordinating the effective planning for temporary
housing for the residents of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County displaced by a
disaster. The Temporary Housing Group will work closely with state, federal, and local agencies to
expedite any necessary processes to establish alternate long-term housing options for displaced
residents. Additionally, the Temporary Housing Group will complete and maintain status reports for
major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action
Plan assigned to the Temporary Housing Group.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Housing & Neighborhoods Department

Participating Agencies:
           •    Emergency Services Homeless Coalition
           •    United Way of Northeast Florida

Animal Issues Group
The Animal Issues Group is responsible coordinating the provision of care, veterinary services,
welfare, and control of animals during a declared incident or disaster. These responsibilities
include but are not limited to the following:
           •    Pet-Friendly Sheltering
           •    Sheltering
           •    Animal search and rescue
           •    Veterinary services
           •    Lost animal care
           •    Food and water
           •    Immunization and disease control
           •    Security and quarantine

Additionally, the Animal Issues Group will complete and maintain status reports for major issues or
incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned
to the Animal Issues Group.




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Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Animal Care and Control Division

Participating Agencies:
            •   American Red Cross, Northeast Florida Chapter
            •   Atlantic Beach Animal Control
            •   Duval County Health Department
            •   Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission
            •   Jacksonville Agriculture Extension Service
            •   Jacksonville Beach Animal Control
            •   Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
            •   Jacksonville Humane Society
            •   Jacksonville Office of Volunteer Services
            •   Jacksonville Veterinary Medical Society
            •   Jacksonville Zoological Gardens
            •   Neptune Beach Animal Control
            •   U.S. Naval Air Station Jacksonville/Chief Veterinary Officer

Public Works Group
The Public Works Group support to assist county agencies and municipalities in response/recovery
operations, including providing support to various operational units such as fire and law
enforcement, countywide damage assessment (structures and infrastructure), route recovery,
debris removal, debris volume assessment, building safety inspections and demolitions.
Additionally, the Public Works Group will complete and maintain status reports for major issues or
incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned
to the Public Works Group.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Public Works Department

Participating Agencies:
            •   Jacksonville Environmental Resource Management Department
            •   Jacksonville Parks, Recreation & Entertainment Department
            •   JEA Utilities

Utilities Group
The Utilities Group plans for and coordinates necessary actions to facilitate the restoration of
energy, potable water, and sewer systems following a disaster. JEA Utilities is the lead agency for
the Utilities Group and is responsible for coordinating all utility restoration-related activities, tracking
the restoration of said utilities, ensuring support for field operations, including effective coordination
with other response elements, pro-active exchange of information and coordination of external
resource support. Additionally, the Utilities Group will complete and maintain status reports for



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major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action
Plan assigned to the Utilities Group.


Lead Agency:
           •    JEA Utilities

Participating Agencies:
           •    Beaches Energy Services
           •    BellSouth

Telecommunications Group
The Telecommunications Group plans for and coordinates necessary actions to facilitate the
restoration of telecommunications systems, fixed and mobile, following a disaster. Jacksonville
Information Technologies Division is the lead agency for the Telecommunications Group and is
responsible for coordinating restoration-related activities, tracking the restoration of
telecommunication utilities, ensuring support for field operations, including effective coordination
with other response elements, pro-active exchange of information and coordination of external
resource support. The priority is to restore telecommunications to critical facilities, including the
EOC/Area Command. Additionally, the Telecommunications Group will complete and maintain
status reports for major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area
Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Telecommunications Group.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Information Technologies Division

Participating Agencies:
           •    BellSouth
           •    JEA Utilities
           •    Wireless Phone Service Providers



Corporate Recovery Group
The Corporate Recovery Group plans for the flow of information between government emergency
management agencies, private corporations and business groups in order to facilitate corporate
evacuations, re-entries, and recovery; provides education and training to corporate employees;
coordinates the flow of private relief and recovery resources into impacted areas; and identifies
potential sources of relief and recovery materials and supplies available through the private sector.
Additionally, the Corporate Recovery Group will complete and maintain status reports for major
issues or incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan
assigned to the Corporate Recovery Group.




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Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Economic Development Commission

Participating Agencies:
           •    Jacksonville Business Journal
           •    Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
           •    Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
           •    Private Sector Participants

Transportation Group
The Transportation Group provides overall coordination of transportation assistance to city and
county departments, other governmental and private agencies, and others requiring transportation
assistance in disaster situations. The Transportation Group coordinates the designation and
restoration of services on critical transportation routes within the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County, including the coordination of general traffic and access control
programs. Other responsibilities include:


           •    Coordinate the response operations targeted at restoring and maintaining normal
                operations of public transportation systems;
           •    Designate critical transportation routes;
           •    Route recovery
           •    Supporting evacuation transportation planning;
           •    Provide backup transportation for victims;
           •    Provide transportation for emergency workers during recall operations;
           •    Complete and maintain status reports for major issues or incidents and implement
                the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the
                Transportation Group.

Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Transportation Authority

Participating Agencies:
           •    Duval County School Board - Transportation
           •    Florida Department of Transportation
           •    Jacksonville Airport Authority
           •    Jacksonville Community Services Dept./Adult Services Division
           •    Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
           •    Jacksonville Fleet Management Division
           •    Jacksonville Parks, Recreation & Entertainment Department
           •    Jacksonville Port Authority
           •    Jacksonville Public Works Department
           •    Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
           •    JEA & Jacksonville Beach Utilities
           •    JTA Connexion


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            •   United States Coast Guard - Captain of the Port

Logistics Section Overview
The Logistics Section is responsible for planning and executing the acquisition and movement of
supplies, equipment, personnel and providing facilities in support of the response to an incident.
The Logistics Section is also responsible for tracking the status of resource requests from
placement to fulfillment. In order to maintain effective span of control, the Logistics Section is
organized into the following two groups:
            •   Services Group
            •   Support Group

The Logistics Section is responsible for the following:
            •   Identify potential sources of resources, including vendors, partner agencies and
                other jurisdictions through mutual aid;
            •   Procure, track and arrange for the delivery of materials and/or equipment required to
                support the response;
            •   Track the status of resource requests, including requests forwarded to state and
                federal agencies through the E-Team and Tracker systems;
            •   Identify, acquire, renovate and provide logistical services for facilities required to
                support the incident response;
            •   Support the establishment of material/equipment warehousing, distribution centers
                and staging areas, when directed;
            •   Coordinate the acquisition of supplementary staff through use of temporary staff
                agencies, community volunteers, mutual aid agreements or other available sources;
            •   Coordinate the screening, acceptance and handling of donated materials and
                services;
            •   Coordinate logistical support services for the EOC/Area Command.

Food Unit
The Food Unit provides feeding services for disaster response workers. The Food Unit determines
food and water requirements; plans menus, orders food, provides cooking facilities, cooks, serves,
maintains food service areas, and manages food security and safety concerns. Additionally, the
Food Unit will complete and maintain status reports for any major issues or incidents and
implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Food
Unit.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Procurement Department

Participating Agencies:
            •   None




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Ground Support Unit
The Ground Support Unit provides transportation in support of incident operations (except aircraft),
maintains and repairs primary equipment, vehicles, and mobile ground support equipment, records
usage time for all ground equipment (including contract equipment) assigned to the incident, and
supplies fuel for all equipment. Additionally, the Ground Support Unit also maintains a
transportation pool for major incidents. This pool consists of vehicles (e.g., staff cars, buses, pick-
ups) that are suitable for transporting personnel. The Ground Support Unit also provides up-to-date
information on the location and status of transportation vehicles to the Resources Unit.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Fleet Management Division

Participating Agencies:

            •   None

Communications Unit
The Communications Unit develops the Communications Plan (ICS205) that is consistent with the
Tactical Interoperable Communications ICP in order to make the most effective use of the
communications equipment and facilities. Additionally, the Communications Unit will complete and
maintain status reports for major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area
Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Communications Unit. The Communications Unit is
also responsible for the Interoperable Communications ICP.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Information Technologies Division

Participating Agencies:
            •   Amateur Radio Emergency Services
            •   BellSouth
            •   Duval County Emergency Communications Group
            •   Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
            •   Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department
            •   Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
            •   Wireless Phone Service Providers

Fuel Unit
The Fuel Unit will be responsible for receiving, tracking, storing, and distributing fuel for all mobile
equipment/vehicles utilized in the disaster response. The Fuel Unit will work closely with the
Ground Support Unit. Additionally, the Fuel Unit will complete and maintain status reports for
major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident Action
Plan assigned to the Fuel Unit. The Fuel Unit develops a fuel plan consistent with the Fuel Plan
ICP.


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Lead Agency:
           •      Jacksonville Fleet Management Division

Participating Agencies:
           •      None


Facilities Unit
The Facilities Unit will be responsible for monitoring and management of all publicly-owned
buildings and real estate. Additionally, the Facilities Unit will complete and maintain status reports
for major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of the EOC/Area Command Incident
Action Plan assigned to the Facilities Unit.


Lead Agency:
           •      Jacksonville Public Works Department/Public Buildings Inspection Division

Participating Agencies:
           •      Jacksonville Economic Development Commission

Donations Unit
The Donations Unit will be responsible for the management, receipt, tracking, storing, and
distribution of solicited and unsolicited donated goods. Additionally, the Donations Unit will
complete and maintain status reports for major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of
the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Donations Unit.


Lead Agency:
           •      Jacksonville Office of Volunteer Services

Participating Agencies:
           •      United Way of Northeast Florida

Supply Unit
The Supply Unit will be responsible for ordering, receiving, tracking, storing, and distributing any
commodity necessary in support of the response to a disaster. Additionally, the Supply Unit will
complete and maintain status reports for major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of
the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Supply Unit.


Lead Agency:
           •      Jacksonville Procurement Department



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Participating Agencies:
           •    Florida National Guard

Procurement Unit
The Procurement Unit administers all financial matters pertaining to vendor contracts. The
Procurement Unit coordinates with local jurisdictions to identify sources for equipment, prepares
and signs equipment rental agreements, and processes all administrative requirements associated
with equipment rental and supply contracts.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Procurement Department

Participating Agencies:
           •    Jacksonville Administration & Finance Department

Reception Center Unit
The Reception Center Unit will be responsible for receiving, tracking, and distributing mutual aid
resources (equipment, supplies and personnel). Additionally, the Reception Center Unit will
complete and maintain status reports for major issues or incidents and implement the objectives of
the EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan assigned to the Reception Center Unit.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Community Services Department (Mutual Aid Reception Center)

Participating Agencies:
           •    Volunteer Jacksonville (Unaffiliated Volunteer Reception Center)

Planning Section Overview
The Planning Section's primary responsibility is to collect, analyze, verify, display and disseminate
incident information. This includes impact information, response activities, details regarding the
field operating environment and the status of available resources. This Section functions as the
primary support for response decision-making to the overall emergency organization, including
preparing situation briefings, map displays, anticipatory appraisals and developing plans necessary
to cope with changing field events. During the incident response, the Planning Section Chief
provides situational advice to help guide operational decision-making. This Section is also
responsible for facilitating the incident action planning process and the development of the
EOC/Area Command Incident Action Plan and Recovery Plans and the After-Action Report. The
Planning Section ensures that safety/damage assessment information is compiled, assembled and
reported in an expeditious manner. The Planning Section (Documentation Unit) is also responsible
for the detailed recording of the entire response effort and the preservation of these records during
and following the disaster. Due to the limited physical area of the EOC/Area Command, and the
limited staff available for this function, information and planning becomes a shared task of the
Operations Group.

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Technical Specialists
Technical specialists have special skills and are activated only when needed. Specialists may
serve anywhere within the organization, including the Command Staff. No minimum qualifications
are prescribed, as technical specialists normally perform the same duties during an incident that
they perform in their everyday jobs, and they are typically specially certified in their fields or
professions. Technical specialists assigned to the Planning Section may report directly to its chief,
or they may report to any function in an existing unit, or may form a separate unit within the
Planning Section, depending on the requirements of the incident and the needs of the Section
Chief. Technical specialists may also be assigned to other parts of the organization (e.g., to the
Operations Section to assist with tactical matters or to the Finance/Administration Section to assist
with fiscal matters). For example, a legal specialist or legal counsel may be assigned directly to
the Command Staff to advise the Emergency Manager on legal matters, such as emergency
proclamations, legality of evacuation orders, and legal rights and restrictions pertaining to media
access. The incident itself will primarily dictate the needs for technical specialists. Below are a few
representative examples of the kinds of technical specialists that may be required:


           •    meteorologist
           •    flood control specialist
           •    explosives specialist
           •    structural engineering specialist
           •    radiation health physicist
           •    attorney or legal counsel
           •    industrial hygienist

Documentation Unit
The Documentation Unit maintains accurate and complete incident files, including a complete
record of the major steps taken to resolve the incident; provides duplication services to incident
personnel; and files, maintains, and stores incident files for legal, analytical, and historical
purposes. Documentation is part of the Planning Section primarily because this unit prepares the
IAP and maintains many of the files and records that are developed as part of the overall IAP and
planning function.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division

Participating Agencies:
           •    Northeast Florida Regional Council

Resources Unit
The Resources Unit is responsible for maintaining the status of all resources (lead and
participating) assigned by the EOC/Area Command for the disaster or incident. This is achieved by
proactive collaboration with the Reception Center Unit and other components of the Logistics
section, maintaining a status-keeping system, and maintenance of a master list of all resources.



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Lead Agency:
           •     Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division

Participating Agencies:
           •     Northeast Florida Regional Council
           •     Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
           •     Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department
           •     Jacksonville Public Works Department

Situation Unit
The Situation Unit collects, processes, and organizes ongoing situation information, prepares
situation summaries, and develops projections and forecasts of future events related to the
incident. The Situation Unit also prepares maps and gathers and disseminates information and
intelligence for use in the IAP. This unit may also require the expertise of technical specialists and
operations and information security specialists.


Lead Agency:
           •     Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division

Participating Agencies:
           •     Northeast Florida Regional Council

Damage Assessment Unit
The Damage Assessment Unit is responsible for coordinating damage assessment-related
activities, including effective coordination with other response elements, pro-active exchange of
information and effective/efficient collection and dissemination of damage information.


Lead Agency:
           •     Jacksonville Public Works Department

Participating Agencies:
           •     Duval County Property Appraiser
           •     Florida Division of Emergency Management - Area 3 Coordinator
           •     Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
           •     Jacksonville Fire & Rescue - GIS Section
           •     Jacksonville Planning & Development Department
           •     Jacksonville Public Works Department/Building Inspection Division
           •     Northeast Florida Regional Council




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GIS Unit
The GIS Unit supports the operations of the EOC/Area Command by creating and maintaining
maps and photographs using the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s GIS system
and other mapping/photographic systems. The GIS Unit catalogs all products so that they are
easily retrievable. Finally, the GIS Unit establishes procedures for prioritizing mapping requests.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville GIS Division

Participating Agencies:
            •   Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
            •   Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
            •   Duval County School Board
            •   Northeast Florida Regional Council
            •   Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA)

Finance/Administration Section Overview
The Finance/Administration Section has four (4) major responsibilities:
            •   Provides policy guidance and establishes procedures to authorize the commitment
                and payment of funds. Provides recommendations and guidance to and receives
                direction from the Executive Group on countywide financial matters.
            •   Coordinates the accounting for personnel time during the emergency response and
                recovery efforts, and ensuring that employees continue to receive pay, health
                insurance and retirement benefits.
            •   Tracks and processes payments of vendor purchase orders, contracts, claims and
                other payments during the emergency.
            •   Ensures that an accurate accounting of the cost of responding to the emergency
                (including both response and recovery) is maintained. This includes accounting for
                personnel time, the cost of services provided and for acquiring and maintaining
                response facilities, materials and equipment.

The Jacksonville Administration       &     Finance   Department   is   the   lead   agency   for    the
Finance/Administration Section.


Time Unit
The Time Unit is primarily responsible for ensuring proper daily recording of personnel time, in
accordance with the policies of the relevant agencies.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Administration & Finance Department




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Participating Agencies:
            •   Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office

Cost Unit
The Cost Unit provides cost analysis data for the incident. This unit must ensure that equipment
and personnel for which payment is required are properly identified, obtain and record all cost data,
and analyze and prepare estimates of incident costs. The Cost Unit also provides input on cost
estimates for resource use to the Planning Section. The Cost Unit must maintain accurate
information on the actual costs of all assigned resources.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Administration & Finance Department

Participating Agencies:
            •   Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office

Compensation/Claims Unit
The Compensation/Claims Unit ensures that all forms required by workers’ compensation
programs and local agencies are completed. The Compensation/Claims Unit also maintains files
on injuries and illnesses associated with the incident and ensures that all witness statements are
obtained in writing. The Compensation and Claims Unit maintains logs on the claims, obtains
witness statements, and documents investigations and agency follow-up requirements.


Lead Agency:
            •   Jacksonville Administration & Finance Department

Participating Agencies:
            •   Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office

Public Information Officer
The Public Information Officer (PIO) plans for, coordinates, provides and disseminates information
to the general public during all phases of disaster operations. The PIO is responsible for
interfacing with the public and media and/or with other agencies with incident-related information
requirements. The PIO develops accurate and complete information on the incident’s cause, size,
and current situation; resources committed; and other matters of general interest for both internal
and external consumption. The PIO may also perform a key public information monitoring role.
Whether the command structure is single or unified, only one incident PIO is designated.
Assistants may be assigned from other agencies or departments involved. The Emergency
Manager, or designee must approve the release of all incident-related information.




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Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Mayor’s Administration, Press Secretary

Participating Agencies:
           •    American Red Cross, Northeast Florida Chapter
           •    Duval County Health Department
           •    Emergency Email Network
           •    Florida Department of Law Enforcement
           •    Florida National Guard, North Area Command
           •    Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
           •    Jacksonville Public Information Division
           •    Public Information Officers:
                        Jacksonville Agriculture Extension Service
                        Jacksonville Airport Authority
                        Jacksonville Animal Care & Control Division
                        Jacksonville Economic Development Commission
                        Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department
                        Jacksonville Parks, Recreation & Entertainment Dept.
                        Jacksonville Port Authority
                        Jacksonville Public Library
                        Jacksonville Public Works Department
                        Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office
                        JEA Utilities
                        U.S. Naval Air Station Jacksonville – Regional Operations Center

Liaison Officer
The Liaison Officer is the point of contact for representatives of other Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County, state, federal, and municipal governmental agencies, nongovernmental
organizations, and/or private entities. The Liaison Officer, or designee, will serve as the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s liaison to the federal Joint Field Office (JFO), if
established during recovery. In either a single or UC structure, representatives from assisting or
cooperating agencies and organizations coordinate through the Liaison Officer. Agency and/or
organizational representatives assigned to an incident must have the authority to speak for their
parent agencies and/or organizations on all matters, following appropriate consultations with their
agency leadership. Assistants and personnel from other agencies or organizations (public or
private) involved in incident management activities may be assigned to the Liaison Officer to
facilitate coordination.


Lead Agency:
           •    Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division

Participating Agencies:
           •    Florida Division of Emergency Management – Area 3 Coordinator
           •    Northeast Florida Regional Council



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Safety Officer
The Safety Officer monitors incident operations and advises the Emergency Manager on all
matters relating to operational safety, including the health and safety of emergency responder
personnel. The Safety Officer has emergency authority to stop and/or prevent unsafe acts during
incident operations. The Safety Officer, Operations Section Chief, and Planning Section Chief must
coordinate closely regarding operational safety and emergency responder health and safety
issues.


Lead Agency:
           •     Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department

Complexes and Divisions
As stated above, ICS is both modular and flexible to meet the needs of the incident. In many
instances, the organizational structure depicted in Figure 33 will be adequate to manage the
incident.   However, in certain situations such as larger, more complex events requiring
extraordinary coordination, it may beneficial to sub-divide the Operations Section into four (4)
geographic areas or “complexes:” Roles, responsibilities and trigger points of Complex Command
are addressed in the Complex Command ICP.


           •     North complex
           •     West complex
           •     South complex
           •     Beaches complex

Figure 35 on the next page depicts how the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is
divided geographically into the four (4) complexes. When activated, a complex may have its own
ICS management structure; however, all complexes must establish effective, efficient
communications and coordination processes and protocols with the Operations Section of the
EOC/Area Command. Additionally, not every complex must be activated, nor does each complex
require identical staffing; pursuant to ICS principles, all of these are dictated by the needs of the
incident.




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Figure 35. Complexes




Response
The response phase is entered upon formal activation of the EOC/Area Command. The
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s initial response activities are primarily structured
to minimize the effects of the emergency or disaster. This includes protection of human life and
property. Examples of initial response activities undertaken by the EOC/Area Command include:
           •    Disseminating warnings, emergency public information and instructions to the
                residents and visitors of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County;
           •    Making all necessary notifications, including Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
                County departments and personnel and to state and federal agencies, as needed;
           •    Documenting situation status;
           •    Declaring a state of local emergency;
           •    Coordinating evacuations and/or rescue operations;
           •    Coordinating the care of displaced persons and treating the injured;
           •    Clearing priority transportation routes;
           •    Repairing critical facilities and structures;
           •    Conducting initial damage assessments and surveys;
           •    Assessing the need for mutual aid assistance;
           •    Coordinating the restriction of traffic/people movement and unnecessary access to
                affected areas; and
           •    Developing and implementing action plans.




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As response activities continue, the EOC/Area Command’s activities involve the coordination and
management of personnel and resources to further mitigate the disaster/emergency and facilitate
the transition to recovery operations:
           •    Preparing detailed damage assessments;
           •    Coordinating the operation of mass care facilities;
           •    Coordinating mass fatality operations;
           •    Procuring required resources to sustain operations;
           •    Protecting, controlling and allocating vital resources;
           •    Coordinating restoration of vital utility services;
           •    Tracking resource allocation;
           •    Conducting advance planning activities;
           •    Documenting expenditures;
           •    Developing and implementing action plans for extended operations;
           •    Disseminating emergency public information;
           •    Coordinating with national, state and local volunteer agencies; and
           •    Recovery planning.

Notification and warning
Once the decision has been reached to activate the Emergency Operations Center/Area
Command (EOC), the on-duty Duty Officer or alternate will notify EOC/Area Command
representatives by activating a notification system. Once notified, EOC/Area Command personnel
will immediately respond to the EOC/Area Command. EPD personnel and designated EOC/Area
Command representatives are expected to report directly to the EOC/Area Command without
notification if they become aware of a significant incident that may have impacted the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County and they can not reach the EOC/Area Command Activation
voicemail box after trying for more than 15 minutes either because the public dial network is
inoperable or overloaded.


The Emergency Operations Center is expected to be staffed and operational within one (1) hour of
the activation notification.


Issuance of Executive Orders and Proclamations
The Mayor of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County shall by proclamation declare a
state of disaster emergency, which shall activate the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County's comprehensive emergency management plan and place into operation the Emergency
Operations Center. It will be the authority for the deployment and use of any resources to which
the plan applies and for use or distribution of any supplies, equipment, materials or facilities
available pursuant to Chapter 674 of the City Ordinance Code, and any other provisions of City
ordinances and regulations relating to disaster emergencies.


The Planning Process
It was recognized early in the development of ICS that the critical task of adequate planning was
often overlooked. The results were poor resource use, inappropriate tactics and strategies, safety
problems, higher costs, and lower effectiveness. As such, the Jacksonville Emergency Operations


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Center/Area Command (EOC) utilizes the incident planning process of the ICS to provide a
systematic means for all agencies involved in the response to have their objectives recognized and
incorporated into the overall incident plan. In addition, this process allows everyone to know the
plan and their role in it. The result of this planning process is typically the written Incident Action
Plan (IAP). The benefits of this written plan are undeniable when the size and complexity of the
response require the participation of many responders and multiple agencies.


Incident action planning is essential for a successful response to expanding incidents.

Operational periods
An important concept in regard to this planning process is the operational period. All ICS planning
is designed around identifying accomplishments expected over a set period of time called the
operational period. The specific length of time of the operational period varies based on a variety
of factors. The Emergency Manager (Chief of the Jacksonville EPD) will determine the length of
the operational period with input from operations staff. Typically, operational periods for the
Jacksonville EOC/Area Command are 0700-1900 and 1900 to 0700 daily. In some cases, the
operational period length may change from day to day based on operational and incident needs.

Roles and responsibilities in the Planning Process
Many individuals play a key role in the planning process and the success of a response. While
specific roles and responsibilities of staff and the entire process are outlined in detail in the
Planning Section ICP, the roles of key individuals are briefly outlined in Figure 36 and Table 8
below.


Figure 36. ICS Planning Roles




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Table 8. Planning Roles and Responsibilities

     Emergency              Provides overall incident objectives and strategy.
     Manager                Establishes procedures for incident resource ordering.
                            Establishes procedures for resource activation, mobilization, and employment.
                            Approves completed IAP by signature.
                        With Safety Officer:
                            Reviews hazards associated with the incident and proposed tactical
                            assignments. Assists in developing safe tactics.
                            Develops safety message(s).
     Operations             Assists in identifying strategies.
     Section Chief          Determines tactics to achieve command objectives.
                            Determines work assignments and resource requirements.
     Planning Section       Conducts the Planning Meeting.
     Chief                  Coordinates preparation and documentation of the Incident Action Plan.
     Logistics              Ensures that resource ordering procedures are communicated to appropriate
     Section Chief          agency ordering points.
                            Develops a transportation system to support operational needs.
                            Ensures that the Logistics Section can support the IAP.
                            Completes assigned portions of the written IAP.
                            Places order(s) for resources.
     Finance/Admin.         Provides cost implications of incident objectives, as required.
     Section Chief          Ensures that the IAP is within the financial limits established by the Incident
                            Commander.
                            Evaluates facilities, transportation assets, and other contracted services to
                            determine if any special contract arrangements are needed.




Planning Cycle
The cyclical planning process is designed to take the overall incident objectives and break them
down into tactical assignments for each operational period. Planning for each operational period
begins with the Emergency Manager or unified command setting objectives. The objectives are
set based on the continued assessment of the situation and the progress made. The Planning "P"
best illustrates the incident planning process (see Figure 37 the Planning “P” on the next page).


          •     The leg of the “P” describes the initial response period: Once the incident/threat
                begins, the steps are Notification, Initial Response & Assessment, Incident Briefing
                (ICS 201), and Initial Incident Command (IC)/Unified Command (UC) Meeting.
          •     At the top of the leg of the “P” is the beginning of the first operational planning
                period cycle. In this circular sequence, the steps are IC/UC Sets Objectives, Tactics
                Meeting, Preparing for the Planning Meeting, Planning Meeting, IAP Prep &
                Approval, and Operations Briefing.
          •     At this point a new operations period begins. The next step is Execute Plan &
                Assess Progress, after which the cycle begins anew with IC/UC Sets Objectives,
                etc.




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Figure 37. The Planning "P"




Tactics Meeting
Prior to the Planning Meeting, the Operations Section Chief will hold a tactics meeting to review the
tactics developed by the Operations Section. Obviously, the Operations Section Chief leads the
tactics meeting. The Operations Section Chief, Safety Officer, Planning Section Chief, Logistics
Section Chief, and Resources Unit Leader attend the tactics meeting. The objectives for the
tactics meeting include:
           •    Generate appropriate strategies to meet the incident objectives – strategies should
                make good sense, be cost-effective, and meet political considerations.
           •    Determining how the selected strategies will be accomplished in order to achieve
                the incident objectives.
           •    Assigning resources to implement the tactics.
           •    Identifying methods for monitoring tactics and resources to determine if adjustments
                are required (e.g., different tactics, different resources, or new strategy).




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The Planning meeting
The planning meeting provides the opportunity for the command staff, as well as other incident
management personnel, agency officials, and cooperating/assisting agencies and organizations, to
review and validate the operational plan as proposed by the Operations Section Chief. The
Planning Chief leads the meeting following a fixed agenda to ensure that the meeting is efficient
while allowing each organizational element represented to assess and acknowledge the plan. The
Operations Section Chief delineates the amount and type of resources he or she will need to
accomplish the plan. The Planning Section’s Resources Unit will have to work with the Logistics
Section to fulfill the resource needs. At the conclusion of the meeting, the Planning Section Staff
indicates when all elements of the plan and support documents must be submitted so the plan can
be collated, duplicated, and made ready for the operational period briefing.


           •    The Planning Section Chief gives the situation and resources briefing and
                conducts the planning meeting.

           •    The Incident Commander states the incident objectives and policy issues.

           •    The Operations Section Chief states the primary and alternative strategies to meet
                the objectives, with contributions made by the Planning and Logistics Section
                Chiefs.

           •    The Operations Section Chief specifies reporting locations and additional facilities
                needed, with contributions from the Logistics Section Chief.

           •    The Planning and Logistics Section Chiefs develop the resources, support, and
                overhead orders. The Logistics Section Chief places the orders.

           •    The Logistics Section Chief considers additional support requirements needed for
                communications, traffic, safety, medical, etc., with contributions from the Planning
                Section Chief.

           •    The Planning Section Chief finalizes the IAP, the Incident Commander approves
                the IAP, and the General Staff implements the IAP.

           •    Organizational elements prepare IAP assignments and submit them to the Planning
                Section.

           •    The Planning Section collates, prepares, and duplicates the IAP document for the
                operational period briefing. The Planning Section will:
                • Set the deadline for completing IAP attachments.
                • Obtain plan attachments and review them for completeness and approvals.
                • Determine the number of IAPs required.
                • Arrange with the Documentation Unit to reproduce the IAP.
                • Review the IAP to ensure it is up-to-date and complete prior to the Operations
                   Briefing and plan distribution.
                • Provide the IAP briefing plan, as required, and distribute the plan prior to the
                   beginning of the new Operational Period.


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                •   The Resources Unit coordinates with the Logistics Section to acquire the
                    amount and type of resources needed.


Operational Period Briefing
This may also be referred to as the shift briefing, where the Emergency Manager reviews the IAP
with EOC/Area Command staff. The operational period briefing is conducted at the beginning of
each operational period. Immediately prior to the start of the new operational period, incident
management personnel, agency officials, and cooperating/assisting agencies and organizations
should attend the operational period briefing. In some cases, all of the tactical personnel should
attend if they can be accommodated. EOC/Area Command staff members are briefed on the
operational elements of the plan to ensure they are aware of what it is that must be accomplished.
In addition, staff members will have a chance to ask relevant questions regarding the plan, be
briefed on any critical safety issues, and be informed regarding specific logistical information. The
operational period briefing should be brief and concise; the Planning Section Chief facilitates the
briefing following a concise agenda.


Following the operational period briefing, section supervisors will meet with their assigned
resources for a detailed briefing on their respective assignments.


Logistics
Resources must be organized, assigned, and directed to accomplish the incident objectives.
Managing resources safely and effectively is the most important consideration of an incident. As
noted above, the Planning Section (Resources Unit) tracks resources and identifies resource
shortages. The Logistics Sections orders, or acquires the needed resources. The Logistics
Section serves as the single ordering point for all requested resources, including mutual aid
resources. Figure 38 on the next page describes the resource ordering process:
•   The division identifies the need.
•   The need is communicated to the division’s superior (e.g., complex command or branch
    leader). The superior ensures the need is consistent with the division’s mission or assignment.
•   The request is forwarded to the Operations Section Chief and, if approved, forwarded to the
    Planning Section/Resources Unit.
•   The Resources Unit checks available inventory. If the resource is not available, the request is
    forwarded to the Logistics Section for procurement.
•   The Logistics Section collaborates with the Planning Section/Resources Unit to continually
    track the progress and location of the resource.

More information on this process can be found in the Operations Section and Logistics Section
ICPs.




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Figure 38. Resource Ordering Process




                                                                                               Delivery
                 Delivery




                                                                                Delivery
Evacuation
A large-scale evacuation of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County residents and
visitors may be initiated by numerous potential threats including hurricanes, tropical storms, floods,
hazardous materials spills, wildland fires, nuclear/biological/chemical terrorist events, and others.
Evacuation estimate figures are feasible for hurricane evacuations, but all other evacuations for
other types of disasters will be extremely variable. Estimates of population, pre-designated
evacuation routes and clearance times for effected areas of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County for pre-determined evacuation areas are presented in the Evacuation
ICP.
The Chief of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness
Division has the responsibility to recommend to the Mayor, the need to issue an evacuation order
for high risk areas in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County prior to the threat of a
hurricane, tropical storm, wildland fire, flooding incident or any other applicable threat.
The safety of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County citizens is of mutual concern to
both county and municipal officials. A safe large-scale evacuation in advance of an approaching
hurricane or tropical storm in northeast Florida requires the coordinated effort of all governmental
and non-governmental agencies. Implementation of the evacuation order and ultimately re-entry
into the impacted area is the responsibility of the elected legislative body of each local government.
Direction and control of all evacuation and re-entry activity within or through a municipality is
retained by the local entity affected. However, the ongoing communications and coordination will


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be maintained with all impacted jurisdictions through regularly scheduled conference calls,
situation reports through the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County EOC/Area Command.


Sheltering
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division maintains
a memorandum of understanding with Duval County Public Schools relative to the closing of
schools prior to an incident or disaster and the use of certain schools as Special Needs Shelters
and general population shelters. When considering the use of these facilities, the Superintendent
of Schools will participate in the development of the evacuation schedule and will approve closure
times for all schools prior to the issuance of an evacuation order. Additional roles and
responsibilities are detailed in the Sheltering ICP and Special Needs ICP.

Shelters can be selected for a variety of evacuation circumstances. For hurricanes, facilities must
meet structural criteria to withstand the high winds. Facilities must also be located outside of areas
where storm surge and flooding may occur. The basic criterion for hurricane shelter selection is
outlined in the American Red Cross (ARC) publication, “Guidelines for Hurricane Evacuation
Shelter Selection (4496).”

Emergency Evacuation Assistance
As mandated by the state, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County maintains a registry
of individuals with special needs who require assistance when evacuating. The Emergency
Operations Center/Area Command (EOC) coordinates an evacuation plan to relocate these
individuals to specialized shelters. The details of this plan can be found in the Special Needs ICP.
The Special Needs Evacuation Program (SpNEP) arranges transportation to specialized shelters
for pre-registered clients and a limited amount of late registrants. Registrants may be assigned to
a Special Needs Shelter (SpNS) or a medical facility depending on their medical needs and health
conditions.
SpNS are refuges of last resort intended to maintain, to the extent practical, the current health,
safety, and well-being of medically dependent individuals who are not acutely ill. SpNS operate in
public schools or another safe structure and provide basic medical attention to clients with special
needs or who need assistance with daily activities in the event of an impending hurricane. While in
operation, the SpNS must meet a multitude of human needs both physical and psychological under
adverse conditions.
SpNS are located in public schools or other safe structures and managed by the Duval County
Health Department (DCHD). Support staff from the county/city agencies, non-profit groups and
private sector will also assist with operations.
SpNS are generally intended to operate for a limited time, one to three days. SpNS will generally
open to evacuees 24-36 hours prior to the arrival of tropical storm force winds associated with a
threatening hurricane. In most instances, evacuees are able to return to their homes within a short
time or relocate to other housing. Special needs clients requiring temporary housing following a
storm can be assisted by social service agencies. A SpNS will continue operating until all the
special needs clients have returned home or have been transferred to another facility.
DCHD (with support and augmentation from state headquarters), is the lead agency for the
recruitment of health care providers, as defined in F.S. 456.0001(4), to staff the special needs
shelters in times of emergency or disaster events and to provide resources to carry out this
responsibility.


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The Special Needs Steering Committee (SpNSC) has the responsibility to plan for the special
needs population and should have input into the design (addressing the four phases of emergency
management: preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation), activation, operation and
deactivation of SpNS. This committee is made up of organizations and agencies that include, but
are not limited to the Emergency Preparedness Division (EPD), DCHD, Emergency Medical
Services (EMS), American Red Cross (ARC), home care agencies, hospice organizations,
extended care living facilities, ambulance companies, oxygen and durable medical equipment
providers and others.


Transportation
It is the responsibility of the Transportation Group to coordinate and facilitate the emergency
transportation requirements of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County during the
response, and recovery phases of an incident or disaster. These requirements include but are not
limited to the following:
             • Evacuation assistance
             • Traffic control
             • Debris clearance
             • Logistical transportation
More detailed information on the roles and responsibilities can be found in the Transportation
Group ICP.

Needs Assessment/Incident Management System
The EOC/Area Command has implemented an electronic incident management system (IMS) from
E-Team® for the purpose of automating the collection, consolidation and distribution of information
related to the incident. The EOC/Area Command uses E-Team® to perform the following functions:


           •    Review situation overview then drill down to details;
           •    Gather and share critical information across agencies, jurisdictions and groups;
           •    Assess damage to critical infrastructure;
           •    Determine response capabilities;
           •    Notify and alert key parties;
           •    Execute procedures and protocols; and
           •    Request, deploy and track resources.

The EOC/Area Command has standardized forms for reporting disaster intelligence and for making
resource requests. EOC/Area Command sections/branches/units generate status reports on a
regular basis and transmit these reports to the EOC/Area Command. It is the responsibility of the
Situation Unit within the EOC/Area Command Planning Section to collect all of these status reports
and produce a consolidated summary of the situation status. The EOC/Area Command also has
specialized reporting forms that have been incorporated into the E-Team® Incident Management
System software package.




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Action planning is an effective management tool and is critical to the EOC/Area Command
operations. Action planning involves two essential characteristics:


1) A process to identify objectives, priorities and assignments related to emergency response or
recovery actions; and
2) Documentation of the priorities, objectives, tasks and personnel assignments associated with
meeting the objectives.


The Planning Section is responsible for facilitating the action planning meeting and completing and
distributing the incident action plan. Action plans are developed for a specified operational period,
which may range from a few hours to 24 hours. The operational period is determined by first
establishing a set of priority actions that need to be performed. A reasonable time frame is then
established for accomplishing those actions. The action planning process involves the Executive
Group, Emergency Manager, and Section Chiefs (and other EOC/Area Command staff as
needed). The action plans need not be complex, but should be sufficiently detailed to guide
EOC/Area Command elements in implementing the priority actions. It is important that all incidents
have some form of action plan. The plan developed around some duration of time is called an
Operational Period, will state the objectives to be achieved and describe the strategy, tactics,
resources and support required to achieve the objectives within the time frame. Generally, the
length of the operational period is determined by the length of time needed to achieve the
objectives; typically, this period is 12 hours in length. The Planning Section can create action plans
for each work shift, a 24 hour period, or whatever makes sense for a given event. A more detailed
description of this process is outlined in the Planning Section ICP.


Citizen Corps
Jacksonville Citizen Corps creates opportunities for individuals to volunteer in programs that focus
on community safety, crime prevention, disaster preparedness and response. These programs
include:
           •    N.E. Florida VOAD (Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters)
           •    Duval Prepares
           •    JEMA (Jacksonville Emergency Medical Auxiliary)
           •    CERT (Community Emergency Response Team)
           •    Medical Reserve Corps
           •    ARES (Amateur Radio Emergency Services)
           •    Civil Air Patrol (CAP)
           •    Neighborhood Watch
           •    VIPS (Volunteers in Police Service) – Community Posse
           •    ShAdCo (Sheriff’s Advisory Council)

The governing body of Jacksonville Citizen Corps is the Citizen Corps Council, which is the
Mayor’s Security and Emergency Preparedness and Planning Council. Jacksonville’s Citizen Corps
mission is to make our communities safer, stronger, and better prepared to respond to disasters by
engaging individuals in crime prevention and emergency preparedness and response through
education, training and volunteer service.



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Mutual Aid Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding

Introduction

The State Emergency Management Act, Chapter 252, Florida Statutes, authorizes the State of
Florida and its political subdivisions to develop and enter into mutual aid agreements for
emergency aid and assistance. To enter into a Memoranda of Agreement, the City of Jacksonville
City Council and the Councils of respective Urban Service Districts have passed legislation.


Ordinance Code 674, section 674.203 authorizes The Chief of the Emergency Preparedness
Division to be the lead responsibility for handling mutual aid requests and/or providing help to other
government jurisdictions asking for assistance under the Statewide Mutual Aid Agreement.


Mutual Aid Requests

Mutual aid will only be requested if the Emergency Preparedness Division deems that local
resources inadequate.      The authorized representative, or the Chief of the Emergency
Preparedness Division, shall transmit mutual aid requests through the Logistics Section, in
coordination with the Planning Section/Resources Unit. The Logistics Section shall serve as the
contact and coordination point for all mutual aid requests. The Planning Section/Resources Unit
will coordinate and track all mutual aid requests. For additional information on the resource
ordering process, see Figure 38 on page 124.

The following steps will be followed in making requests for resources from other government
organizations that have entered into the aforementioned agreement:

1.     Mayor declares a local state of emergency because a disaster has occurred. A copy of the
       declaration is sent to the Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) in
       Tallahassee.

2.     The authorized representative will make direct contact with the State Warning Point at the
       DEM and provide the information listed below. The Planning Section/Resource Unit will
       follow-up with written confirmation using DEM’s tracker system.

                      •   A description of the damage sustained or threatened.
                      •   An identification of the specific Emergency Support Function or
                          Functions for which such assistance is needed.
                      •   A description of the specific type of assistance needed within each
                          Emergency Support Function.
                      •   A description of the types of personnel, equipment, services, and
                          supplies needed for each specific type of assistance, with an estimate of
                          the time each will be needed.
                      •   A description of any public infrastructure for which assistance will be
                          needed.

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                       •   A description of any sites or structures outside the territorial jurisdiction
                           of the Requesting Party needed as centers to stage incoming personnel,
                           equipment, supplies, services or other resources.
                       •   The place, date and time for personnel of the Requesting Party to meet
                           and receive the personnel and equipment of the Assisting Party.
                       •   A technical description of any communications or telecommunications
                           equipment needed to ensure timely communications between the
                           Requesting Party and any Assisting Parties.


Responding to a Mutual Aid Request
When a request is received from DEM or a Requesting Party to provide assistance, the Emergency
Preparedness Division will immediately contact the appropriate agency head to determine if
resources are available. The following steps will be adhered to in processing the request:

           •    Convey to the agency head the information received from DEM or Requesting Party.
                This information will be provided via voice then entered into the state’s tracking
                system.

           •    Advise the appropriate agency head that the Statewide Mutual Aid Agreement
                stipulates that “assisting parties shall render assistance to extent personnel,
                equipment and resources are available”. Also, advise “participating governments
                agree to render assistance to the fullest extent possible”. The agency head should
                be informed that the Requesting Party is responsible for costs incurred, unless there
                is an agreement between the parties that all or a portion of the costs will be provided
                on a gratis basis.

           •    Agency head determines if the resources requested can be provided.

           •    After the determination has been made, the tracking system form will be completed
                and forwarded to the Emergency Preparedness Division.
           •    The Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division will provide a copy to the
                requesting party immediately.

           •    The Requesting Party/DEM shall respond by executing and returning a copy to the
                Assisting Party ASAP. The Emergency Preparedness Division will notify the agency
                head and provide a copy of the executed documentation.

           •    If the request was not routed through DEM, the Emergency Preparedness Division
                will contact the State Warning Point and advise it of the request and the response to
                the request as soon as possible. Subsequently keeping them informed if the
                Requesting Party made the request directly to the Assisting Party.

A copy of the tracking system form with information received will be placed in Planning
Section/Resource Unit files. Also, copies will be forwarded to the City’s Comptroller’s Office in City
Hall.




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Recovery
Introduction
Following a disaster, once the principal threat has passed and the primary concern of protection of
citizens from harm has been addressed, it becomes almost as critical to public safety to ensure the
speedy yet orderly recovery of the community. Recovery functions include continued, potentially
long-term response operations (such as debris removal and disposal, infrastructure repair, etc.),
liaison with state and federal response and recovery agencies, damage assessment, responding to
the basic needs of citizens who may have lost their homes, possessions, businesses, or jobs.
Emergency management has to be prepared to address the long-term operations needed to return
the community to normalcy.

The lead agency responsible for coordinating recovery operations following a natural or manmade
disaster is the Emergency Preparedness Division.

The Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division shall serve as the initial contact with the
Florida Division of Emergency Management (DEM) for the coordination of recovery efforts. In the
event of a major or catastrophic event, the activated entities within the EOC/Area Command shall
provide liaison services to their corresponding state and federal ESFs and related agencies.

Under the National Response Plan, federal Emergency Support Function (ESF) #14 (Long-Term
Community Recovery and Mitigation) coordinates the resources of federal departments and
agencies to support the long-term recovery of states and communities. When the State Emergency
Operations Center is activated in response to an emergency/ disaster, a recovery and mitigation
component is activated.

Following the local establishment of a federal Long-Term Recovery Office (LTRO), the Chief of the
Emergency Preparedness Division shall designate a local LTRO liaison. For certain hazards or
incident-specific incidents, the lead response agency may continue to be the City’s principal
coordinating representative.

Once into the recovery phase of a major disaster, the Planning Section shall assume the liaison
function with the state recovery staff, as will appropriate representatives of the various activated
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County agencies involved in recovery operations.

Coordination for the establishment of Disaster Recovery Centers, additional staging areas, and
other sites that may be needed for coordinated assistance will primarily be the responsibility of the
Human Services Branch and its subordinate groups and requisite lead agencies. Activation of
staging areas already identified by various response agencies of the emergency management
organization, and those established as satellite centers for the municipal governments of the beach
communities should they be required to relocate west of the Intracoastal Waterway, will be
activated according to their established schedules and SOGs.


Executive Group
In response to a major destructive storm, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s
2010 Comprehensive Plan (Objective 7.5) calls for the preparation of a post-disaster Plan that will
identify programs and actions that will reduce or eliminate the exposure of human life and property
to natural hazards. To direct the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s hurricane


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recovery operations, the 2010 Plan (Policy 7.5.2) calls upon the Mayor of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County to appoint an EOC/Area Command Executive Group. The Executive
Group shall be comprised of those same individuals identified earlier, as such, in this document.

As directed by the policies of the 2010 Plan, the Executive Group shall:

1. Review and decide upon emergency building permits.

2. Analyze and recommend hazard mitigation options, including reconstruction or relocation of
damaged public facilities.

3. Coordinate the preparation of the post-disaster redevelopment plan.

4. Recommend amendments to the 2010 Plan and the Comprehensive Emergency Management
Plan, and other appropriate policies and procedures.

5. Coordinate with state and federal disaster assistance officials.


Disaster Declaration
Requests for federal disaster assistance will be predicated on the requirements outlined in the
Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Public Law 93-288, as
amended). After the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County conducts the initial damage
assessment and reports to the State Emergency Operations Center, a joint local/state preliminary
damage assessment may be scheduled that could include the Federal Emergency Management
Agency. This damage assessment validates the local data and is the basis for requesting a
Presidential Disaster Declaration. Other federal agencies that may participate in the assessment
process include the Small Business Administration and Natural Resource Conservation Service.
This process is described in 44 CFR, Part 206, Subpart B - The Declaration Process and other
federal and state policies and procedures.



Transition from Response to Recovery
As recognized in local ordinances; the declaration of a local state of emergency and the “Response
Phase” is a temporary reorganization of government to address disaster caused issues. These
issues generally fall into the broad categories of meeting victim needs, enhancing public safety
service delivery and repairing or restoring infrastructure functionality. There is no clear line of
differentiation between the “Response Phase” and “Recovery Phase.” The command and control,
coordination and resources to serve disaster victims, transitions from an emergent need to a more
deliberative process of service delivery as programs/activities transition from Response Phase to
Recovery Phase. County recovery activities, coordination with the federal and state governments
and the processes for obtaining and administering state and federal assistance are described later
in this section.




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Figure 39. Response to Recovery Curve




Figure 39 pictorially represents a number of features in the Response phase and Recovery phase
related to each other. One feature is that the Recovery phase starts at the inception of the
disaster, similar to the Response phase. Managerial focus and resources in the early stages is
expended through the coordination of the Emergency Operations Center and its structures. Over a
period of time, the Response phase diminishes and the Recovery phase activities become more
preeminent. The rest of this section describes the Recovery phase activities.


Recovery Functions
Recovery functions have been organized according to three primary functions that occur in the
aftermath of a disaster. These three major recovery functions include:


          •     Damage Assessment,
          •     Infrastructure and Public Assistance, and
          •     Individual Assistance.

NOTE: For detailed information on recovery functions, please refer to the Recovery Plan ICP.


Damage Assessment
The Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division shall designate a Damage Assessment Officer
to supervise assigned persons in a Damage Assessment Unit (DAU). This unit will have four
functional components:

1. Public Sector Damage Assessment Team(s), which will be responsible for assessing the
damage inflicted upon publicly owned property.



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2. Private Sector Damage Assessment Team(s), which will be responsible for collecting information
on housing and business losses.

3. Municipal Damage Assessment Team(s) are teams established within the independent
municipalities of Duval County that will provide Damage Assessment services within their
incorporated areas.

4. Human Needs Assessment Team(s), are persons assigned to collect field information on the
needs of our community following a disaster that has severely impacted facilities and other
community assets that are depended upon for daily living, and to report back to the EOC/Area
Command

Specific Damage Assessment procedures and responsibilities can be found in Damage
Assessment Unit ICP.

Impact to the local economy shall be ascertained however possible, but will rely on the following
organizations for preliminary information and periodically revised data:

1.     Property Appraiser’s Office (value of damaged or destroyed properties)

2.     Planning and Development Department (impact on jobs, etc.)

3.     Corporate Recovery Group (business specific losses)

Teams will be drawn from Property Appraiser staff. If warranted by the extent of the disaster, these
teams may be augmented by personnel from other Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
agencies and outside sources. Following an event, Damage Assessment teams will be dispatched
into the affected areas to perform a Preliminary Damage Assessment. These assessments shall
be conducted by windshield survey.

Damage Assessment reports will be transmitted to the Damage Assessment Unit within the
EOC/Area Command Planning Section in a timely manner as established at the time of the
disaster. Damage Assessment field estimates may be transmitted electronically to the EOC/Area
Command from the field if facilities are available. Damage Assessment reports may also assist in
the establishment of baseline human and community needs, based upon the information gained
from field inspections.

Develop preliminary dollar estimates of potential damage based upon estimated damage
percentages and appraised property value, and develop related reports and briefing information in
accordance with state-required formats.

Public Works Department will support Damage Assessment efforts by inspecting bridges, roads
and other infrastructure, and reporting this information to Damage Assessment Unit.

Information gathered shall be monitored for inclusion in Situation Reports by Planning Section’s
Situation Unit.

Initial Damage Assessments shall be accomplished by participation in flyovers conducted by the
state’s Rapid Initial Assessment Teams (RIATs). The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County participants have been identified, and the roster of these assignees is updated prior to


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hurricane season. Flyovers by the RIATs will also be used to initially develop a needs assessment
for goods and services needed by the community as a result of the disaster. Needs Assessment
data and information will be tracked by the Planning Section, and distributed to human service
response agencies.

Other methods used to assess physical damages and develop needs and services estimates
include:

1. Continued flyovers utilizing Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County-owned (Mosquito
Control, Sheriff’s Office, etc.) or acquired aircraft.

2. Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County vehicles, such as trucks, automobiles, off-road
vehicles, etc.

3. Riverine Damage Assessment shall be conducted using Fire/Rescue Department, Sheriff’s
Office, and other Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County marine assets, and by utilization
of state (Florida Marine Patrol, Game and Fish, etc.), or volunteer marine assets.

4. Where damage is extensive, and roads may not be passable, Damage Assessment teams may
resort to foot patrols.


State of Florida Rapid Impact Assessment Team (RIAT)
Following any major or catastrophic disaster, a rapid assessment of local damage and victim needs
is essential in determining the critical resources needed to support disaster victims. To accomplish
this, the state will deploy a Rapid Impact Assessment Team(s) (RIAT) immediately following a
catastrophic emergency or disaster in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County which
requires immediate Damage Assessment to provide local officials full understanding as to the
extent and impact of the emergency or disaster.

The Florida Division of Emergency Management will initiate RIAT deployment following procedures
specified in FLNG-RIAT. The RIAT team leader will coordinate assessment activity with the City of
Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division Chief or designee.                  The
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County officials required to assist RIAT operations will
immediately report to the Emergency Operations Center/Area Command (EOC) when advised of
RIAT arrival in Duval County. Following the arrival of the RIAT, the Emergency Preparedness
Chief and the RIAT Team Leader will conduct a situation briefing to ensure both RIAT team
members and local officials have the same initial assessment information. Following this briefing,
team members and their local counterparts will conduct the assessments in accordance with the
applicable state agency checklists (FLNG-RIAT located at the EOC/Area Command). The RIAT
will report all of its findings to the EOC/Area Command Damage Assessment Unit as soon as
possible.

State EOC will determine when RIAT assessments are completed and notify the team leader to
terminate activity.




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Initial Safety and Damage Assessment
In the immediate aftermath of the disaster, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County will
conduct a countywide local impact assessment. The Emergency Preparedness Division Chief, or
designee, is responsible for coordinating the Initial Safety and Damage Assessment. The
Emergency Preparedness Division will coordinate the initial assessment with the State of Florida
Rapid Impact Assessment Team (RIAT). Additionally, all Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County agencies, especially Fire Rescue, Sheriff’s Office and Public Works, are responsible for
reporting operational information, reports from the public, and observed damage to the EOC/Area
Command. The goal of this assessment is to determine the magnitude and severity of damage to
structures and infrastructure; and, in the event of a severe rainfall event, determine the level of
flooding damage.

All impact assessment team members must report impact assessment results to the EOC/Area
Command within hours of disaster impact. The Damage Assessment Unit is responsible for
compiling and analyzing initial damage assessments. The results are mapped on a Geographic
Information System map with color-coded categories.

The impact assessment data provides a countywide general overview of the most significantly
impacted areas and, therefore establishes a prioritization mechanism for Damage Assessment
team deployment, resource allocation, and disaster assistance.

The data collected from the initial Damage Assessment will be reported to the State Emergency
Operations Center. If outside assistance will be required, the initial Damage Assessment will be
used as the basis for a local declaration of emergency.


Preliminary Damage Assessment
A Damage Assessment is needed to quickly assess the life safety needs, magnitude of the
disaster and eligibility for state and federal aid. Damage Assessment is accomplished in phases.
Preliminary Damage Assessment (PDA) scans the affected area to determine the width and
breadth of damage, looking at critical facilities to determine the immediate and life safety needs.

The EOC/Area Command Planning Section’s Damage Assessment Unit is the county’s single point
for receiving Damage Assessment reports and determining the disaster magnitude. The Duval
County Public Works Department serves as lead agency for the Damage Assessment Unit while
the Property Appraisers Office provides analysis support for Damage Assessment. This agency
can provide a graphic depiction of damage levels as well as monetary Damage Assessments.
The Damage Assessment Unit produces a Preliminary Damage Assessment for the State EOC
situation report and other government agencies.

The Preliminary Damage Assessment (PDA) begins immediately after the incident occurs. This
preliminary Damage Assessment determines whether more detailed damage assessments are
necessary and identifies those areas where further efforts should be concentrated. The
preliminary Damage Assessment is reported to the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
Emergency Operations Center within twelve hours of the emergency occurrence by all field
resources.



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From the Preliminary Damage Assessments, a "quick dollar estimate" of the damages will be
derived, based on certain presumptions and assumptions predetermined by the recovery team in
the EOC/Area Command. The team will also use damage estimates from the Northeast Florida
Hurricane Loss Study, property values from the Property Appraisers files, and standard rates for
labor and equipment.

If the Preliminary Damage Assessment indicates that the damage is severe and widespread, a
declaration of a State of Emergency may be possible without a detailed written Damage
Assessment. In that case state and federal teams may be dispatched to assist in completing the
Damage Assessment.

Information is collected and evaluated using state Damage Assessment Forms, Situation Reports,
and other means and is shared with state and federal officials as needed. This prevents duplication
of effort and verifies incomplete information.

The EOC/Area Command Planning Section’s Damage Assessment Unit is the single point to
consolidate and evaluate Damage Assessment information. This assessment is formatted using
state Damage Assessment Forms to facilitate rapid dissemination of information.


Post-Disaster Habitability Certification
Once structures, buildings, and homes have been severely damaged, and/or had power cut off in
impacted areas, power cannot be restored until inspected by a certified electrician. The Duval
County Building Official will notify utility suppliers in the County of reinstatement of electrical
service. All buildings damaged must be permitted for rebuilding or restoration and all new work
must be up to current codes. If building is more than 50% damaged, then it will be brought up to
current codes. Condemnation of severely damaged buildings and structures will be accomplished
when they become public safety issues. These are legal responsibilities of all jurisdictions within
the county.



Infrastructure & Public Assistance

General
For Affected governments and qualified not-for-profit organizations, a Public Officials Briefing shall
be held. At the briefing, public officials shall be oriented on available assistance and procedures,
and shall receive “Notice Of Interest” forms to be filed with state and federal officials. Subsequent
“Project Applications” shall be filed with the DEM and FEMA for further processing. State and
federal authorities will evaluate the project applications and determine justification for assistance.

Jacksonville Administrative & Finance Department and Department of Procurement personnel shall
serve as the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s principal representatives in
preparation of disaster application forms, monitoring of projects to completion and certification, and
disbursement of relief funds. The City Administration and Finance Department shall also
coordinate the development of Disaster Survey Report review and represent the Consolidated City
of Jacksonville/Duval County in negotiations for restitution of losses with federal and state officials.

Debris removal shall be coordinated and executed by the EOC/Area Command Public Works
Group and Complex Command Public Works Group. Fallen trees and similar debris shall be


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disposed, to the extent possible, at the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s mulching
facility located at the Trail Ridge Landfill. Burn sites, if needed, shall be identified by the EOC/Area
Command Public Works Group, and operated with the cooperation of the EOC/Area Command
Firefighting Group, and local environmental officials. Methods for disposal of non-mulchable debris
shall be determined by the Public Works Group, in conjunction with local and state environmental
officials. Vegetative debris will be processed at temporary debris storage and retention sites.

The EOC/Area Command Finance/Administration Section will implement administrative procedures
for financial transactions, cost accounting, grants management, document tracking and payroll
processing. Following deactivation of the EOC/Area Command, these functions shall be continued
by those agencies that staff the Finance/Administration Section. Procedures and instructions for
preparing Project Worksheets and tracking disaster costs have been developed by the
Administration and Finance Department, which also provides training and instruction on these
procedures.


Public Assistance Grant Program
The objective of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) Public Assistance (PA)
Grant Program is to provide assistance to states, local governments, and certain non-profit
organizations to alleviate suffering and hardship resulting from major disasters or emergencies
declared by the President.


Through the PA Program, FEMA provides supplemental federal disaster grant assistance for the
repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly owned facilities and the facilities
of certain Private Non-Profit (PNP) organizations.


The federal share of assistance is not less than 75% of the eligible cost for emergency measures
and permanent restoration. The grantee (usually the state) determines how the non-federal share
(up to 25%) is split with the sub-grantees (eligible applicants).



Applicant Briefing (Kickoff meeting)
An applicant briefing will be scheduled to advise potential eligible applicants (municipalities, county
government and private non-profit entities) of the availability and requirements of federal
assistance. These briefings will be publicized through the media and to the Emergency
Preparedness Division, in accordance with 44 CFR-206 Subpart G & H. Each potential applicant
will be asked to complete and return a Request for Public Assistance (RPA) form. The RPA reports
damages suffered by each potential applicant and is used by the FCO and PAO to determine the
number of damage survey and inspection teams.

A completed RPA will be transmitted to the FCO for each potential applicant. If the RPA is denied
by the FCO, the PAO will notify the potential applicant in writing, explaining the specific reason(s)
for denial and providing information on appeal procedures.

Potential applicants will also be requested to complete and return a “Designation of Sub-grantee’s
Agent” form that designates the official authorized to sign the funding agreement and execute



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relevant public assistance documents. Before any public assistance funds are released, the State
and Applicant must enter into a disaster relief funding agreement.


Project Worksheets
Each potential applicant must submit, within the designated application period, a “List of Projects”
to be reviewed for public assistance. This list should identify, for each damage site and project; the
disaster assistance category, site location, description of the damage and scope of work necessary
to repair, replace or restore projects to pre-disaster conditions. Damage survey and inspection
teams, comprised of county, state and federal engineers, planners and architects, will review each
project and activity on the List of Projects.

The Public Assistance Officer will coordinate with each applicant to arrange the survey and
inspection schedules, ensure participation by appropriate local officials and ensure necessary
records and documentation are available. The inspection team will prepare Project Worksheets
(PW) for each project, identifying activity descriptions, scopes of work and cost estimates. Each
PW undergoes two levels of review before approval by the FCO. This approval must occur within
45 days of the date of first inspection. The first review, performed jointly by the state/federal
damage survey and inspection team, is for concurrence on the PW. If state and federal inspectors
concur, the PW goes to the FCO for approval. If there is a disagreement on the PW, it is returned
to the applicant for resolution of the discrepancy. The second review, conducted by FEMA staff, is
done before final approval of the FCO. If the PW is approved, it is forwarded to the FCO for
approval. If there is a discrepancy, it is returned to the survey and inspection team for resolution of
the discrepancy.

Any changes made to a PW during any stage of the review process will be returned to the
applicant, who will then have an opportunity to review the change, concur or not concur and attach
any additional documentation or statements to support their position.


Appeals
The County, on behalf of a Sub-grantee, can petition the GAR to appeal any FEMA determination
on, or denial of, federal public assistance. This appeal must be made in writing within 60 days from
the date of notification of FEMA’s determination. The Sub-grantee must provide sufficient
information that permits the County to provide to the GAR the facts needed to assess the validity of
the appeal. The FCO will review the appeal and conduct the necessary investigation to determine
the validity of the appeal. The FCO will, within 90 days following receipt of the appeal, notify the
GAR in writing of the disposition of the appeal or if additional information is required. If additional
information is requested, the FCO shall have an additional 90 days, from receipt of the information,
to review the information and notify the GAR of the disposition of the appeal. If the FCO denies an
appeal, the Sub-grantee may submit a second appeal to the FEMA Associate Director. This appeal
must be in writing and submitted through the GAR and FCO within 60 days after receipt of the
denial of the first appeal. The FEMA Associate Director has 90 days in which to make a decision
on appeal or request additional information. If the Associate Director denies the appeal, a third
and final appeal may be made to the FEMA Director within 60 days after receipt of the Associate
Director’s denial. The FEMA Director has 90 days in which to make a decision on the appeal or
request additional information. The Director shall notify the GAR of the final disposition of the
appeal.



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Program Assistance and Management
The PAO will administer all public assistance grants, agreements and contracts. Administrative
staff will be responsible for providing technical assistance to eligible applicants and sub-grantees,
and maintaining and submitting all documents and paperwork necessary to obligate and disburse
public assistance funds. This includes establishing a system for the processing of payments to
sub-grantees and to FEMA; and establishing and maintaining accounting records for each payment
draw down by the state and each payment to sub-grantees. Public Assistance will be handled
using the Public Assistance Manual and forms from the state.


Final Inspections
When all PWs in any project application have been completed, a project summary must be
submitted by the Sub-grantee to the PAO and Governor’s Authorized Representative. State and
federal inspectors will conduct a final inspection of the project to verify the project’s completion.
Final inspection documents will then be prepared and forwarded to the FCO for the preparation of
any closing spplements.


Insurance Coordination Procedures
Most Public Assistance Grants will not be processed until insurance coordination with the
appropriate carrier has been completed. County and local government Risk Managers must ensure
early turn around of insurance documents and documentation. The State Public Assistance Office
will administer all public assistance grants, agreements and contracts. Administrative staff will be
responsible for providing technical assistance to eligible applicants and sub-grantees and for
maintaining and submitting all documents and paperwork necessary to obligate and disburse
public assistance funds. This includes establishing a system for the processing of payments to
sub-grantees and to FEMA; and establishing and maintaining accounting records for each payment
draw down by the state and each payment to the sub-grantees.


Additional Disaster-Specific Grant Programs
Other disaster-related grant programs that the state and the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County may be eligible to apply for include:

           •    Community Disaster Loan Program - Provides funds to any eligible jurisdiction in a
                designated disaster area that has suffered a substantial loss of tax and other
                revenue.

           •    Fire Management Assistance Grant Program - Assistance for the mitigation,
                management, and control of fires on publicly or privately owned forests or
                grasslands, which threaten such destruction as would constitute a major disaster.

           •    Hazard Mitigation Grant Program - Provides grants to states and local governments
                to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster
                declaration.




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           •    Reimbursement for Firefighting on Federal Property - Provides reimbursement only
                for direct costs and losses over and above normal operating costs for fighting fire on
                property owned by the federal government.



Debris Management
The EOC/Area Command Public Works Group is responsible for debris management. During the
recovery from a major disaster, such as a hurricane, debris removal will be divided into two
separate phases:

Phase I - Debris Clearance: Clearance of Debris that hinders search and rescue operations and
immediate life-saving actions, and the clearance of that debris, which may pose an immediate
threat to public health and safety. This activity will be accomplished with local government
resources, aid from neighboring counties and state assistance agencies, contracted private
providers, and volunteers.

Phase II - Debris Removal: Removal of Debris that hinders the orderly recovery of the community.
Due to the potential of being monumental in scale, this phase of the operation will be conducted in
large part by the Corps of Engineers, who are mandated by the National Response Plan to provide
such services, following the issuance of a Presidential Declaration of Natural Disaster.

The EOC/Area Command Public Works Group has the responsibility for the overall coordination of
debris removal efforts to include securing all required state and federal agency environmental
permits. Emergency debris removal efforts will focus on clearing major transportation arteries in an
effort to allow the movement of emergency vehicles, supplies, resources and traffic. After the
restoration of the major transportation arteries has been completed, debris will then be removed
from collector roadways, residential/local roadways, and public parks. The Florida Department of
Transportation is responsible for clearing debris from state and federal roads in major arterial
systems.

In an effort to minimize the impacts on remaining landfill capacities, alternate means of debris
disposal will be utilized whenever possible. Vegetative debris will be burned or chipped. Burning
will not be used when it creates a public health hazard. The EOC/Area Command Public Works
Group will identify suitable burn sites.

It is anticipated that significant numbers of personnel with engineering and construction skills,
along with construction equipment and materials, will be required from state and federal agencies
and from sources located outside of the affected area(s). The acquisition and deployment of these
resources will be coordinated among the EOC/Area Command Logistics Section and Public Works
Group. It is an EOC/Area Command Public Works Group-required contingency to have County
contracts for support of debris management activities.
The General Counsel’s Office will develop entry procedures for debris removal from private
property.

Logistics Section is responsible for other emergency period contracts and the EOC/Area
Command Public Works Group is responsible for developing sample debris removal contracts.
This function is addressed in detail in the Debris Management ICP.




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Individual Assistance

Disaster Recovery Centers
Following a disaster of such magnitude that far exceeds the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County’s and the state’s ability to meet the needs of the community, and results
in the requesting and granting of a Presidential Disaster Declaration, the emergency management
organization (EOC/Area Command) shall, as previously described, at the request of the Federal
Emergency Management Agency or Florida Division of Emergency Management, establish
Disaster Recovery Centers for individuals seeking recovery assistance. The Emergency
Preparedness Division Chief, or designee, will coordinate with the state, pre-event and post-event,
regarding the need and location of a DRC. The County, state and FEMA staffs jointly share the
responsibility of choosing a location for the DRC. Joint state and FEMA managers provide overall
management of the DRC. These sites shall be established at geographically strategic sites,
providing all effected citizens with access to available programs, and shall provide representatives
from numerous federal, state, local, and private relief agencies. Locations of the centers, as well
as information on FEMA’s tele-registration program, shall be made known via the Public
Information Officer, and all other available information outlets (see PIO portion of the Command
Section ICP). Refer to DRC standard operating procedures for more details.

Tele-registration is the planned primary mechanism for the registration of affected citizens and
persons impacted by a disaster to receive disaster information and assistance. Applicants may call
1-800-621-FEMA (3362) (hearing/speech impaired ONLY-Call TTY: 1-800-462-7585) to apply for
assistance. Applicants may also apply in person at a DRC for emergency assistance or apply
online or by mail.

Some of the services that a DRC may provide include:
           •    Guidance regarding disaster recovery,
           •    Clarification of any written correspondence received,
           •    Housing Assistance and Rental Resource information,
           •    Answers to questions, resolution to problems and referrals to other public and
                private non-profit agencies that may provide further assistance,
           •    Status of applications being processed by FEMA, and
           •    SBA program information if there is a SBA Representative at the Disaster Recovery
                Center site.


Individual Assistance Programs
The following federal grant programs are available to individuals following a disaster:


           •    Disaster Assistance - Disaster assistance is money or direct assistance to
                individuals, families and businesses in an area whose property has been damaged
                or destroyed and whose losses are not covered by insurance. It is meant to help
                victims with critical expenses that cannot be covered in other ways. This assistance
                is not intended to restore damaged property to its condition before the disaster.

           •    Crisis Counseling - Provides supplemental funding to states for short-term crisis
                counseling services to people affected in Presidential-declared disasters.


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           •    Disaster Legal Services - When the President declares a disaster, FEMA, through
                an agreement with the Young Lawyers Division of the American Bar Association,
                provides free legal assistance to disaster victims. This may include assistance with
                insurance claims, landlord-tenant problems, consumer protection and the
                replacement of wills and other documents.

           •    Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) - The Disaster Unemployment
                Assistance (DUA) program provides unemployment benefits and re-employment
                services to individuals who have become unemployed because of major disasters.
                Benefits begin with the date the individual was unemployed due to the disaster
                incident and can extend up to 26 weeks after the Presidential declaration date.

           •    Small Business Administration Disaster Loans - The U.S. Small Business
                Administration (SBA) can make federally subsidized loans to repair or replace
                homes, personal property or businesses that sustained damages not covered by
                insurance.


Community Relations
The lead agency for the EOC/Area Command Reception Center Unit (i.e., Community Services) or
their designee will act as the County Community Relations Coordinator. Trained volunteers will
assist the Community Relations Coordinator in this capacity. This team will function as the liaison
with the FEMA/State Team. The Community Relations Team, in conjunction with the Damage
Assessment Team, will determine the most critically damaged or impacted areas for the
FEMA/State Team to focus on.       The various municipalities, Chamber of Commerce, ministerial
associations and other civic organizations will be contacted to assist in assessing the community
needs.

The roles and responsibilities of the Community Relations Team include:

   •   Sole contact/liaison with the State Community Relations Coordinator in Tallahassee or the
       LTRO.

   •   Responsibility for maintaining the Community Relation County Roster database provided by
       the State DEM Recovery Section every June.

   •   Responsibility for recruiting local participants in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
       County area to be part of the FEMA/State/Local Community Relations Teams during a
       Presidential Declared Disaster in Duval County.

   •   Responsibility for dissemination and collecting information vital to the disaster victims in
       order for them to recover from the declared disaster. Flyers and applicant guides will be
       provided to the disaster victims for them to tele-register on the 1-800-621-FEMA line for
       Disaster Assistance.

   •   Responsibility for reporting any disaster victims unmet needs to the Human Services
       Branch.



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   •   Responsibility for providing the disaster victim with an opportunity to tell their story to a
       responsive Community Relations Team member.

   •   Responsibility for maintain on-going communications with community leaders/organizations
       and local government officials regarding disaster issues and the disaster applicant process.

   •   Perform other roles and responsibilities, which are outlined in the state’s Community
       Relations SOP and Community Relations Field Guide.


Unmet Needs Coordination
Unmet needs are any disaster-related losses experienced by the victim that cannot be provided for
by the programs available from local, state, or federal government agencies due to the victim’s
ineligibility for such services or the unavailability of the goods or services. During the recovery
phase, a collaborative effort is established between government and the private non-profit
community.

During the long-term recovery phase all unmet needs will be forwarded to the Human Services
Branch. Human Needs Assessment Teams (HNAT), municipalities and local officials will meet to
help identify unmet needs. With assistance from the volunteer groups, the Human Services
Branch will utilize existing lists of community service providers, local churches, community
outreach programs and municipalities to fulfill all requests for unmet needs.

Specific Community/Human Needs Assessment procedures and responsibilities can be found in
the Duval County Health Department Post-Incident Community Needs and Rapid Impact
Assessment Plan.

Training for HNAT members and local community groups is scheduled throughout the year.
Training includes emergency home repair, debris removal, donation warehouse management,
processing centers, crisis counseling and other needed assistance.


National Flood Insurance Program
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County participates in the National Flood Insurance
Program. Portions of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County are in a special hazard
flood zone. Citizens cannot buy flood insurance if their local jurisdictional government does not
participate in the program. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County also participates in
the Community Rating System, which allows communities to have an impact on the rates paid by
their citizens for flood insurance. Communities are classified as Class 1 (most premium reduction
allowed) through Class 10 (no reduction allowed). Communities not participating are classified as
Class 10

The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County developed a Comprehensive Land Use Plan
that limits the increasing of densities within the wetlands and flood plains. The Comprehensive
Land Use Plan is the basis for rebuilding, building, and planning within the flood plains. The
management of storm water runoff is also addressed within the plan in the Master Storm water
Drainage Plan. All recovery actions, both short and long term, must be completely addressed
through the Comprehensive Plan.


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Jacksonville has developed and submitted statewide mutual aid agreements within the state.
Additionally, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Comprehensive Plan is an all-
inclusive plan that accepts input from not only citizen groups but also technical advisory groups
that were developed based on expertise of functional members.


Emergency Housing
The Temporary Housing Group is responsible for coordinating the effective planning for temporary
housing for the residents of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County displaced by a
disaster. The Temporary Housing Group will work closely with state, federal, and local agencies to
expedite any necessary processes to establish alternate long-term housing options for displaced
residents.


Emergency/Disaster Support Other Than Public Assistance or Individual Assistance
Duval County and its citizens may be eligible to receive other emergency recovery assistance,
provided through non-disaster specific grant programs, including:


Community Services Block Grant (CDBG) - Localities use the funds to support a variety of services
that help low-income people. Services typically assist with childcare, employment, education,
emergency services, health care, housing, nutrition, transportation, youth development, and
coordination of resources and community participation.


Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LILHEAP) - LIHEAP will provide a one-time
benefit to eligible households to be used for energy bills. The amount of the benefit is determined
by income, household size, fuel type and geographic location.


Low-Income Home Repair Program (LEHRP) - LEHRP provides grants to local agencies
administering the Weatherization Assistance Program to assist low-income people, especially the
elderly and physically disabled, with emergency housing repairs that affect the health and safety of
residents. These funds provide for repairs that might be left undone with only weatherization
funding.


Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME) - Participating jurisdictions may choose among a
broad range of eligible activities, using HOME funds to provide home purchase or rehabilitation
financing assistance to eligible homeowners and new homebuyers; build or rehabilitate housing for
rent or ownership; or for "other reasonable and necessary expenses related to the development of
non-luxury housing," including site acquisition or improvement, demolition of dilapidated housing to
make way for HOME-assisted development, and payment of relocation expenses.


   •   State Housing Initiative Partnership Program (SHIP) - The State Housing Initiatives
       Partnership (SHIP) Program provides funds to local governments in the State of Florida as
       an incentive to produce and preserve affordable housing through the creation of a
       partnership between the public and private sectors. The funds are derived from the


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       collection of documentary stamp tax revenues, which are deposited into the Local
       Government Housing Trust Fund, based on a population-based formula.



Hazard Mitigation


Introduction
Mitigation efforts includes those activities, policies or programs developed and adopted by
government officials that will prevent, reduce or alleviate the impact caused by disasters or
emergencies on property, population and the environment. Proper and coordinated planning is a
prerequisite to effective and efficient procedural changes required in order to address hazard
mitigation. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County currently participates in several
pre/post-event mitigation programs. These programs are designed to minimize the risk to
residents, lessen damage to public and private properties and reduce the detrimental effects to
critical infrastructure. Our goal is to ensure that mitigation activities, initiatives and outreach are
coordinated in an efficient manner and provide vulnerability reduction and support to our
community, critical infrastructure and key resources.


Hazard mitigation planning is an essential function for the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County that has an on-going, significant impact on our vulnerable community. The Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County has a Local Mitigation Strategy (LMS) which determines the
most beneficial mitigation measures for the entire county. The LMS is a multi-jurisdictional hazard
mitigation plan where each participating city was involved in the planning process and has officially
adopted the plan. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County has incorporated mitigation
goals and concepts into our CEMP, emergency response plans, business plans and capital
improvement plans. Hazard mitigation also requires a refined decision process for a long-standing
commitment toward disaster loss reduction.


Lead Agency
The Emergency Preparedness Division is the lead agency for all mitigation activities in the county.
The Emergency Preparedness Division Mitigation Coordinator has the responsibility for directing all
pre/post-disaster mitigation activities and for coordinating mitigation activities with the Duval
Prepares Partnership Committee, also known as the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County Local Mitigation Working Group’s Advisory Committee.


City of Jacksonville Business Plan
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County undertakes, as part of its Annual Business
Plan, a program that requires each City agency to assess the potential damage that its facilities
and operations could receive due to a variety of natural and manmade disasters or emergencies.
Each agency must assess its ability to respond and recover to any disaster. Upon completion of
the assessment, each agency is then required to prepare a pre-event plan to mitigate the
anticipated effects posed by all hazards. Mitigation efforts may include capital improvement
projects, enhancement and enforcement of existing building codes, personnel and office policies,
employee training, or facility hardening projects.


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2010 Comprehensive Plan
Several elements of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s 2010 Comprehensive
Plan address hazard mitigation issues.      Included among the issues addressed by the
comprehensive plan are:


1.     Drainage network management.


2.     Protection of riverine wetlands and estuarine marshes.


3.     Floodplain management.


4.     Preservation of the beach and dune system.


5.     Restoring damaged beaches.


6.     Providing hurricane shelter.


7.     Restricting imprudent coastal development.


8.     Mitigation actions following natural disasters and post-disaster plan development.


9.     Marina siting.


10.    Critical Infrastructure Protection from all hazards.


Community Emergency Preparedness Initiatives
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s six (6) Citizen Planning Advisory Councils
(CPAC) had been tasked with developing neighborhood-based emergency preparedness
programs. Guidelines provided by Emergency Preparedness Division allow for considerable
autonomy in program development, but encourage the CPAC’s to develop viable public information
programs that will inform citizens of hazard specific threats to their neighborhood. In addition these
programs address suitable methods of personal mitigation through home or property
improvements, and encourage the public to identify hazardous situations in their neighborhoods
and suggest public mitigation projects for evaluation by Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County agencies.




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To assist the CPAC’s with their preparedness goals, Emergency Preparedness Division has
initiated the Jacksonville Community Emergency Response Team (JaxCERT) program that offers
training and participation in comprehensive Emergency Management activities.


Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Activities
Pre-disaster mitigation activities in the pre-disaster environment are the responsibility of the
Emergency Preparedness Division. The Emergency Preparedness Division through the LMS
process coordinates pre-disaster mitigation activities. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County LMS identifies the hazards to which the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is
vulnerable; assesses the facilities and structures that are most vulnerable to all hazards; offers a
prioritized list of mitigation projects to take advantage of available funding; and links mitigation
projects to these sources of funding.


Pre-disaster hazard mitigation activities and hazard vulnerability are described in detail in the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County LMS. Vulnerability of structures and infrastructure
can be found in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Local Mitigation Strategy
(Section G, chapter 1 through 4). The LMS is a community-based plan to make the county and
local communities more resistant to natural and technological hazards. The mitigation project
priority list and ranking criteria are also supplied in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County LMS August 2004, as well as the Hazard Mitigation Interagency Coordinating Procedure
(Appendices 1 & 3) November 2003. These are available from the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division.




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Figure 40. LMS Planning Process




The Emergency Preparedness Division is responsible for maintaining the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County LMS. The LMS will be updated at least annually, after each major
disaster, or on an as needed basis. The process by which enhancements to the LMS are made
starts with suggestions from the Duval Prepares Subcommittees, consensus from the Duval
Prepares Partnership Committee and then final approval by the Security and Emergency
Preparedness Planning Council.         Participation by Duval Prepares is coordinated by the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division and involves
supporting agencies listed in Table 9.


Pre-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Functions
Hazard mitigation under sections 404 and 406 of the Stafford Act is any action taken to reduce or
eliminate the long-term risk to human life and property from natural hazards. While the

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Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County is performing normal daily repair or restorative
work throughout the county, it should consider mitigation methods that will prevent or reduce
damage in future incidents thereby reducing future damage costs. One of the objectives of the
pre-disaster mitigation program is to identify vulnerable structures and critical infrastructure that
require improvements or hardening. These projects can be pursued on a project-by-project basis
and a positive benefit/cost ratio must exist to ensure that the additional work will be achieving the
highest benefit in relation to cost. Mitigation is accomplished by doing additional work that is
beyond the scope of normal repairs and beyond code requirements in order to reduce the
vulnerability to future disaster related damages.


Mitigation planning is provided through the state sponsored LMS and carried out by the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Local Mitigation Working Group that consists of
representatives from all phases of the community including county departments, municipalities,
public and private schools and universities, non-profit organizations and members of the private
sector. Day-to-day supervision of the LMS is accomplished through a steering committee
appointed by the Working Group and is staffed by Emergency Preparedness Division personnel.


The LMS contains a full hazard mitigation plan covering virtually any hazard that might occur in the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County. It also includes numerous recommended
mitigation projects and a summary of possible funding sources. Please refer to the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County LMS for more detailed mitigation information.


Post-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Activities
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division will also be
responsible for coordinating local agency participation in post-disaster mitigation activities. Local
agencies involved in these operations will vary according to the specifics of each event.
Emergency Preparedness Division staff will contact all agencies for post-disaster mitigation
activities and notify them as to their role in these operations.


Post-disaster, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County will be conducting repair and
restorative work to their critical infrastructure throughout the county, it should consider mitigation
methods that will prevent or reduce damage in future incidents thereby reducing future damage
costs.




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Figure 41. Post-disaster Mitigation Process




Post-Disaster Hazard Mitigation Functions
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division will also be
responsible for coordinating local agency participation in post-disaster mitigation functions. The
implementation of existing mitigation functions will be accelerated as a result of the arrival of
outside assistance in the aftermath of a disaster. Post-disaster functions include, Initial Damage
Assessment (IDA), restoration of essential services, mitigation assessment, flood data, compile
damage reports and assess condition of critical infrastructure.


Concept of Operations
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County operates under the Incident Command
System (ICS) during emergency operations. This system is especially effective for managing
response and recovery operations that involve multiple agencies each working on various
interrelated tasks. The organization system employed during mitigation activities is streamlined in
large part because the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness
Division has the primary responsibility for nearly all aspects of pre/post-disaster mitigation.
Although there are times when the Emergency Preparedness Division receives assistance from
supporting agencies, the vast majority of mitigation activities are carried out directly by Emergency
Preparedness Division staff.




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The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County has adopted a Local Mitigation Strategy
(LMS). The LMS supports this plan. The LMS has been revised in accordance with the Disaster
Mitigation Act of 2000 and the Emergency Preparedness Division’s Scope of Work through the
Department of Community Affairs.


The LMS process of assessing hazards and prioritizing activities serves as the primary mitigation
activity of the County. The Duval Prepares Partnership Committee is the representative
civic/community group that oversees hazard mitigation in Duval County and therefore also serves
as the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County LMS Working Group. Duval Prepares has
three active subcommittees that assist with mitigation activities: Business Sustainability, Public
Information and Risk Assessment/Planning. The Emergency Preparedness Division’s Mitigation
Coordinator facilitates the productivity of the Duval Prepares committees and LMS working group.
The Mitigation Coordinator also participates in mitigation civic groups outside of the direct control
of the Emergency Preparedness Division, (i.e. the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes committees,
the Jacksonville Insurance Task Force and the Northeast Florida American Red Cross speaker’s
bureau).


Duval Prepares provides a forum for public sector and private sector entities to share information,
resources and methodologies regarding mitigation. This includes discussing development trends,
structural hazard mitigation (flood-proofing, wind-proofing, storm water management projects,
floodplain management projects, infrastructure hardening and acquisition and demolition), non-
structural mitigation (regulatory: zoning, land development regulations, and permitting fees;
financial incentives: ad valorem tax breaks on retrofitting improvements, insurance premium
reductions, and financing for structural hardening funding), identifying vulnerable infrastructure and
prioritizing community mitigation initiatives. Through the efforts of Duval Prepares, the Mitigation
Coordinator is able to keep a listing of LMS priority projects, as well as a full listing of mitigation
projects organized into categories, to track project needs in the county. The Mitigation Coordinator
encourages Duval Prepares Partners to apply for funding and then cultivates public/private
involvement in accomplishing the goals to further the implementation of mitigation in the
community.




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Figure 42. Mitigation Organizational Structure



                                 MAYOR                     Security & Emergency Preparedness
                          CITY OF JACKSONVILLE                       Planning Council
                             DUVAL COUNTY                            Mayor, Chairman



                                                                          Duval Prepares/
                             Chief Administrative
                                                                         LMS Working Group
                                    Officer
                             City of Jacksonville

                                                                        Public Information
                                                                        Subcommittee
                                Fire & Rescue
                              Director/Fire Chief                       Risk Assessment/Planning
                                                                        Subcommittee

                                                                        Business Sustainability
                      Emergency Preparedness Division                   Subcommittee
                                     Chief
                       Jacksonville Security Coordinator            Citizen Corps



                               Mitigation &
                                Recovery                             JaxCERT
                                                                     Steering Committee

                                                                     JaxCERT
                                  CERT &                             Graduates
                               Citizen Corps




The main goal of Duval Prepares is to ensure that the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County is more disaster resistant through public/private partnerships. Duval Prepares has been
successful in developing a website, placing newspaper announcements, conducting radio and
television spots, producing numerous printed materials, participating in outreach opportunities
nearly every week of the year, making public presentations and contributing to public policy efforts.


The Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Council (SEPPC) is the governing body for
mitigation policy and procedure before and after a disaster. The Emergency Preparedness Division
Chief and Mitigation/Recovery Coordinator present Duval Prepares/LMS Working Group
recommendations to the SEPPC for final approval. Under the organization of Citizen Corps,
Jacksonville Community Emergency Response Team (JaxCERT) Steering Committee members
and JaxCERT graduates can assist in comprehensive emergency management activities, which
include pre- and post-disaster mitigation activities.


The Jacksonville Property Appraiser will support the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County Emergency Preparedness Division by providing technical expertise regarding property
values, damages and losses to properties as a result of a disaster.


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Jacksonville Building Department, Zoning Department and the other Municipal Building and Public
Works Departments will provide support to the Emergency Preparedness Division in identifying
mitigation activities that could reduce the vulnerability for damage and loss of public infrastructure,
businesses, and housing from natural and manmade disasters


Jacksonville Public Works Department and the Municipal Public Works Departments will assist the
Emergency Preparedness Division in identifying potential road, bridge, culvert, water, and sewer
mitigation projects.


The Emergency Preparedness Division is responsible for coordinating all mitigation planning with
assistance from a number of supporting agencies. Lead and participating agencies for mitigation
activities are described in Table 9.


Table 9. Agency Responsibilities for Hazard Mitigation
      Agency and Position Description                 Pre-Disaster Mitigation   Post-Disaster Mitigation

     City of Atlantic Beach Public Safety Director,             P                          P
     Fire Chief and Planning Director
     City of Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness                L                          L
     Division Mitigation Coordinator
     City of Jacksonville Engineering Division                  P                          P
     Floodplain Manager
     City of Jacksonville Planning and Development              P                          P
     Director
     City of Jacksonville Beach Public Safety                   P                          P
     Director, Fire Chief and Planning Director
     City of Neptune Beach Public Safety Director,              P                          P
     Fire Chief and Planning Director
     Digital Sanctum Website Designer                           P                          P
     Federal Alliance for Safe Homes                            P                          P
     Public Outreach Coordinator
     Florida Department of Financial Services                   P                          P
     Insurance Specialist
     Florida Division of Forestry                               P                          P
     Wildfire Mitigation Specialist
     Florida Floodplain Managers’ Association                   P                          P
     NE FL Regional Coordinator
     Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce                           P                          P
     Small Business Center Vice President
     JEA Emergency Preparedness Planner                         P                          P
     NE Florida American Red Cross                              P                          P
     Disaster Services Director
     NE Florida Association of Contingency                      P                          P
     Planners
     Information Specialist
     NE Florida Regional Planning Council                       P                          P
     Emergency Preparedness Planner
     Peak 10 Technology Gateways                                P                          P
     Senior Account Executive
     State Farm Insurance Companies                             P                          P
     Media Center Supervisor



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      Agency and Position Description               Pre-Disaster Mitigation   Post-Disaster Mitigation

     Town of Baldwin Public Safety Director, Fire             P                          P
     Chief and Planning Director
     UNF - Small Business Development Center                  P                          P
     Energy/Mitigation Specialist
     US Army Corps of Engineers – Jacksonville                P                          P
     District Facility Management Director
     Wachovia Senior Vice President Operations                P                          P
     Coordinator
      L = Lead Agency
      P = Participating Agency



Planning Assumptions
The Emergency Preparedness Division will notify all participating agencies required for mitigation
operations; coordinate all mitigation activities required to identify potential mitigation projects and
initiatives coordinate the application process for mitigation related grants; and serve as the grant
administrator for all mitigation grants.


Personnel resources for daily operations in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County are
limited. In the aftermath of a disaster, these resources are stretched even further. As a result, the
County relies in large part on information generated by Emergency Preparedness Division and
Public Works during the local damage assessment process, the prioritized project list from the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County LMS, and overall guidance from the Emergency
Preparedness Division Chief or his designee in determining specific mitigation priorities following a
disaster. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division
has initiated disaster service agreements with outside agencies to alleviate shortfalls in resources
and personnel.


Coordination of Mitigation Activities
The Emergency Preparedness Division will serve as the organization responsible for coordinating
mitigation activities for lead and participating agencies.           The Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division Chief or his designee is the person
responsible for this task. The process of coordination is assisted by the Duval Prepares
Partnership Committee and active subcommittees. In particular, the Duval Prepares Public
Information Subcommittee will be responsible for providing information to citizens on how they can
prevent disaster damages in the future.


In the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, much of the work involved in identifying
opportunities for possible mitigation activities is carried out during the pre-disaster mitigation phase
(e.g. during the mitigation project identification process carried out by the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County LMS Working Group). Opportunities for mitigation are also discovered
during the initial and preliminary damage assessments and throughout the public assistance
processes. The participating agencies noted above document damage to public infrastructure,
businesses and residences working in conjunction with the Emergency Preparedness Division. The
Emergency Preparedness Division, along with input from participating agencies, then considers the


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information gathered during the recovery phase and determinations are made regarding potential
mitigation projects.


Coordination of Mitigation Activities with Municipalities and the State
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division Chief or
designee will be responsible for coordinating mitigation activities with the municipalities and the
State EOC. The Mayors of the City of Atlantic Beach, the City of Jacksonville Beach, the City of
Neptune Beach and Town of Baldwin or their designees will be updated throughout the response,
recovery, and mitigation phases of the event. The Emergency Preparedness Division Chief or his
designee will coordinate on an as needed basis with the Bureau of Recovery and Mitigation at the
Division of Emergency Preparedness.


Mitigation Assessment
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division is the lead
agency charged with post-disaster mitigation assessment.      The Chief of the Emergency
Preparedness Division, or his designee, has the primary responsibility for assessing mitigation
needs in the post-disaster environments.


Equipment and Resources Necessary for Mitigation Assessment
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division Chief will
be responsible for ensuring all equipment and resources necessary for mitigation assessment are
available when needed. Vehicles used for mitigation assessment include city and county
government vehicles, and personal vehicles.


The following equipment is provided by the Emergency Preparedness Division and used for
mitigation assessment: office supplies, maps, and digital cameras. Other resources may be
requested on an as needed basis through the Emergency Preparedness Division.


Local Agencies with Supporting Roles in Mitigation Assessment
The Duval County Property Appraiser, Public Works, Duval County Health Department, Duval
County Building Department, Planning & Development Department and other Municipal Public
Works, Building and Zoning Departments are the supporting agencies that work closest with the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division in post-disaster
mitigation assessment. There are, however, a number of other local agencies that may indirectly
support mitigation in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County.




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Table 10. Mitigation Assessment Team Matrix (Left blank intentionally)
                    Name               Title                       Agency                   Phone Number




Training Procedures for Mitigation Personnel
Personnel involved in mitigation activities will receive on-going training according to their individual
needs. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division will
work with all mitigation assessment team members to ensure that all training needs are met. The
primary source for mitigation training is the Florida Division of Emergency Management.


Structural Hazard Mitigation Initiatives
Several on-going initiatives are illustrated in Table 11 on the next page. More initiatives can be
found in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Local Mitigation Strategy, page 86
through 93.




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Table 11. Duval County Structural Mitigation Initiatives
         Category             Agency                     Structural Mitigation Initiative
         Decrease             Jacksonville Beach         Jacksonville Beach critical facilities
         Vulnerability                                   installation of storm shutters at
                                                         pollution control plant and storm
                                                         doors for city building
         Decrease             Duval County Schools       Structural enhancements and
         Vulnerability        Board                      retrofitting for shelters and other
                                                         critical facilities.
         Reduce Risk          Jacksonville Electric       • Retrofit sewage lift stations
                              Authority                        (flood proofing) to enhance
                                                               elevation;
                                                          • Retrofit water wells with an
                                                               alterative electrical source;
                                                          • Retrofit vulnerable electric sub-
                                                               stations (flood proofing);
                                                          • Plan and implement
                                                               underground utility placement.
         Reduce Risk          Florida Department of      Maintenance of drainage
                              Transportation             infrastructure
                              Local government



Non-Structural Mitigation Activities
Several on-going initiatives are illustrated in Table 12 below. More initiatives can be found in the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Local Mitigation Strategy, page 86 through 93.


Table 12. Duval County Non-Structural Mitigation Initiatives

          Category          Agencies                     Non-Structural Mitigation
                                                         Initiative
          Education,        Florida Department of        Flood insurance education
          Training and      Insurance                    program for property owners.
          Awareness         Municipal Building
                            Departments
                            City of Jacksonville/Duval
                            County/Duval County
                            Emergency
                            Preparedness Division
                            City of Jacksonville/Duval
                            County Engineering
                            Department.




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          Category           Agencies                     Non-Structural Mitigation
                                                          Initiative
          Education,         NE Florida Builders          Education/incentive programs
          Training and       Association                  for builders; higher building
          Awareness          Building Officials           standards and cost effective
                             Organization                 retrofitting
                             Florida Department of
                             Community Affairs
                             Florida Department of
                             Business and
                             Professional Regulation
                             FLASH
          Education,         City of Jacksonville/Duval   Evacuation Education
          Training and       County Emergency             Program that informs general
          Awareness          Preparedness Division        population of evacuation
                                                          routes, time frames, shelter
                                                          and procedures.
          Land Use and       City of Jacksonville/Duval   Develop requirement to
          Zoning             County Building              ensure defensible space
                             Department, Permitting       around homes/subdivisions
                             Department, and Fire         from wildfires
                             Department



Mitigation Memoranda of Understanding, Mutual Aid Agreements, or Inter-Local
Agreements
The Emergency Preparedness Division has a formal Memorandum of Agreement with Duval
Prepares Partners to assist in pre-disaster mitigation activities. Since Duval Prepares serves as the
Local Mitigation Working Group and the Working Group was designated by the Security and
Emergency Preparedness Planning Council on September 24, 1998 as the official mitigation
advisory group, it is understood that they also agree to assist in post-disaster mitigation activities
outlined in the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Local Mitigation Strategy. The
workgroup is also responsible for the prioritization of projects for the Hazard Mitigation Grant
Program (HMGP).


Local Government Status in the National Flood Insurance Program
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville is a participant in the National Flood Insurance Program
(NFIP) and has a Community Rating System score. A certified Floodplain Manager in the
Engineering Division of the Public Works Department conducts the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County’s participation. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
citizens may receive flood zone determinations or Community Rating System information from the
Engineering Division/Development Management Group office in the City Hall Annex. The City of
Atlantic Beach, the City of Jacksonville Beach, the City of Neptune Beach and the Town of Baldwin
also participate in the NFIP. As much of the development now in place along the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s coast and rivers was developed prior to adoption of NFIP
standards and rating zones, it is anticipated that should a major hurricane strike our area, many
structures, both private and public, would have to be rebuilt or replaced by structures meeting NFIP


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standards. To support federal mitigation efforts that are associated with the NFIP, the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County participates in the Flood Mitigation Assistance Program and
hosts local workshops to educate residents on flood damage reduction techniques.


Process for Identifying Mitigation Opportunities in the Post-Disaster Environment
The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Preparedness Division is
responsible for coordinating all recovery operations in the county. As a result of this active role in
the recovery process, the Emergency Preparedness Division is well poised to identify opportunities
for future mitigation projects such as elevation and/or acquisition of flood prone structures,
drainage improvement projects, and infrastructure enhancement projects. The Emergency
Preparedness Division works closely with the damage assessment teams in the field and the
building inspectors for Duval County and the municipalities to identify potential mitigation
opportunities. More information about this process can be found in the Division’s Hazard Mitigation
Interagency Coordinating Procedure, January 2004, Post Disaster Operations section.


Process to Manage Mitigation Assistance Funds
All mitigation and recovery grants are coordinated by the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County Emergency Preparedness Division. The Emergency Preparedness Division has managed
a variety of recovery and mitigation grants in the past including Hazard Mitigation Grant Program
funds. The Emergency Preparedness Division is also the administrator for all emergency
management grants involving the County. Most emergency management grants have a 75%
federal, 25% local financial contribution. In certain cases, up to 12.5% of the local 25% match can
be in-kind. Sources of in-kind match can be staff time, equipment and volunteers. An additional
source of cash match that can be utilized for a disaster or economic peril is the City of Jacksonville
cash carry-over account (“Rainy Day Fund”).



PREPAREDNESS ACTIVITIES
General issues
CEMP Development and Maintenance
The Deputy Director, Planning and Operations, is responsible for the development and
maintenance of the CEMP, ensuring that necessary revisions are prepared, coordinated, published
and distributed.

Preservation of Vital Records and Databases
During Emergency Operations, the Planning Section Chief, AMIO, and individual Consolidated City
of Jacksonville/Duval County agencies are responsible for the preservation of vital records and
databases deemed essential for continuing government functions and conducting post-disaster
operations. All Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County agencies and constitutional
authorities must ensure protection of their records so that normal procedures may continue after
the disaster. These records are also necessary for the rapid recovery from the effects of a disaster.

In the event that an emergency alternate location for the seat of government is necessary as a
result of a natural disaster, the Mayor of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, with

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the advice and assistance of the Emergency Preparedness Division Chief, shall activate Continuity
of Operations (COOP) Plans for executive agencies to use in preparation of removal to an
emergency alternate location.

The COOP Plans of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County agencies contain:

1) Procedures for determining which personnel, records, equipment and supplies are to be
considered "essential" and, therefore, will be pre-staged and/or scheduled for removal to the
alternate location.

2) The method or methods by which records, equipment and supplies are to be pre-staged and/or
prepared for physical removal from their usual locations to the emergency alternate location.

3) The precautions to be taken and steps to be followed to preserve and protect vital records and
databases.

Registration of Persons with Special Needs
State Law requires the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s Emergency Preparedness
Division to conduct an annual voluntary registration program to identify those persons within a
county who need transportation assistance during a disaster. The Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County has opted to develop and operate a comprehensive program that
attempts to identify every resident with a special medical need. In 2005 a database was developed
by the EPD, and at the present time the registry averages 1,500 registered persons with special
needs. Each year special needs clients will register with EPD, and are placed or updated in the
database. This database will be used by the Emergency Operations Center during such time
evacuations are required. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County also has
incorporated a plan and collaborated with Jacksonville Transit Authority, JFRD and area
ambulance services to transport special needs clients to special needs shelters and area hospitals.

Each January, a new special needs database will be created for that calendar year. The previous
year’s database will be archived for future referral. Letters of renewal will be mailed to the special
needs clients on the existing database announcing the new registration process. This process is
addressed in the Special Needs & Adopt a Shelter ICP.

The registration forms are distributed in a variety of ways: annual mail-out with Jacksonville Electric
Authority (JEA) and Beaches electric bills provides special needs population with information on
the program and where to recover registration forms. Registration forms are directly distributed to
Home Health Care (HHC) agencies, Children’s Medical Services (CMS), Community Centers,
Senior Centers, JEA and Beaches customer service centers and sending directly to individuals
who make requests through the City Link CARE System. Registration forms are on line at the
COJ.net website, to be printed out and mailed in. Transportation only forms can are distributed to
county libraries.

Public Awareness & Education
The Planner for Public Education & Training is responsible for public education and information
throughout the year. Following are some local means of public information dissemination:

           •    Public Access TV Talk Shows & Programs


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           •    WJCT Viewer Forum
           •    Florida Times-Union Eye On The Storm and other disaster preparedness manuals
           •    The Jacksonville Business Journal Special Edition
           •    Emergency Email Network
           •    Emergency Preparedness Web Site Updates
           •    Public notices via Email of Duval Prepares meetings
           •    Business disaster preparedness fairs
           •    Annual Hurricane Exercises
           •    Emergency Preparedness Information in local phone books
           •    Emergency Preparedness Information in Annual Town Planner Calendar
           •    Special Medical Needs registration mail outs
           •    The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s 630-INFO Line

Information is communicated to the public throughout the year about hazards, vulnerabilities and
disaster preparedness. Venues include: the COJ.net website, television interviews, on-site
presentations to community groups, and numerous printed materials, including a disaster
preparedness guide to every household receiving the local Florida Times-Union newspaper.

Public education promotions and on-site presentations are conducted especially during the
following annual events:


                      Hazardous Materials Awareness Week            February
                      Hazardous Weather Awareness Week              February
                      Be Kind to Animals Week                       May
                      Hurricane Preparedness Week                   May
                      Mayor’s Neighborhood Summit                   June
                      Fire Prevention Week                          October
                      Project SafeSide                              October
                      Family Safety Awareness Week                  December

During evacuations, changeable highway message signs are permanently installed on I-10 and I-
95 and several portable signs are available through the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office especially to
communicate to the evacuating public.

Public Service Announcements
Public Service Announcements are pre-drafted and available for editing in the EOC/Area
Command under the direction of the PIO. These drafts cover a wide variety of probable disaster
scenarios.

Recovery Information
Communication to the public is vital following a disaster. The Emergency Preparedness Division
will provide recovery information for dissemination to the public, including the location of Disaster
Recovery Centers, Recovery Information Centers and Disaster Legal Assistance. Mass media is
the primary communication method, followed by printed materials distributed by field personnel.
Information will also be available on the on line at the COJ.net website.



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Mitigation Opportunities
Duval Prepares is a major effort used to communicate mitigation opportunities through educational
outreach programs for individual homeowners and the public. Duval Prepares is a voluntary
organization of leaders in several industries such as insurance, forestry, construction, disaster
relief and business recovery that meet monthly to further mitigation efforts, direct grant dollar
expenditure and raise awareness of the benefits of mitigation.

Maps of Evacuation Zones and Routes
Maps of evacuation zones and routes can be obtained year-round from the Emergency
Preparedness Division, City Hall, City Hall Annex, City Hall in the Mall, or the American Red Cross
Northeast Florida Chapter. These maps may also be viewed on on-line at the COJ.net website.

Please refer to the following figures for maps of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
evacuation zones.




Figure 43. Evacuation Routes North of Atlantic Boulevard




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Figure 44. Evacuation Routes Between Atlantic and Beach Boulevard




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Figure 45. Evacuation Routes Between Beach and J.T. Butler Boulevard




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Exercises

The Planner for Public Education and Training is responsible for disaster exercises.
The purpose of the exercise process is to produce an opportunity for the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County, with private organizations and other governmental agencies, to learn
roles and responsibilities in a disaster. These inter-agency exercises maybe tabletop, functional,
drill or full-scale exercises. The exercise process is designated by the State of Florida, Department
of Community Affairs, Division of Emergency Management.
Every EOC/Area Command Functional Group/Unit, lead and participating agencies, shall
participate in at least one of the several Exercises conducted by the Emergency Preparedness
Division each year. Some of the private agencies included in that total include the American Red
Cross, Salvation Army, Association of Contingency Planners and Lutheran Social Services. All
City agencies that are listed in the EOC/Area Command Functional Groups/Units section of this
plan shall participate in exercising. Federal, state and regional governmental agencies may also
participate in City of Jacksonville exercises. These may include the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers,
U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Navy, the National Weather Service, Florida Division of Emergency
Management, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, and the Northeast Florida
Regional Council.


Regional coordination efforts are enhanced by the presence of collaborative regional organizations
that includes representation from many different jurisdictions and different disciplines. Regional
Terrorism Exercises are conducted annually through the Regional Domestic Security Task Force
(RDSTF) Region 3 and Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI). The RDSTF and UASI carry out
tabletop, functional, and full-scale exercises with a full array of regional partners. RDSTF and UASI
exercises may be coordinated.


The annual exercise cycle usually includes City involvement in a functional exercise in the
spring/summer, a full-scale Exercise in the fall, RDSTF/UASI Functional and/or Full-scale
exercises, and 3 to 4 smaller tabletop and functional exercises throughout the year, based on need
and environment. Following is an example of the Planning Process for designing and scheduling a
disaster exercise for Duval County:



SAMPLE PLANNING PROCESS

1st Meeting (Initial Planning Conference)
       Layout Exercise strategy. Develop Exercise objectives/purpose.

2nd Meeting
       Evaluate timeline/milestones. Confirm Email list for Exercise briefing. Follow up on Design Team.

3rd Meeting
       Discuss scenarios for the Infrastructure Branch and Logistics Section in a post-disaster environment. Include
       variables of flooding, debris management, temporary housing, transportation needs, blackouts, downed power
       lines and food/water issues. Focus on roles of the Communications Unit, Planning Section & Resources Unit
       during the Exercise.


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4th Meeting
         Confer on scenarios for the Operations Section. Focus on roles of the Communications Unit, Planning Section
         & Resources Unit during the Exercise. Researched FEMA and other purchasing forms used for disaster
         requisitions. Focus on EOC/Area Command Functional Groups/Units using Incident Master for resource
         requests to the Resources Unit. Lay out area and parameters of post-disaster damage, including number of
         fatalities and displaced citizens.


EXERCISE TIMELINE/MILESTONES
 April         Exercise briefing, including dates & times, e-mailed to invite adequate participation.
 April         Exercise design team confirmed.
 May           State Exercise messages (Resource Requests) due.
 May           Resource Requests reviewed via State Exercise conference call.
 May           Scenarios developed.
 May           Exercise evaluation points identified.
 May           Exercise evaluators/controllers identified. Evaluation forms/package developed.
 May           Exercise messages developed. PowerPoint presentation of Exercise created
 June          Run Disaster Exercise
 June          Exercise Critique. Critique results available to participants


All exercises will be evaluated according to the requirements of the Homeland Security Exercise
Evaluation Program (HSEEP). The HSEEP is a capabilities and performance-based exercise
program that provides a standardized policy, methodology, and language for designing,
developing, conducting, and evaluating all exercises.


At the conclusion of each exercise, the Emergency Preparedness Division seeks feedback and
analysis from Exercise participants. These responses are collected and analyzed and a list of
deficiencies is generated. These deficiencies are translated by staff into an After-Action Report
(AAR) and Improvement Plan (IP) containing measurable goals for improvement. These goals will
be tracked in an attainment database, as part of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County’s Quality program.


Exercises may also be conducted for individual EOC/Area Command Sections and Branches, as
needed.


Training

The Planner for Public Education and Training is also responsible for Emergency Preparedness
training. The Emergency Preparedness Division has developed an 8-hour core curriculum of four
emergency management classes required for all persons assigned to the EOC and available to all
city employees and volunteers.


Additionally, emergency management training opportunities provided at the state and national level
are monitored and communicated to appropriate groups throughout the year. A variety of national
courses are available for online and self-study training. Staff are encouraged to seek professional
emergency management accreditation through the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM) and/or the Florida Emergency Preparedness Association (FEPA).


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Training needs for personnel involved in EOC operations is indicated in Table 13 below.

Table 13. Recommended Training

                            RECOMMENDED TRAINING COURSES FOR EOC STAFF POSITIONS




                                                                                                                                                                             Public Information
                                                                                           Infrastructure Branch



                                                                                                                   Logistics Section
                                                     Emergency Services




                                                                                                                                         Planning Section




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Elected Officials
                                                                                                                                                            Finance/ Admin




                                                                                                                                                                                                  Liaison Officer



                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Safety Officer
                                                                          Human Services
                                        Operations
                                         Section




                                                                                                                                                                Section



                                                                                                                                                                                   Officer
                                                          Branch



                                                                             Branch
Shelter Management
                                                                             R                                      R                                                             R               R                                  R

E273 Managing Floodplain
Development                                                                                R                                             R                                                                                           O

E278 NFIP/CRS
                                                                                           R                                             R

E279 Retrofitting Flood-Prone
                                                                                           O                                             O
Buildings
E362 Multi-Hazard Safety for Schools
                                                                             R                                                           O                                                        O

E388 Advanced PIO
                                                                                                                                         O                                        R

E905 IEMC Hurricane Prep. &
Response                                                                                                                                 R

E906 IEMC Hurricane Recovery &
Mitigation                                                                                 R                                             R

IS120 Exercise Design Course
                                                         O                   O             O                       O                     R                      O                 O               O                 O                O

IS700 NIMS
                                                         M                   M             M                       M                     M                      M                 M               M                 M                M

ICS100 Intro to ICS
                                                         M                   M             M                       M                     M                      M                 M               M                 M                R

ICS200 Basic ICS
                                                         M                   M             M                       M                     M                      M                 M               M                 M                R

ICS300 Intermediate ICS*
                                                         M                   M             M                       M                     M                      M                 M               M                 M                O

ICS 400 Advanced ICS*
                                                         M                   M             M                       M                     M                      M                 M               M                 M                O

IS800 NRP
                                                         M                   M             M                       M                     M                      M                 M               M                 M                R

IS230 Principles of Emergency
Management                                                R                  R             R                       R                     R                      R                 R               R                 R                O

IS235 Emergency Planning Course
                                                         O                   O             O                       O                     R                      O                 O               O                 O                R

IS240 Leadership and Influence
                                                          R                  O             O                       O                     R                      O                 O               O                 O                R


R = recommended                        O = optional                                                                                    M = mandatory

* Specific positions only - please verify with Emergency Preparedness Division.




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                                RECOMMENDED TRAINING COURSES FOR EOC STAFF POSITIONS




                                                                                                                                                                              Public Information
                                                                                              Infrastructure Branch



                                                                                                                      Logistics Section
                                                        Emergency Services




                                                                                                                                          Planning Section




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Elected Officials
                                                                                                                                                             Finance/ Admin




                                                                                                                                                                                                   Liaison Officer



                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Safety Officer
                                                                             Human Services
                                          Operations
                                           Section




                                                                                                                                                                 Section



                                                                                                                                                                                    Officer
                                                             Branch



                                                                                Branch
   IS241 Decision Making and Problem
   Solving                                                   R                  O             O                       O                   R                      O                 O               O                 O

   IS242 Effective Communication
                                                             R                  O             O                       O                   R                      O                 O               O                 O

   IS244 Developing Volunteer
   Resources                                                                    R                                     R                   O                                                        R

   IS247 Decision Making in a Crisis
                                                             R                  O                                     O                   R

   G130 Exercise Evaluation Course
                                                            O                   O             O                       O                   R                      O                 O               O                 O                O

   G191 ICS/EOC Interface
                                                             R                  R             R                       R                   R                      R                 R               R                 R                O

   G202 Debris Management
                                                                                              R                                           R                                                                          R                O

   G250.7 Rapid Assessment Planning
                                                             R                                R                       R                   R

   G275 EOC Management Operations
                                                                                                                                          R

   G276 Resource Management
                                                                                              R                       R                   R

   G290 Basic PIO
                                                                                                                                          O                                        R

   G317 CERT Train-the-Trainer
                                                                                                                                          O                                                        R

   G360 Hurricane Planning
                                                                                                                                          R                                                                                           R

   G381 Public Assistance Operations I
                                                                                                                                          R

   G385 Disaster Response and
   Recovery                                                                                                                               R

   G386 Mass Fatalities
                                                                                                                                          R

   G393 Mitigation for Emergency
   Managers                                                                                                                               R

   G601 Damage Assessment
                                                                                                                                          R

   G250.11 COOP/COG
                                                            O                   O             O                       O                   R                      O                 O               O                 O                O

   G908 Joint Information System
                                                                                                                                          R                                        R


   R = recommended                       O = optional




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FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

The Finance and Administration Section shall provide fiscal and managerial support as required.
The Chief of the City of Jacksonville’s Department of Administration and Finance-Accounting
Division has the task and responsibility of financial recovery of any disaster event (large or small)
that may occur in the city/county. Responsibilities include identifying, documenting, and recovering
costs from the State of Florida, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other
federal government agencies like the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and USDA-Natural Resource
Conservation Service to maximize the cost recovery opportunity.

The Accounting Division will provide fiscal and accounting support to the Procurement Department
and will focus efforts to coordinate and assist in the completion of documentation of reimbursable
expenditures as determined by FEMA.

To provide maximum financial recovery, the most important task following a disaster is to identify
and document all the damage. The Department of Procurement has developed a handbook to
assist personnel as a guide to properly collect and document information needed for financial
recovery. Damage assessment activities are done in collaboration with the Damage Assessment
Unit of the Planning Section. Procedures to do so include:

   A. Initiate the Documentation Process – Start keeping records using the Damage Assessment
      Report (DAR).
   B. Map damage sites – each damaged site will need to be located and marked on a
      city/county map and local map. Damaged sites should include a street address or the
      closest available landmark. A local map may represent a subdivision, office complex, or
      structural diagram indicating the damage location within the building.
   C. What to document – prepare a list of work performed and facilities damaged as a direct
      result of the disaster. The list should separate work and damages into those categories
      identified by FEMA. Include both work that has been completed and work in process (not
      completed). The following documentation must be obtained and forwarded to the
      Accounting Division when requested:
           1. Maintain a separate file for each site. Do not combine sites.
           2. Prepare daily activity reports from supervisors’ daily logs.
           3. Keep these documents for each site done by force account:
                     i. Daily activity reports for labor, materials and equipment
                    ii. Delivery tickets
                   iii. Invoices
                  iv. Payroll journals
                    v. Canceled checks for paid goods
                  vi. Daily logs from supervisors
                  vii. Keep these documents for each site by contract:
                            1. Bid advertisement and list of bidders
                            2. Contract awarded
                            3. Invoices canceled checks
                            4. Record of work inspections
           4. Supporting Documentation – Pictures of damage should be taken with a 35-
               mm/digital camera versus a Polaroid and put in the site file.
           5. Record keeping forms – there are two ways to complete items of work: one is by
               contract, and the other is by utilization of Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval


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                County-owned personnel, equipment and materials. Utilization of the Consolidated
                City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s own resources is called Force Account Work.
                The proper documentation in each case is described below:
                     i. Contract work – if the work is completed on a lump sum contract, an invoice
                        and copy of the contract is needed.       A detailed breakdown of all cost
                        including equipment use, dates used, hourly rates and hours used must be
                        documented.
                    ii. Force Account Work – A written record of labor, equipment, material used,
                        contract record and rental equipment be prepared, as necessary and signed
                        to be eligible for reimbursement. These forms must be certified by the
                        department heads or division chiefs and must include all supporting
                        documentation.

When the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County uses other jurisdictions’ resources under
Mutual Aid, the same documentation is required. Document where you assigned this assistance,
what they did, and how it was controlled. In addition, an invoice showing the date, amount paid,
and check number is required indicating that we have paid the other jurisdiction. Direct mutual aid
requires the same documentation for both the sending and receiving parties.

The Assisting Party shall bill the Requesting Party with an itemized notice as soon as practicable.
Billings should not be later than 60 days following period of assistance. Requesting Party shall pay
bills or advise of disputed items no later than 60 days after the billing date. Modifications can be
made through mutual agreement by both parties to extend the ending payment time, donations,
etc.

The Public Assistance (PA) Program provides reimbursement to state and local governments for:
the repair or reconstruction of public facilities, which are owned and operated by a government;
debris removal; and protective measures.

The Florida Department of Community Affairs - Division of Emergency Management administers
the PA Program, as the grantee for all federal funds related to the program. The Consolidated City
of Jacksonville/Duval County is a sub-grantee to the program.

An applicant’s briefing on all aspects of the PA Program is held as soon as possible after receipt of
the declaration. The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County will send a designated
authorized agent who is qualified to speak officially for the local government.



INTERAGENCY AGREEMENTS

Emergency utilization of resources and capabilities of organizations not part of Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County government will be pre-arranged under agreements or understandings
to the maximum extent feasible.

Agreements and understandings will be entered into by duly authorized officials and will be
formalized in writing whenever possible.

Agreements and understandings between elements of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval
County government will be included within the plans of Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval


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County government. Details of such agreements and understandings which are in appropriate for
inclusion in this plan will be set forth in supporting operations procedures, instructions and other
directives of the units of government concerned.

Agreements remain in effect until rescinded or modified. Agreements must state the procedure for
payment or reimbursement for personnel services rendered, equipment costs and expenditure of
material. A clear statement of agreement on this matter is mandatory.



OTHER FINANCIAL AGREEMENTS
1. State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP) – Funds from Dept of Homeland Security
(DHS) to improve the ability of state and local agencies to prevent and respond to terrorist attacks
using chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive weapons.

2. Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) – Funds from DHS's Office of Grants & Training to
address unique planning, equipment, training and exercises needs in high-threat, high-density
urban areas. Funds enhance and sustain capability to prevent, respond to and recover from
threats or acts of terrorism.

3. Emergency Management Preparedness and Assistance (EMPA) – Funds allocated from the
Emergency Management Preparedness and Assistance Trust Fund created by the Legislature in
1993 to implement necessary improvements in the State's emergency preparedness and recovery
program and facilities.

4. Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) - Funds to the state/local jurisdictions to
pay for statewide and local disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery programs

5. Hazard Analysis Grant – Funds from state to identify and conduct on-site evaluation of facilities
in the community housing hazardous materials.

6. Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) – Funds from DHS to prepare for terrorist
events that involve radiological, nuclear, biological and explosive agents, as well as epidemic
disease outbreaks, large scale hazardous material accidents and major natural disasters.

7. Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) – Funds to recruit and train citizens to be
prepared for emergency situations in their community and neighborhoods.

8. Citizen Corps Grant - Funds to promote volunteer service activities that support homeland
security and community safety.

9. Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) - Authorized under Section 404 of the Robert T.
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, the program provides grants to states and
local government to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after a major disaster
declaration.

10. Pre-Disaster Mitigation Grant Program (PDM) - Authorized under Section 203 of the Robert T.
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, the program is to assist states and local
governments in implementing cost-effective hazard mitigation activities that complement a
comprehensive mitigation program.


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11. Flood Mitigation Assistance Grant Program (FMA) - FMA provides funding to assist states and
communities in implementing measures to reduce or eliminate the long-term risk of flood damage
to buildings, manufactured homes, and other structures insurable under the National Flood
Insurance Program.




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REFERENCES & AUTHORITIES

STATE OF FLORIDA

Section 252.38, Florida Statutes, directs each county to establish an Emergency Management
Agency and appoint a Director to carry out the provisions of section 252.31 - 252.60. The
Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s Emergency Preparedness Division Chief is the
emergency manager for the county. In this capacity, the Division Chief is directly and solely
responsible for:

1. Organization, administration and operation of the Emergency Preparedness Division, the County
Emergency Operations Center and other related operational facilities.

2. Serves in the capacity of advisor to the Mayor during emergency or disaster operations.

3. Coordinator of activities services and programs to emergency planning and emergency
response throughout the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County.

4. Maintaining liaison with state, federal and other local Emergency Management Agencies.

5. Development and maintenance of operational planning for emergency responses.

6. Instituting training programs and public information programs.

7. Ascertaining the requirements of the county in order to implement emergency response
operations.

8. Taking all preparatory steps necessary, including the partial or full emergency mobilization of
agencies of county and municipal governments in advance.

9. Cooperating with the Governor's Authorized Representative, the State Division of Emergency
Management and all other federal and relief agencies in matters pertaining to Emergency
Management.

10. Taking measures to carry into effect any request from municipalities, agencies, the State
Division of Emergency Management, or federal agencies for any appropriate emergency
management activity.

11. Carrying out any implemented actions deemed necessary by the Mayor.

CONSOLIDATED CITY OF JACKSONVILLE/DUVAL COUNTY

Ordinance Code Chapter 674, Disaster Preparedness and Civil Emergency, creates and maintains
as the local emergency preparedness agency, the Emergency Preparedness Division of the
Consolidated City of Jacksonville’s Fire and Rescue Department. Chapter 674 also establishes
the Emergency Preparedness Planning Council to review the emergency operations plans of the
Consolidated City, outlines the emergency powers of the Mayor of the Consolidated City of


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Jacksonville/Duval County, and the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County's emergency
preparedness and response network. Executive Order 96-201 establishes the foundations of the
emergency preparedness organization of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, and
also provides the guidelines that are to be followed when the emergency powers ranted by Part 3,
Chapter 674, are to be invoked and exercised.

Chapter 31 of the Ordinance Code creates the Fire and Rescue Department. Chapter 31 also
establishes the Emergency Preparedness Division as part of that Department, and recognizes that
the Division Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division shall also perform the duties and hold
the office of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County Emergency Planning Director and
Security Coordinator.

The City of Jacksonville FY 2002/03 Business Plan requires that every agency of the Consolidated
City of Jacksonville/Duval County prepare an Agency Disaster Report assessing their ability to
respond to any disaster or emergency that may either affect their agency or which may call upon
that agency to perform response or relief efforts. Each agency, as part of the assessment process,
is required to address numerous issues, including the disaster role of the agency, the validity of
existing plans and procedures, the training of employees in their disaster response roles, family
preparedness and emergency use and acquisition of resources.

Once the self-assessment is completed, each agency is then required to develop and implement,
with the assistance of the Emergency Preparedness Division, a Long Term Action Plan, which will
enhance their emergency preparedness and disaster response.

The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County requires that each agency designate an
Emergency Coordinating Officer (ECO). The ECO is responsible for the preparing and maintaining
of emergency preparedness and disaster response plans and procedures for their agency. Part of
this responsibility includes participation in disaster training exercises and drills as may be available.

Whenever employees of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County are rendering aid
outside the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County pursuant to a mutual aid plan or inter-
jurisdictional agreement, they shall have the same powers, duties, rights, privileges and immunities
as if they were performing their duties within the city limits. Whenever volunteer or auxiliary
emergency preparedness personnel are detailed to an emergency disaster support force outside
the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County, they shall have the same powers, duties and
immunities as if they were performing their emergency preparedness duties within the city limits.

STATUTORY FISCAL PROCEDURES


Ordinance Code 674.209 – Compensation, Reimbursement
In the case of equipment belonging to the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County,
provided to and used in another jurisdiction, loss or damage sustained and operation and
maintenance expense incurred as a result of that use shall be itemized in a claim for compensation
from the other jurisdiction, which shall be made under oath by the Chief from documentation
provided by the appropriate Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County employees usually
responsible for such equipment. The claim shall be served by mail or otherwise upon the chief
fiscal officer of the other jurisdiction, and a copy shall be provided to the Director of Administration
and Finance and the Council Auditor. The Chief shall report to the Mayor each instance of


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damage, loss or expense that is not reported to him within 60 days after it is sustained or incurred.
In the case of emergency preparedness personnel furnished by the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County to another jurisdiction, the administration and training service shall keep
a record of the compensation (including compensation due to personal injury or death) paid to
public employees who are a part of the emergency preparedness personnel so furnished and also
a record of the actual traveling and maintenance expenses of all emergency preparedness
personnel so furnished, while they are rendering aid to the other jurisdiction, to the extent that the
other jurisdiction does not provide transportation, meals and housing to such emergency
preparedness personnel free of charge. The Chief shall submit an itemized statement of these
compensation, traveling and maintenance expenses to the other jurisdiction on whose behalf they
were incurred as directed by the Mayor and furnish a copy of such statement to the Director of
Administration and Finance and Council Auditor.

The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County shall be liable for any loss or damage to any
equipment provided by other jurisdictions and used by or in the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County pursuant to a mutual aid plan or inter-jurisdictional agreement and shall
pay any expense incurred in the operation and maintenance of the equipment; provided, that no
claim by another jurisdiction shall be allowed unless, within 60 days after the loss, damage or
expense is sustained or incurred an itemized notice of the claim, under oath, is served by mail or
otherwise upon the Director of Administration and Finance.               The Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County shall also reimburse another jurisdiction providing aid to the city/county
for compensation (including compensation due to personal injury or death) paid to employees
furnished as a part of the aid and shall defray the actual traveling and maintenance expenses of
the employees while they are rendering aid, to the extent that the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County does not provide transportation, meals and housing to the employees
free of charge. The term employee, as used in this subsection, shall mean and include paid,
volunteer and auxiliary employees and emergency preparedness workers actually provided by the
other jurisdiction to aid the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County.

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES REFERENCES APPLYING TO THE CEMP

The Planning and Development Department is responsible for maintaining the 2010
Comprehensive Plan which refers to the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan in at least
2 Objectives:

Objective 7.1.3 – The City, acting as Duval County, shall review, and update as necessary, the
hurricane evacuation portion of the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP) prior to
June 1 of each year. The latest versions of, or changes to, all state and regional emergency plans
shall be incorporated into the CEMP to ensure intergovernmental plan consistency.

Objective 7.5 – Within 60 days of the occurrence of a major destructive storm or similar disaster,
the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County shall prepare a post-disaster redevelopment
plan designed to reduce or eliminate the exposure of human life and property to natural hazards.

POLICIES

7.5.1 The Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan CEMP shall include guidance for post-
disaster recovery operations. Post disaster recovery efforts and development shall include


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implementation of hazard mitigation programs that result in the reduction or elimination of future
losses from similar events.

7.5.2 After a hurricane has severely impacted Jacksonville, the Mayor of the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County, and other local officials as designated by the Mayor, shall meet to
review preliminary damage assessments as collected by the Emergency Preparedness Division.
The Mayor may take such actions as deemed necessary to restore the Consolidated City of
Jacksonville/Duval County to post storm conditions. Life safety issues, such as search and rescue
activities shall receive first priority. Following life safety, recovery efforts shall be focused on
damage assessment and human needs assessment, re-establishment of the public infrastructure.
The Emergency Management Organization, as established by the CEMP, shall remain in operation
until recovery efforts can be continued under normal governmental operations.

7.5.3 The Executive Group of the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County’s Emergency
Management Organization shall oversee recovery actions and provide policy guidance for recovery
operations.

7.5.4 The Emergency Management Organization shall implement the existing recovery policies
and procedures of the CEMP and any policies or procedures issued or endorsed by the Executive
Group. These policies shall include, but not be limited to, the issuance of emergency building
permits, coordination with state and federal officials, authorization of mitigation options in the
replacement of damaged or destroyed public property and infrastructure; approval of a post-
disaster redevelopment plan, and amendments to the Comprehensive Plan and the CEMP.

7.5.5 Immediate repair and cleanup actions needed to protect the public health and safety include
repairs to potable water, wastewater, and power facilities; removal of debris; stabilization or
removal of structures about to collapse; and minimal repairs to make dwellings habitable. These
actions shall receive first priority in permitting decisions

7.5.6 As part of its Local Mitigation Strategy, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
shall adopt prior to October 1, 1999 a formal decision making process to evaluate redevelopment
options, considering such factors as cost to construct, cost to maintain, repetitive damage, impacts
on land use, impacts on the environment, and public safety.

7.5.7 The Emergency Management Organization shall propose amendments to the 2010
Comprehensive Plan which reflect the recommendations in any interagency hazard mitigation
reports or other reports prepared pursuant to Section 406 of the Disaster Relief Act of 1974 (PL 93-
288).

7.5.8 If rebuilt, structures which suffer damage in excess of fifty percent of their appraised value
shall be rebuilt to meet all current building and code requirements, including those enacted since
original construction of the structure.

7.5.9 Structures which suffer substantial damage to pilings, foundations, or load bearing walls shall
be required to rebuild landward of their current location or to modify the structure to delete the
areas most prone to damage.

7.5.10 Following a disaster, the Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County shall identify any
existing non-public structures in the Coastal High Hazard Area (CHHA), inventory their assessed



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value, judge the utility of the land for public access or resource protection, and make
recommendations for acquisition during post-disaster recovery.

7.5.11 The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County shall consider and implement where
appropriate the recommendations of the hazard mitigation annex of the local Comprehensive
Emergency Management Plan.

7.5.12 The Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County shall prohibit the location of
development in areas within the CHHA which have sustained recurring hurricane-related damage.

The Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department standard operating procedures for mass casualty
incidents (# 212), railroad accidents (#214), Incident command system (#219), hazardous materials
(#230), bomb (#231), and civil disorder (#241), each address policies that relate to the
Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan and or the Emergency Operations Center.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office document entitled the “Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office All-Hazards
Response Plan” addresses law enforcement policies that also relate to the Comprehensive
Emergency Management Plan in terms of emergency powers, management Responses to
Disasters, Command Centers, Communications, Aircraft accidents, Hurricane Evacuation and
Sheltering and Mass Fatality Incidents.

Additionally, The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has developed a Terrorism/Weapons of Mass
Destruction Incident Protocol Guide which articulates actions needing coordination with the actions
prescribed in the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan.

The JEA (public water, sewer and electric services independent authority) has a 2-volume
Emergency Plan Book that refers to interaction with the EOC/Area Command, CEMP in terms of
notification, response and recovery.

The City of Jacksonville/Duval County has entered into Mutual Aid & Disaster Aid Agreements with
the following:

1.     Statewide Mutual Aid Agreement

2.     Clay County

3.     St. Johns County

4.     Baker County

5.     Nassau County

6.     Jacksonville Naval Air Station

7.     Mayport Naval Station

8.     The American Red Cross

9.     The Salvation Army



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ORDINANCES AND ADMINISTRATIVE RULES
The following laws, ordinances, and administrative rules apply to the City of Jacksonville/Duval
County emergency management activities:

State of Florida Statutes

Chapter 1, Definitions

Chapter 7, County Boundaries

Chapter 14, Title IV, Executive Branch Governor

Chapter 22, Emergency Continuity of Government

Chapter 23, Florida Statutes, as amended by Chapter 93-211, Laws of Florida

Chapter 30, Sheriffs

Chapter 73, Eminent Domain

Chapter 74, Proceedings Supplemental to Eminent Domain

Chapter 125, County Government; Chapter 162, County or Municipal Code Enforcement; Chapter
165, Title XII, Municipalities: Formation of Local Governments; Chapter 166, Municipalities; and
Chapter 553, Building Construction Standards.

Chapter 154, Public Health Facilities

Chapter 161, Beach and Shore Preservation; Part III, Coastal Zone Preservation.

Chapter 163, Intergovernmental Programs; Part I, Miscellaneous Programs

Chapter 166, Municipalities

Chapter 187, State Comprehensive Plan

Chapter 252, Emergency Management

Chapter 321, Highway Patrol

Chapter 380, Land and Water Development

Chapter 381, Title XXIX, Public Health

Chapter 401, Medical Communications and Transportation

Chapter 403, Environmental Control

Chapter 404, Radiation

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Chapter 406, Medical Examiners

Chapter 409, Title XXX, Social Welfare

Chapter 427, Transportation Services

Chapter 768, Good Samaritan Act

Chapter 870, Affrays, Riots, Routs and Unlawful Assemblies.

Federal

Public Law 93-288, as amended, which provides authority for response assistance under the
Federal Response Plan, and which empowers the President to direct any federal agency to utilized
its authorities and resources in support of state and local assistance efforts.

Public Law 93-234, Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, as amended, provides insurance
coverage for all types of buildings.

Public Law 81-290, the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, provides a system for joint
capability building at the federal, state and local levels for all types of hazards.

Public Law 99-499, Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, which governs
hazardous materials planning and right-to-know.

Public Law 101-615, Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act (HMTUSA), which
provides funding to improve capability to respond to hazardous materials incidents.

Public Law 95-510, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of
1980 (CERCLA) as amended, which requires facilities to notify authorities of accidental releases of
hazardous materials.

Public Law 101-549, Clean Air Amendments of 1990, which provides for reductions in pollutants.

Public Law 85- 256, Price-Anderson Ct, which provides for a system of compensating the public
the public for harm caused by a nuclear accident.

Public Law 84-99 (33 USC 701n), Flood Emergencies, authorizing an emergency fund for flood
emergency preparation, flood fighting and rescue operations, or repair and restoration of flood
control works threatened or destroyed by flood.

Public Law 91-671, Flood Stamp Act of 1964, in conjunction with section 412 of the Stafford Act,
relating to food stamp distributions after a major disaster.

Public Law 89-665 (16 USC 470 et sq), National Historic Preservation Act, relating to the
preservation of historic resources damaged as a result of disasters.




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Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, 42 USC 11311-11352, Federal Emergency
Management and Shelter Program.

National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, 42 USC 4001 et.seq.



Administrative Rules, State of Florida

Florida Department of Community Affairs Administrative Rules 9G2, 6, 11, 12, 14, 16, 17, 19 and
20.

Florida Department of Community Affairs Administrative Rules 9J2 and 5



Administrative Rules, Federal

CFR 44 Parts 59-76, National Flood Insurance Program and related programs

CFR 44 Part 13 (The Common Rule). Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and
Cooperative Agreements

CFR 44 Part 206, Federal Disaster Assistance for Disasters Declared after November 23, 1988

CFR 44 Part 10, Environmental Conditions

CFR 44 Part 14, Audits of State and Local Governments

Presidential Directives, Federal

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 (HSPD-5), which enhances the ability of the United
States to manage domestic incidents by establishing a single, comprehensive national incident
management system (NIMS).


Homeland Security Presidential Directive 8 (HSPD-8), establishes policies to strengthen the
preparedness of the United States to prevent and respond to threatened or actual domestic
terrorist attacks, major disasters, and other emergencies by requiring a national domestic all-
hazards preparedness goal, establishing mechanisms for improved delivery of federal
preparedness assistance to state and local governments, and outlining actions to strengthen
preparedness capabilities of federal, state, and local entities.


Duval County Ordinances

Duval County Comprehensive Management Plan, 1998 as amended.



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Chapter 674, Ordinance Code (Disaster Preparedness and Civil Emergency), Sections 674.101,
674.103, 674-202, 674.203 and 674-205

Executive Order 96-201

Declaration of a Local State of Emergency




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RECORD OF CHANGES OR REVISIONS

 Page   Change or revision                                                                             Date
  1     Developed linked, detailed Table of Contents to facilitate location of items                  6/15/06
  6     Developed linked, detailed List of Tables and Figures to facilitate location of items         6/15/06
  9     Updated Executive Summary                                                                     6/15/06
  11    Section outlines the new structure for the CEMP, in detail                                    6/15/06
  18    Added new section clarifying promulgation of the CEMP; outlining that the only                6/15/06
        Basic Plan is approved by the City Council. Other portions of the plan are not
        required to be approved by the Council.
  19    Entire Situation portion of the CEMP was updated with current risk, demographic               6/15/06
        and economic data and figures to the extent the data were available. All figures
        were numbered to make it easier to reference and locate within the section.
  24    Hurricane hazard section was updated to include the concepts that the City of                 6/15/06
        Jacksonville/Duval County encourages “in-county” evacuation, and that all planning
        is based on the policy that all evacuation activities will cease at the arrival of tropical
        storm force winds.
  68    Concept of Operations portion – added new section summarizing the National                    6/15/06
        Incident Management System (NIMS)
  71    Added new section summarizing the Incident Command System (ICS)                               6/15/06
  90    Emergency Response Organization – deleted operations group activities that were               6/15/06
        scaled specifically to hurricane watch and warning actions (see “old CEMP” pp. 22-
        23) since the intent is to make the CEMP more all-hazard. Hurricane watch and
        warning actions will be placed in the Hurricane HSP.
  93    Added expanded section on lead agencies; updating their role and updating the                 6/15/06
        matrix of responsibilities.
 116    Added new section summarizing the new complexes and divisions.                                6/15/06
 118    Added a new section outlining the planning process in accordance with ICS                     6/15/06
        procedures.
 118    Added new section outlining ICS planning process, including the Planning “P.”                 6/15/06
 123    Added new section and figure outlining the resource ordering process of the                   6/15/06
        Logistics Section.
 127    Added a section on Citizen Corps opportunities.                                               6/15/06
 130    Reorganized the Recovery section into three functional subsections: Damage                    6/15/06
        Assessment, Public Assistance and Individual Assistance. Added detail on specific
        public and individual assistance programs. Elaborated on state and federal
        responsibilities for recovery activities.
 142    Hazard mitigation introduction was updated to included risk and vulnerability of              6/15/06
        community and critical infrastructure/key resources.
 148    Pre/post disaster mitigation operations – added new sections summarizing pre/post             6/15/06
        disaster mitigation activities and functions. We also included Figure 40 a flow chart
        describing the LMS planning process.
 150    Added Figure 41 post disaster mitigation process chart from FEMA.                             6/15/06
 150    Concept of Operations portion – elaborated on LMS process and functional role of              6/15/06
        EPD coordinator, Duval Prepares Partnership, SEPPC, mitigation civic groups.
 152    Updated Figure 42 mitigation organizational structure chart.                                  6/15/06
 156    Updated “Mitigation Assessment Team Matrix”                                                   6/15/06
 154    Added new section comprised of “structural” mitigation initiatives. These initiatives         6/15/06
        are reflected on a new table inserted into plan, see Table 11.


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 Page   Change or revision                                                               Date
  154   Added new section comprised of “non-structural” mitigation initiatives. These   6/15/06
        initiatives are reflected on a new table inserted into plan, see Table 12
 157    Updated section on Special Needs Registration.                                  6/15/06
 164    Updated “Recommended Training” table.                                           6/15/06
 177    HSPD-5 and HSPD-8 added to References and Authorities section.                  6/15/06




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DISTRIBUTION LIST

Once approved, a copy of this CEMP will be distributed to each of the following individuals, entities
or lead agency representatives (list subject to change):


       American Red Cross, Northeast Florida Chapter, CEO
       Association of Contingency Planners, Northeast Florida Chapter
       Atlantic Beach, Mayor of
       Baldwin, Mayor of
       Baptist Medical Center
       BellSouth
       Chief Judge, Circuit Court
       City Council President
       Clerk of Circuit Court
       Duval County Health Department, Director
       Duval County Property Appraiser
       Duval County School Board, Chairperson
       Duval Delegation
       First Coast Disaster Council
       Florida Air National Guard
       Florida Department Of Transportation
       Florida Division of Emergency Management - Area 3 Coordinator
       Jacksonville Administration & Finance Department
       Jacksonville Agricultural Extension Service
       Jacksonville Airport Authority
       Jacksonville Animal Care & Control Division
       Jacksonville Beach, Mayor of
       Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
       Jacksonville Community Council, Inc., Exec. Director
       Jacksonville Community Services Department
       Jacksonville Disabled Services Division
       Jacksonville Economic Development Commission
       Jacksonville Emergency Preparedness Division
       Jacksonville Environmental Resource Management Department
       Jacksonville Fire & Rescue Department
       Jacksonville Fleet Management
       Jacksonville General Counsel
       Jacksonville GIS Division
       Jacksonville Housing & Neighborhoods Dept.
       Jacksonville Housing Authority
       Jacksonville Humane Society
       Jacksonville Information Technologies Division
       Jacksonville Mayor’s Administration, Press Secretary
       Jacksonville Office of Volunteer Services
       Jacksonville Parks, Recreation & Entertainment Department
       Jacksonville Planning & Development Department
       Jacksonville Port Authority

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      Jacksonville Procurement Department
      Jacksonville Public Information Division - City Link
      Jacksonville Public Works Department
      Jacksonville Seaport Authority
      Jacksonville Sheriff's Office
      Jacksonville Transportation Authority
      Jacksonville Veterinary Medical Society
      Jacksonville Zoological Gardens
      JEA Utilities
      Mayor, Consolidated City of Jacksonville/Duval County
      Medical Examiner’s Office
      Memorial Hospital
      Navy Region Southeast
      Neptune Beach, Mayor of
      Northeast Florida Regional Council
      Northeast Florida Veteran’s Council
      Second Harvest Food Bank/Lutheran Social Services
      Shands Hospital
      St. Luke’s Hospital
      St. Vincent’s Hospital
      Supervisor of Elections
      Tax Collector
      The Salvation Army
      U.S. Coast Guard - Capt of the Port
      U.S. Naval Air Station Jacksonville - Regional Operations Center
      United Way of Northeast Florida
      Volunteer Jacksonville




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ATTACHMENT 1: ORDINANCE CODE, CHAPTER 674

ORDINANCE CODE OF THE CITY OF JACKSONVILLE, CHAPTER 674, DISASTER
PREPAREDNESS AND CIVIL EMERGENCY


PART 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 674.101. Declaration of policy.
Because of the existing and continuing possibility of the occurrence of disasters or emergencies of
unprecedented size and destructiveness resulting from enemy attack, sabotage, terrorism or other
hostile action or from natural or man-made causes; and because of the existing and continuing
possibility of the occurrence of disasters or emergencies of a localized nature within the City but
involving the likelihood of imminent and real danger to property and the lives of the people of the
locality; and in order to ensure that preparations of the City will be adequate to deal with, reduce
vulnerability to and recover from these disasters and emergencies, generally to provide for the
common defense and protect the public peace, health and safety, and to preserve the lives and
property of the people of the City; the Council finds and declares it necessary:
(a) To create and maintain a local disaster preparedness agency in the City and to authorize
cooperation with the federal and state governments, other local disaster preparedness agencies,
and other local groups and individuals.
(b) To provide for the exercise of the emergency powers conferred by F.S. Chs. 252 and 870.
(c) To provide the means to assist in the prevention of disasters or emergencies caused or
aggravated by inadequate planning for and regulation of public and private facilities and land use.
(d) To authorize the appropriate officials of the City to deal with routs, riots, riotous assemblies,
overt acts of violence or the imminent threat of any of these.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 2001-1310-E, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.101.

Sec. 674.102. Reserved.
Editor's note: The provisions of former § 674.102, relative to legislative authority, were deleted as
part of the Super Supplement to the Code. Former § 674.102 derived from Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2;
Ord. 83-591-400, § 1.
Note: Former § 430.102.

Sec. 674.103. Definitions.
In this Chapter, unless the context otherwise requires:
(a) Emergency preparedness means the preparation for and the carrying out of all emergency
responsibilities and functions other than those for which military forces or state agencies are
primarily responsible, to prevent, minimize and repair injury and damage resulting from the
occurrence or imminent threat of widespread or severe damage, injury or loss of life or property
resulting from disasters or emergencies.
(b) Chief means the Chief, Emergency Preparedness Division, as provided in Part 6, Chapter 31,
Ordinance Code. For purposes of this ordinance the Chief shall also be the "director" of a County
emergency preparedness management agency, as contemplated in F.S. § 252.38(1)(b).
(c) Jacksonville Security Coordinator means an individual selected by the Mayor and designated,
in writing, who shall be an Assistant to the Mayor for City Security, participating at the Mayor's staff
level, and who shall be the individual responsible for coordinating and making recommendations to


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the Mayor for all security and emergency preparedness issues, preparing and maintaining security
emergency preparedness plans, and who is directly responsible for coordinating all emergency
related communications among members of the Planning Council during times of disaster or
emergency.
(d) Disaster means the occurrence or imminent threat of widespread or severe damage, injury or
loss of life or property resulting from any natural or man-made cause, including enemy attack,
sabotage, terrorism or other hostile military or paramilitary action, fire, flood, earthquake,
windstorm, wave action, volcanic activity, explosion or accident involving radiation by-products.
(e) Division means the Emergency Preparedness Division of the Fire and Rescue Department.
(f) Emergency means:
(1) The occurrence or imminent threat of localized damage, injury or loss of life or property
resulting from a natural or man-made cause.
(2) The occurrence or imminent threat of riot, rout, riotous assembly or overt acts of violence
disturbing the public peace or safety.
(g) Planning Council means the Emergency Preparedness Planning Council.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4; Ord. 2001-1310-E, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.103.

Sec. 674.104. Supremacy of Chapter, rules, etc.
Whenever the provisions of this Chapter or of any part of this Chapter are being exercised, they
shall be supreme and shall supersede any other provisions of law inconsistent with the exercise of
these provisions. Rules, regulations and orders issued pursuant to the authority contained in this
Chapter shall, during the time that they are actually being used or executed and to the extent of
any conflict, supersede any other rules, regulations and orders with which they may be in conflict.
This Chapter being intended to secure to the government the emergency powers and authority
required to handle a disaster or emergency, it shall take precedence over any law, rule, regulation
or order that may interfere with its execution or hinder the ability of City officials and employees to
exercise its emergency powers.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.104.

Sec. 674.105. Uniformity with state and federal actions.
In order to attain uniformity in measures taken to aid emergency preparedness or to quell civil
emergencies, all action taken under this Chapter and all rules, regulations and orders made or
issued with due consideration for the orders, rules, regulations, actions, recommendations and
requests of state and federal authorities relevant thereto and, to the extent permitted by law, shall
be consistent with those orders, rules, regulations, actions, recommendations and requests.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.105.




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PART 2. SECURITY, DISASTER AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

Sec. 674.201. Territorial applicability of part.
This Part shall be applicable throughout the General Services District, as authorized and required
by F.S. § 252.38(1). Nothing in this Part shall prohibit or prevent the government of the Second,
Third, Fourth or Fifth Urban Services Districts from establishing a local disaster preparedness
agency within the district, but that agency shall be subject to the provisions of this Part and shall be
required to coordinate its efforts through the Division and to cooperate with the Division and
observe the rules and orders made and issued by the Chief that apply to or affect the agency and
the Urban Services District.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.201.

Sec. 674.202. Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Council.
(a) There is created the Security and Emergency Preparedness Planning Council which shall
consist of the Mayor as chairman, the Jacksonville Security Coordinator as vice chair, the Director
of Fire and Rescue, the Chief of the Emergency Preparedness Division, the President of the City
Council, or designee, the Chair of the Duval County Legislative Delegation, or designee, the
Director of Regulatory and Environmental Services, the Public Health Officer, the Chief
Administrative Officer, the Chief of Staff, the Director of Public Works, the Sheriff, the Chief Judge
of the Fourth Judicial Circuit, the Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer of the JEA, the
Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer of the Jacksonville Seaport Authority, the Managing
Director/Chief Executive Officer of the Jacksonville Airport Authority, the Executive Director of the
Jacksonville Transportation Authority, the Chairperson or designee of the Duval County School
Board, representatives of each military group in Jacksonville, representatives of all major hospitals
in the City (having 300 or more beds) and a number of other representatives, not to exceed 11 in
number, from civic, business, industry, labor, veterans, professional or other groups and from the
federal government, to be appointed by the Mayor from time to time.
(b) The Planning Council shall recommend an emergency preparedness plan to the Council as
provided in Section 674.205 and shall review and comment to the Council on all mutual aid plans
and interjurisdictional agreements which are proposed for approval by the Council to implement the
emergency preparedness plan. The Planning Council shall also conduct a continuing study of the
need for amendments to and improvements in the emergency preparedness plan and recommend
necessary changes to the Council from time to time.
(c) The Planning Council shall meet at the call of the chairman or vice-chairman. A majority of the
members shall constitute a quorum to do business, and for this purpose a member who is unable
to attend in person may designate one person as his alternate, who is authorized to represent his
principal and may vote on all matters before the Planning Council. The Planning Council is
authorized to adopt, amend and repeal rules for the conduct of its business, including a method of
obtaining public comment on a proposed emergency preparedness plan and changes to such plan.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4; Ord. 97-1094-E, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.202.

Sec. 674.203. Emergency Preparedness organization.
(a) Authorization. The Council hereby authorizes the emergency preparedness organization
established in this Section. Whenever the Mayor activates the emergency preparedness
organization, the elements and units created by this Section shall be formed and function as
provided in this Section and shall proceed to execute the emergency preparedness plan, or so
much thereof as is necessary, or to practice its execution. The Mayor, acting through the Chief,
shall schedule and conduct mock or practice disasters with sufficient frequency that the personnel

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involved in the emergency preparedness organization become familiar with their duties and
functions in the emergency preparedness plan.
(b) Structure. The emergency preparedness organization of the City shall be organized as
follows:
(1) Head of emergency preparedness organization. The head of the emergency preparedness
organization shall be the Mayor, assisted by the Jacksonville Security Coordinator, an Executive
Group and an Operations Group. Control and direction of the emergency preparedness
organization shall be vested in the Mayor and he shall be responsible for the prompt, efficient
execution of the emergency preparedness plan, or so much thereof as is necessary to:
(i) Reduce the vulnerability of the people and of the City to damage, injury and loss of life and
property.
(ii) Prepare for and execute rescue, care and treatment of persons victimized or threatened by
disaster.
(iii) Provide a setting conducive to the rapid and orderly start of restoration and rehabilitation of
persons and property affected by a disaster.
(2) Executive Group. There is an Executive Group, under the coordination of the Mayor, which is
comprised of the Jacksonville Security Coordinator and appropriate department heads and other
key individuals identified by the Mayor. The Executive Group will carry out the following
responsibilities:
(i) Provides direction and control of the emergency preparedness organization.
(ii) Issues Executive Orders, proclamations and regulations. Amends and/or rescinds directives in
light of fulfilling responsibilities.
(iii) Provides for an orderly transition to normalcy following an emergency.
(iv) Initiates action to operationalize the Emergency Operation Center.
(v) Formulates responses to crisis situations.
(vi) Develops and issues emergency policy decisions.
(vii) Maintains public information channels with appropriate and timely information releases.
(viii) Addresses security of all consolidated government and independent agency property
including issuing badges and maintaining a log-in/log-out book at City Hall at St. James, while
ensuring public access to public buildings, personnel and services.
(ix) Develops mail-handling policies and training.
(x) Develops evacuation procedures including written directives for securing City-owned
equipment for all City-owned properties.
(xi) Establishes mandatory security measures to be utilized by the City's Information Technologies
Division (ITD) including, but not limited to, providing security of the physical location as well as
securing all information technology.
(xii) Develops and maintains a security evaluation of City Hall at St. James in addition to all other
City-owned buildings with reports of said evaluations to be provided to City Council on an annual
basis or upon request of the Council.
(xiii) Ensures that ITD will create and maintain a website to provide information to the public
including information for family and community security and emergency preparedness and provide
for updates during emergencies.
(3) Operations Group. There is an Operations Group, under the Executive Group, which is
headed by the Jacksonville Security Coordinator and includes both operational and services
staffing. Primary responsibilities assigned to the group include the following:
(i) Ensures the implementation of directives issued by the Executive Group.
(ii) Keeps the Executive Group informed about the response to the needs created by the
emergency situation.
(iii) Maintains upward, downward and lateral communication within the emergency operational
structure.


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(iv) Promotes coordination and cooperation among public and private sector participants.
(v) Coordinates inter- and intra-governmental activities including the activities, services, and
programs for emergency management within the County and maintains liaison with other federal,
state and local emergency management agencies.
(vi) Provides fire and rescue services designed to protect life and property, ensure fire protection,
respond to emergency medical, search and rescue services, and utilize volunteer fire and rescue
manpower to augment regular full-time personnel.
(vii) Provides law enforcement services designed to protect life and property, ensure the
management, operation and control of police and traffic safety, execute traffic control procedures
and establishes/maintains open routes for evacuation, movement of response efforts, control of re-
entry to affected areas, enhance a smooth transition when activating the Emergency Operations
Center, and utilize volunteer police manpower to supplement the regular work force.
(viii) Ensures adequate health and medical services by establishing first aid, ambulance services,
emergency hospital systems, casualty services, distribution and collection of health supplies,
maintaining blood services, providing laboratory services, morgue and nutrition services,
maintaining and restoring water sanitation, proper handling of medical records and coordinating the
administration of medical services, coordination of the utilization of health personnel, assisting in
the registration and shelter for handicapped persons, and assisting in damage assessment during
recovery.
(ix) Coordinate with the American Red Cross in identifying, establishing and operating emergency
shelter facilities capable of housing and mass feeding of affected persons, providing emergency
clothing and necessary sundries, coordinating with health and medical services in identifying
individuals requiring medical attention, assisting federal and state officials in the preparation and
operation of Disaster Application Centers, and providing help in damage assessment for residential
units.
(x) Maintain contact between government and various private, commercial, and industrial
organizations involved in emergency operations, provide operational supply functions that include
manpower, transportation, telecommunications, fuel, equipment, purchasing, conduct appropriate
administrative and financial transactions required and provide assistance in damage assessment.
(xi) Maintain and/or effect necessary repairs to establish safe water operations, coordinations with
the Public Works Department in maintaining the safe disposal of wastewater and sanitation
operations, assists in clearing debris, evaluate, repair and construct essential facilities and submit
timely damage and repairs assessment reports, maintain and effect the distribution of supplies,
tools, and expertise to facilitate safe operations.
(xii) Coordinate debris removal with the JEA to maintain passable roadways, and endeavor to
maintain integrity of water treatment plants and wastewater treatment plants and work with the
Public Works Department to evaluate and coordinate repair of roadways and drainage systems
and submit timely reports of damage assessments and repairs, maintain and effect the distribution
of supplies, tools, and expertise to facilitate safe roadway movement.
(xiii) Coordinate electrical requirements during the emergency situation, assist in damage/repair
assessments and submit timely reports.
(xiv) Assists in requesting state assistance or invoice emergency-related mutual aid assistance
upon declaration of a state of emergency.
(xv) Initiates and coordinates the activation of the Emergency Operations Center.
(xvi) Coordinates evacuation of persons throughout the County (including those listed in the
registry of disabled citizens.)
(xvii) Coordinates damage assessments during the recovery phase.
(xviii) Perform any additional functional requirements, determined by the Mayor to be necessary in
responding to or in restoring normal conditions within the City.



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(c) Manning. The manning levels and personnel distribution of the emergency preparedness
organization shall be specified in the emergency preparedness plan. To the greatest extent
possible, City personnel, including appointed officials and other employees, shall be used to
provide a trained, reserve cadre of emergency preparedness personnel, and the assignment of a
City employee to a specific position in the emergency preparedness organization shall be
considered, during the time that the emergency preparedness organization is activated by the
Mayor, as temporary additional duty and not as an assignment or transfer to another public
position. Volunteer and auxiliary emergency preparedness personnel shall also be assigned to
positions in the emergency preparedness organization, but such assignment shall not ipso
facto make the person assigned a public employee nor entitle him to any powers, duties, rights,
privileges or immunities except as provided or authorized by this Chapter.
(d) Activation; inactive status. The emergency preparedness organization being a temporary
reorganization of the government to meet the extreme requirements of a disaster, it shall be
activated only by order of the Mayor during an actual, impending, mock or practice disaster and at
other times as requested by the Governor or to fulfill a mutual aid or interjurisdictional agreement
approved by the Council as provided in Section 674.205. The Mayor may activate part or all of the
emergency preparedness organization, may expand his order activating part of the emergency
preparedness organization to include other parts, and may order part or all of the activated
emergency preparedness organization to be deactivated when it is no longer needed to meet the
exigencies of the disaster. During the time when the emergency preparedness organization is in an
inactive status, the Chief and the Division shall be responsible for maintaining the records, files and
other papers pertaining to the various services of the emergency preparedness organization and
for keeping and, as necessary, revising an accurate, adequate record of personnel assignments to
the emergency preparedness positions authorized by the emergency preparedness plan; and the
Division shall provide the headquarters services for the emergency preparedness organization and
perform such functions of the emergency preparedness organization as are authorized by the
emergency preparedness plan to be performed while the emergency preparedness organization is
in an inactive status.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 81-808-365, § 1; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4; Ord.
97-229-E, § 26; Ord. 2001-1310-E, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.203.

Sec. 674.204. Volunteer and auxiliary emergency preparedness personnel.
The recruitment, training and use of individuals, not employees of the City, as volunteer and
auxiliary emergency preparedness personnel is authorized, and the Mayor may recruit, train and
assign these personnel in accordance with the emergency preparedness plan and as required by
the exigencies of a disaster when these personnel are used. Volunteer and auxiliary personnel
shall receive training adequate to allow them to perform their assigned duties, and for this purpose
the Mayor may make use of private volunteer organizations that provide instruction or instructors of
on-the-job training with or using City employees and of formal training in the Police Academy,
Firefighters School or other schools and classes; provided, that no individual receiving instruction
as a volunteer or auxiliary emergency preparedness worker shall be entitled to nor receive any
benefits, compensation or status as a public employee.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.204.

Sec. 674.205. Emergency preparedness plan.
The Emergency Preparedness Planning Council, through the Mayor, shall propose to the Council,
from time to time, an emergency preparedness plan and necessary changes thereto, this plan to
be integrated into and coordinated with the emergency preparedness and survival plans and

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programs of the state and federal governments in addition to those items included in Section
674.203. Upon adoption by resolution of the Council, the emergency preparedness plan shall
become effective and shall govern the activities, duties and functions of the emergency
preparedness organization authorized by Section 674.203; and no change to the emergency
preparedness plan shall become effective unless and until adopted by resolution of the Council.
The emergency preparedness plan shall be a comprehensive plan for the emergency
preparedness of the City and the Emergency Preparedness Planning Council is authorized to
present the plan in stages or phases for adoption by the Council. All mutual aid and
interjurisdictional assistance agreements shall be made in conformity with and shall be subject to
the requirements of the emergency preparedness plan and the emergency preparedness plan shall
provide for cooperation with the adjoining counties, the sharing of emergency preparedness
personnel and resources and the creation and mobilization of emergency preparedness support
forces on an interjurisdictional basis; but no mutual aid plan or interjurisdictional agreement, or any
change thereto, shall become effective until approved by the Council. To facilitate the development
of an emergency preparedness plan for the General Services District, as required by F.S. §
252.38(1)(a), all City departments, authorities, independent agencies and constitutional officers
shall prepare and periodically revise emergency preparedness contingency plans pursuant to
directions, guidelines and assistance from the Division. The Division shall ensure that such
contingency plans are consistent with and made part of the City's emergency preparedness plan.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4; Ord. 2001-1310-E, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.205.

Sec. 674.206. Disaster emergencies.
(a) The Mayor is responsible for meeting the dangers presented to the City and its people by a
disaster. The Mayor may issue executive orders, proclamations and regulations and amend or
rescind them in the fulfillment of this responsibility, and these executive orders, proclamations and
regulations shall have the force and effect of law during the period for which they are effective.
During the continuance of a state of disaster emergency, the Mayor is commander-in-chief of the
emergency preparedness forces available for emergency duty. To the greatest extent possible, the
Mayor shall delegate or assign command authority by prior arrangement embodied in the
emergency preparedness plan or in appropriate executive orders or regulations, but this shall not
restrict his authority to do so by orders issued at the time of and during the disaster emergency.
(b) A disaster emergency shall be declared by proclamation of the Mayor if he finds that a
disaster has occurred or that the occurrence or the threat thereof is imminent. The state of disaster
emergency shall continue until the Mayor finds that the threat or danger has been dealt with to the
extent that the emergency conditions no longer exist and he terminates the state of disaster
emergency by proclamation; but no state of disaster emergency may continue for longer than 30
days unless renewed by the Mayor. At the same time that the state of disaster emergency is
declared, the Mayor shall convene the Council in special meeting, at which he shall report to the
Council all the facts and circumstances concerning the disaster and his recommendations in
connection therewith. The Council by resolution may terminate a state of disaster emergency at
any time, whereupon the Mayor shall issue a proclamation ending the state of disaster emergency.
A proclamation issued under this subsection shall indicate the nature of the disaster, the area or
areas of the City threatened by it, and the conditions which have brought it about or which make
possible the termination of the state of disaster emergency. A proclamation issued under this
subsection shall be promptly disseminated by means calculated to bring it to the attention of the
general public and, unless the circumstances attendant upon the disaster prevent or impede, it
shall be promptly filed with the Council Secretary.
(c) Whenever a mock or practice disaster alert is to be called, for the purpose of training and
exercising part or all of the emergency preparedness organization, the proclamation shall clearly


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state that a mock or practice alert is being called and that no state of disaster emergency actually
exists. The Mayor is not required to convene the Council in special meeting for a mock or practice
disaster alert, and any proclamations, orders and regulations issued by the Mayor during a mock or
practice disaster alert shall not carry the force of law.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.206.

Sec. 674.207. Emergency powers of Mayor.
In addition to all other powers conferred upon the Mayor by law, during a state of disaster
emergency he may:
(a) Suspend the provisions of any ordinance prescribing procedures for the conduct of City
business or the rules, regulations or orders of any City agency, if strict compliance with the
ordinance, rule, regulation or order would in any way prevent, hinder or delay necessary action in
coping with the disaster.
(b) Utilize all available resources of the City government as reasonably necessary to cope with
the disaster.
(c) Transfer the direction, personnel or functions of City agencies, or units thereof, for the purpose
of performing or facilitating emergency services.
(d) Request the assistance and cooperation of the independent agencies, or such of them as are
reasonably necessary to implement the emergency preparedness plan, and, in the event that an
independent agency fails or refuses to provide the requested assistance and cooperation or that
there is no one available to order such assistance and cooperation, commandeer or utilize the
independent agency's personnel and equipment as is reasonably necessary to cope with the
disaster.
(e) Subject to the provisions of Section 674.211, commandeer or utilize any private property if he
finds this necessary to cope with the disaster.
(f) Direct and compel by any necessary and reasonable force the evacuation of all or part of the
population from a stricken or threatened area within the City if he deems this action necessary for
the preservation of life or other disaster mitigation, response or recovery.
(g) Prescribe routes, modes of transportation and destinations in connection with an evacuation.
(h) Control ingress to and egress from a disaster area, the movement of persons within the area
and the occupancy of premises therein.
(i) Suspend or limit the sale, dispensing or transportation of alcoholic beverages, firearms,
explosive and combustibles.
(j) Make provision for the availability and use of temporary emergency housing.
(k) Take or direct measures for limiting or suspending lighting devices and appliances, gas and
water mains, electric power distribution and other utility services in the general public interest.
(l) Take or direct measures concerning the conduct of civilians, the movement and cessation of
movement of pedestrian and vehicular traffic prior to, during and subsequent to drills and actual or
threatened disasters, the calling of public meetings and gatherings and the evacuation and
reception of the civilian population, as provided in the emergency preparedness plan.
(m) Authorize the use of forces already activated or mobilized to assist private citizens of the City
in cleanup and recovery operations during a disaster when permission to enter onto or into private
property has been obtained from the property owner.
(n) Enforce and utilize the provisions of mutual aid plans and interjurisdictional agreements and,
in connection therewith:
(1) Organize and dispatch emergency preparedness support forces, including personnel, supplies
and equipment as necessary, to other counties, transfer operational command of these forces to
the other jurisdiction and resume operational command of these forces when they are no longer
needed outside the City.


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(2) Request and assume operational command of emergency preparedness support forces,
including personnel, supplies and equipment as necessary, dispatched from other jurisdictions into
the City and transfer operational command of these forces to the original jurisdiction when they are
no longer needed in the City.
(3) Loan, lease or transfer, on such terms and conditions as he deems necessary to promote the
public welfare and protect the interests of the City, any property of the City government required or
useful to effectuate the mutual aid plan or interjurisdictional agreement, and receive and utilize any
property of another jurisdiction by loan, lease or transfer on such terms and conditions as he
deems advisable, pursuant to a mutual aid plan or interjurisdictional agreement.
(o) Waive procedures and formalities otherwise required by the Charter or by law pertaining to:
(1) The performance of public work.
(2) The entering into of contracts.
(3) The incurring of obligations.
(4) The employment of permanent and temporary workers.
(5) The utilization of volunteer workers.
(6) The rental of equipment.
(7) The purchase and distribution, with or without compensation, of supplies, materials and
facilities.
(8) The appropriation and expenditure of public funds.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.207.

Sec. 674.208. Oath.
Each person, whether he is a public employee, a volunteer worker or an auxiliary worker, who is
assigned to a specific position in the emergency preparedness plan shall, before entering upon his
duties thereunder, take the following oath in writing before a person authorized by law to
administer oaths:
I,[name] , do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the
United States and of the State of Florida against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear
true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental
reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which
I am about to enter.
The subscribed, sworn oath shall be filed in the records of the Division.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.208.

Sec. 674.209. Local services; compensation, reimbursement.
(a) Whenever City employees are rendering aid outside the City pursuant to a mutual aid plan or
interjurisdictional agreement, they shall have the same powers, duties, rights, privileges and
immunities as if they were performing their duties within the City limits. Whenever volunteer or
auxiliary emergency preparedness personnel are detailed to an emergency disaster support force
outside the City, they shall have the same powers, duties and immunities as if they were
performing their emergency preparedness duties within the City limits.
(b) The City shall be liable for any loss or damage to any equipment provided by other
jurisdictions and used by or in the City pursuant to a mutual aid plan or interjurisdictional
agreement and shall pay any expense incurred in the operation and maintenance of the
equipment; provided, that no claim by another jurisdiction shall be allowed unless, within 60 days
after the loss, damage or expense is sustained or incurred an itemized notice of the claim, under
oath, is served by mail or otherwise upon the Director of Administration and Finance. The City shall
also reimburse another jurisdiction providing aid to the City for compensation (including

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compensation due to personal injury or death) paid to employees furnished as a part of the aid and
shall defray the actual traveling and maintenance expenses of the employees while they are
rendering aid, to the extent that the City does not provide transportation, meals and housing to the
employees free of charge. The term employee, as used in this subsection, shall mean and include
paid, volunteer and auxiliary employees and emergency preparedness workers actually provided
by the other jurisdiction to aid the City.
(c) In the case of City equipment provided to and used in another jurisdiction, loss or damage
sustained and operation and maintenance expense incurred as a result of that use shall be
itemized in a claim for compensation from the other jurisdiction, which shall be made under oath by
the Chief from documentation provided by the appropriate City employees usually responsible for
such equipment. The claim shall be served by mail or otherwise upon the chief fiscal officer of the
other jurisdiction, and a copy shall be provided to the Director of Administration and Finance and
the Council Auditor. The Chief shall report to the Mayor each instance of damage, loss or expense
that is not reported to him within 60 days after it is sustained or incurred. In the case of emergency
preparedness personnel furnished by the City to another jurisdiction, the administration and
training service shall keep a record of the compensation (including compensation due to personal
injury or death) paid to public employees who are a part of the emergency preparedness personnel
so furnished and also a record of the actual traveling and maintenance expenses of all emergency
preparedness personnel so furnished, while they are rendering aid to the other jurisdiction, to the
extent that the other jurisdiction does not provide transportation, meals and housing to such
emergency preparedness personnel free of charge. The Chief shall submit an itemized statement
of these compensation, traveling and maintenance expenses to the other jurisdiction on whose
behalf they were incurred as directed by the Mayor and furnish a copy of such statement to the
Director of Administration and Finance and Council Auditor.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.209.

Sec. 674.210. Limitations upon liability.
No officer, employee or agent of the City shall be held personally liable in tort for any injuries or
damages suffered as a result of any act, event or omission of activity in the scope of his duties
under this Part, or specified by the emergency preparedness plan, or assigned or ordered by the
Mayor or under his direction, unless the officer, employee or agent acted in bad faith or with
malicious purpose or in a manner exhibiting wanton and willful disregard of human rights, safety or
property.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.210.

Sec. 674.211. Compensation.
(a) Compensation for services or for the taking or use of private property shall be owed by the
City only to the extent that:
(1) A claimant may not be deemed to have volunteered his services or property without
compensation; and
(2) The taking or use exceeds the legal responsibility of the claimant to render the services or
make the property available.
Compensation owed for personal services shall be only such as the Council may have fixed and
for which funds shall have been specifically appropriated. Compensation for private property shall
be owed only if the property was commandeered or otherwise used in coping with a disaster and
its use or destruction was ordered by the Mayor or a member of the disaster emergency forces of
the City. A person claiming compensation for the use, damage, loss or destruction of private
property or for services shall file a claim as provided in Chapter 112.

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(b) Nothing in this Section applies to or authorizes compensation for the damaging or destruction
of standing timber or other property in order to provide a firebreak or damage resulting from the
release of waters or the breach of impoundments in order to reduce pressure or other danger from
actual or threatened flood. Nothing in this Section shall be construed as authorizing compensation
to be paid beyond the amount of funds available for this compensation nor except to the extent that
the Legislature may have waived the sovereign immunity of the City.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.211.

Sec. 674.212. Liability of private persons.
A person owning or controlling real estate or other premises who voluntarily and without
compensation grants a license or privilege or otherwise permits the designation or use of the whole
or any part of the real estate or premises for the purpose of sheltering persons during an actual,
impending, mock or practice disaster, together with his successor in interest, if any, shall not be
liable for the death of or injury to any person on or about the real estate or premises during an
actual, impending, mock orpractice disaster or for loss or damage to the property of the person,
solely by reason or as a result of the license, privilege, designation or use, unless gross negligence
or willful and wanton conduct of the person owning or controlling the real estate or premises or of
his successor in interest shall be the proximate cause of the death, injury, loss or damage.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.212.

Sec. 674.213. Authority to accept services, gifts, etc.
(a) Whenever the state or federal government offers to the City services, equipment, supplies,
materials or funds, by way of gift, grant or loan, for the purpose of emergency preparedness, the
Mayor may accept the offer on behalf of the City and utilize the services, equipment, supplies,
materials or funds subject to the terms of the offer and the rules and regulations, if any, of the
agency making the offer. Funds accepted by the Mayor may be expended only after appropriation
by the Council.
(b) Whenever a person offers to the City services, equipment, supplies, materials or funds, by
way of gift, grant or loans, for the purpose of emergency preparedness, the Mayor, acting through
the Chief, may accept the offer on behalf of the City and utilize the services, equipment, supplies,
materials or funds subject to the terms of the offer. Funds accepted by the Chief may be expended
only after appropriation by the Council.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.213.

Sec. 674.214. Disaster prevention.
(a) In addition to disaster prevention measures included in the emergency preparedness plan, the
Emergency Preparedness Planning Council shall consider, on a continuing basis, steps that could
be taken to prevent or reduce the harmful consequences of disasters. At its direction and pursuant
to any other competence and authority they have, City officials and agencies charged with
responsibilities in connection with floodplain management, stream encroachment and water flow,
water conservation, fire prevention and control, air and water quality, public works, land use and
land-use planning, and construction standards shall make studies of disaster-prevention-related
matters. The Emergency Preparedness Planning Council, from time to time, shall make such
recommendations to the Council and other appropriate public and private entities as may facilitate
measures for prevention or reduction of the harmful consequences of disasters.
(b) If the Emergency Preparedness Planning Council or the Division determines, on the basis of
studies or other competent evidence, that an area of the City is susceptible to a disaster of

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catastrophic proportions without adequate warning, that existing building standards and land-use
controls in that area are inadequate and could contribute substantially to the magnitude of a
disaster and that changes in zoning or other land-use regulations or building requirements are
essential in order to prevent or reduce the harmful consequences of a disaster, the Emergency
Preparedness Planning Council, on the basis of its own determination or on the determination of
the Division, shall conduct one or more public hearings to obtain public comment on necessary
changes. If it finds, after the public hearings, that changes are essential, it shall make
recommendations to the Council and other appropriate public and private entities with jurisdiction
over the area and subject matter.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.214.

Sec. 674.215. Emergency Preparedness Division.
The Division shall:
(a) Keep persons throughout the General Services District well informed by establishing and
maintaining a comprehensive educational program that focuses on emergency preparedness; such
programs shall be responsive to identified needs and shall involve, to the extent practicable, all
aspects of the community including but not limited to the media, retailers, banks, utilities,
independent agencies of the City and other public sector and private sector entities;
(b) Keep the Emergency Preparedness Planning Council and the City Council well informed by
preparing and submitting an annual emergency preparedness report;
(c) Identify, record and update, on an annual basis, persons with special needs residing in the
General Services District and also facilitate the development and implementation of a means
designed to pick up and return such persons to designated locations;
(d) Be the central repository for all mutual aid agreements, concerning emergency preparedness,
which have been approved and authorized by the City Council;
(e) Maintain a state of readiness posture by conducting exercise programs each calendar year.
(Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4)




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PART 3. CIVIL EMERGENCY

Sec. 674.301. Preservation of public peace.
In the event of overt acts of violence or the imminent threat of violence within the City, and when
the Governor has not declared a state of emergency to exist, the Mayor is authorized, by
proclamation, to declare that a state of civil emergency exists in the City and to exercise one or
more, or all, of the emergency powers granted by this Part.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.301.

Sec. 674.302. Requirements for declaration.
Whenever the Mayor determines that there has been an act of violence or a flagrant and
substantial defiance of or resistance to a lawful exercise of public authority and that, on account
thereof, there is reason to believe that there exists a clear and present danger of a riot or other
general public disorder, widespread disobedience of the law and substantial injury to persons or
property, all of which constitute an imminent threat to public peace or order and to the general
welfare of the City or a part or parts thereof, he may declare that a state of civil emergency exists
within the City or any part or parts thereof.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.302.

Sec. 674.303. Automatic emergency measures.
Whenever the Mayor declares that a state of civil emergency exists pursuant to Section 674.302,
and as a part of the proclamation making such declaration, the following acts shall be prohibited
during the period of the civil emergency throughout the City:
(a) The sale of, or offer to sell, with or without consideration, any ammunition or gun or other
firearm of any size or description.
(b) The intentional display, after the emergency is declared, by or in any store or shop of any
ammunition or gun or other firearm of any size or description.
(c) The intentional possession in a public place of a firearm by any person, except duly authorized
law enforcement personnel or a person in military service acting in the official performance of his
duty.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.303.

Sec. 674.304. Discretionary emergency measures.
Whenever the Mayor declares that a state of civil emergency exists pursuant to Section 674.302,
he may exercise any or all of the following powers, in whole or in part, with such conditions and
limitations as he deems appropriate, which shall be in effect during the period of the civil
emergency in the area or areas for which the emergency has been declared:
(a) The establishment of curfews, including the prohibition of or restrictions on pedestrian and
vehicular movement, standing and parking, except for the provision of essential services such as
fire, police and hospital services (including the transportation of patients), utility emergency repairs
and emergency calls by physicians.
(b) The prohibition of the sale or distribution of any alcoholic beverage, with or without the
payment of a consideration therefor.
(c) The prohibition of the possession by any person in a public place of any portable container
containing any alcoholic beverage.
(d) The closing of places of public assemblage with designated exceptions.


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(e) The prohibition of the sale or other transfer of possession, with or without consideration, of
gasoline or any other flammable or combustible liquid, altogether or except by delivery into a tank
properly affixed to an operable motor-driven vehicle, bike, scooter, boat or airplane and necessary
for its propulsion.
(f) The prohibition of the possession in a public place of a portable container containing gasoline
or any other flammable or combustible liquid.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.304.

Sec. 674.305. Filing and publication.
A state of civil emergency or emergency measure declared, ordered or promulgated pursuant to
Sections 674.302 through 674.304 shall, as promptly as practicable, be filed with the Council
Secretary and delivered to appropriate news media for dissemination to the general public.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.305.

Sec. 674.306. Special meeting of Council.
Concurrently with the declaration of the state of civil emergency, the Mayor shall convene the
Council in special meeting, at which he shall report to the Council all the facts and circumstances
known to him concerning the civil emergency and his recommendations in connection therewith.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.306.

Sec. 674.307. Duration and termination of emergency.
A state of civil emergency declared pursuant to Section 674.302 shall commence upon the
declaration thereof by the Mayor and shall terminate at the end of a period 72 consecutive hours
thereafter unless, prior to the end of the period, the Mayor by proclamation or the Council by
resolution shall terminate the state of civil emergency. An extension of the 72-hour time limit must
be accomplished by request from the Mayor and the concurrence of the Council by resolution
adopted in regular or special meeting.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.307.

Sec. 674.308. Part inapplicable to Urban Services Districts.
The provisions of this Part shall not apply to, and the emergency powers herein granted may not
be exercised within, the Second, Third, Fourth or Fifth Urban Services District.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1)
Note: Former § 430.308.




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PART 4. PENALTIES

Sec. 674.401. Major violations: disaster preparedness.
A person who, knowingly and wilfully:
(a) Fails or refuses to perform a duty imposed upon him by an emergency preparedness plan or
required of him by an order issued by the Mayor or issued at the direction of the Mayor, during an
actual, impending, mock or practice disaster; or
(b) Fails or refuses to go to his assigned place of duty during an actual, impending, mock or
practice disaster or, having gone to such place of duty, to remain there until and unless relieved,
dismissed or reassigned by competent authority; or
(c) Fails or refuses to obey, observe or enforce the provisions of any order, directive or regulation
issued by the Mayor or issued at the direction of the Mayor pursuant to his emergency powers
under Section 674.207; or
(d) Fails or refuses to participate in or to perform his assigned duties as a member of an
emergency preparedness support force within or without the City, or to go outside the City as a
member of an emergency preparedness support force; or
(e) Obstructs, interferes with or prevents, or procures the obstruction, interference with or
prevention of:
(1) The enforcement, observance or execution of or compliance with any part of an emergency
preparedness plan or with an order, directive or regulation issued by the Mayor or issued at the
direction of the Mayor; or
(2) The performance of a duty or the exercise of a power by an officer, employee or agent of the
City or a emergency preparedness worker, during an actual, impending, mock or practice disaster;
Shall be guilty of a class D offense. For offenses that are of a continuing nature, each day the
offense continues shall constitute a separate offense.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.401.

Sec. 674.402. Minor violations: disaster preparedness.
A person who, during an actual, impending, mock or practice disaster:
(a) Reserved.
(b) Whether or not the emergency preparedness organization has been activated pursuant to
Section 674.203(d), solicits or attempts to persuade any member of the emergency preparedness
organization to fail or refuse:
(1) To perform his assigned duties; or
(2) To go to his assigned place of duty; or
(3) Having gone to his place of duty, to remain there until and unless relieved, dismissed or
reassigned by competent authority; or
(c) Whether or not the emergency preparedness organization has been activated pursuant to
Section 674.203(d), solicits or attempts to persuade any other person to fail or refuse:
(1) To obey, observe or enforce the provisions of or to comply with any order, directive or
regulation issued by the Mayor or issued at the direction of the Mayor or pursuant to his
emergency powers under Section 674.207; or
(2) To enforce, observe or execute or to comply with any part of an emergency preparedness
plan;
Shall be guilty of a class C offense.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.402.




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Sec. 674.403. Violations: civil emergency.
A person who, knowingly and wilfully:
(a) Fails or refuses, or procures a failure or refusal, to obey, observe or enforce the provisions of
an order or directive issued by the Mayor pursuant to his emergency powers under Section
674.303 or Section 674.304; or
(b) Obstructs, interferes with or prevents, or procures the obstruction, interference with or
prevention of:
(1) The enforcement, observance or execution of or compliance with any part of an emergency
preparedness plan or with an order, directive or regulation issued by the Mayor or issued at the
direction of the Mayor; or
(2) The performance of a duty or the exercise of a power by an officer, employee or agent of the
City or a emergency preparedness worker, during an actual, impending, mock or practice disaster;
Shall be guilty of a class D offense.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 95-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.403.

Sec. 674.404. Civil penalties; collection.
(a) In addition to any other penalty that may be imposed under this Part or by any other law, the
Mayor may assess a civil penalty, based upon findings made by him, giving due consideration to
the appropriateness of the penalty with respect to the gravity of the violation, the good faith of the
violator and the history of previous violations. A civil penalty is assessable in the following
instances:
(1) A member of the emergency preparedness organization who fails or refuses to perform a duty
imposed upon him by an emergency preparedness plan or required of him by an order issued by
the Mayor or issued at the direction of the Mayor, during an actual, impending, mock or practice
disaster, may be assessed a civil penalty not exceeding $1,000.
(2) A member of the emergency preparedness organization who fails or refuses to go to his
assigned place of duty during an actual, impending, mock or practice disaster or, having gone to
his place of duty, to remain there until and unless relieved, dismissed or reassigned by competent
authority may be assessed a civil penalty not exceeding $750.
(3) A member of the emergency preparedness organization who fails or refuses to participate in
or to perform his assigned duties as a member of an emergency preparedness support force within
or without the City, or to go outside the City as a member of an emergency preparedness support
force, during an actual, impending, mock or practice disaster, may be assessed a civil penalty not
exceeding $500.
(4) A person who fails or refuses to obey, observe or enforce the provisions of an order, directive
or regulation issued by the Mayor or issued at the direction of the Mayor pursuant to his
emergency powers under Section 674.207, Section 674.303 or Section 674.304 may be assessed
a civil penalty not exceeding $500.
(5) A member of the emergency preparedness organization who fails or refuses to obey an order
made or applicable to him by a superior member of the emergency preparedness organization,
when that part of the emergency preparedness organization to which he is assigned or reassigned
has been activated pursuant to Section 674.203(d), may be assessed a civil penalty not exceeding
$300.
(6) A member of the emergency preparedness organization who says or does anything that
brings discredit or reflects adversely upon the emergency preparedness organization or that is
calculated to humiliate, ridicule or insult the emergency preparedness organization or any other
member thereof or to cause dissension within or disruption of the emergency preparedness
organization, or the members thereof, or the emergency preparedness plan, during an actual,
impending, mock or practice disaster, may be assessed a civil penalty not exceeding $250.


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(b) A civil penalty assessed and owed under this Section shall be payable to the Tax Collector
and shall be received into the General Fund--General Services District as miscellaneous receipts
and may be collected in a civil action in the name of the City.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.404.

Sec. 674.405. Administrative discipline.
In addition to any other penalty that may be imposed under this Part or by any other law, the
members of the emergency preparedness organization are subject to administrative discipline, as
follows:
(a) Volunteer and auxiliary emergency preparedness personnel, not public employees, may be
suspended for any definite length of time, reassigned to another position in the emergency
preparedness organization, required to undergo additional or intensive training and instruction (in
addition to that generally required of all emergency preparedness personnel), delayed in or denied
advancement within the emergency preparedness organization, or dismissed from the emergency
preparedness organization (with or without disqualification to become a member of the emergency
preparedness organization at a future time). The emergency preparedness plan proposed by the
Planning Council shall contain provisions and procedures for the imposition, review and
implementation of administrative discipline upon the persons subject to this subsection, including
adequate due process in the imposition of administrative discipline and review of decisions by an
impartial administrative body or bodies.
(b) Public employees shall be administratively disciplined in the same manner as they may be
administratively disciplined for violations of personnel rules or other employment rules applicable to
the public employees, and for this purpose the provisions of the emergency preparedness plan
concerning assignment and reassignment to positions in the emergency preparedness
organization, advancement within the emergency preparedness organization, training and
experience requirements and dismissal from the emergency preparedness organization shall be
deemed to be employment rules of the appointing authority under which the public employee
usually works. When the emergency preparedness organization is activated pursuant to Section
674.203(d), and so long as the activation continues, the provisions and procedures contained in
the emergency preparedness plan for the imposition, review and implementation of administrative
discipline shall supersede any other provisions and procedures for this purpose, wherever
contained or by whatever other board, body or person administered.
(Ord. 79-1242-665, § 2; Ord. 83-591-400, § 1; Ord. 94-1272-768, § 4)
Note: Former § 430.405.




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PART 5. PROTECTIVE MEASURES AGAINST SEXUAL OFFENDERS AND SEXUAL
PREDATORS

Sec. 674.501. Temporary emergency shelters; sexual predators and offenders
notification requirements.
(a) For the purpose of this Section "temporary shelter" is defined as any public or private building
or facility which is offered to individuals and families who are homeless or who evacuate their
homes or a hotel, motel, or other place of temporary residence as a result of any storm, flood,
hurricane, tornado, explosion, fire, or other incident of any nature as a place to reside, rest, sleep,
or eat.
(b) Any person who is required by Florida law to register as a sexual predator or sexual offender
and who utilizes or intends to utilize a temporary shelter provided by any public or private entity
and established as a result of any emergency or incident or threatened emergency or incident
shall, immediately upon entering the shelter, notify the individual or individuals operating the
shelter that he or she is a registered sexual predator or sexual offender. The sexual predator or
sexual offender shall be assigned to a temporary shelter specifically designated for use by sexual
predators and sexual offenders.
(c) The Sheriff may designate a public building or a jail or other correctional facility as a temporary
shelter to be utilized by sexual predators and sexual offenders.
(d) Failure of a sexual predator or sexual offender to make notification as required in Section (b)
shall constitute a Class D offence.
(Ord. 2005-629-E, § 3)

Sec. 674.502 Sexual predators residency requirements.
(a) It is unlawful for any person who is required by Florida law to register as a sexual predator to
reside within 2,500 feet of any school, public library, day care center, park, playground, or other
place where children regularly congregate.
(b) A person residing within 2,500 feet of any school, public library, day care center, park,
playground, or other place where children regularly congregate does not commit a violation of this
Section, provided that the sexual predator is in full compliance with probation, parole, or conditional
release and does not commit another sexual offense, and was in compliance with the residency
restrictions prior to July 1, 2005, if any of the following apply:
(1) The person established the permanent residence prior to July 1, 2005.
(2) The person was a minor when he/she committed the offense and was not convicted as an
adult.
(3) The person is a minor.
(4) The school, public library or day care center within 2500 feet of the persons permanent
residence was opened after the person established the permanent residence.
(c) A person who violates subsection (a) shall be guilty of a class D offence.
(Ord. 2005-629-E, § 3)




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PART 6. NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Sec. 674.601. Findings.
The President of the United States in Homeland Security Directive 5 (HSPD), directed the
Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security to develop and administer a National Incident
Management System (hereinafter referred to as "NIMS"), which would provide a consistent
nationwide approach for federal, state, local and tribal governments to work together more
effectively and efficiently to prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from domestic incidents,
regardless of cause, size or complexity. The collective input and guidance from all federal, state,
local and tribunal homeland security partners has been, and will continue to be, vital to the
development of effective implementation and utilization of a comprehensive NIMS. It is necessary
and desirable that all federal, state, local and tribal emergency agencies and personnel coordinate
their efforts to effectively and efficiently provide the highest levels of incident management. To
facilitate the most efficient and effective incident management it is critical that federal, state, local
and tribal organizations utilize standardized terminology, standardized organizational structures,
interoperable communications, consolidated action plans, unified command structures, uniform
personnel qualification standards, uniform standards for planning, training, and exercising,
comprehensive resource management, and designated incident facilities during emergencies or
disasters. The NIMS standardized procedures for managing personnel, communications, facilities
and resources will improve the City's ability to utilize funding to enhance state and local agency
readiness, maintain first responder safety and streamline incident management processes. The
Incident Command System components of NIMS are already an integral part of various incident
management activities throughout the state and City, including current emergency management
training programs. The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks (9-11 Commission)
recommended adoption of a standardized Incident Command System.
(Ord. 2005-945-E, § 1)

Sec. 674.602. Designation.
NIMS is designated as the standard for prevention, preparation for, response to and recovery from
incidents of disasters and/or emergencies that may occur in and throughout the General Services
District.
(Ord. 2005-945-E, § 1)

Sec. 674.603. Coordinator.
(a) The Planning Council shall, from time to time, issue rules and orders for implementation of
NIMS. To the extent they are involved in NIMS activities, the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Urban
Services Districts, the Independent Agencies, the Sheriff, the Property Appraiser, the Tax
Collector, the Supervisor of Elections and the Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts shall observe
and obey all directives set out in this part as well as all rules and orders issued by the Planning
Council.
(b) The Chief shall be the NIMS Coordinator for the General Services District. To the extent they
are involved in NIMS activities, the Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Urban Services Districts, the
Independent Agencies, the Sheriff, the Property Appraiser, the Tax Collector, the Supervisor of
Elections and the Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts must coordinate all their NIMS
implementation actions with the Planning Council through the NIMS Coordinator.
(Ord. 2005-945-E, § 1)




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Sec. 674.604. NIMS Directives.
(a) The Planning Council shall develop a program to integrate NIMS, to the extent appropriate,
into the Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan.
(b) The Planning Council shall identify statutes, ordinances, rules, regulations or operating
procedures that should be repealed or amended to facilitate implementation of NIMS.
(c) By December 30, 2005, all City agencies, as well as all other entities named in Section
674.503, shall report, to the Planning Council through the NIMS Coordinator, their strategies for
use of NIMS in their respective response structures, including new employee training.
(d) City employees must complete the required NIMS training appropriate to their level of
assigned responsibilities and maintain that level of training by certification within timeframes to be
established by the federal requirements for NIMS.
(e) The NIMS Coordinator will report on the status of the implementation of NIMS at each
quarterly meeting of the Planning Council.
(Ord. 2005-945-E, § 1)




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ATTACHMENT 2: RESOLUTION/PROMULGATION LETTER




JUNE 15, 2006                                                         208

				
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