Docstoc

CLAYTON COLLEGE _ STATE UNIVERSITY

Document Sample
CLAYTON COLLEGE _ STATE UNIVERSITY Powered By Docstoc
					CLAYTON COLLEGE &

  STATE UNIVERSITY
                        Office of the Provost and

                        Vice President for Academic Affairs





  October 20, 2009


  Dr. Marci M. Middleton
  Director of Academic Program Coordination
  Office of Academic Affairs
  Board of Regents ofthe University System of Georgia
  270 Washington Street SW
  Atlanta, Georgia 30334

  Dear Dr. Middleton:

  Clayton State University is pleased to submit the formal proposal for the MS degree with major
  in Psychology. This degree is unique within the USG as a professional master's degree in applied
  psychology. Please note that we are asking an exception in the 36-hour rule. This exception is
  necessary for a professional degree and particularly one in applied psychology.

  Clayton State is adequately staffed with faculty resources to deliver this program and also has the
  other necessary facility and support resources in existence or planned. The program was
  approved by the graduate council on October 2,2009. The attached Formal Proposal provides
  information for review and approval at the System level.

  Please do not hesitate to call if there are questions you have as you make your review.


  Sincerely,




  Dr. Thomas Eaves
  Associate Provost


  cc:	        Dr. Melinda G. Spencer, Chief of Staff, USG
              Dr. Tim Hynes, Interim President, Clayton State University
              Dr. Michael Crafton, Interim Provost, Clayton State University


  CLAYTON ST;\TF': .. . 'your ullivm'it.y


  5900 North Lee Street, Morrow, Georgia 30260         PH   (770) 961-3485   FX   (770) 961-3700
  WWlN.c1aytoo,edu
  An Affirmative Action/Equal Access/Equal Opportunity Institution
                                                                Clayton State University
                                                    Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                  Page I
                    NEW PROGRAM PROPOSAL

                MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY

                           October, 2009

Institution: Clayton State University
Institutional Contact:
Date: October, 2009
College: Arts and Sciences
Department: Ps ychology
Name of Proposed Program: Master of Science in Psychology
Degree: Master of Science
Major: Psychology
Degree Inscription: Master of Science
CIP Code: 42.0101
Program Classification: Graduate
Anticipated Starting Date: Fa1l20l0




1.	 Curriculum: The entire course of study required to complete the degree program as
    well as a sample program of study that might be followed by a representative student
    in either the Applied Developmental or Clinical Tracks are detailed on the following
    pages. All courses listed and described are new courses and are not currently part of
    any degree program at Clayton State University. This curriculum is designed so that
    it can be implemented one track at a time or in two phases depending upon the
    resources that are available at the time of implementation. The degree program can
    be implemented initially with the resources of the University and the Department of
    Psychology. The administration and departmental faculty are attuned to the
    importance of providing appropriate faculty resources for a quality program with
    appropriately rigorous supervision and a faculty/student ratio that is conducive to the
    intensive training required for professional masters degree programs.
                                                                     Clayton State University
                                                         Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                       Page 2
                                NEW PROGRAM PROPOSAL

                             COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES
                           MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY
                                    Core: Required of all students
PSYC   5000, Advanced Development (3-0-3)
PSYC   5010, Ethics and Professional Identity (3-0-3)
PSYC   5020, Cultural Issues in Applied Settings (3-0-3)
PSYC   6100, Psychological Assessment I (Intelligence) (2-3-3)

                              Research Core: Required ofAll Students
PSYC 5040, Advanced Research Methods and Statistics I: Parametric Approaches and Experimental
Designs (3-0-3)
PSYC 5050, Advanced Research Methods and Statistics II: Nonparametric Approaches and Quasi­
Experimental Designs (3 -0-3)

                                  The Professional Concentration
 Applied Developmental                               Clinical
 PSYC 5210, Cognitive Development                    PSYC 5350, Advanced Psychopathology &
 (3-0-3)                                             Diagnosis
 PSYC 5220, Social and Emotional Development         (3-0-3)
 (3-0-3)                                             PSYC 5160, The Helping Relationship
 PSYC 5230, Biological Foundations of Behavior       (3-0-3)
 (3-0-3)                                             PSYC 5170, Therapeutic Interventions I
 *PSYC 5240, Agencies that Serve Children            (3-0-3)
 (3-0-3)                                             PSYC 5180, Therapeutic Interventions II
 *PSYC 5250, Children and the Courts                 (3-0-3)
 (3-0-3)                                             PSYC 6590, Clinical Practicum I
 PSYC 5260, The Family System and the Child          (0-V-3)
 (3-0-3)                                             PSYC 5200, Family & Couples Therapy
 *PSYC 5270, The Educational System and the Child (3-0-3)
 (3-0-3)                                             PSYC 6520, Psychological Assessment II
 PSYC 5280, Developmental Disorders and              (Personality)
 Psychopathology                                     (2-1-3)
 (3-0-3)                                             PSYC 5150, Group Therapy
 PSYC 6490, Internship in Applied Development I      (3-0-3)
 (0-V-3)                                             PSYC 6599, Clinical Practicum II
 PSYC 6500, Internship in Applied Development II     (0-V-3)
 (0-V-3)
*NOTE: Students will choose 2 out of 3 of these courses
                                                                 Clayton State University
                                                    Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                  Page 3
                                  The Capstone Experience
        Candidates for the M.S. in Psycholo~ have two options for de2ree completion:
Non-Thesis (6 hrs)                               Thesis (6 hrs maximum)

Working with an advisor, the student identifies an       The student develops, writes, and defends a
area of study and prepares a professional paper.         research proposal, and then completes a
                                                         research study, writes, and defends a thesis. A
                                                         faculty advisor is assigned to supervise the
                                                         student.

PSYC 6890, Professional Paper (3-0-3)                    PSYC 6995, Thesis (3-0-3)
PSYC 6899, Professional Paper Completion (1-0-1)         PSYC 6999, Thesis Completion (may be
                                                         repeated for up to 3 hours credit) (1-0-1)

Comprehensive Examination (written and oral) is          Defense of Thesis is required
required            ,




                       Sample Curriculum for Master of Science in Psychology
        The following presents a suggested model for progression through the Applied
        Developmental (ADP) and Clinical tracks. The first charts present a program model for
        full-time ADP and Clinical track students and will allow students to matriculate through
        the program after two years of full-time study. A second, part-time model is presented for
        the Applied Developmental Program; this option will allow a student to complete the
        program in a three-year time period. Students choosing to pursue the ADP degree on a
        part-time basis will be responsible for fulfilling all course prerequisites as listed in the
        full course descriptions.
                                                                      Clayton State University
                                                          Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                        Page 4


Proposed Curriculum Masters of Science in Psychology - Applied Developmental
Psychology
Required Courses (aU students)
                    Course Title                                                     Hours
PSYC    5000                Advanced· Development                                    3
PSYC    5010                Ethics and Professional Identity                         3
PSYC    5020                Cultural Issues in Applied Settings                      3
PSYC    5040                Advanced Research Methods and Statistics I:              3
                            Parametric Approaches and Experimental Designs
PSYC 5050                   Advanced Research Methods and Statistics II:             3
                            Nonparametric Approaches and Quasi-Experimental
                            Designs
PSYC 6100                   Psychological Assessment I (Intelligence)                3
                                                                                      18
Applied Development Track
                    Course Title                                                      Hours
PSYC    5210                 Cognitive Development                                    3
PSYC    5220                 Social and Emotional Development                         3
PSYC    5230                 Biological Foundations of Behavior                       3
PSYC    5260                 The Family System and the Child                          3
PSYC    5280                 Developmental Disorders and Psychopathology              3
PSYC    6490                 Internship in Applied Development I                      3
PSYC    6500                 Internship in Applied Development II                     3
PSYC    5270*                The Educational System and the Child                     3
PSYC    5240*                Agencies that Serve Children                             3
PSYC    5250*                Children and the Courts                                  3
*NOTE: Students will choose 2 out of 3 of these courses                              27

Research/Capstone
Non-Thesis - Comprehensive Examination (written and oral) is required
                     Course Title                                                     Hours
PSYC 6890                      Professional Paper                                     3
PSYC 6899                      Professional Paper Completion (may be repeated for     1-3
                               up to 3 hours credit)                                  4-6
                               Total Hours                                            49-51
OR
Thesis - Defense of Thesis is required
                         Course Title                                                 Hours
PSYC 6995                       Thesis                                                3
PSYC 6999                       Thesis Completion (may be repeated for up to 3        1-3
                                hours credit)                                         4-6
                                Total Hours                                           49-51
                                                          Clayton State University
                                              Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                            Page 5
Applied Developmental Psychology: Provided is a sample program of study that
might be followed by a representative student

                                      YEARl
                                   Term' 1 (Fall)
PSYC 5000             Advanced Development                                   3
PSYC 5040             Advanced Research Methods and Statistics I:            3
                      Parametric Approaches and Experimental Designs
PSYC 5210              Cognitive Development                                 3

                                  Term 2 (Spring)
PSYC 5050             Advanced Research Methods and Statistics II:           3
                      Nonparametric Approaches and Quasi-Experimental
                      Designs
PSYC 5240               Agencies that Serve Children                         3
PSYC 6100             Psychological Assessment I (Intelligence)              3

                                  Term 3 (Summer)
PSYC 5010             Ethics and Professional Identity                       3
PSYC 5220             Social and Emotional Development                       3

                                       YEAR 2

                                     Term 1 (Fall)

PSYC 5230              Biological Foundations of Behavior
                   3
PSYC 5250               Children and the Courts
                             3
PSYC 6490              Internship in Applied Development I
                  3

                                    Term 2 (Spring)
PSYC 5020             Cultural Issues in Applied Settings                    3
PSYC 5260 or 5270      The Family System and the Child or Educational        3
                       System...
PSYC 6500              Internship in Applied Development II                  3
PSYC 6890 or 6995     Professional Paper or Thesis                           3

                                  Term 3 (Summer)
PSYC 6899 or 6999     Professional Paper Completion or Thesis Completion     1
PSYC 5280              Developmental Disorders and Psychopathology           3


Proposed Curriculum Masters of Science in Psychology - Clinical Psychology

Required Core Courses (both tracks)
                   Course Title                                              Hours
PSYC 5000          Advanced Development                                      3
PSYC 5010          Ethics and Professional Identity                          3
PSYC 5020          Cultural Issues in Applied Settings                       3
                                                                Clayton State University
                                                Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                  Page 6

PSYC 5040
           Advanced Research Methods and Statistics I:               3

                     Parametric Approaches and Experimental Designs

PSYC 5050
           Advanced Research Methods and Statistics II:
             3

                     Nonparametric Approaches and Quasi-Experimental
                     Designs

PSYC 6100
           Psychological Assessment I (Intelligence)
                3

                                                                               18

Clinical Track
                     Course Title
                                              Hours

PSYC 5350
           Advanced Psychopathology & Diagnosis
                      3

PSYC 5160
           The Helping Relationship
                                  3

PSYC 5170
           Therapeutic Interventions I
                               3

PSYC 5180
           Therapeutic Interventions II
                              3

PSYC 6590
           Clinical Practicum I
                                      3

PSYC 5200
           Family & Couples Therapy
                                  3

PSYC 6520
           Psychological Assessment II (Personality)
                 3

PSYC 5150
           Group Therapy
                                             3

PSYC 6599
           Clinical Practicum II
                                     3

                                                                                27


Research/Capstone
Non-Thesis - Comprehensive Examination (written and oral) is required
                        Course Title                                           Hours

PSYC 6890               Professional Paper                                     3

PSYC 6899               Professional Paper Completion (may be repeated for     1-3

                        up to 3 hours credit)                                  4-6

                        Total Hours (Non-Thesis)                               49-51

                                          OR
Thesis - Defense of Thesis is required
                         Course Title                                          Hours

PSYC 6995                Thesis                                                3

PSYC 6999                Thesis Completion (may be repeated for up to 3        1-3

                         hours credit)                                         4-6

                         Total Hours (Thesis)                                  49-51




Clinical Psychology: Provided is a sample program of study that might be followed
by a representative student
                                      YEAR 1

                                    Term 1 (Fall)

PSYC 5000
            Advanced Development                                  3

PSYC 5040
            Advanced Research Methods and Statistics I:           3

                      Parametric Approaches and Experimental Designs

PSYC 5350
            Advanced Psychopathology & Diagnosis
                 3

                                                               Clayton State University
                                                   Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                 Page 7


                                   Term 2 (Spring)
PSYC 5050
             Advanced Research Methods and Statistics II:            3

                       Nonparametric Approaches and Quasi-Experimental
                       Designs
PSYC 5160
             The Helping Relationship                                3

PSYC 6100
             Psychological Assessment I (Intelligence)               3


                                   Term 3 (Summer)
PSYC 5010
             Ethics and Professional Identity
                       3

PSYC 5170
             Therapeutic Interventions I
                            3


                                        YEAR 2

                                      Term 1 (Fall)
PSYC 5180
             Therapeutic Interventions II
                            3

PSYC 6520
             Psychological Assessment II (Personality)
               3

PSYC 6590
             Clinical Practicum I
                                    3


                                     Term 2 (Spring)
PSYC   5020
           Cultural Issues in Applied Settings
                    3

PSYC   6599
           Clinical Practicum II
                                  3

PSYC   5150
           Group Therapy
                                          3

PSYC   6890 or 6995
   Professional Paper or Thesis
                           3


                               Term 3 (Summer)
PSYC 6899 or 6999
 Professional Paper Completion or Thesis Completion          1

PSYC 5200
         Family & Couples Therapy                                    3

                                                                    Clayton State University
                                                     Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                      Page 8
Of the eight institutions in the University System of Georgia that offer a Master's degree
in Psychology, none offers a Master's in Applied Developmental Psychology. The
University of Georgia offers a Masters of Art in Educational Psychology with an
emphasis in Applied Cognition and Development. This degree appears, however, to
emphasize traditional research training, stating that the goal of the program is for
graduates "to contribute to research and scholarship on schooling and student learning
using psychological principles of human development and learning." In contrast, the
proposed program is designed to provide students with strong research skills, but largely
by teaching students how to effectively use data to guide programmatic and/or policy
decisions. Moreover, the proposed program focuses on critical developmental contexts
beyond that of the educational sphere. It is one of the organizing principals of this
program that the graduates will have a deep understanding of the multitude of contexts
that impact child and adolescent development. It is anticipated that, if approved, this new
Master's of Applied Developmental Psychology will be unique within the University
System of Georgia; furthermore, it will be one of only a handful of graduate programs
across the nation with this targeted emphasis on providing strong training in both the
foundations of development and the translation of basic knowledge to real world
contexts.

The two programs that most closely mirror the proposed program are the Masters of Arts
in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology from the Lynch School of
Education at Boston College
(http://www.bc.edu/schools/lsoe/academics/graduate/map/master arts/madevelop.html)
 and the Masters of Science in Applied Developmental Psychology from the School of
Education at the University of Pittsburg
(http://www.education.pitt.edu/adp/dindex.aspx?did=107). Both of these programs
reflect a strong commitment to serving children, families, and communities and utilizing
scientific knowledge as a tool to better the lives of children, perspectives strongly
endorsed by and pursued within the Department of Psychology at Clayton State
University. The proposed program, however, offers a somewhat more rigorous course of
academic preparation (i.e. 50 versus 30 and 36 hours at Boston College and Pittsburg
University, respectively). These differences reflect first and foremost our commitment to
meticulous training of our students, and second our adherence to standards established by
the Council of Applied Master's Programs in Psychology.

As mentioned previously, eight programs in the USG offer a masters degree in
psychology; at present, five of them have a clinical or counseling track. Two of the
programs, those at UGA and Georgia State University, only offer admission to students
seeking to earn a Ph.D. The University of West Georgia offers a Master of Arts in
Psychology with a specific focus on the humanistic and transpersonal theories applied to
counseling. Augusta State University and Valdosta State University offer Masters of
Science degrees with clinical/counseling tracks. Their programs are somewhat similar to
the proposed program; however they do not require specific courses in Cultural Issues,
Couples and Family Therapy, and Group Therapy. The remaining program most similar
to the proposed program in the University System of Georgia is the Master of Science in
Community Counseling at North Georgia College & State University. This North
                                                                      Clayton State University
                                                        Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                       Page 9
      Georgia program, like the one proposed in this document, requires courses in
      Multicultural Counseling, Family Counseling, and Group Therapy.

      The proposed Clayton State program is unique in that it is designed as a terminal or
      professional masters degree with research preparation while also providing a heavily
      applied emphasis. The mission, like that of the program at North Georgia College & State
      University, is to meet community needs for mental health intervention in a multicultural
      environment. The Department of Psychology at Clayton State University is uniquely
      prepared to provide the proposed program because of the highly diverse, multicultural
      faculty and student body (among the most diverse in the Southeastern United States).

      Both of the proposed tracks include field experiences, either in the form of internships or
      clinical supervision. The Department of Psychology has a proven track record with
      student internships since all students in the Baccalaureate program are required to
      complete at least one senior internship of 150 supervised hours in the field. During
      Spring Semester, 2009, for example, a total of 64 interns have been placed throughout
      Clayton State's service area in a wide variety of sites including mental health and
      counseling centers, educational institutions, hospitals, and non-profit organizations..
      Community support for our program and our interns has been strong and will provide an
      excellent foundation as we implement graduate programming.


2. Course Descriptions for CSU's M.S. in Psychology

      PSYC 5000, Advanced Development (3-0-3) The exploration of seminal theories of
      human development, including Freud, Erikson, Piaget, Gibson, and the Information
      Processing perspective. Students will learn the distinguishing features ofthe different
      theoretical perspectives and evaluate how these theories influence practice in applied
      settings. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

      PSYC 5010, Ethics and Professional Identity (3-0-3) This course is designed to teach
      students to evaluate ethical issues related to applied professional practice in human
      services in a systematic way. Students will become familiar with professional ethics
      codes and develop an ability to apply these codes to a variety of specific problem
      situations. The course also examines ethical and legal standards, risk management, and
      professional credentialing. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

      PSYC 5020, Cultural Issues in Applied Settings (3-0-3) A focus on multicultural
      trends and characteristics of diverse groups, including how attitudes and behaviors are
      influenced by factors such as gender, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and disability.
      Students are encouraged to explore personal attitudes, stereotypes, biases, myths, and
      misconceptions about culturally diverse people and how these may impact therapeutic
      relationships. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

      PSYC 5040, Advanced Research Methods and Statistics I: Parametric Approaches
      and Experimental Designs (3-0-3) The first of a two-course sequence, this course
                                                                     Clayton State University
                                                    Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                      Page 10
focuses on the major methodological approaches utilized in clinical and developmental
research settings. Emphasis will be placed on the common parametric approaches for
evaluating group differences. Emphasis is also placed on understanding the fundamentals
of the research process including how to design, conduct, analyze, report, and critically
evaluate psychological research. Statistical computer packages will be integrated in order
to learn how to practically apply descriptive and inferential statistics to the design and
interpretation of experimental research methods. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S.
program and, PSYC 2105 and PSYC 3560 or equivalent.

PSYC 5050, Advanced Research Methods and Statistics II: Nonparametric
Approaches and Quasi-Experimental Designs (3-0-3) The second of a two-course
sequence, this course focuses on methodological strategies appropriate for use with small
sample sizes, such as permutation testing, and nested data structures such as hierarchical
linear modeling, commonly encountered in clinical and developmental settings.
Statistical computer packages will be further integrated in order to learn how to
practically apply correlation and regression statistics to the design and interpretation of
quasi-experimental and non-experimental research methods. Emphasis is placed on
students learning how to apply their mastery of research methods and statistics to
generate a formal research proposal. Pre-requisite: PSYC 5040 Advanced Research
Methods and Statistics I: Parametric Approaches and Experimental Designs.

PSYC 5350, Advanced Psychopathology and Diagnosis (3-0~3) This course is
designed to instruct students in the phenomenon of adult psychopathology and the present
diagnostic system used by the majority of mental health professionals (DSM-IV-TR). The
course will consider psychopathology from a descriptive and etiological perspective, as
well as review theoretical and research contributions to our understanding of the etiology
and maintenance of psychopathology. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program

PSYC 6100, Psychological Assessment I (Intelligence) (2-3-3) This
didactic/experiential course will review and explore various theories and procedures in
the measurement of cognitive and intellectual functioning, including I) identification of
various assessment methods and their potential use, 2) administration, scoring and
interpretation of assessment data, 3) synthesis of assessment data for the purpose of
creating a written report, and 4) ethical and legal concerns regarding assessment
procedures and report writing. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program

PSYC 6520, Psychological Assessment II (Personality) (2-3-3) This
didactic/experiential course will review and explore various theories and procedures in
the administration, scoring, interpretation, synthesis and report writing for various
projective, diagnostic, career, and personality assessments. Ethical and legal
ramifications of assessment will also be explored. Pre-requisite: PSYC 6100
Psychological Assessment I (Intelligence) and PSYC 5350 Advanced Psychopathology
and Diagnosis.

PSYC 5160, The Helping Relationship (3-0-3) A practical introduction to the skills
needed to establish and maintain a successful therapeutic relationship, as well as an
                                                                    Clayton State University
                                                     Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                    Page 11
exploration of the various interpersonal and intrapersonal issues that may need to be
addressed in such relationships. The course will include role-playing and other
experiential exercises as part of the learning process. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S.
program

PSYC 5170, Therapeutic Interventions I (3-0-3) A study of theories and techniques of
individual psychotherapy using a variety of models, including psychodynamic,
behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and integrative approaches. Emphasis is placed on
learning to discern which approaches are best suited to individual clients and problems.

PSYC 5180, Therapeutic Interventions II (3-0-3) A continuation of Therapeutic
Intervention I which presents theories and techniques of individual psychotherapy using a
variety of models, including psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and
integrative approaches. Emphasis is placed on learning to discern which approaches are
best suited to individual clients and problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 5170 Therapeutic
Interventions 1.

PSYC 5150, Group Therapy (3-0-3) An exploration of the theory and practice of group
psychotherapy. Emphasis is on learning how to develop and lead therapy groups.
Experiential exercises will be included. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program

PSYC 5200, Family and Couples Therapy (3-0-3) A focused examination of
assessment and psychotherapy with couples and families. Students will learn a variety of
theories and approaches to working with the family system. Pre-requisite: Admission to
M.S. program

PSYC 6590, Clinical Practicum I: (0-V-3) Supervised practice in psychotherapy in
mental health settings. Pre-Requisites: PSYC 5370 Therapeutic Interventions I, PSYC
5350, Advanced Psychopathology and Diagnosis, and PSYC 5160, The Helping
Relationship.

PSYC 6599, Clinical Practicum II (0-V-3) Supervised practice in psychotherapy in a
different setting or with a different client population from that experienced in PSYC
6590, Clinical Practicum 1. Pre-requisite: PSYC 6590, Clinical Practicum 1.

PSYC 5210, Cognitive Development (3-0-3) A review of theory and recent empirical
findings pertaining to cognitive and linguistic development from infancy to adolescence.
Students will review both normative and atypical patterns of development and evaluate
the relative role of genetics and environmental settings on the development of these
domains. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

PSYC 5220, Social and Emotional Development (3-0-3) An overview of theory and
recent empirical findings pertaining to social and emotional development from infancy to
adolescence. Students will review both normative and atypical patterns of development
and evaluate the relative role of genetics and environmental settings on the development
of these domains. In particular, students will evaluate literature focusing on important
                                                                Clayton State University
                                                  Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                 Page 12
contexts of social and emotional development, including family, peers, and schools. Pre­
requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

PSYC 5230 Biological Foundations of Behavior (3-0-3) An advanced overview of the
neural systems involved in the regulation of human behavior, focusing on the interactions
between the cortical, limbic, and hypothalamic systems. Topics may include
developmental neuroscience, learning and memory, behavioral disorders, stress,
aggression, and common central nervous system disorders in both children and adults. A
previous neuroscience course or courses is strongly encouraged. Pre-requisite: Admission
to M.S. program.

PSYC 5240, Agencies That Serve Children (3-0-3) An introduction to the methods and
management of public and private agencies working with children and youth. Populations
will include but not be limited to children in foster care, private group homes, juvenile
justice facilities, special education settings, and programs for speakers of other languages.
Emphasis will be on agencies and organizations in the metro Atlanta region. Pre­
requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

PSYC 5250, Children and the Courts (3-0-3) An examination of legal issues that affect
the lives of children and places them within a developmental context. The student will be
introduced to Georgia law on such issues as the role ofjuvenile court, the treatment under
law of the delinquent child, the "unruly" child (including those categorized as truants and
runaways), and the neglected or abused child. Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

PSYC 5260, The Family System and the Child (3-0-3) An exploration of child
development within the context of the family system. Theories and research in family
studies will be explored, including family structure, dynamics, and psychopathology.
Skills in family assessment, interviewing, intervention, and parent training will be taught.
Pre-requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

PSYC 5270, The Educational System and the Child (3-0-3) An ecological approach
will be used to examine the impact of educational systems on the child. The course
explores mechanisms of development based on the theories of Bronfenbrenner, Vygotsky
and Erikson to shed light on how the educational system interacts with the child's risk
factors, resilience, family environment, and early childhood experiences. Pre-requisite:
Admission to M.S. program.

PSYC 5280, Developmental Disorders and Psychopathology (3-0-3) The focus of this
course will be to explore common developmental disorders and major forms of child and
adolescent psychopathology, to evaluate current etiological models and diagnostic
standards, and to review empirical evidence on current treatment approaches. Pre­
requisite: Admission to M.S. program.

PSYC 6490, Internship in Applied Development I (1-V-3) Supervised field experience
in an agency that provides services to children and families. Students must have
                                                                    Clayton State University
                                                     Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                      Page 13
      completed a minimum of 15 hours of course work within the Applied Developmental
      Psychology Master's with a minimum GPA of 3.0 prior to enrolling in internship.

      PSYC 6500, Internship in Applied Development II (l-V-3) Supervised field
      experience in an educational setting with children. Students must have completed a
      minimum of 15 hours of course work within the Applied Developmental Psychology
      Master's with a minimum GPA of 3.0 prior to enrolling in internship.

      PSYC 6890, Professional Paper (3-0-3) Working with a faculty advisor, the student
      identifies an area of study, prepares a reading list, and writes a professional paper. Pre­
      requisite: Completion of30 hours of course work with a GPA of3.0.

      PSYC 6899, Professional Paper Completion (l-0~1) Working with a faculty advisor,
      the student completes the masters non-thesis project. May be repeated for a total of 3
      credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 6890, Professional Paper.

      PSYC 6995, Thesis (3-0-3) Working with a faculty advisor, the student develops and
      defends a research proposal and begins conducting the research. Pre-requisite: PSYC
      5040, PSYC 5050 and completion of a minimum of 30 hours of course work with a GPA
      of3.0.

      PSYC 6999, Thesis Completion (1-0-1) Working with an advisor, the student completes
      a research study, writes a thesis, and defends the thesis. Pre-requisite: PSYC 6995. May
      be repeated for up to 3 credits.

      PSYC 6990, Masters Research (1-0-1) Guided research in psychology. May be
      repeated for up to 3 credits.

3. Admissions Criteria

      Admission requirements to the School of Graduate Studies at Clayton State University
      can be found at http://graduate.clayton.edulreqdoc.htm. Additional information can be
      found in the Graduate Catalog beginning on page 27.

      (http://publications.clayton.edu/GradCatalog09-l 0-62309.pdf)


      Admission to the Master of Science in Psychology program will be based upon the
      following: a completed undergraduate degree from an accredited institution with
      undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 or better; a completed program application
      form; a statement of approximately 200 words describing the candidate's career goals and
      purpose for application to the program and track; combined scores on the Graduate
      Record Examination General Test (950 total with at least 475 on each of the Verbal and
      Quantitative Reasoning sections); three letters of recommendation; a sufficient
      undergraduate background in psychology; and, an interview with the Program Director.
      Provisional admissions status may be granted for those candidates whose grade point
      average and/or GRE scores do not meet the minimum standards for regular admission.
                                                                        Clayton State University
                                                         Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                        Page 14
       The primary semester for admission will be Fall with a limited number of admissions
       being considered in the Spring when spaces are available.

4.	 Availability of Assistantships

       A limited number of assistantships will be available for students in the M.S. program.
       Tuition waivers and stipends are among the options under consideration.


5.	 Student Learning Outcomes for the proposed program tracks:

                           Mission Statement and Learning Outcomes
                 For the Master's of Science in Psychology: Applied Developmental Track

   The Mission of the Master's program in Applied Developmental Psychology is to provide
   students with advanced knowledge in normative and atypical patterns of development and the
   critical contexts of development. Moreover, students will develop skills for assessing and
   monitoring development and devising, implementing, and evaluating programs that serve
   increasingly diverse populations of children and adolescents. The program offers a unique
   emphasis on the application of knowledge in community settings and prepares students for
   immediate employment in a range of settings including government and non-profit agencies,
   research centers, and parent education programs. The program will also prepare students who
   wish to pursue doctoral training in applied developmental psychology, developmental
   psychology, clinical psychology, and educational psychology. Graduates of the program will:

               •	 demonstrate an understanding of the major theoretical perspectives on child
                  and adolescent development and how these differing perspectives can be used
                  to develop and guide interventions and services for diverse populations of
                  children and adolescents.
               •	 understand and apply the ethical standards set forth by the American
                  Psychological Association, especially those ethical guidelines pertaining to
                  mmors.
               •	 demonstrate knowledge of the major domains of development and both the
                  biological foundations for and environmental influences on development
                  within these domains
               •	 demonstrate knowledge of the major contexts for development (e.g. family,
                  educational, community, and legal systems) as well as how programmatic and
                  policy decisions can both favorably and adversely impact the functioning of
                  these systems and the children within them
               •	 apply knowledge of methodological strategies for assessing child and
                  adolescent development and the programs that serve them
               •	 demonstrate proficiency in both written and oral communication, particularly
                  regarding the implications of research findings to relevant audiences.
                                                                   Clayton State University
                                                      Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                   Page 15
                                       Mission Statement

                        Masters of Science in Psychology: Clinical Track


   The Mission of the Masters program in Clinical Psychology is to prepare students to be
   competent, ethical practitioners of psychological services in the community. Students will
   develop skills in psychological assessment, and in a variety of therapeutic modalities,
   including individual, family, couples, and group therapy. Students will be able to apply
   knowledge from various theoretical frameworks (e.g., cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic,
   humanistic) to intervene effectively with a wide variety of psychological problems. The
   program emphasizes learning to consider the uniqueness of each individual and the influence
   of culture and ethnicity when providing services to people from diverse backgrounds.
   Students will be expected to develop self-awareness, empathy, and compassion for the people
   struggling with mental health problems. This program will prepare graduates to work in a
   broad range of mental health settings. The program will also prepare students who wish to
   pursue doctoral training in clinical or counseling psychology. Graduates ofthis program will
   be able to:

              •	 use critical thinking skills to assess mental health and implement effective
                 interventions using a variety of therapeutic modalities and theoretical
                 approaches (e.g., cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic).
              •	 understand and apply ethical standards to the provision of psychological
                 services in the community.
              •	 demonstrate knowledge and skills to intervene effectively with individuals
                 from varying cultural backgrounds.
              •	 interpret and apply research methods and statistical techniques to advance the
                 study and practice of clinical psychology.
              •	 use interpersonal and written communication effectively and professionally.

6. Administration of the Program:

      Graduate programs are administered through the School of Graduate Studies. The
      program will be housed in the Department of Psychology in the College of Arts and
      Sciences. It will be managed by a Coordinator through the Chair of the Department of
      Psychology. The Coordinator will hold graduate faculty status and be a member of the
      Graduate Council.

7.	 Waiver to Degree-Credit Hour: N/A

8. Accreditation:

      While the American Psychological Association accredits applied doctoral programs, they
      do not accredit programs at the masters level. Therefore, The Masters in Psychology
      Accreditation Council (MPAC) was formed for the purpose of accrediting applied
      masters programs. Information about MPAC can be obtained by visiting the Council
      website at http://www.mpacsite.org/home. Once it is fully implemented, the Clinical
      Track of the Master of Science in Psychology program will be submitted for accreditation
                                                                         Clayton State University
                                                            Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                          Page 16
      with MPAC and departmental faculty will be active members of the Council of Applied
      Masters Programs in Psychology (CAMPP). An overview of the accreditation standards
      can be viewed at http://www.camppsite.org/about.htm. and these standards are also
      appended to this document (See Appendix A). Currently, two institutions in Georgia are
      MPAC accredited: Augusta State University and Brenau University. This accreditation
      is important for the health and credibility of the program and will provide an extra
      measure of assurance to applicants, graduates, and employers alike.

      In addition to MPAC accreditation, the program has been designed to contain all of the
      required course elements for licensure by the Composite Board (Professional Counselors,
      Social Workers, and Marriage and Family Therapists) of the State of Georgia. These
      program and courses will be submitted for Composite Board approval so that students
      completing the Clinical Track will be eligible for licensure as a professional counselor in
      Georgia. The State University of West Georgia is an example of an institution which has
      obtained Composite Board permission for its students to sit for licensure. Required
      course elements include: Counseling Theory; Counseling Practicum/Internship; Human
      Growth and Development, Social and Cultural Foundations, The Helping Relationship;
      Group Dynamics, Processing, and Counseling; Appraisal/Evaluation of Individuals;
      Research and Evaluation; and Professional Orientation. All ofthese elements have been
      included in the curriculum for the Clinical Track of the M.S. in Psychology at Clayton
      State University.

9. Projected Enrollment for the Program:

      Demand is expected to be strong for both of these tracks. It is most likely that the initial
      emollment will be 20 for the Applied Developmental Track and 10-15 for the Clinical
      Track. Admission for the Clinical Track will be strictly limited by the number of
      Licensed Clinical faculty to provide supervision for the students in the program; we
      currently have 2 full-time Licensed Clinical faculty and one affiliated Licensed Clinical
      faculty member. The B.S. program in Psychology & Human Services is characterized by
      an innovative blend of theory, research, and application; this program has become the
      largest single major on campus and has enjoyed steady, strong growth since its
      implementation in 2002. Since its inception in Fall, 2002, approximately 424 students
      have graduated with the Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and Human Services.
      As of Spring Semester 2009, there were over 500 Psychology & Human Services majors
      at Clayton State University and the growth trajectory for the program has been strong and
      steady despite the addition of other majors at the University. The present annual
      graduation rate is over 100 students, and so there is a significant population of CSU
      graduates who have expressed interest. Appendix B illustrates the growth pattern for the
      baccalaureate pro gram.

      Each semester, student satisfaction surveys are given to the graduating seniors; these
      surveys reveal an extremely high satisfaction rate with the quality of the program with an
      overall satisfaction rating during Spring Semester, 2008 for the experience in the
      department at 4.73 out of 5.0 and the satisfaction with instruction in the program at 4.93.
      This survey data also reveals that approximately 87% of graduating seniors are interested
                                                                       Clayton State University
                                                          Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                         Page 17
      in pursuing a Masters degree, although relatively few students express a desire to enter a
      doctoral program.

      A Fall, 2008 poll ofjunior and senior Psychology and Human Services majors provided
      evidence for the viewpoint that current students eagerly support the possibility of Masters
      level programming in psychology at Clayton State University. Out of 191 Psychology
      majors polled, 177 (93%) expressed interest in a Masters in Psychology from CSU with
      137 (72%) indicating interest in a Clinical/Counseling program and 91 (48%) indicating
      interest in the Developmental option. [Note: Students could express interest on either
      program option or both].

      Finally, data provided by the Atlanta Regional Commission documents continued growth
      for the counties in the University's service area. Appendix C provides data on the growth
      experienced in the Metropolitan Atlanta Area through 2007.Strong demand is expected
      because of the size of the Baccalaureate program (See Appendix B) and the projected
      growth in the service area (See Appendix C). Enrollment in the Bachelor of Science in
      Psychology and Human Services program is 540 for Spring Semester 2009 and a survey
      conducted during Fall, 2008 indicated that over 80 percent of current students are
      interested in pursuing a masters degree at Clayton State University. The maximum
      enrollment the program (both tracks) could be expected to reach is approximately 60
      students in the next four years, but this number will be dependent upon the faculty
      resources available.

9. Faculty:

       The Department of Psychology is comprised of a highly qualified, diverse, and dedicated
       group of faculty, each of whom is an excellent teacher and professionally active scholar.
       Student evaluations of the faculty in the Department of Psychology consistently rank
       among the highest for faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences.

       Summary credentials for eleven full-time faculty in the Department of Psychology and
       three affiliated faculty are provided below. It should be noted that many of the members
       of the faculty have significant graduate hours in areas within psychology besides those of
       their specialization, including cognitive, developmental, counseling, research methods,
       and statistics. The depth of these faculty members' preparation will allow many of them
       to teach courses other than those for which they are specifically listed. The
       accompanying chart and biographical sketches provide information relative to the
       credentials, specialty and subspecialty areas, and research interests of the faculty in the
       Department of Psychology as well as the affiliated faculty.

       The University load equivalent is 12 instructional unitslhours per semester. Graduate
       courses are weighted 1.5 times undergraduate for instructional load considerations; six
       graduate hours carries a load equivalent of nine undergraduate hours. Each faculty
       member will be expected to teach two to three courses in the masters curriculum each
       academic year.
                                                                    Clayton State University
                                                       Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                     Page 18
    The Department Chair currently teaches one lecture-based course each fall/spring term
    and supervises undergraduate students in practicum/intemship settings. The load
    differential is expected to remain 50% administrative and 50% instruction
    (classroom/practicum). A faculty member will be named as graduate program
    Coordinator. The Coordinator will have a reduced course assignment.


     Faculty           Rank        Highest     Degrees         Academic Discipline(s)    Current
      Name                         Degree      Earned           for Doctoral Degree      Workload
     Bridges,        Assistant      Ph.D.    BA,MS, PhD        Educational Psychology      4/4
       Eric          Professor
     Daddona,        Assistant      Ph.D.     BA, M.Ed.        Counseling Psychology        1/1
      Mark           Professor                  PhD
     Director,
       CAS
     Deckner,         Assistant     Ph.D.    BS,Med,MA,           Developmental            4/4
     Deborah          Professor                  PhD                Psychology
     Deering,         Professor     Ph.D.     BSN,MSN           *Clinical Psychology       4/4
     Catherine      Georgia Lie.                (Child
                    #PSYOO1607               Psychiatric) ,
                                                 PhD
     Gannon,         Associate      Ph.D.      BA,PhD          Counseling Psychology       4/4
       Erica         Professor
     Goldman,        Assistant      Ph.D,     BA,MS,PhD          Social Psychology         4/4
       Brian         Professor
     Harrison,       Professor      Ph.D.       BA,MA,             Psychotherapy/          4/4
      Sandra                                     PhD              Interdisciplinary
     Maddox,          Assistant     Ph.D.       BA,PhD          *Clinical-Community        4/4
      Samuel          Professor                                      Psychology
                    Georgia Lie.
                    #PSYOO2983

     McCarty,        Professor,     Ph.D,     BA, M.Ed.        Educational Psychology:     2/2
      Donna                                   (Counseling)       CognitivelDevelop-
    Dept. Head                                    PhD               mental focus
      Miller,        Associate      Ph.D.       BS,BA              Psychobiology            3/3
    Antoinette       Professor               Equivalent, MS,
                                                  PhD
       Norman,       Associate      Ph.D.     BS,MS,PhD        Counseling Psychology       4/4
         Mario       Professor
        Walley-      Assistant      Ph.D.    BA,MA,PhD           Clinical Psychology       4/4
          Jean,      Professor
        Celeste
       Affiliated
        Faculty
         Smith,     Georgia Lie.    Ph.D.    BA,MA,PhD          *Clinical Psychology
       Christine    #PSYOO3l84
         Dean,       Nationally     Ph.D.     BS,MS, PhD       Counseling Psychology
-   ..
        Jennifer      Certified
         Hayes,                     Ph.D.     BA, M.Ed.              Counseling
       Angelyn                                  PhD
    * Currently a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in the State a/Georgia
                                                               Clayton State University
                                                   Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                Page 19


                                 Biographical Sketches

                               Primary Masters' Faculty


Eric M. Bridges, Assistant Professor of Psychology (BA, Georgia State University,
1993; MS, Georgia State University, 1997; PhD, University of Georgia, 2004). Dr.
Bridges teaches classes in educational psychology, psychology ofthe African American
experience, human development, social psychology and general psychology. His research
interests include coping strategies of African Americans, multicultural education, gifted
education and health psychology. Dr. Bridges is a member of the American
Psychological Society and the National Association of African American Studies.

Deborah F. Deckner, Assistant Professor of Psychology (BS, Vanderbilt University,
1991; MEd, Vanderbilt University, 1995 MA, Georgia State University, 2000; PhD,
Georgia State University, 2002). Currently, Dr. Deckner teaches a range of introductory
and upper division undergraduate courses including Introduction to Human Development,
Infancy, Adolescent Psychology, and Psychology Research Methods and anticipates
rotating the responsibility for teaching several ofthe new graduate courses, including
Advanced Development, Cognitive Development, Social and Emotional Development,
Developmental Disorders and Psychopathology, and Advanced Research Methods I and
II. She has numerous publications including peer reviewed journal articles and book
chapters on typical and atypical patterns of communication development in young
children and actively mentors student research through the use of public release data sets.
Dr. Deckner is also an active member of the International Society for Infant Studies and
the Society for Research in Child Development. Dr. Deckner recently served as a
reviewer for the Developmental Disabilities: Biological, Cognitive, Social, Emotional,
and Personality Processes panel for the Spring 2009 biennial conference of the Society
for Research in Child Development and has recent publications in Journal ofAutism and
Developmental Disorders, Journal ofApplied Developmental Psychology, Merrill­
Palmer Quarterly, and Child Development.

Catherine Gray Deering, Professor of Psychology (BSN, Duke University, 1978;
MSN, Yale University, 1980; PhD University of Rhode Island, 1991). Dr. Deering has 30
years of clinical experience working with children, adolescents, and adults in a wide
variety of mental health settings. She has taught graduate courses in child and adolescent
psychopathology, child psychotherapy, and family therapy in the Masters Degree
Program in Child Psychiatric Nursing at Yale University. At Clayton State, she teaches
developmental psychology, abnormal psychology, theories of personality, health
psychology, and crisis intervention. She has over 30 publications, including many
journal articles and book chapters on child and adolescent psychiatric disorders,
psychotherapy, therapeutic communication, clinical supervision, and teaching. She is also
an Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Emory
University School of Medicine, providing psychotherapy supervision for psychiatry
residents, pre-doctoral interns, and postdoctoral fellows in clinical psychology.
                                                                   Clayton State University
                                                    Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                   Page 20
Erica J. Gannon, Associate Professor of Psychology (BA, University of Georgia, 1996;
PhD, Auburn University, 2002). Dr. Gannon teaches a variety of both lower- and upper­
division courses including applied psychology, therapeutic interventions, group
dynamics, and advanced psychoanalytic theories. Her research interests are in the area of
teaching of psychology, including an interest in active learning and in teaching writing in
the psychology curriculum.

Brian M. Goldman, Assistant Professor of Psychology (BA State University of New
York, College at Oneonta, 1995; MS, University of Georgia, 2001; PhD, University of
Georgia, 2004). Dr. Goldman teaches various lower and upper division courses, including
introduction to human development, psychology of adjustment, statistics for psychology,
research methods- psychology, social psychology, and special topics in psychology. His
research focuses on authenticity, self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, and well-being.
In addition to published empirical research journal articles in Psychological Science,
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Selfand Identity, Aggressive Behavior, and
Annals ofthe American Psychotherapy Association, he has published multiple book
chapters in works such as Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Self-Esteem:
h'iUes and Answers, and Handbook ofSelfand Identity. He has presented his research
regularly at a number of national and regional conferences and is an active member of the
Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Sandra M. Harrison, Professor of Psychology (BA, Mercer University, 1968; MA,
Indiana University, 1974; PhD, Emory University, 1987). Dr. Harrison teaches courses
addressing human services in the United States, in international/multicultural contexts,
and related to asset-based community development. She is currently on the Advisory
Board of United Way Clayton, the Executive Board of the Clayton Collaborative
Authority, and the Executive Committee of the Archway Clayton Project. She is a
graduate of the Leadership Clayton program and has long-standing relationships with the
Clayton County Juvenile Court, the Clayton County Department of Family and Children
Services, and the Clayton County Public Schools. Dr. Harrison is a member of the
National Organization for Human Services and the Southeastern Psychological
Association.

Samuel J. Maddox, Assistant Professor of Psychology (BA, Morehouse, 1997; PhD,
University of South Carolina, 2005) Through internships with the Marcus Institute, post­
doctoral training with Emory University School of Medicine and independent private
practice as a licensed psychologist, Dr. Maddox has extensive experience working with
families of children with a variety of developmental, behavioral, emotional and academic
difficulties. Dr. Maddox teaches courses ranging from introductory psychology to
abnormal child psychology, testing and measurement, program evaluation, and forensic
psychology. Consistent with his publication of the journal article of School Bonding in
Children and Adolescents, Dr. Maddox's research interest focuses upon contextual
factors that impact children's development.

Donna Wood McCarty, Professor of Psychology (BA, University of Georgia, 1976;
M.Ed., University of Georgia, 1978; Ph.D. Educational Psychology, Georgia State
                                                                   Clayton State University
                                                     Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                    Page 21
University, 1990). Dr. McCarty has taught a variety of courses including general
psychology and human development, learning and behavior, applied psychology,
educational psychology, and conflict resolution/mediation. She is a certified mediator
and has taught the required diversity maturity component of mediation certification
training. With a particular interest in cognition and memory, her research interests
include the impact of belief systems on retention and retrieval processes in memory. She
has also become interested in the use of qualitative research methodologies to guide
planning and decision-making in areas such as faculty development, the impact of
instructional technology on the teaching/learning process, and the use of conflict
resolution strategies to enhance academic leadership effectiveness. Dr. McCarty has
authored articles and book chapters, and has presented nationally and internationally on
these, and related, topics. She serves as Chair of the Department of Psychology at
Clayton State University.

Antoinette R. Miller, Associate Professor of Psychology (BS, BA Equivalent, Duke
University, 1994; MS, Northwestern University, 1996, PhD, Northwestern University,
1999). Dr. Miller teaches a variety of courses, including introductory courses in general
psychology and human growth and development, and upper-division courses in
abnormal, cognitive, and physiological psychology, and cognitive neuroscience. She has
published several research articles in psychophysiology and a variety of case-based
instructional materials. She is an avid practitioner of problem-based learning, and her
research interests include problem-based learning's effectiveness, universal design for
instruction, and memory distortion. Dr. Miller currently serves as Coordinator for
Clayton State's Department of Psychology.

Mario V. Norman, Associate Professor of Psychology (BS, University of Mississippi,
1994; MS, Tennessee State University, 1997; PhD, Tennessee State University, 2001).
Dr. Norman currently teaches a variety of courses, including introductory courses in
general psychology and psychology of adjustment, and upper-division courses in social
psychology, cross-cultural psychology, and applied ethics for the helping profession. He
has prior experience of teaching primarily in a graduate program where he taught an array
of classes, such as counseling theories, human development, social and diversity, and
ethics. He perceives professorship in a multicultural context, which is important in his
research interests and his style of teaching. His research interests include racial identity,
resilience, stress, and multiculturalism.

Dr. J. Celeste Walley-Jean, Assistant Professor of Psychology (BA Spelman College,
1995;MA University of Southern Mississippi, 1998; PhD University of Southern
Mississippi, 2002) Dr. Walley-Jean has clinical experience working with women, men,
and adolescents who have experienced violence in their relationships. Dr. Walley-Jean
teaches courses in abnormal psychology/psychopathology, social psychology,
psychology and gender, and research design and implementation Her area of research
investigates women's use and experience of violence in their relationships, especially
African American college women's interpersonal aggression. She has had two
manuscripts recently accepted concerning African American college women's use of
interpersonal aggression and perceptions of African American women's anger.
                                                                      Clayton State University
                                                          Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                       Page 22



10. Fiscal, Facilities, Enrollment Impact, and Estimated Budget

      As mentioned previously, enrollment projections are based upon three primary factors:
      the success of the Bachelor of Science program in Psychology & Human Services, survey
      results indicating a strong interest in masters programs in psychology at Clayton State
      University, and the growth of the counties in the service area. Based upon all of these
      data, it is anticipated that demand for the program will be strong. The B.S. in Psychology
      & Human Services has typically maintained a part-time faculty usage rate of
      approximately 14% each semester; while it is clear that this percentage will increase as a
      result of the implementation ofthe M.S. in Psychology program, the initial
      implementation has been planned to use existing institutional resources for start-up and
      can be implemented by the current, highly qualified faculty members of the Department
      of Psychology and the affiliated faculty. The faculty and administration at Clayton State
      are committed to maintaining the quality of the both the current undergraduate program
      and the proposed graduate program. The institution will not submit a request for new
      funds as part of this budget request.

      Clayton State is also fortunate to have a group of administrative staff on campus with
      appropriate graduate preparation in psychology to assist in teaching lower division
      courses in the baccalaureate curriculum as well as a licensed, doctoral level clinician on
      the Counseling Center staff. In addition to the existing full-time psychology faculty and
      administrative staff with appropriate credentials, Clayton State's proximity to Atlanta and
      the networks established by the faculty ensure that excellent adjunct faculty can be
      identified to supplement instruction during the initial semesters of implementation.
      Additional faculty will be needed and added as the program grows. Program revenues are
      anticipated to be sufficient to fund additional faculty positions by the beginning of the
      third year.

      Existing facilities will be adequate for the early implementation of this degree. A
      laboratory facility is needed for full support of both programs. The University is
      committed to providing functional and well-equipped laboratory space for this program.
      Space in the former Business and Health Sciences building has been made available
      through the movement of faculty and administration into the new School of Business
      Building and the Technology Building. A design for renovation of the space is in the
      final phases of development and will include sound-proofed, secure spaces for child
      observations, clinical interviews, group supervision, offices, data entry and analysis, and
      dedicated storage of client files/testing materials. One-way mirrors, recording/playback
      equipment, and other features essential to the teaching, supervision, and research
      activities of students and faculty will be provided in this laboratory space.

       In summary, an examination of data on the growth ofthe baccalaureate program, surveys·
       of student interest in graduate programs at CSU, and the growth of the counties in the
       Metropolitan Area suggest that there will be a strong response to the proposed graduate
                                                                   Clayton State University
                                                      Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                     Page 23
program. It is anticipated that there will be a larger number of applicants for the first
years of implementation than can be accommodated given the existing faculty and
resources. The proposed budget reflects a careful analysis of the number of students who
can be admitted if we are to foster an academically excellent terminal masters program
while maintaining the quality of the highly successful bachelor's degree program.
                                                                              Clayton State University
                                                                  Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                               Page 24
                                                         First Year                      Second Year                                        Third Year                                          Fourth Year
                                                         FY 2009                         FY 2010                                            FY 2011                                             FY 2012
I. ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS                                         ..........',.           ....       .............,.........
                                                                                                                  .                        ...,.
                                                                                                                                                         ....        j
                                                                                                                                                                                      .., \ ....
                                                                                                                                                                                           ..




Student Majors
Shifted from other programs                              5                               10                                                 15                                                  20
New to the institution                                   20                              30                                                 45                                                  50
Total Majors                                             25                              40                                                 60                                                  70

Course Sections Satisfying Program Requirements         1"/.,.\",., """,'"          I"".";'. ""':""                       ••   ,""""".'j " ',.","'",.,j                                 1/ . . , " ' : '
Previously existing                                      3                               11                                                 24                                                  31
New                                                      8                               9                                                  7                                                   0
Total Program Course Sections                            11                              20                                                 31                                                  31

Credit Hours Generated by Those Courses                 I , ':"'... / '              /           ' .......   :., .. ':,
                                                                                                                               ,',         .,           .."".             "        "".', .'   .....      •




Existing enrollments                                     0                               600                                                 1100                                               1300
New enrollments                                          600                             600                                                 630                                                840
Total Credit Hours                                       600                             1200                                                1730                                               2140

DEGREES AWARDED                                                                          1                                                  18                                                  25
                                                         Year 2                          Year 3                                             Year 4                                              Year 5


II. EXPENDITURES                                         EFT Dollars                     EFT Dollars                                        EFT Dollars                                         EFT Dollars
Personnel- reassigned or existing positions               "",,",               ."        "'\         ..., " :                              ..)/           ,,',,/,: ;.,\,                                          ""." ...

Faculty                                                  $65,000                         $65,000                                             $67,000                                            $68,000
Part-time Faculty                                        $0                              $0                                                  $0                                                 $0
Graduate Assistants                                      $0                              $0                                                  $0                                                 $0
Administrators                                           $0                              $30,000                                             $30,000                                            $30,000
Support Staff                                            $10,000                         $10,000                                             $10,000                                            $10,000
Fringe Benefits                                          $21,000                         $29,400                                             $29,960                                            $30,240
Other Personnel Costs
Total Existing Personnel Costs                           $96,000                         $134,400                                            $136,960                                           $138,240

EXPENDITURES (Continued)
Personnel- new positions                                      ;          '.,             .•
                                                          ..."."",." .... 1··••• '.• ' . \ " . ' ,... ",'.
                                                                                                 ,           ...' ,.,.",.             )
                                                                                                                                            \)
                                                                                                                                             '."".,,:
                                                                                                                                                         .'.,.,     "", ....


                                                                                                                                                                  j",.i ', '.".
                                                                                                                                                                               ,     ..•         '.
                                                                                                                                                                                                ..''',') ',: '.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         .,
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     ' .... '

Faculty (1 3ra yr; 14th yr)                               $0                             $0                                                  $60,000                                            $120,000
Part-time Faculty (replacement sections for graduate      $27,500                        $30,000                                             $40,000                                            $40,000
assignment)
Graduate Assistants                                       $0                             $10,000                                             $15,000                                            $20,000
Administrators                                            $0                             $25,000                                             $28,000                                            $30,000
Support Staff                                             $0                             $12,000                                             $13,000                                            $15,000
Fringe Benefits                                           $2,750                         $13,360                                             $32,280                                            $50,200
Other personnel costs                                     $0                             $0
Total New Personnel Costs                                 $30,250                        $90,360                                             $188,280                                           $275,200

Start-up Costs (one-time expenses)
Library/learning resources
                                                              ,ii.;.; ••'
                                                          $5,000
                                                                                    .".....
                                                                                         $0
                                                                                                                                 ..   .:
                                                                                                                                             $0
                                                                                                                                                           ,)'                         i
                                                                                                                                                                                                $0
                                                                                                                                                                                                     .'.,.'             ..

Equipment                                                 $0                             $0                                                  $0                                                 $0
Assessment/Testing Materials                              $15,000                        $0                                                  $0                                                 $0

Physical Facilities: construction or major renovation     $10,000
Total One-time Costs                                      $30,000
                                                                                                                 Clayton State University
                                                                                                     Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                                                                  Page 25
Operating Costs (recurring costs - base budget)                                       ,       ....   ',':".: .......   :   "
                                                                                                                               .:'   ... ".'
                                                                                                                                     .   "   ,':'           ./   ,1/......,..
Supp1ies/Expenses                                                                         $15,000                              $10,000    $15,000                          $15,000
Travel                                                                                    $1,000                               $2,000                $4,000                $5,000
Equipment                                                                                 $4,000                               $0                    $0                    $0
                                                                                                                                                                                             -
Library/1eaming resources                                                                 $2,000                               $2,000                $4,000                $4,000
Liability Insurance                                                                       $4,000                               $4,000                $4,000                $5,000
Total Recurring Costs                                                                     $26,000                              $18,000               $27,000               $29,000

GRAND TOTAL COSTS                                                                         $182,250                             $242,760              $352,240              $442,440
                                                                                                                                                    I : ' i . ':' I . , .
                                                                                                                               ~
    i··'.···.,'      ..."....:......   i"· . . ,.   .' ..... .....:, .:: . \ "':"ii":i:i~i'\ii'                                                                                        "
              ."',                       ,..'.'"    ',....: . ' : ' , · · i " " i i i : : i ' \ ' . , i                                             I:'i,' ,':: . ,              '   .....


                                                                                      ::,.:


                                                                                     ........
III. REVENUE SOURCES                                                                                     :":' ...... .. '   ,.,:'       , ·.......... i
              .



Source of Funds                                                                           : : , i \ i · : · i i . . i ' \ ' , ...... ·::·'·i·.:···               i:        ...




Reallocation of existing funds
New student workload                                                                                                                                 $0                    $0
New Tuition - ($170/SCH; $175/SCH)                                                        $102,000                             $204,000              $302,750              $374,500
Federal funds
Other grants
Student fees                                                                              $30,000                              $60,000               $90,000               $90,000
Other                                                                                     $0
New state allocation requested for budget hearing                                         $0

Nature of Funds
Base budget                                                                               $112,000                             $264,000              $317,500              $376,000
One-time funds                                                                            $71,000

GRAND TOTAL REVENUES                                                                      $183,000                             $264,000              $392,750              $464,500
                                                                  Clayton State University
                                                      Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                                   Page 26

Facilities Information for New Academic Programs

Proposed Location for the Program:                _

Floor area required for the program (gross and net square feet):          500 s9 ft

Type of spaces required:
      •	 No. of classrooms
      •	 No. oflabs                       I (Includes a child observation room, a group
           supervision room, a data entry/analysis room, a clinical interview office, 2
           secure storage areas and office spaces)
       •	 No. of offices             _ _.:=.2      _
       •	 Other spaces



Place an "X" beside the appropriate selection:

               Existing facility will be used as is (Area s.f.):

   X           Existing facility will require modification (Area s.f.):

               Projected renovation cost: $ I0,000

               Estimated relocation cost:

               Total funding required: $ I0,000

               Source of Funding: Base Budget



               Construction of new facilities will be required (Area s.f.):

               Estimated construction cost:

               Estimated total project cost:

               Proposed source of funding:



List any infrastructure impacts that the program will have (i.e., parking, power, HVAC,
etc.) and indicated estimated cost and source of funding.

Other comments:


Note: A system Facilities Project Manager may contact you with further questions
separate from the review ofthe new academic program.
                                                            Clayton State University
                                                Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                             Page 27
Appendix A
                              CAMPP Standards


    ( I))                        General Standards of Education and Training

                              CURRICULUM STANDARDS FOR APPLIED
                              MASTER'S PROGRAMS
 Council of Applied Master's Applied master's degree programs in psychology
    Programs in Psychology    should meet the following minimum standards:
      www.camppsite.org       I. The program should be identifiable as a psychology
                              program. This is to be defined primarily in terms of
  •	 Mission Statement        the disciplinary affiliations of those who teach in and
  •   Request Membership      administer the program.
      Information             II. The program must have a mission statement which
  •	  General Standards of    guides the structure and content of the curriculum.
      Education and Training  The mission statement should reflect a commitment
  •	  By-Laws                 to the CAMPP model of practitioners who bring
  •	 Members of the Executive scholarship and reflection to their work, and an
      Committee               understanding of diversity in clientele, methodology
  •	  How to register for the and application.
      CAMP Listserv           III. The program and its curriculum should have a
  • CAMPP Newsletter          coherent organization and structure that reflects its
  •	 Annual Report            mission statement.
  •	  National Conferences    IV. The program should be the equivalent of two
  • Update Program Listing academic years of full time study. This would
                              normally include 40-50 semester hours, or the
                              equivalent, of program requirements.
                              V. Typically, the program will include evidence of
                              graduate level education and training in the following
                              areas:
                              A. A base of general/theoretical psychology to
                              include the following:
                               1) Biological bases of behavior to the degree that it is
                              appropriate for the sub-discipline.
                              2) Acquired or learned bases of behavior
                              3) Social!cultural/systemic bases of behavior
                              4) Individual or unique bases of behavior
                              B. Understanding of methodology used to investigate
                               questions and acquire knowledge in the discipline.
                              This could include study in research design and/or
                               methodology, statistics or critical thinking and
                               scientific inquiry. At a minimum, there should be one
                               course in research methods and/or statistics as
                               applied to psychological questions.
                               Clayton State University
                 Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                 Page 28
C. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY
1) Coursework in the theory, history, and applications
of psychological principles and theories appropriate
to the sub-discipline.
2) Significant supervised experience appropriate to
the discipline
-For clinical/counseling programs, it is recommended
that a program require a minimum of 700 hours
supervised experiences of which 40% is direct client
contact. Programs not meeting this recommendation
need to provide additional documentation of
significant supervised experience.
- Appropriate onsite supervisor: For
clinical/counseling programs, on site supervisors
should have at least a master's degree in a mental
health field (i.e., psychology, mental health
counseling, social work, marriage and family
therapy) and at least two years post-masters
experience. They should possess credentials
appropriate to state requirements (licensure or
certification) where required.
-Supervision ratios and faculty compensation: When
individual supervision is provided by program
faculty, supervision of five students is considered
equivalent to the teaching of one 3-student hour
course. Group supervision should be considered a
teaching activity and receive teaching credit
equivalent to a didactic course.
3) Ethical and professional standards
4) Sensitivity to social and cultural diversity,
resulting in appropriate assessment and intervention
strategies and other professional behaviors
5) Teaching of assessment relevant to goals of the
training program (e.g., interviewing techniques,
program evaluation)
VI. Entrance requirements for the applied master s
program in psychology should reflect the
responsibility that the program has to the public.
Efforts should be made to ensure that students have
the intellectual and personal capabilities required to
perform as competent professionals in the sub­
discipline.
VII. Programs will demonstrate that appropriate
procedures are used to assess student competencies
and professional behavior consistent with each
programs mission statement and goals prior to the
                               Clayton State University
                Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                               Page 29
Completion of the program.
VIII. The program will have a sufficient number of
appropriately trained faculty to accommodate the
labor-intensive nature ofteaching the Skills of
applied psychology.
                                                                 Clayton State University

                                                     Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology

                                                                                  Page 30

                                    Appendix B
                      B.S. Degree Growth at CSU

                           Psychology Majors Fall 2002 • 2008



600


500


400


300


200


100


    o                                            ---,----,----,-----(
         Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005 Fall 2006 Fall 2007 Fall 2008




                     --------------------

                           Psychology Graduates FY 2004 ·2008

               /1----------------------,.-'---.---'---'----,

      120[;/I

      100        l
                !
               /-i--,----­
        80 Y    I
                !
               )----­
                 I
        60


        40     1 !


        20



               2003 • 04     2004 - 05   2005 - 06   2006 - 07   2007 - 08

L
                                                         Clayton State University
                                             Program Proposal, M.S. in Psychology
                                                                          Page 31
                                Appendix C
                    Growth Statistics for Service Area


 2007 Population by County and the City of Atlanta


                                                          2003             2007
                    1980      1990      2000              ARC              ARC
                  Census    Census    Census         Estimate           Estimate
Atlanta Region    1,896,182 2,557,800 3,429,379            3,669,300    4.,029,400
Cherokee             51,699    91,000   141,903              164,100     204,363
Clayton             150,357   184,100   236,517              253,500     272,217
Cobb                297,718   453,400   607,751              630,600     691,905
DeKalb              483,024   553,800   665,865              691,300     737J)93
Douglas              54,573    71,700    92,174              101,900     124,495
Fayette              29,043    62,800    91,263               98,400     106,144
Fulton              589,904   670,800   816,006              850,200     992,137
Gwinnett            166,808   356,500   588,448              658,200     776,380
Henry                36,309    59,200   119,341              146,400     186.1)37
Rockdale             36,747    54,500    70,111               74,700      82,052

City of Atlanta     424,922     415,200    416,474           432,900     464.200
 in DeKalb           37,183      35,300     29,775            31,900
 in Fulton          387,739     379,900    386,699           401,000
Marci M. Middleton

From:                       Tom Eaves [TomEaves@mail.clayton.edu]
Sent:                       Tuesday, October 20,20099:52 AM
To:                         Marci M. Middleton
Subject:                    Psychology questions
Attachments:                Response to the Office of Academic Programs July 9 Draft DWM.doc


Marci,

I am attaching responses to those "lingering" questions regarding the psychology proposal. We believe that our
responses will meet concerns.

Dr. Tom Eaves
Associate Provost
Clayton State University
678-466-4100
215 University Center
TomEaves@claytonstate.edu




                                                           1
                      Response to the Office of Academic Programs·

                            Master of Science in Psychology

                                Clayton State University

                                      July 9, 2009


Issue 1: In terms of the licensure of students, please describe requisite postgraduate
training and/or experience that will be required for students to sit for the licensed
practical counselor exam. What timeframe is required for supervised practice?

Although requirements vary somewhat from state to state, in Georgia the licensure of
professional counselors is governed by the Composite Board, which is comprised of
Professional Counselors, Social Workers, and Marriage and Family Therapists. The rules
can be viewed at http://rules.sos.state.ga.us/docs/135/5/02.pdf and are also attached as a
Word document for convenience. In essence, the rules state that an applicant for
licensure who holds a master's degree in psychology must meet the following
requirements for licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor:

      •	 A master's degree in a program of applied psychology from an accredited

         institution

      •	 At least three years of post master's directed experience under supervision in the
         practice of Professional Counseling plus at least 300 hours in a supervised
         counseling or applied psychology practicum or internship site.

The Clinical track of Clayton State University's proposed Master of Science in
Psychology will provide the appropriate master's degree for licensure. Furthermore, the
graduate degree program will require 300 hours of supervised counseling experience as a
key component of the program. This requirement is also consistent with those of the
Masters in Psychology Accreditation Council (MPAC), the accreditation the program
faculty intend to pursue. The M.S. in Psychology has been carefully designed to fulfill all
requirements for licensure by the Composite Board of the State of Georgia as well as
accreditation by MPAC.

Issue 2: What agencies has Clayton State University approached concerning
opportunities for supervised practice and the possible employment of graduates?

The existing Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Human Services program requires at
least one internship and allows for a second optional internship (each requiring 150 hours
in the field). As a result of this history of experience with internships, the program
faculty have already established numerous contacts and relationships for site supervision
in the Metropolitan Atlanta Area. Between 30 and 60 B.S. interns currently gain
experience in the field each semester in mental health facilities (public and private),
community organizations, and governmental agencies. These Bachelor's level internship
students have received consistently positive evaluations from their site supervisors and
have been quite successful in securing employment; in fact, on several occasions our B.S.
 .	                                                                      .

students have been accepted as interns in settings that normally only take Master's level
students.
Based on their previous experiences with our Bachelor's level students, the community
agencies and organizations we have approached have reacted very positively to the
prospect of Master of Science interns from Clayton State University. For example, the
Youth Empowerment Project, the Frazer Center, the Clayton County Mental Health
Center, the Marcus Autism Center, Riverwoods Psychiatric Center, and the Clayton State
University Office of Counseling Services have all indicated a willingness to provide field
settings and/or supervise students from a Master of Science in Psychology program at
CSU. In addition to the Licensed Counselors, Social Workers, and Marriage and Family
Therapists in these field settings, the Clinical Psychology faculty and Professional
Counseling staff from Clayton State University will also be able to provide appropriate
supervision. We are fortunate that our long-established relationships with organizations
across our community have made identifying and securing practicum sites for potential
Master's students a natural progression rather than a new endeavor.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:9
posted:9/26/2012
language:Unknown
pages:35