Docstoc

Blood Products Self-sufficiency

Document Sample
Blood Products Self-sufficiency Powered By Docstoc
					            29th July 2002 vCJD: Blood Products


Baroness Masham of Ilton asked Her Majesty's Government:



 In view of the Committee on Safety of Medicines's decision
     and guidance issued in 1998 not to recommend the use of
     United Kingdom-sourced plasma in the manufacture of
     blood derivative products due to the unknown and
     theoretical risk of vCJD, why 50–70,000 patients per year
     are still being treated with transfusion plasma derived from
     United Kingdom donors, and[HL5083]
 Why their ongoing consideration of ways to improve the
     safety of transfusion plasma administered by the National
     Health Service has not been referred to the National
     Institute for Clinical Excellence for independent and
     evidence-based appraisal of the available plasmas; and
     whether they plan to do so.[HL5082]




Lord Hunt of Kings Heath: There is no evidence that
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease or variant CJD has ever been
transmitted to patients through blood or blood products. Since
1998 the Government have acted on expert advice from the
Committee on Safety of Medicines to minimise the unknown
risk to patients of vCJD by sourcing plasma for the manufacture
of licensed blood products from the United States and Germany.

The United Kingdom Expert Committee on the Microbiological
Safety of Blood and Tissues for Transplantation (MSBT) is
actively reviewing other possible ways in which the unknown
risk from vCJD in blood might be reduced even further. This
includes the importation of transfusion plasma known as fresh
frozen plasma (FFP) (used in managing patients with severe
burns, massive blood loss and supporting intensive care unit
patients); the possible exclusion of people who have received
blood transfusions from giving blood and work on reducing the
plasma component of blood platelets. The review involves
detailed risk assessments about the possible impact of

29 Jul 2002 : Column WA141

such measures on secondary transmission of vCJD and the
impact on the UK blood supply. In the case of FFP, the review
is looking at the need for confidence in the viral inactivation
techniques used for non-UK plasma and the availability of
sustainable supplies. Decisions on some of these measures will
be taken later this year.
 These issues have not been referred to the National Institute of
    Clinical Excellence as the membership of MSBT is set up
  specifically to look at blood safety issues and seeks specialist
  advice or includes the relevant specialists among its members.

               19th Dec 02Blood Donors: vCJD

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:



 What details they have of the blood donor in Scotland found
   recently to have vCJD and from whom plasma had been
   used to manufacture haemophilia treatment by the
   National Health Service; and what guidance they are
   giving patients who could be affected.[HL639]
Lord Hunt of Kings Heath: Questions relating to Scotland on
 this particular issue are for the devolved administration. My
noble friend may wish to write to the Scottish Executive about
                            this matter.



  22 Jan 2003 Haemophiliacs: vCJD Implicated Products


Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:



 Further to the Written Answer by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath
     on 19 December 2002 (WA156), whether any patient
     living in England or Northern Ireland could be affected by
     the case of the blood donor in Scotland found recently to
     have vCJD and from whom plasma had been used to
     manufacture haemophilia treatment by the National Health
     Service; whether any patient living in Wales could be
     affected; and what contact there has been between the
     Department of Health and both the Scottish and Welsh
     Executives about the case.[HL933]




Lord Hunt of Kings Heath: The batches of clotting factor
concentrates manufactured by the Scottish National Blood
Transfusion Service from the plasma taken from a donor who
subsequently developed vCJD were distributed to haemophilia
centres in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Patients treated with
these products living in Scotland and Northern Ireland have
been contacted by their clinicians. A small number of patients
who received these implicated products are now living in
England. Information has been passed to their local haemophilia
centres so that they can be contacted. We are not aware of any
cases involving patients living in Wales. There was extensive
correspondence on this case between the secretariat of the CJD
Incidents Panel and the various Scottish bodies involved.




            22 Jul 2004 Blood Donation and vCJD
Lord Warner: My right honourable friend the Secretary of
State for Health has made the following Written Ministerial
Statement today.

My Statement on 17 December 2003 informed the House of the
first case of possible transmission of vCJD via blood transfusion
and the actions taken as a result of this case to protect future
blood supplies. I promised then to provide updates on any major
changes.

My Statement of 16 March 2004 indicated that the Committee
on the Microbiological Safety of Blood and Tissue for
Transplantation (MSBT) had met at my request to consider
whether further measures were needed. The recommendations
were to exclude from donating blood anyone who had
previously received transfusions of whole blood components
since January 1980. These measures were introduced with effect
from 5 April 2004.

MSBT met again on 29 June to review experience of these
measures. The committee recommended tightening the
exclusion criteria for two groups who have similarly received
transfusions of whole blood components since 
 
 : Column
WS53
 
 January 1980: previously transfused apheresis
donors; and donors who were unsure if they had previously had
a blood transfusion.

Apheresis donors are a small pool of committed donors who
make frequent attendances to donate blood, where machine
processing removes only certain blood components and the rest
is returned to the donor.

When actions were taken in April 2004 to exclude certain
donors, neither of these groups was excluded until any potential
impact on the blood supply became clearer.

In the light of experience since the exclusions came into effect,
MSBT has now advised that these groups can be excluded
without adverse impact on the blood supply. These new
exclusions will take effect from 2 August.

In a separate development, a second case of possible vCJD prion
transmission via blood transfusion has now been confirmed. A
patient in the UK received a transfusion of blood in 1999 from a
donor who subsequently developed vCJD. Though the patient
died of causes unrelated to vCJD, abnormal prion protein has
been found in spleen tissue. This patient had a genetic type that
differs from that so far found in patients who have developed
vCJD.

I understand that a detailed account of the case will be appearing
   soon in the medical journal the Lancet. This new finding was
       referred to the Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory
Committee (SEAC) and MSBT for expert advice. SEAC agreed
  that this second patient with apparent vCJD infection added to
  the evidence that the vCJD agent can be transmitted by blood.
     MSBT concurred with this view, and has advised that no
    additional public health measures are required to protect the
 blood supply. This confirms the precautionary approach set out
                 in my Statement of 17 December.


                         28th Oct04 vCJD
Lord Morris of Manchester: My Lords, I beg leave to ask the
Question standing in my name on the Order Paper. In doing so, I
declare an interest, not a pecuniary one, as president of the
Haemophilia Society.
 The Question was as follows:

 To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have
    already been warned or could eventually be warned by the
    Department of Health that they may be at risk of
    developing vCJD as a result of National Health Service
    treatment.

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Warner): My Lords, in England 15 recipients of
whole blood were notified in December 2003 of their possible
increased risk of variant CJD. For recipients of plasma products,
the patient notification exercise started on 21 September, and
will run for a few months. Patient records are being examined
currently. Until completed, it is not possible to say how many
more people will be notified as a result of this exercise.

Lord Morris of Manchester: My Lords, I am grateful to my
noble friend. Is he aware just how devastating this deadly
further threat has been to the haemophilia community, already
mourning 1,000 deaths from HIV and hepatitis C infection by
contaminated NHS blood products, and both deeply hurt and
offended by the total denial of any financial help for families
bereaved by hepatitis C infection?

We are told nobody is to blame for the disaster. But how can
this be validated, except by an independent inquiry and how,
without one, shall we ever know 
 
 whether the risk of vCJD
would have been reduced had the safer recombinant treatment
been available for all haemophilia patients in 1995? Is there not
now a compellingly urgent need for a wide-ranging public
inquiry into this worst-ever treatment disaster in the history of
the NHS?

Lord Warner: My Lords, I recognise what my noble friend
says. This exercise causes further anxiety for a group of people
for whom everybody in this House has enormous sympathy. We
have undertaken this tracing exercise in full consultation with
the Haemophilia Society, to which I pay tribute for all its help. I
am afraid that we must accept that there is a great deal of
scientific uncertainty about variant CJD and no consensus
among experts on assessing the risks to those patients who have
received potentially contaminated—I emphasise "potentially"—
batches of plasma. The Government have been transparent in
their actions and in putting information on variant CJD in the
public arena and before Parliament, and we will continue to do
so. Wrongful practices have not been employed; we do not
believe that a public inquiry is justified.

Lord Walton of Detchant: My Lords, does the Minister accept
that the agent responsible for the transmission of both sporadic
and new variant CJD is neither a bacterium nor a virus but an
abnormal molecule of protein called a prion? Does he therefore
accept that the presumed discovery of transmission of that agent
by blood transfusion was both unexpected and alarming? No
diagnostic or screening test exists at present, although recently
Stanley Prusiner, Nobel prize-winner for his work on prions,
suggested that one may be impending. Nevertheless, is it not
crucial, as the noble Lord, Lord Morris, has said, that
recombinant factor 8 should be made widely available
throughout the NHS for all haemophilia sufferers?

Lord Warner: My Lords, I am grateful to the noble Lord for
his remarks, given his great expertise in this area of medicine
and science. It is certainly true that, as yet, there is no blood test
for variant CJD, let alone one that could detect the disease years
before symptoms develop. We accept the need to make progress
on recombinant products but we will do so in an orderly way. I
can write to the noble Lord with details of our progress.

Lord Roberts of Conwy: My Lords, what sort of financial
assistance is available in those 1,000 cases to which the noble
Lord referred? Obviously, many families will have been
devastated by those deaths.

Lord Warner: My Lords, this Question is about variant CJD
and a tracing exercise. The noble Lord, Lord Morris, introduced
the issue of hepatitis C, which we have debated in this House on
several occasions but that is outside the scope of this Question. I
will write to the noble Lord with details on hepatitis C and the
other issues that he mentioned.

Baroness Neuberger: My Lords, in agreeing that, obviously,
considerable distress has been caused to all 
 
 those who have
received the letters, will the Minister now consider whether
something particular should be done for the younger people who
may be affected? There is growing evidence that younger people
are more susceptible to variant CJD than older ones. Growing
evidence, particularly from some French scientists, shows that
of the cases in the UK a disproportionate number of younger
people and teenagers have been affected. Is the Minister
prepared to consider specific counselling for younger people
among those who have received a letter warning them of the
possible risk?

Lord Warner: My Lords, the exercise for tracing people who, I
re-emphasise, are potentially at risk of having received possibly
contaminated plasma products is being conducted through the
Health Protection Agency and, perhaps more significantly,
through the 150 clinicians who are treating those with
haemophilia and bleeding disorders. They are best placed to
advise their patients—they know their patients—on how to
respond and to present this information of risk to them. I
emphasise that we are talking about products that are potentially
contaminated. The 176 batches of plasma products that have
been traced are all the result of further dilution of any
contaminated blood that has been injected into those batches. It
makes risk assessment in this area extraordinarily difficult.
There is no consensus among experts on the risk.

Earl Howe: My Lords, the Minister will know that, as part of
the Government's precautionary approach, it was decided that all
people who have received a blood transfusion since 1980 are
banned from giving blood. What official assessment has been
made of the effect of that ruling on the number of people now
able to donate blood, and is there any threat to blood supplies?

  Lord Warner: My Lords, taking a proportion of donors and
 potential donors out of the supply chain has some impact. But
  the Government have gone to great lengths to ensure that we
  have an adequate blood supply. One of the measures that we
have been taking, in full consultation with the medical and other
health professions, is how we make best use of the blood supply
  that we have. Over the years, there has been concern that we
 may have inappropriately used some of our blood supply. We
  are taking measures with experts to ensure that our available
                blood supply is used efficiently.


                       20 Jul 2005 vCJD
Lord Warner: My honourable friend the Parliamentary Under-
Secretary of State (Caroline Flint) has made the following
Written Ministerial Statement.

Further to the Statements made to the House by the then
Secretary of State (John Reid) on 17 December 2003 and 16
March 2004 (and the Written Statements of 22 July 2004 and 9
September 2004) concerning variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
(vCJD) and blood, I wish to provide a further update on this
subject.

Following cases of possible transmission of vCJD by blood
transfusion, we have already put in place a series of
precautionary public health measures. These include:



 in December 2003 we put in place arrangements for contacting
     recipients of blood from donors who went on to develop
     vCJD so that any necessary action could be taken;
 since April 2004 we have excluded anyone who has received a
     blood transfusion since January 1980 from donating blood;
     and



 in September 2004 we announced arrangements to identify
     and notify patients who had received certain batches of
     UK manufactured plasma products. 


20 Jul 2005 : Column WS114



In the light of further advice I have received from two of my
department's expert committees, the CJD Incidents Panel
(CJDIP) and the Committee on Microbiological Safety of
Blood, Tissues and Organs (MSBTO), I am now announcing
further public health precautions in relation to a small group of
blood donors whose blood has been transfused to people who
later developed vCJD.

The Chief Medical Officer, Sir Liam Donaldson, had asked the
expert committees to consider the implications for donors where
a recipient of their blood had developed vCJD. The
recommendations of the committees are based on an assessment
of risk undertaken by the Department of Health's analysts. The
risk assessment is being published on the department's website.

There are 110 donors in the UK whose blood was given to three
people who later developed vCJD and for whom this blood
might be a possible source of their infection. The advice of the
committees is that, although we do not know whether these
cases of vCJD could be related to the blood that they received,
we should take precautionary steps to inform and support the
individual blood donors concerned and to safeguard public
health.
As an extension to the current precautionary measures, these
people are being contacted by the National Blood Service and
advised not to donate blood, tissues or organs. Current donors
from this group of 110 are being contacted today and offered
expert advice and support. The National Blood Service will
contact the GPs of lapsed donors, that is those who have not
donated blood during the past five years, and make
arrangements to contact these people as soon as practicable.

The committees have also advised that the donors in question
should be considered at risk of vCJD for wider public health
purposes and that the donors and their clinicians should be
informed of their risk status and asked to implement the public
health precautions currently specified by the CJD Incidents
Panel. This means that they should inform doctors, nurses and
dentists of their status if they present for surgery or other
invasive medical procedures.

These public health precautionary measures are the same as
those applied to any patients considered by the CJDIP to be at
risk of vCJD, including the individuals notified following the
previous Statements to the House.

There is another group of people for whom further public health
precautions may need to be considered. This group is all the
other recipients of blood from the currently identified group of
110 donors (estimated to be up to 3,000 individuals). At present,
these people are already excluded from blood donation
themselves by the measures implemented in April 2004. I have
asked for additional expert advice on this group and I will take
further action if necessary. 
 
 : Column WS115


Blood donors should be assured that it is not possible to contract
vCJD by giving blood. Blood donors are highly committed to
helping others and we greatly value their contribution. The NHS
depends on their continued commitment to donating blood
which saves lives every day in this country.
The vast majority of the over two million current blood donors
will not be involved in this new safety measure and need take no
action. However, current and past blood donors who are
concerned can contact the National Blood Service helpline on
0845 7711 711.

People who have received blood donations and other members
of the public who are concerned should contact NHS Direct on
0845 850 9850.

  As with our actions to date on the possible transmission of
 vCJD, we continue to follow a highly precautionary approach.




19 Dec 2006 Health vCJD

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty’s Government:

 How many NHS patients identified by the National Blood
   Service as having received blood from a donor who later
   developed vCJD were people with haemophilia. [HL750]



The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): No patient with haemophilia or other bleeding
disorders have been identified as having received blood from a
blood donor who subsequently developed vCJD, nor have there
been any reported cases of vCJD associated with receipt of
plasma products.

However, all haemophilia patients who received plasma
products between 1980 and 2001 sourced from UK donor
plasma have been designated as “at risk of vCJD for public
purposes”. All plasma products are now sourced from non-UK
plasma. The United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors’
Organisation is collecting data that will provide an estimate of
the number of haemophilia patients who have been exposed to
plasma products which may be implicated with vCJD.

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty’s Government:

 What is their response to the findings of Professor John
   Collinge in the December 2006 edition of the Lancet on
   the transmission by infected blood of variant CJD; and
   what action they are planning to take. [HL751]

Lord Warner: The Lancet article refers to the third known case
of vCJD transmission via blood transfusion from a vCJD-
infected donor. This case was originally notified to the
department in January 2006 and announced by the Health
Protection Agency in a press release on 9 February 2006, a copy
of which has been placed in the Library.

There are 24 living patients in a group of people who had
received blood components from donors subsequently known to
have developed vCJD. They were all notified in 2005 or earlier,
through their GPs, of their risk status and have been provided
with information and support. The Health Protection Agency
contacted the GPs earlier in the year to notify them of this third
case and the agency has ensured that the GPs are fully informed
and briefed about the subsequent Lancet publication.

The department has implemented a series of measures to reduce
the risk of vCJD being transmitted through the blood supply.
Shortly after vCJD was first identified in 1996, the possibility of
human-to-human transmission through blood was considered,
and the department implemented precautionary measures to
reduce what was, at that time, a theoretical risk. These measures
have been strengthened since evidence of transmission via blood
began to emerge from animal studies, and following the first
case of transfusion-associated transmission in humans, reported
in December 2003. An important additional step, introduced in
March 2004, was to exclude from blood donation those people
who had themselves received a blood transfusion since January
1980. Other precautionary measures include:

from December 1997, blood components, plasma products or
tissues obtained from any individual who later develops vCJD,
were withdrawn/recalled;


in July 1998, it was announced that plasma for the manufacture
of blood products, such as clotting factors, would be obtained
from non-UK sources;from November 1999, white blood cells,
which may carry a significant risk of transmitting vCJD, were
removed from all blood used for transfusion;in August 2002, it
was announced that fresh frozen plasma for treating babies and
young children born on or after 1 January 1996 would be
obtained from the USA; in July 2004, the exclusion criteria for
blood donation were extended to include previously transfused
platelet donors, and donors who were unsure if they had
previously had a blood transfusion;in September 2004, the
department announced further precautionary measures for
patients who had received certain batches of plasma products;in
July 2005, the use of USA-sourced fresh frozen plasma was
extended to all children up to the age of 16;in July 2005, the
department announced further precautionary measures for those
patients who donated blood to three people who later developed
vCJD.
 The department continues to keep all the evidence in relation to
       transmission of vCJD by blood under close review.

       30 Jan 06 HIV: Inadvertent Blood Infection
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 What representations they have received for increases to the
   fund administered by the Macfarlane Trust to support
   people with haemophilia who have been infected with HIV
   through contaminated National Health Service blood
   products, together with the families of registrants who
   have died; [HL3501]
 Whether, in considering the case for increased funding to the
   fund administered by the Macfarlane Trust to support
   people with haemophilia infected with HIV through
   contaminated National Health Service blood products, they
   will adhere to a commitment given by a previous
   administration that payments to the Macfarlane Trust and
   the fund would be kept under constant review to ensure
   that its funding was in line with the needs of registrants;
   and [HL3502]


30 Jan 2006 : Column WA9



 Whether, when considering the case for increased funding to
   the fund administered by the Macfarlane Trust to support
   people with haemophilia infected with HIV through
   contaminated National Health Service blood products, they
   will consult the trust on the extent of the changes that have
   occurred in the circumstances of registrants of the trust
   since the fund was set up in 1988; and [HL3503]

Whether they will meet representatives of the Macfarlane Trust
 to discuss the case for increasing the annual cash allocation to
the fund maintained for the support of people with haemophilia
  who were infected with HIV through contaminated National
  Health Service blood products, together with the families of
              registrants who have died. [HL3504]

    The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): The Department of Health has received a report from
  the chairman of the Macfarlane Trust putting the case for
 increased funding for the trust. The department keeps under
 review the funding of the trust, and the demands upon it, in
which context the report from the chairman is a helpful input.
   Ministers and officials in the department meet the trust
     periodically to review all aspects of the trust's work.
             Blood Products: Self-sufficiency
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner on 19
     December 2005 (WA 202), when they expect to place in
     the Library of the House the findings of the report on self-
     sufficiency in blood products; and what steps they propose
     to take to draw it to the attention of Members of the House
     concerned with this matter. [HL3219]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): We expect to publish the report on self-sufficiency in
blood products shortly. A copy will be placed in the Library. We
will ensure that relevant Members of the House are sent a copy
of the report.




          HIV: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 What representations they have received from Ms Carol
   Grayson concerning the death of her husband, a
   haemophilia patient, from HIV infection by contaminated
   National Health Service blood donors at Arkansas State
   Penitentiary; and what response they propose to make to
   these representations. [HL3584]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): We have received several recent communications
from Ms Carol Grayson about the import of plasma from the
United States. We will be responding shortly. I will insure that a
copy of the letter from Ms Grayson dated 14 January is sent to
my noble friend.




         NHS: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the answer by the Lord Warner on 12 January
     (Official Report, col. 300) about documents dealing with
     contaminated National Health Service blood products that
     were destroyed in error by the Department of Health in the
     early 1990s, on what date or dates they were destroyed; by
     whose decision they were destroyed; and whether it is only
     documents on these products that have been destroyed in
     error by the department. [HL3732]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): My noble friend is aware that during the HIV
litigation many papers were recalled. We understand that papers
were not adequately archived and were unfortunately destroyed
in the early 1990s.

My noble friend is also aware that further documents were
destroyed in the 1990s. Officials at the Department of Health
have established that these documents related to the minutes and
papers of the Advisory Committee on the Virological Safety of
Blood between 1989 and 1992. These papers were destroyed
between July 1994 and March 1998. A decision, most probably
made by an inexperienced member of staff, was responsible for
the destruction of these files.
The Lord Morris of Manchester—To ask Her Majesty’s
Government, further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner
on 27th February (WA 26), on what dates documents dealing
with contaminated National Health Service blood products were
destroyed in error in the early 1990s. [DoH] (HL4382)

The Lord Morris of Manchester—To ask Her Majesty’s
Government, further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner
on 27th February (WA 26), whether any action was taken after
papers used in the HIV litigation were destroyed in error in the
early 1990s to prevent further erroneous destruction in the
future; and, if so, why that did not prevent the subsequent
destruction of papers between July 1994 and March
1998. [DoH] (HL4383)

The Lord Morris of Manchester—To ask Her Majesty’s
Government further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner
on 27th February (WA26), whether papers relating to any other
National Health Service policy areas were destroyed
erroneously in the 1990s. [DoH] (HL4384)


                 Recombinant Factor VIII
Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
if she will list the files and information the Department holds on
the supply for use in the UK of Factor VIII and blood and
plasma products, including files relating to the source of such
products from inmates within the Arkansas prison system, over
the last 37 years; and what record she has of files and
information once held which are no longer available. [49700]

Caroline Flint [holding answer 7 February 2006]: Officials
would need to undertake lengthy enquiries to provide the
information requested on files held on the supply for use in the
United Kingdom of Factor VIII and blood and plasma products,
including files relating to the source of such products. 
   
 15
Mar 2006 : Column 2335W


During the HIV litigation many papers were recalled. We
understand that papers were not adequately archived and were
unfortunately destroyed in the early 1990s.

Officials have also established that documents relating to the
advisory committee on the virological safety of Blood were
destroyed in error between July 1994 and March 1998.


          NHS: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner on 27
     February (WA 26), on what dates documents dealing with
     contaminated National Health Service blood products were
     destroyed in error in the early 1990s; and [HL4382]

 Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner on 27
     February (WA 26), whether any action was taken after
     papers used in the HIV litigation were destroyed in error in
     the early 1990s to prevent further erroneous destruction in
     the future; and, if so, why that did not prevent the
     subsequent destruction of papers between July 1994 and
     March 1998; and [HL4383]

 Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner on 27
     February (WA 26), whether papers relating to any other
     National Health Service policy areas were destroyed
     erroneously in the 1990s. [HL4384]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): The precise date of the destruction of documents on
contaminated blood products in the early 1990s is not known.
The Department of Health carried out a major awareness
programme on records management in 1993 to 1995, producing
new guidance and introducing a departmental records
management audit programme. The subsequent introduction of
electronic records management to the department has involved
further improvements in guidance and support, emphasising the
need for careful attention when managing records.

The department has no evidence that records relating to National
Health Service policy areas other than blood products were
destroyed erroneously in the 1990s.


                         Hepatitis C
Dr. Gibson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
recent assessment she has made of the health of patients who
contracted hepatitis C in the 1970s and 1980s from infected
blood. [55742]

Caroline Flint: A study from the Royal Free Hospital published
in 2000 1 reported on the natural history of hepatitis C in a
cohort of around 300 patients with haemophilia infected
between 1961 and 1985.

In April 1995, a lookback exercise was undertaken to identify
and trace patients who had received blood before September
1991 (when routine screening of blood donations was
introduced) from donors subsequently shown to be positive for
hepatitis C. The majority of patients, who were identified from
the lookback exercise, form the basis of the National Hepatitis C
Register. This includes a record of patients with a known date of
acquisition. The National Hepatitis C Register is held by the
Health Protection Agency (HPA) and funded by the
Department. Clinicians are asked to provide follow-up data
anonymously for registered patients every two to three years,
and the HPA has produced papers on the cohort 2 3 . This study
is on-going. Details of the register are available on the HPA
website at
www.hpa.org.uk/infections/topics_az/hepatitis_c/menu2.htm.

    Notes:
1
  Yee TT, Griffioen A., Sabin C.A. et al. The natural history of
HCV in a cohort of haemophilia patients infected between 1961
and 1985. Gut 2000; 47: 845–851. 2 Harris H.E., Ramsay R.E.,
Andrews N. et al. Clinical course of hepatitis C virus during the
first decade of infection: cohort study. BMJ 2002; 324: 450–3. 3
Harris H.E., Ramsay M.E., Andrews N.J. Survival of a national
cohort of hepatitis C virus infected patients, 16 years after
exposure. Epidemiol Infect—in press. [E-pub ahead of print 28
October 2005.]


       Hepatitis C: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Aberavon asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they are content with the administration of the
      Skipton Fund for ex gratia payments for hepatitis C
      infection by contaminated National Health Service blood
      and blood products; and what ministerial surveillance there
      has been of its administration. [HL4570]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): The Skipton Fund is an independent company set up
to make ex-gratia payments to those people who contracted
hepatitis C through National Health Service treatment. In
January 2006, Department of Health officials were notified
about a fraud against the Skipton Fund. Officials in the
department and the NHS Counter Fraud and Security
Management Services are working with the Skipton Fund to
ensure that the necessary arrangements are in place to handle the
administration of the scheme and prevent potential cases of
maladministration. 
 
 30 Mar 2006 : Column WA148
3rd May Lords

          HIV: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Whether they are now able to agree an extended programme of
   funding, similar to the three-year settlement that concluded
   on 31 March, to the Macfarlane Trust responsible for
   administering the fund to support haemophiliacs infected
   with HIV through contaminated National Health Service
   blood products and other beneficiaries; and, if not, when
   an announcement will be made; and [HL5507]

 Whether, if the Macfarlane Trust, responsible for
   administering the fund to support people with haemophilia
   infected with HIV by National Health Service
   contaminated blood products and others, were to receive
   external funding, there would be an equivalent reduction in
   support from the Department of Health; and [HL5508]

 What consultations there have been with the Macfarlane Trust
   in respect of the business case for an increase in the cash
   allocation to the fund administered by the trust to support
   people with haemophilia infected with HIV by National
   Health Service contaminated blood products and other
   beneficiaries. [HL5509]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): The Department of Health has not yet finalised the
budget allocations for the current year from which the
Macfarlane Trust is funded. It is our intention to continue
funding this trust on a year-to-year basis. We are still
considering the business case for extra funding for this trust. We
have seen no indication that any external funding is likely for
this trust.
            Blood Products 4/5/06 commons
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether
her Department has carried out an internal review into the use of
blood and plasma products infected with HIV and hepatitis C;
and if she will make a statement. [65513]

Caroline Flint: The Department has not carried out an internal
review into the use of blood and plasma products infected with
HIV and hepatitis C. However, on 27 February the Department
published a report, 'Self-Sufficiency in Blood Products in
England and Wales'. This report was the result of an internal
review of papers on self-sufficiency in blood products.

The review was commissioned following suggestions that the
policy of self-sufficiency in blood products during the 1970's
and early 1980's might have prevented haemophilia patients
being treated with infected blood products. The report makes
clear that self-sufficiency in blood products would not have
prevented the infection of haemophilia patients.

4th May Lords

                  Blood: Self-sufficiency
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Why the Department of Health's internal report Self-
   Sufficiency in Blood Products does not include a review of
   blood product policy prior to 1979. [HL5510]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): I refer my noble friend to the reply I gave on 19 April
2006 (Official Report, col. 1054–56).

Tabled on the 27th April 06

The Lord Morris of Manchester—To ask Her Majesty’s
Government what is the administrative procedure for
authorising the shredding of documents within the Department
of Health that have been stored or archived; what grade of
official can make an order for the shredding of documents that
have been stored or archived; and what action senior officials
take if the administrative procedure for authorising the
shredding of documents that have been stored or archived has
been breached. [DoH] (HL5511)

  Department of Health: Shredding of Documents
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 What is the administrative procedure for authorising the
   shredding of documents within the Department of Health
   that have been stored or archived; what grade of official
   can make an order for the shredding of documents that
   have been stored or archived; and what action senior
   officials take if the administrative procedure for
   authorising the shredding of documents that have been
   stored or archived has been breached. [HL5511]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): The Department of Health is obliged under the Public
Records Act 1958 to identify records needing long-term
retention, while destroying most records as soon as their
administrative value ends. Administrative decisions on the
retention or destruction of records are routinely made between
two and five years after the date of the last paper on the file.

Records marked for destruction are held in the file store until the
marked destruction date, then batched into consignments,
marked as destroyed on the file store database, and despatched
for secure destruction. The department receives a certificate of
destruction for each batch destroyed.

Current guidance states that decisions on retention or destruction
should be made by,

 "whoever has best knowledge of the subject matter. The
       reviewer should be in Payband IP2 (Executive Officer
       Grade) or above".


    
 15 May 2006 : Column WA5


Departmental policy on records management also states that,

    "Line managers are responsible for ensuring that record
        keeping within their areas is consistent and meets
        Departmental standards".



Senior officials would become aware that the procedures had
been breached if poor practice were revealed by an audit, or if a
request for records could not be satisfied because records had
been inappropriately destroyed.

Any action taken would depend on the specific circumstances of
the breach.

Prey, tell us the specific circumstances of the breach. as (Inexperienced) and
(Executive Officer Grade) contradict each other (Inadvertent my arse!)




    19/5/06 Hepatitis C: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner on 30
        March (WA 147) on the administration of the Skipton
        fund, what representations they have received from Mrs
        Harriet Bullock, the widow of a National Health Service
        patient infected with hepatitis C by contaminated National
        Health Service blood products; and what response is being
        made. [HL5794]
The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): Mrs Harriet Bullock has written to Ministers on
several occasions concerning the administration of the Skipton
fund. The Department of Health has provided a response on
each occasion. My noble friend may wish to obtain responses
directly from Mrs Bullock, rather than through these channels.

   23/5/06 commons Destroyed Documents (Blood
                   Products)
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether
her Department has carried out an internal review into the
destruction in the 1990s of documents held by her Department
relating to national health service blood and plasma products
infected with HIV and hepatitis C; and if she will make a
statement. [65509]

Caroline Flint: During the HIV litigation many papers were
recalled, and following that we understand papers were not
adequately archived and were unfortunately destroyed in error.

Officials subsequently established during the hepatitis C
litigation that documents relating to the advisory committee on
the virological safety of blood between 1989 and 1992 had been
destroyed in error. Following this discovery, an internal
investigation was undertaken in April 2000 by the Department’s
internal audit.




    24/5/06 Lords Contaminated Blood Products:
                    Hepatitis C
3.23 pm
Lord Jenkin of Roding asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Whether the files of papers about contaminated blood products
   which have recently come to light, some of which have
   been returned to the Department of Health, provide
   evidence to support the claims of haemophiliacs that their
   infection with hepatitis was caused by such blood
   products.

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): My Lords, we have established that a number of
documents that have been disclosed by the department in the
HIV and hepatitis C litigation were 
 
 
 held by Blackett Hart
& Pratt Solicitors. It agreed to return the papers to our solicitors,
who are now considering them with other departmental officials.
Advice has yet to be given to Ministers on the significance of
the returned files.

Lord Jenkin of Roding: My Lords, the files that have turned
up came from the archives of more than one firm of English
solicitors. Given the substantial volume of documents passed to
the department's solicitors—I am told that there are no fewer
than 12 big lever-arch files—and the fact that what they have is
a small fraction of the material that has been held in solicitors'
archives, and given that the department's paper Self-Sufficiency
in Blood Products in England and Wales was expressly
dependent on information that had survived the inadvertent
destruction of some 600 of its files, are not there overwhelming
arguments for a much more open, independent inquiry into what
many regard as perhaps the most serious disaster that has ever
happened in the National Health Service?

Lord Warner: My Lords, as the noble Lord acknowledges,
there are a substantial number of lever-arch files, as he put it,
containing documents to be gone through, which is what we are
doing. Until we have gone through those files we cannot explain
to the noble Lord or anyone else the significance of the
documents for the document that we published. We will go
through those files as quickly as possible, and I will discuss
shortly with my honourable friend the Minister for Public
Health how we can give public reassurance and place
information from those files where it is significant in the public
arena.

Lord Morris of Manchester: My Lords, I declare an interest as
president of the Haemophilia Society. Is my noble friend aware
that 1,242 haemophilia patients, have now been fatally infected
by contaminated NHS blood products? In the light of this
awesome reality, is it not disgraceful that officially protected
documents of such sensitivity and importance to the
haemophilia community were destroyed at the Department of
Health? Is it not indisputable now that extra funding is urgently
needed to help the afflicted and bereaved, not least widows who
today receive no help at all?

Again, has not the case now become unanswerable for an
impartial public inquiry into what my noble friend Lord
Winston, vice-president of the Haemophilia Society, has called
the worst-ever treatment disaster in the history of the NHS?

Lord Warner: My Lords, I pay tribute to my noble friend's
work on behalf of the Haemophilia Society and its members. He
has great persistence and skill in this area. I share his concerns
about the position that many of the victims whose blood has
been infected by hepatitis C have suffered. As he knows, we
have introduced a hepatitis C ex gratia payment scheme, which
is working. We do not believe that a public 
 
 inquiry is
needed. As I have said on many occasions in the House, we do
not think that there is evidence to suggest wrongdoing. We will
examine carefully the new files that the solicitors have passed to
us and place the results in the public arena as quickly as
possible.

Baroness Barker: My Lords, what steps will the Department of
Health take to ensure the safety of the documents and to ensure
that they will not be destroyed inadvertently, as documents that
should have been kept for 25 years were destroyed between
1994 and 1998?

Lord Warner: My Lords, they were passed from solicitor to
solicitor. Government solicitors have professional
responsibilities in this area. My colleague Caroline Flint and I
will ensure that they are safeguarded, but we need the time to go
through the documents to see what their significance is. There
are a large number of documents to be gone through.

Baroness Gardner of Parkes: My Lords, surely the Minister
accepts, though, that the haemophiliacs who have hepatitis got it
from blood products. He said that there was no evidence of
wrongdoing, but I do not think that anyone is talking about
wrongdoing. People would never have given blood products if
they had been aware that they were contaminated. It was a most
unfortunate thing. As chairman of a hospital that had a major
haemophiliac unit, I saw such tragic cases, and it should be
acknowledged that that was the cause.

Lord Warner: My Lords, I do not want to give a science
lecture, but we have been over the ground before. The blood
infected with hepatitis C was used in circumstances where there
was no means of identifying hepatitis C in the blood. The
clinical opinion at the time was that hepatitis C was a mild
infection, and it took 25 years to find out its seriousness. There
was no means of treating the blood in those circumstances. This
was blood given to people when it was a matter of life or death
whether they received that blood, and we were acting on the best
scientific and clinical advice at the time.

Baroness Finlay of Llandaff: My Lords, given the distress
caused to those who are now bereaved, can the Minister give an
assurance that the information gleaned from the review of
documents will be communicated not just to the public through
the press and media but directly to bereaved families, who may
need help in interpreting the information that they receive?
Lord Warner: My Lords, the noble Baroness's point is
absolutely fair, and I accept it. We will be working with the
Haemophilia Society. We will consult it, as we do on many
occasions, when we have been through the documents, and we
will discuss with it how best to inform individual members of
the society and others, where that is appropriate and necessary.



      Hansards 8/6/06 Imported Blood Products
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1)
whether individuals with haemophilia were given factor VIII
imported blood products; and if she will make a statement;
[64127]

(2) whether individuals with haemophilia were given imported
blood products under the named patient system without (a)
consultation and (b) the signed agreement of the patient; and if
she will make a statement. [64129]

Caroline Flint: During the 1970s and 1980s, clinicians were
able to obtain blood products domestically, from Blood Products
Laboratory (BPL) or purchase imported products from other
international pharmaceuticals companies.

We are aware that during the 1980s pharmaceuticals companies
were developing clotting factors, using new techniques in an
attempt to reduce the risk of transmitting non-A and non-B
hepatitis. We understand that the preference of some
haemophilia centre directors was that these products should be
administered through controlled clinical trials rather than on a
named patient basis. However, this did not preclude individual
clinicians, in consultation with a patient, from prescribing on a
named patient basis, if considered in the patient’s best interest.
               Hansards 8/6/06 Hepatitis C
Mr. Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
what the timetable is for the establishment of a compensation
scheme for those infected with hepatitis C by NHS blood or
blood products. [76010]

Caroline Flint: The Skipton Fund was established in 2004, to
administer the ex-gratia payment scheme for people infected
with hepatitis C following national health service treatment with
blood or blood products. The scheme became operational on 5
July 2004.



                     Notifiable Diseases
Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
(1) what factors were taken into account when deciding not to
include the (a) HIV and (b) H5N1 viruses on the list of
notifiable diseases; [75018]

(2) which sexually transmitted diseases (a) are and (b) are not
on the list of notifiable diseases; and what criteria are used when
deciding which diseases to include. [75017]

Caroline Flint: Under the Public Health (Control of Disease)
Act 1984, there is a requirement to notify local authorities of
cases of certain infectious diseases so 
 8 Jun 2006 : Column
851W
 that they can consider whether to use the measures to
control disease that the Act provides. Section 11 of the Act sets
out the procedure for notifying the relevant local authority of
cases of cholera, plague, relapsing fever, smallpox, typhus and
food poisoning. Regulations made under the Act (the Public
Health (Infectious Diseases) Regulations 1988) apply section 11
to certain other infectious diseases(1).
However, statutory notification of specified infectious diseases
is only one of a range of methods by which epidemiological
surveillance and control of infectious diseases are carried out.
HIV, sexually transmitted infections and H5N1 are not
notifiable diseases(2).

For HIV, local and national data are collected from several
sources including reporting of diagnosed cases by clinicians and
laboratories and by unlinked anonymous surveys of HIV
prevalence in population sub-groups, such as genito-urinary
medicine (GUM) clinic attendees and injecting drug users in
contact with specialist services. Similarly, for other sexually
transmitted infections, there are other surveillance methods used
including returns from GUM clinics of episodes of sexually
transmitted infections and the national Chlamydia screening
programme.

Making HIV and other sexually transmitted infections notifiable
might raise concerns about patient confidentiality and could
deter individuals at risk of infection from seeking advice, testing
and specialist care.

H5N1 infection does not readily pass from birds to humans and
there is currently no evidence that this pathogen is capable of
spreading from person-to-person efficiently nor of sustaining
such transmission. This infection can only be diagnosed by
laboratory confirmation of the pathogen as the clinical illness
has similarities with several other infections. H5N1 infection in
birds or poultry, which comes within the definition of avian
influenza, is notifiable as a disease of animals and as an animal
disease that may transmit to humans. This allows measures to be
put in place to reduce the risk of spread to other birds or poultry
and to humans.
 (1)
       Acute encephalitis, acute poliomyelitis, anthrax, diphtheria,
        dysentery (amoebic or bacillary), leprosy, leptospirosis,
        malaria, measles, meningitis, meningococcal septicaemia
        (without meningitis), mumps, ophthalmia neonatorum,
       paratyphoid fever, rabies, rubella, scarlet fever, tetanus,
       tuberculosis (where the opinion of the registered medical
       practitioner that the person is suffering from tuberculosis
       is formed from evidence not solely derived from
       tuberculin tests, typhoid fever, viral haemorrhagic fever,
       viral hepatitis, whooping cough, and yellow fever.
(2 )
  Viral hepatitis is statutorily notifiable and can be transmitted
sexually. However, apart from hepatitis B virus, sexual
transmission is not the most important mode of infection.



              HIV/AIDS (Blood Transfusions)
Pete Wishart: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
much compensation has been paid by the UK Government to
those who contracted HIV through blood transfusions. [74297]

Caroline Flint: Up to March 2006, the United Kingdom
Government have distributed a total of £39,787,617 via the
Macfarlane and Eileen Trusts, to those who contracted HIV
infection from blood transfusions or from treatment with blood
products.



               Hansards 12/6/06 Haemophilia
Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
pursuant to the answers of 5 June to Questions 73258, 73259
and 73260, on people with haemophilia, if she will publish the
Department's consideration and decision with regard to the
Macfarlane Trust's submission. [76443]


12 Jun 2006 : Column 1014W
Caroline Flint: There has been no further development since
my last reply.

            Hansards 19/06/06 Haemophilia
Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
pursuant to the answer of 12 June 2006, Official Report,
columns 1013-14W, on haemophilia, (1) when she expects
developments with regard to the Department’s consideration of
the Macfarlane Trust’s submission; [78804]

(2) whether she plans to meet the chairman of the Macfarlane
Trust. [78805]

Caroline Flint: The Minister for Public Health plans to meet
the chair for the Macfarlane Trust on 12 July and the Macfarlane
Trust’s submission will be discussed. An earlier date was
offered.



                         Lord Crisp

 Sir Edmund Nigel Ramsay Crisp, KCB, having been created
Baron Crisp, of Eaglescliffe in the County of Durham, for life—
Was, in his robes, introduced between the Baroness Prashar and
the Lord Adebowale.

 Hansards 26/06/06 Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the Written Answer by the Lord Warner on 30
     March (WA 147) on the administration of the Skipton
     Fund for ex gratia payments for hepatitis C infection from
     contaminated National Health Service blood products,
     what developments there have been in regard to fraud
     against the fund and surveillance of its administration.
     [HL6314]
26 Jun 2006 : Column WA123

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): The NHS Counter Fraud and Security Management
Service is continuing to work with the fund to ensure that
measures are in place to prevent fraud from both internal and
external sources. Action has been taken to implement several
recommendations from this work. Further measures remain
under consideration.



     Contaminated Blood Products: Hepatitis C

                         29th June 06
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the answers by the Lord Warner on 24 May
     (Official Report, cols. 824–26) on contaminated blood
     products: hepatitis C, whether they will arrange for access
     by the Haemophilia Society to the official documents
     about contaminated National Health Service blood
     products reported to have been destroyed in the
     Department of Health, copies of which have recently been
     made available to the department by Blackett, Hart and
     Pratt Solicitors. [HL6577]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): The Department of Health has commissioned an
independent analysis of the documents to which my noble friend
refers. Once this has been carried out, we will consider which of
the documents can be released.

Questions for answer
Pete Wishart (Perth and North Perthshire):To ask the Secretary
of State for Health, how much compensation has been paid by
the UK Government to those who contracted HIV through blood
transfusions. (74297)


Pete Wishart (Perth and North Perthshire):To ask the Secretary
of State for Health, what the time plan is for the proposed
business plan for the Eileen Trust. (74298)


             Contaminated Blood Products
                     4th Dec 06
Mr. Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
pursuant to the answer of 23 November 2006, Official Report,
column 225W, on contaminated NHS blood products, how
decisions are made on the communication of information on
possible risks and the protection of public health. [107371]

Caroline Flint: In January this year, the Department submitted
a memorandum of evidence to the House of Lords Economic
Affairs Committee Inquiry into the Government's policy on the
management of risk. This sets out the Department's approach to
managing risk.

A copy of the memorandum by the Department has been
published by the House of Lords Select Committee on
Economic Affairs. This is available at:

www.publications.parliamentuk/pa/ld200506/ldselect/ldeconaf/
183/18302.htm#evidence


www.cjd.ed.ac.uk.




             Contaminated Blood Products
                           7 Dec 06
Mr. Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
pursuant to the answer of 23 November 2006, Official Report,
column 225W, on contaminated NHS blood products, what
assessment she has made of the merits of undertaking a public
inquiry into the supply of contaminated NHS blood products to
people with haemophilia in relation to HIV and hepatitis B.
[107372]

Caroline Flint [holding answer 4 December 2006]: We regret
that patients were infected with HIV and hepatitis B through
treatment with plasma products, prior to the introduction of heat
treatment in the mid 1980s.

These heat treatments were developed to inactivate HIV. HIV
was much more sensitive to heat treatment than hepatitis C and
hepatitis B. From the mid 1980s a range of heat treatments for
plasma products were developed that eliminated HIV, hepatitis
B and hepatitis C.

Donor screening for HIV was introduced in 1985 and donor
screening for hepatitis B was introduced by 1972. Both these
microbiological tests were introduced as soon as practicable. In
view of these actions, we do not consider a public inquiry is
justified.

In February this year, the Department published the report on
“Self Sufficiency in Blood Products in England and Wales”
which is available at:

 www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/Public
   ationsPolicyAndGuidance/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidanc
   eArticle/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4130917&chk=c91C7q

This provides a summary on the issue of infected blood
products.
             Contaminated Blood Products
                      12/12/06
Mr. Todd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the
evidential basis was for the establishment of 29 August 2003 as
the earliest point of death which would entitle relatives and
dependants of those infected by NHS contaminated blood
products to claim from the Skipton Fund. [107784]

Caroline Flint: The announcement to set up a payment scheme
for patients infected with hepatitis C though national health
service contaminated blood and blood products was made on 29
August 2003. The principle behind the scheme is to target
available resources to help alleviate the suffering of people
living with the virus, therefore at that time 29 August 2003
became the unavoidable cut off date.

In January this year, Ministers agreed to extend the period when
claims can be made to the Skipton Fund on behalf of deceased
patients by relatives or dependants. Therefore the relatives or
dependants of a person infected with hepatitis C through NHS
blood and blood products who died after 5 July 2004, which is
when the scheme became operational, will also be eligible to
make a claim.


                       Health: vCJD
                         19/12/06
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty’s Government:

 How many NHS patients identified by the National Blood
   Service as having received blood from a donor who later
   developed vCJD were people with haemophilia. [HL750]


The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord
Warner): No patient with haemophilia or other bleeding
disorders have been identified as having received blood from a
blood donor who subsequently developed vCJD, nor have there
been any reported cases of vCJD associated with receipt of
plasma products.

However, all haemophilia patients who received plasma
products between 1980 and 2001 sourced from UK donor
plasma have been designated as “at risk of vCJD for public
purposes”. All plasma products are now sourced from non-UK
plasma. The United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors’
Organisation is collecting data that will provide an estimate of
the number of haemophilia patients who have been exposed to
plasma products which may be implicated with vCJD.

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty’s Government:

 What is their response to the findings of Professor John
   Collinge in the December 2006 edition of the Lancet on
   the transmission by infected blood of variant CJD; and
   what action they are planning to take. [HL751]

Lord Warner: The Lancet article refers to the third known case
of vCJD transmission via blood transfusion from a vCJD-
infected donor. This case was originally notified to the
department in January 2006 and announced by the Health
Protection Agency in a press release on 9 February 2006, a copy
of which has been placed in the Library.

There are 24 living patients in a group of people who had
received blood components from donors subsequently known to
have developed vCJD. They were all notified in 2005 or earlier,
through their GPs, of their risk status and have been provided
with information and support. The Health Protection Agency
contacted the GPs earlier in the year to notify them of this third
case and the agency has ensured that the GPs are fully informed
and briefed about the subsequent Lancet publication.

The department has implemented a series of measures to reduce
the risk of vCJD being transmitted through the blood supply.
Shortly after vCJD was first identified in 1996, the possibility of
human-to-human transmission through blood was considered,
and the department implemented precautionary measures to
reduce what was, at that time, a theoretical risk. These measures
have been strengthened since evidence of transmission via blood
began to emerge from animal studies, and following the first
case of transfusion-associated transmission in humans, reported
in December 2003. An important additional step, introduced in
March 2004, was to exclude from blood donation those people
who had themselves received a blood transfusion since January
1980. Other precautionary measures include:

from December 1997, blood components, plasma products or
tissues obtained from any individual who later develops vCJD,
were withdrawn/recalled;

in July 1998, it was announced that plasma for the manufacture
of blood products, such as clotting factors, would be obtained
from non-UK sources;from November 1999, white blood cells,
which may carry a significant risk of transmitting vCJD, were
removed from all blood used for transfusion;in August 2002, it
was announced that fresh frozen plasma for treating babies and
young children born on or after 1 January 1996 would be
obtained from the USA; in July 2004, the exclusion criteria for
blood donation were extended to include previously transfused
platelet donors, and donors who were unsure if they had
previously had a blood transfusion;in September 2004, the
department announced further precautionary measures for
patients who had received certain batches of plasma products;in
July 2005, the use of USA-sourced fresh frozen plasma was
extended to all children up to the age of 16;in July 2005, the
department announced further precautionary measures for those
patients who donated blood to three people who later developed
vCJD.
The department continues to keep all the evidence in relation to
transmission of vCJD by blood under close review.
                  Thalidomide Jan-9-07
Mr. MacShane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
discussions she has had with Chemie Grunenthal on obtaining
payment for British victims of thalidomide. [107773]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: We have not held discussions with Chemie
Grunenthal, the original developer of thalidomide. Distillers
Biochemicals Limited was the original United Kingdom
licensee of the product and the company and its successors have
made paymentsto people affected by thalidomide through the
Thalidomide Trust, established in 1973.


                     HEALTH
         Blood Products Laboratory 18/jan/07
Jim Cousins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
much the Blood Products Laboratory spent on the purchase of
24 plasma collection centres belonging to Life Resources
Incorporated in the United States in the last five years; what
revenue benefit to NHS Blood and Transplant these investments
have produced; and what assessment she has made of the future
of these facilities. [114498]

Caroline Flint: Bio Products Laboratory has not purchased 24
plasma collection centres belonging to Life Resources
Incorporated.


18 Jan 2007 : Column 1268W
In December 2002, the Department purchased the United States
(US) plasma collector Life Resources Incorporated. This
acquisition included the purchase of 24 centres collecting blood
plasma from donors across the US. A press release issued on 17
December 2002 provides details of the acquisition including
cost and is available at:
 www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/PressReleases/Press
   ReleasesNotices/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4026006&chk=oa
   Raxa

A US holding company, DCI Biologicals Inc, was established to
manage the business. DCI Biologicals reports to the United
Kingdom parent company, Plasma Resources UK Limited,
owned by the Secretary of State for Health.

The Department is leading a review to identify and explore
opportunities to improve Bio Products Laboratory business and
this review includes DCI Biologicals Inc.




                Health: vCJD 18th/Jan/07
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 What representations the Secretary of State for Health has had
   from the chairman of the Haemophilia Society on the
   findings of Professor John Collinge in the December 2006
   edition of the Lancet on the transmission by infected blood
   of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease to blood donor
   recipients in the United Kingdom; what reply is being
   sent; and what action they are planning. [HL1047]

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord Hunt of
Kings Heath): The chairman of the Haemophilia Society wrote
to the Secretary of State for Health on 12 December about a
number of issues in relation to vCJD and the possible risk of
transmission of vCJD to haemophilia patients through treatment.
Officials are preparing a comprehensive response which will set
out government action and developments in relation to vCJD.
We will send a copy of the response to the noble Lord.


              Fundamental Rights Agency
Mr. Brady: To ask the Minister of State, Department for
Constitutional Affairs what the legal base is for budgeted EU
expenditure of €5,536,000 in 2007 for the Fundamental Rights
Agency. [111299]

Vera Baird: The legal base of the regulation establishing the
Fundamental Rights Agency is article 308 of the treaty
establishing the European Community. The existing European
Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia (EUMC) has an
annual budget of €8.2 million. The Fundamental Rights Agency
will have a mandate significantly wider than that of the EUMC
and, for this reason, its budget has been set at €16 million in
2007 rising to €29 million in 2013.




                   21/2/07 Haemophilia
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how
many and what proportion of documents relating to the infection
of haemophiliacs with contaminated blood products which have
been returned to the Department of Health by Blackett, Heart
and Pratt Solicitors have (a) undergone independent legal
examination and (b) been passed to the Haemophilia Society;
[119897]

(2) how many documents relating to the infection of
haemophiliacs with contaminated blood products have been
returned to the Department by Blackett, Heart and Pratt
solicitors; and if she will make a statement. [119898]

Caroline Flint: In May 2006, Blackett Hart and Pratt solicitors
returned 623 documents to departmental solicitors. All the
documents were reviewed by independent counsel, before they
were sent to officials in the Department. The vast majority of
these documents (604 in total) were released in line with the
Freedom of Information (FOI) Act. The documents were sent to
a number of individuals at their request and to the Haemophilia
Society.

Some documents were withheld under FOI. However, officials
are further reviewing these papers with a view to releasing them
if possible.


      22/2/07 Haemophilia: Blood Transfusions
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how
many documents held in Government records which relate to the
infection of haemophiliacs by contaminated blood products and
which were thought to have been inadvertently destroyed have
been rediscovered; and if she will make a statement; [120746]

(2) what records her Department holds of meetings conducted in
1976 on the need for or production of factor XIII for people with
haemophilia in the UK; and if she will make a statement.
[120759]

Caroline Flint: In February 2006, the Department published a
report “Self-Sufficiency in Blood Products in England and
Wales”. This report considered the issue of self sufficiency in
Factor VIII during the 1970s and 1980s, including the issues
around the production and usage of Factor VIII. Reference 92
and reference 93 contained in the report are minutes of meetings
held in 1976. This information is in the public domain.

In addition we have released papers which were returned to the
Department from Blackett Hart and Pratt solicitors. Some of
these papers date back to 1976, and refer to self-sufficiency in
blood products.

Officials have been working on identifying and reviewing all the
documents currently held by the Department relating to the
safety of blood products between 1970 and 1985. This will
assist officials in establishing the full position in relation to
departmental papers on this issue.


22 Feb 2007 : Column 939W
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on
which dates her Department sought legal advice on the extent of
its liability for the administration of contaminated blood
products to people with haemophilia and subsequent infection
with hepatitis C and HIV; and if she will make a statement.
[120749]

Caroline Flint: We regret that patients were infected with HIV
and hepatitis C through treatment with plasma products, prior to
the introduction of heat treatment in the mid-1980s. However,
the Department has not admitted liability for the tragic infection
of patients with haemophilia.

Legal advice would have been sought prior to the HIV litigation
in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and the hepatitis C litigation
which commenced in 2000.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which
body in her Department (a) funded and (b) carried out research
into haemophilia blood products prior to the introduction of
viral inactivation technology including the taking of liver
enzyme samples; for what purpose this research was carried out;
and if she will make a statement. [120757]

Caroline Flint: The Department does not undertake research
activity. The main agency through which the Government
supports medical and clinical research is the Medical Research
Council (MRC).

Officials are unable to establish specific research projects
relating directly to this issue. However, we know of a study at
the Oxford Haemophilia Centre, in the late 1970s and early
1980s, which was funded by the Department, into the
epidemiology and chronic sequelae of factor VIII and IX
associated hepatitis in the United Kingdom. Papers in
connection to this study have been released under the Freedom
of Information Act.

In February last year, the Department published the report “Self
Sufficiency in Blood Products in England and Wales”, which
provides a summary on the issue of infected blood products and
is available from the Department's website:
 www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/Public
   ationsPolicyAndGuidance/PublicationsPolicyAnd
   GuidanceArticle/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4130917&chk=c9
   1C7q

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether
blood taken from people with haemophilia has been used at any
time since 1977 to measure the pathogenic potential of the UK
blood supply; and if she will make a statement. [120758]

Caroline Flint: We are unaware of such assessments.

Donor screening for HIV was introduced in 1985 and donor
screening for hepatitis C was introduced in September 1991.
Both these microbiological tests were introduced as soon as
practicable.




                        Haemophilia
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
expert advice was received by the Department of Health about
the psychological impact of informing people with haemophilia
(a) of their increased risk of developing vCJD and (b) that they
were considered an at risk group for public health purposes;
what steps were taken to ensure that psychological support
would be available to those affected; and if she will make a
statement. [119895]

Caroline Flint: The notification exercise by the Health
Protection Agency was delivered through the clinicians who
treat people with haemophilia and bleeding disorders. These
specialist clinicians are the best placed to advise their patients,
to counsel them and to present information about risk.

In advance of the notification exercise the United Kingdom
haemophilia doctors association, in consultation with the
haemophilia patients' association, were asked and provided their
views on the handling of the notification exercise.

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
how many meetings officials have had with strategic health
authority chief executives on the service level agreement applied
to the provision of Recombinant Factor VIII to haemophiliacs;
and whether the service level agreement has been finalised.
[115777]

Caroline Flint: On 12 February 2003 the Government
announced an extra £88 million over three years to extend the
availability of recombinant (synthetic) clotting factors for adult
haemophiliacs in England. To help extend the availability of
recombinant the Government provided the following additional
funding:

      £
      millio
      n
2003- 13
04

2004- 21.7
05

2005- 53.4
06


This funding was made available following a long campaign by
the haemophilia lobby groups. Funding was available from the
programme budget.

The roll-out programme for recombinant began in January 2004,
and all haemophilia patients in England are now eligible for
treatment with recombinant products.

Funding is now allocated to strategic health authorities through
the national health service bundle and will be managed through
a service level agreement.


                       Liver: Screening
Dr. Murrison: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1)
when she expects the Fibroscan test for liver stiffness to be
available in the NHS; [119177]

(2) what assessment has been made of (a) the efficacy and (b)
the cost-effectiveness of the Fibroscan test for liver stiffness.
[119178]

Caroline Flint: We understand that FibroScan machines are
already available for national health service organisations to
purchase, should they decide to do so. The NHS Health
Technology Assessment Programme (www.hta.nhsweb.nhs.uk)
is considering commissioning a review of research literature on
the effectiveness of different methods of assessing degree of
liver fibrosis.


            Haemophilia: Blood Transfusions
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
assessment was made of the likely effect on affected people with
haemophilia of receipt of the information before the decision
was taken to write to 
 6 Mar 2007 : Column 1959W
 them
informing them of their at risk status for public health purposes
in relation to vCJD; and what alternatives were considered
before it was decided to write to them in the terms which were
used. [120760]

Caroline Flint: No such specific assessment has been made.
Patients have been notified through the clinicians who treat
them for haemophilia and bleeding disorders. Those specialist
clinicians are best placed to identify the specific needs of their
patients.


             21/03/07 Blood: Contamination
Sammy Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when
she expects Lord Archer of Sandwell's enquiry into
contaminated NHS blood and blood products to be completed.
[128387]

Caroline Flint: This is an unofficial independent public inquiry,
therefore it is not a matter for the Department.



22 Mar 2007 : Column 1126W

                   Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
trials were conducted in the UK between 1984 and 1986 to
ascertain the efficacy of heat treatment for (a) commercial and
(b) non-commercial VIII blood products; and if she will make a
statement. [128427]

Caroline Flint: Heat treated Factor VIII and Factor IX
produced by Bio Products Laboratory (BPL) in the mid 1980s
were evaluated in several haemophilia centres in England and
Wales. The results from these studies have been published by
the investigators in medical journals.

BPL developed 8Y in 1985 and studies on the efficacy of BPL’s
heat treatment undertaken after 1986 showed that the process
was very efficacious. Clinical trials and laboratory studies
reported in 1985 had previously demonstrated the safety and
clinical efficacy of the heat treated product made by the Plasma
Fractionation Laboratory of Churchill hospital Oxford, which
was destined to become the BPL heat treated factor VIII product
(8Y).

The report “Self Sufficiency in Blood Products in England and
Wales” provides a section on heat treatment which contains
information on trials undertaken by a number of commercial
companies. The supporting references are all in the public
domain.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if
she will place in the Library a copy of the Department's internal
audit report referred to in the answer of 23 May 2006, Official
Report, column 1742W, on destroyed documents/blood
products; and if she will make a statement; [128429]

(2) by what date she expects her Department to finish its
identification and review of all the documents currently held
relating to the safety of blood products between 1970 and 1985;
and if she will make a statement. [128430]

Caroline Flint [holding answer 19 March 2007]: The report on
the internal review of documents held by the Department
relating to the safety of blood products between 1970 and 1985
is being finalised. This report will also take account of missing
documents. We expect to complete the report shortly, and a
copy will be placed in the Library.

The internal audit report will be referenced in the internal
review of documents and we will make all reference documents
available.
              23/3/07 Blood Products: Inquiry
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health by what
mechanism she will report to the House the findings of the
review under way into the documents held by the Department
relating to the safety of blood products between 1970 and 1985
when it is completed; and if she will make a statement. [129651]

Caroline Flint: When the report is finalised it will be placed in
the Library.


                           Hepatitis
Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
research is planned in the next 12 months to ascertain the likely
incidence in the UK of all types of chronic hepatitis over the
next decade; and if she will make a statement. [129016]

Caroline Flint: The Medical Research Council (MRC) funds a
portfolio of basic and underpinning research relating to the
various types of hepatitis, which may lead to further
understanding of the condition. Research specifically related to
the likely incidence of all types of chronic hepatitis over the
next decade in this country is not currently being funded.

The Health Protection Agency (HPA) is carrying out ongoing
work to estimate the future burden of hepatitis C-related disease
in this country. The HPA and the British Association for the
Study of the Liver (BASL) are collaborating on a study of end-
stage liver disease in patients who are infected with hepatitis B
or C and on a pilot survey of the number of people infected with
hepatitis C who are treated and treatment outcome in this
country.

                         Hepatitis C
Mr. Love: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to
the answer of 9 March 2007, Official Report, column 2298W,
on Hepatitis C, what her assessment is of the reasons for the
increase in the number of laboratory cases of Hepatitis C in the
London region between 2002 and 2006. [129652]

Caroline Flint: Acute hepatitis C infection usually occurs
without symptoms, and there are no laboratory tests to
differentiate between acute (recent), chronic (long-standing) or
resolved hepatitis C infection. Therefore, trends in the number
of laboratory diagnoses reflect the number of individuals being
tested, rather than the incidence of infection, and those
infections identified may have been acquired years or even
decades earlier.


29 Mar 2007 : Column 1786W
The rise in the number of laboratory diagnoses of hepatitis C in
London is likely to reflect greater awareness of hepatitis C and
increased testing of individuals as part of the investigation of
liver disease (including abnormal liver function), testing in
known risk groups or as part of screening (for example for
occupational health reasons).


                     Blood: Contamination
Mr. Holloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
estimate she has made of the number of haemophiliacs who
were infected with HIV and 
 2 May 2007 : Column
1773W
 hepatitis C through blood transfusions when they were
children, but are unable to receive hardship funds through the
Macfarlane Trust and the Skipton fund; and if she will make a
statement. [132463]

Caroline Flint: The Macfarlane Trust was set up in 1988 to
provide financial help to patients with haemophilia infected with
the HIV virus and their families.

The Skipton fund was set up in 2004 to administer an Ex-gratia
Payment scheme for patients infected with hepatitis C following
national health service treatment with blood or blood products.
Haemophilia patients who were infected with hepatitis C are
eligible for a payment under the Skipton fund.

Anyone eligible for payments, should have received them. The
Department is examining two cases where individuals claim that
they have not received payments they may be entitled to.


                          2 may 07 CJD
Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what
plans she has to test blood donors for vCJD; [131864]

(2) what estimate she has made of the annual cost of testing
blood donors for vCJD. [131865]

Caroline Flint: There are no current suitable tests for testing
blood donation for variant Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (vCJD), and
therefore no current plans to test blood donors. However we are
aware of a number of companies developing vCJD blood tests
and, if such tests become available and after consulting with the
appropriate advisory bodies, we will consider their utility in
testing blood donations with the National Blood Service.

There are no reliable current estimates of the cost of testing
blood donations for vCJD, which could only be accurately
calculated once a suitable test for testing donations is available,
and the cost of such a test known.


                          Haemophilia
Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
what research her Department undertook between 1980 and
1990 into (a) haemophilia and (b) haemophilia linked to HIV;
and what the (i) date and (ii) aims were of each project.
[133791]

Caroline Flint: The Department's principal funding for and
expenditure on research and development in the years from
1980 to 1990 was undertaken on a regional basis and the
information needed to answer the hon. Member's question is not
held centrally. The information that is available gives no
indication that research in the areas in question was centrally
commissioned during that time.

The Medical Research Council’s (MRC) report ‘AIDS Research
1990’ gives an account of a body of MRC-funded research that
includes projects concerned with haemophilia and AIDS. A
copy of the report is available in the Library.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
why funding for the Haemophilia Society has been withdrawn.
[133792]

Caroline Flint: The Haemophilia Society has received core
funding under the Section 64 General Scheme of Grants for a
number of years. We have not withdrawn Section 64 funding. In
line with the criteria for the Section 64 scheme we recently
informed the Haemophilia Society that we will be reducing their
funding and provided an explanation for the reduction in
funding well in advance to allow them to plan for this change.

The following level of funding will be provided over the next
three years:

      £
2007- 60,0
08    00

2008- 30,0
09    00

2009- 30,0
10    00
2 May 2007 : Column 1783W



                  3_May 07 Law on Damages
The Secretary of State for Constitutional Affairs and Lord
Chancellor (Lord Falconer of Thoroton): I will tomorrow
publish a consultation paper The Law on Damages.

The paper considers issues arising from anumber of Law
Commission reports. These include recommendations for
changes to the Fatal Accidents Act 1976 concerning claims for
damages where a person’s death has been caused by the
negligence of another person.

The paper also seeks views on the principles surrounding the
ability of people to claim damages for the cost of private
medical treatment under Section 2(4) of the Law Reform
(Personal Injuries) Act 1948, and on the interface between the
publicand private provision of care and accommodation
services.

In addition, the paper considers the law on claims for psychiatric
illness, aggravated and restitutionary damages, and the treatment
in damages awards of collateral benefits, gratuitous care and
services, and accommodation expenses.

Copies of the consultation paper will be placed in the Libraries
of both Houses and can also be obtained free on the
department’s website at:
www.dca.gov.uk/consult/confr.htm#full. The closing date for
consultation is 27 July 2007.



                     14th May 07 Blood
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how
much her Department spent on BPL Elstree in (a) 1977, (b)
1978 and (c) 1979; and if she will make a statement; [134900]

14 May 2007 : Column 572W
(2) how much her Department spent on the Lister Institute's (a)
Chelsea and (b) Elstree laboratories in (i) 1980, (ii) 1981, (iii)
1982, (iv) 1983 and (v) 1984; and if she will make a statement;
[134904]

(3) how much her Department spent on the Lister Institute's (a)
Chelsea and (b) Elstree laboratories in each year since 1977; and
if she will make a statement. [135278]

Caroline Flint: This information can be provided only at a
disproportionate cost.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how
much her Department spent on the production of blood products
in the UK for use by haemophiliacs in (a) 1977, (b) 1978 and (c)
1979; and if she will make a statement; [134901]

(2) how much her Department spent on the production of blood
products in the UK for use by haemophiliacs in (a) 1980, (b)
1981, (c) 1982, (d) 1983 and (e) 1984; and if she will make a
statement; [134912]

(3) how much her Department spent on increasing blood
donations at regional transfusion centres in (a) 1985, (b) 1986,
(c) 1987, (d) 1988 and (e) 1989; and if she will make a
statement; [134905]

(4) how much her Department spent on increasing blood
donations at regional transfusion centres in (a) 1977, (b) 1978
and (c) 1979; and if she will make a statement. [135279]

Caroline Flint: This information can be provided only at a
disproportionate cost However, in 1975 up to 500,000 (about
half of which would be recurring) was allocated to Regional
Transfusion Centres to increase plasma supplies to Blood
Products Laboratory. This funding was allocated to enable the
United Kingdom to achieve self sufficiency in blood products.
Further information is available in the report “Self Sufficient in
Blood Products in England and Wales” which is available in the
Library. The supporting references to the report are in the public
domain.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how
much her Department spent on imported blood products from
the US in (a) 1977, (b) 1978 and (c) 1979; and if she will make
a statement; [134902]

(2) what volume of factor VIII blood product was imported from
the US into the UK in (a) 1977, (b) 1978 and (c) 1979; and if
she will make a statement; [134903]

(3) what volume of UK-sourced blood was fractionated to
develop blood products for use by haemophiliacs in (a) 1980,
(b) 1981, (c) 1982, (d) 1983 and (e) 1984; and if she will make a
statement; [134907]

(4) what volume of cryoprecipitate was available for use in the
NHS in (a) 1980, (b) 1981, (c) 1982, (d) 1983 and (e) 1984; and
if she will make a statement; [134908]

(5) how much and what proportion of blood products given to
haemophiliacs in (a) 1985, (b) 1986, (c) 1987, (d) 1988 and (e)
1989 was sourced from the US; and if she will make a
statement; [134909]


14 May 2007 : Column 573W
(6) how much and what proportion of blood products given to
haemophiliacs in (a) 1980, (b) 1981, (c) 1982, (d) 1983 and (e)
1984 was sourced from UK donors; and if she will make a
statement; [134910]
(7) how much her Department spent on imported blood products
from the US in (a) 1985, (b) 1986, (c) 1987, (d) 1988 and (e)
1989; and if she will make a statement; [134911]

(8) what volume of factor VIII blood product was imported from
the US into the UK in (a) 1985, (b) 1986, (c) 1987, (d) 1988 and
(e) 1989; and if she will make a statement; [135267]

(9) what volume and proportion of blood products given to
haemophiliacs in (a) 1977, (b) 1978 and (c) 1979 were sourced
from USA donors; and if she will make a statement. [135277]

Caroline Flint: During the 1970s and 1980s the Department did
not purchase imported blood products. At the time, Blood
Products Laboratory (BPL) made plasma products from plasma
collected from British blood donors. From 1999 BPL has
obtained plasma from the United States as a precautionary
measure against vCJD transmission by United Kingdom plasma.
All US plasma collection centres are highly regulated and
conform to a strict code of practice.

Clinicians have been able to directly procure blood products
from other sources and data on their use is not collected
centrally. However, the report “Self Sufficiency in Blood
Products in England and Wales” contains information on the
annual consumption of factor VIII in the UK (table two) for the
years 1969-1987. In addition, further information on the
consumption of both the BPL and commercial blood products is
contained in two articles “Treatment of Haemophilia in the
United Kingdom 1981-1996”, by Rizza CR et al Haemophilia
(2001) 7, 349-359; and “Treatment of haemophilia in related
disorders in Britain and Northern Ireland during 1976-80”, by
Rizza CR et al British Medical Journal (286) 1983. Copies of
these articles have been placed in the Library.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of Statefor Health (1)
many patients were given blood contaminated with (a) HIV and
(b) hepatitis C while being treated by the NHS in each year
since 1997; [135032]

(2) what steps are being taken by her Department to prevent
contaminated blood reaching patients in the NHS. [135033]

Caroline Flint: The National Blood Service (NBS) is aware of
one case of HIV transmission to a blood recipient since 1997.
There have been no documented cases of transmission of
hepatitis C through blood collected by the NBS since 1997.

All blood provided for blood transfusion is screened for
evidence of infection with HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human
T cell lymphotropic virus and Syphilis before being released for
issue to hospitals. In addition, the NBS has put in place a
number of precautionary measures against the risk vCJD, such
as excluding people who have received blood transfusion from
donating blood.


14 May 2007 : Column 574W
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the
Government's policy is on self sufficiency in blood products;
and if she will make a statement. [136644]

Caroline Flint: We are not self-sufficient in plasma products.
Bio Products Laboratory (BPL) produces a range of plasma
products for the national health service and customers abroad.
BPL operates in a competitive market, and the NHS has always
been able to source plasma products from a range of suppliers.
Recombinant clotting products are now available for the
treatment of haemophilia patients.

BPL originally made plasma products from plasma collected
from British blood donors. From 1999 BPL has obtained plasma
from the United States as a precautionary measure against
variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease transmission by United
Kingdom plasma. All US plasma collection centres are highly
regulated and conform to a strict code of practice.
                      Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many requests her Department has received for original copies
of legal waivers signed by haemophiliacs undertaking not to
take legal action against the Department or any other public
body in respect of infection with HIV or hepatitis viruses as a
result of infected blood products; how many such documents the
Department has provided following those requests; and if she
will make a statement. [132464]

Caroline Flint: In the period April 2006 to March 2007 the
Department received three requests forcopies of waivers signed
by haemophiliacs infected with HIV through blood products.
The Department has been unable to satisfy these requests. There
is no requirement for such waivers in relation to infection with
hepatitis.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many haemophiliacs infected with HIV or hepatitis C or both
via contaminated blood products received compensation from
out of court settlements in (a) 1989 and (b) 1991; and if she will
make a statement. [132465]

Caroline Flint: This information is not available in the form
requested. Most of the registrants of the Macfarlane Trust are
haemophiliacs infected with HIV. There is also a smaller
number of their infected intimates, and some female carriers
who were infected with Von Willebrands disease.

On 31 March 1989 there were 700 registrants of the Trust and
on 31 March 1991 there were 970 registrants.

There were no out of court settlements for the period concerned
in relation to infection with hepatitis C.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many legal waivers were recorded by her Department as being
signed by haemophiliacs undertaking not to take legal action
against the Department or any other public body in respect of
infection with HIV or hepatitis viruses as a result of the 
 14
May 2007 : Column 575W
 use of infected blood products;
how many original copies of such documents the Department
holds; and if she will make a statement. [132479]

Caroline Flint: All new registrants of the Macfarlane Trust are
routinely required to sign a Deed of Undertaking at the time of
their registration, which indemnifies the Government against
any further litigation.

The Department currently hold 90 original waivers. A number
of signed waivers, going back to 1989, were inadvertently
destroyed with the files in which they were held. There is no
requirement for such waivers in relation to infection with
hepatitis.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
assistance her Department (a) has given and (b) expects to give
to the independent public inquiryinto the supply of
contaminated NHS blood to haemophilia patients. [135885]

Caroline Flint: Officials met with members of the inquiry team
on 25 April 2007 to discuss what information the Department
may be able to provide to the inquiry. It was agreed that officials
would provide a copy of a report, “Review of Documentation
Relating to the Safety of Blood Products 1970-1985”, which is
due to be issued shortly and will be placed in the Library.
Officials also agreed to provide some additional information
regarding the chronology of certain events.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
estimate she has made of the overall cost to the public purse of
providing ex gratia payments to the relatives of those who died
before 2003 as a result of infection with blood products
contaminated with hepatitis C. [135916]

Caroline Flint: The Skipton Fund was established in 2004, to
administer the ex-gratia payment scheme for people infected
with hepatitis C following national health service treatment with
blood or blood products. It has no commitment to make
payments to the relatives of those infected.



                      15th May 07 Blood
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what
representations her Department received prior to 1990 from the
World Health Organisation on the safety of imported blood from
areas with a high prevalence of hepatitis; and if she will make a
statement; [134906]

(2) what advice her Department received between 1977 and
1989 from the World Health Organisation on the safety of
imported blood from the US; and if she will make a statement.
[135266]

Caroline Flint: We are not aware of advice received from the
World Health Organisation (WHO) on the safety of imported
blood. The Department of Health and Social Security at the time
supported the WHO policy that each country should be able to
supply its own blood and blood products. Further information
about the policy to be self sufficient in blood products is
contained in the report, “Self-Sufficiency in Blood Products in
England and Wales”. A copy has been placed in the Library.

In 1975 a WHO resolution made a number of recommendations
in relation to blood safety (resolution 28.72).



                    7th June 07 HEALTH
                    Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if
her Department will release the audit certificates for files
containing documents mistakenly destroyed by the Department
in the 1990s and which were the subject of an Internal Audit
Report in April 2000 before the end of the inquiry chaired by
Lord Archer into contaminated blood and blood products; and if
she will make a statement; [141006]


7 Jun 2007 : Column 647W
(2) what records her Department holds on the work of the
Advisory Committee on the Virological Safety of Blood relating
to the years 1989 to 1993; and if she will make a statement.
[141032]

Caroline Flint: The Department holds seven files on the work
of the Advisory Committee on the Virological Safety of Blood
for the period 1989-93.

I regret that some volumes were destroyed in the 1990s, and this
was the subject of an internal review and report in 2000 which is
now in the public domain. The internal audit report clearly sets
out the sequence of events which led to the destruction of files.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she
will release the documents returned to the Department by
solicitors in a previous litigation against the Department as
referred to in the Review of Documentation relating to the
Safety of Blood Products 1970 to 1985 to the independent
public inquiry chaired by Lord Archer into contaminated blood
and blood products; and if she will make a statement. [141029]

Caroline Flint: The papers returned to the Department by
solicitors have already been released in line with the Freedom of
Information Act, and are in the public domain.

The Department has given an undertaking to release all the
papers held on the issue of blood safety between 1970-85. The
papers returned from solicitors and the references to the report
“Self Sufficiency in Blood Products in England and Wales” will
consequently be sent to the independent inquiry.
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what
plans her Department has to submit (a) written evidence and (b)
oral evidence from (i) Ministers, (ii) civil servants and (iii) NHS
staff to the independent public inquiry chaired by Lord Archer
into contaminated blood and blood products; and if she will
make a statement; [141030]

(2) whether her Department has been asked to provide (a)
Ministers, (b) civil servants and (c) NHS staff as witnesses for
oral evidence in the independent public inquiry chaired by Lord
Archer into contaminated blood and blood products; and if she
will make a statement. [141031]


7 Jun 2007 : Column 648W
Caroline Flint: Lord Archer of Sandwell wrote to the Secretary
of State for Health in February to invite the Department to give
evidence at the independent inquiry.

Officials met with members of the inquiry team on 25 April
2007 to discuss what information the Department may be able to
provide to the inquiry. We have made available a recently
completed document on the “Review of Documentation
Relating to the Safety of Blood Products 1970-1985 (Non A
Non B Hepatitis)”, and the supporting references. Copies of the
document are available in the Library.

Officials continue to liaise with the secretary to the inquiry
team.
11th June 07
                    Blood: Contamination
Mr. Holloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many known haemophiliacs who acquired HIV and hepatitis C
through blood transfusions there are in (a) Kent and (b) the UK.
[140358]

Caroline Flint: Data are not collected on the number of patients
with haemophilia infected with HIV and hepatitis C who are
living in Kent. Data for the United Kingdom is provided in the
table.

             Estimated number of haemophilia patients infected through conta
             alive
Hepatitis    2,538
C(1)

HIV(2)       360
(1)
    Estimated data from the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Directors’ Org
Database.
(2)
    Data from the Macfarlane Trust.



              12th June 07 Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
advice her Department has given to clinicians asked to give
evidence assurances to the inquiry chaired by Lord Archer into
contaminated blood and blood products; and if she will make a
statement. [141005]

Caroline Flint: None.
                    Blood Transfusions: AIDS
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how
many of the documents rediscovered by her Department as
referred to in the Review of Documentation relating to the
Safety of Blood Products 1970-1985 (a) have yet to be made
publicly available and (b) relate to AIDS/HIV; if she will release
all such documents to Lord Archer's inquiry into this matter; and
if she will make a statement; [140980]

(2) how many of the documents that were rediscovered by her
Department as referred to in the Review of Documentation
relating to the Safety of Blood Products 1970 to 1985 relate to
Non A Non B Hepatitis; and if she will make a statement.
[141007]

Caroline Flint: “The Review of Documentation Relating to the
Safety of Blood Products 1970-1985 (Non A-Non B Hepatitis)”
(NANBH) identified 56 previously unpublished documents that
relate to NANBH. These were released with the review on the
22 May 2007.

The review identifies just over 4,600 documents that have yet to
be made publicly available, and approximately 42 per cent. of
these have been identified as relating to HIV/AIDS. Lord Archer
has been advised that we propose to release these documents in
line with the Freedom of Information Act.


                         12th June 07 vCJD
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what (a)
tests and (b) prototype tests for the presence of vCJD in blood
are (i) available and (ii) the subject of research; and if she will
make a statement. [140982]

Caroline Flint: There is currently no licensed blood screening
test for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD). The
performance of a number of prototype vCJD assays is being
evaluated, and the results of this process will be available later
in the year.


12 Jun 2007 : Column 1009W
              vCJD: Blood Transfusion Services
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
arrangements are in place for blood specimens held by the
Blood Transfusion Service to be used in research to test for
vCJD; and if she will make a statement. [141008]

Caroline Flint: Access to blood samples held by the National
Blood Service is subject to the approval of the service and
where necessary the approval of an appropriate Research Ethics
Committee.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many requests her Department has received for blood specimens
held by the Blood Transfusion Service to be used in research to
test for vCJD; and if she will make a statement. [141009]

Caroline Flint: No record of requests are held by the
Department, any such requests received would be referred to the
National Blood Service for their consideration.


                     15th June 07 Blood: Safety
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if
she will release all remaining documents from those which were
rediscovered by her Department referred to in the Review of
Documentation relating to the Safety of Blood Products 1970 to
1985 before the end of the inquiry chaired by Lord Archer into
contaminated blood and blood products; and if she will make a
statement; [142679]

(2) how many of the documents rediscovered by her Department
referred to in the Review of Documentation relating to the
Safety of Blood Products 1970 to 1985 relate to the period after
1985; and if she will make a statement. [142681]

Caroline Flint: The review identifies that 20.5 per cent. of
papers have been categorised as relating to self sufficiency. The
focus of the review was 1970-85, and 90 per cent. of the
documents related to this time period, just under 10 per cent. fell
outside this timeline.

Lord Archer has been advised that the Department will release
all papers identified in the review, in line with the Freedom of
Information Act. The papers will be released to Lord Archer’s
inquiry as quickly as possible, in batches on a monthly basis.
                                CJD
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
steps have been taken to inform thosewho received blood known
to be at risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD)
contamination that they could be at risk of contracting vCJD;
and if she will make a statement. [142680]

Caroline Flint: The Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease (CJD) incidents
panel advises on the assessment and management of risk to
patients who may potentially have been exposed to CJD
following medical interventions. In December 2003, following
the first suspected case of variant Creutzfeld-Jakob Diseases
(vCJD) transmission through whole blood transfusion, the first
patient notification exercise was undertaken to notify recipients
of blood components donated by people who later developed
vCJD. There are currently around 24 people in this group who
are still alive.

Since then, three other notification exercises have been
implemented in respect of recipients of certain plasma products.
There are approximately 5,000 people in this group, which
includes patients with haemophilia A and B and Von
Willebrand’s Disease to whom it was indicated that they had
received United Kingdom sourced plasma derived vCJD
implicated products during the period 1980-2001, and would
therefore be considered at risk of vCJD for public health
purposes. Additionally notification has been given to about 100
blood donors to patients who later developed vCJD.

All the information documents used for these notification
exercises are available on the Health Protection Agency website
at:

www.hpa.org.uk/infections/topics_az/cjd/information_document
s.htm.


                          vCJD: Blood
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many blood samples from haemophiliacs have been made
available to the National Institute for Biological Standards and
Control for research into prototype vCJD blood tests; on what
dates such samples were made available; and if she will make a
statement. [142986]

Caroline Flint: None.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many samples of blood from haemophiliacs are being used in
research to test for vCJD; and if she will make a statement.
[142987]

Caroline Flint: We are not aware of any blood samples from
haemophiliacs currently in such use. No samples would be used
without ensuring compliance with appropriate ethical and legal
processes.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she
will list the batches of blood products administered to patients in
the UK that are known to be at risk from vCJD contamination;
and if she will make a statement. [142988]

Caroline Flint: In September 2004 selected groups of patients
were informed about the results of a risk assessment exercise for
blood plasma products, undertaken by the Health Protection
Agency. As part of this exercise, the batch numbers for plasma
products implicated with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease were
sent to national health service trusts, primary care trusts and to
the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors Organisation.


             25th June 07, Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant
to the answer of 12 June 2007, Official Report, column 988W,
on blood: contamination, what correspondence her Department
has had with (a) the UK Haemophilia Centre Doctors’
Organisation and (b) clinicians on the inquiry chaired by Lord
Archer into contaminated blood and blood products; and if she
will make a statement. [145480]

Caroline Flint: The Department has not had any formal
correspondence with the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre
Doctors’ Organisation or with clinicians about the Lord Archer
inquiry.

                         Blood: Imports
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant
to the answer of 4 June 2007, Official Report, columns 279-
80W, on blood: imports, (1) how much was spent on
commercially imported AHG concentrate/factor VIII blood
products by health authorities under arrangements centrally
negotiated by her Department in each year from 1977 to 1990;
and if she will make a statement; [145528]

(2) what records her Department holds on centrally negotiated
arrangements for the purchase of commercially imported AHG
concentrate/factor VIII blood products for health authorities in
the 1970s and 1980s; and if she will make a statement; [145529]

(3) how many blood donations were used to prepare AHG
concentrate/factor VIII blood products in the UK in each year
from 1977 to 1985; and if she will make a statement. [145540]

Caroline Flint: This information can be provided only at a
disproportionate cost.

                         Blood: Safety
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant
to the answer of 15 June 2007, Official Report, column 1381W,
on blood: safety, on what date her Department plans to release
the next batch of documents identified in the Review of
Documentation relating to the safety of Blood Products 1970 to
1985; and if she will make a statement. [145479]
Caroline Flint: The first batch of papers were sent to the
inquiry team on 15 June. Arrangements are in hand to place
these papers on the Department's website. As indicated
previously we will be sending papers to the inquiry team at
monthly intervals.


                          Blood: CJD
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant
to the answer of 14 June 2007 to 
 26 Jun 2007 : Column
610W
 question 142988, what the batch numbers were that
were provided to NHS trusts, primary care trusts and to the UK
Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation. [145747]

Caroline Flint: Details of the implicated batch numbers were
provided by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) to the United
Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors Organisation who wrote
to all Haemophilia centre clinicians so that they could inform
patients about their individual risk status. The HPA also
provided the batch numbers to national health service trusts and
primary care trusts for information.

Each patient was asked to indicate whether or not they wished to
know if they had received an implicated batch, and informed
according to their wishes. As some patients indicated through
their clinicians that they do not wish to be informed, it would be
inappropriate to publish full details of batch numbers.


                     9th July 07 HEALTH
                     Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant
to the answer of 25 June 2007, Official Report, column 230W,
on blood: contamination, what (a) written and (b) verbal
communications his Department has had with the UK
Haemophilia Centre Directors Organisation to date on the
inquiry chaired by Lord Archer into contaminated blood and
blood products; and if he will make a statement. [147951]
Dawn Primarolo: The Department has not had any formal
written or verbal communication with the United Kingdom
Haemophilia Centre Doctors’ Organisation about the Lord
Archer Inquiry.


                  10th July 07 Blood Donors
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) on
what dates blood donations were made to the UK Blood Service
by UK blood donors who later developed vCJD; and if he will
make a statement; [147585]

(2) how many UK blood donors have developed vCJD after
donating blood to the UK Blood Service; and if he will make a
statement. [147588]

Dawn Primarolo: Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD)
has been subsequently diagnosed in 18 people who before they
developed symptoms of disease had donated blood in the United
Kingdom which was transfused to recipients. These blood
donations were made between 1981 and 2004, and 66 people
have been identified who received blood from these donations.
Some of these donations were made many years before vCJD
was identified (and before Bovine Spongiform encephalopathy
was described).




              12th July 07 Blood: Contamination
Paddy Tipping: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
approaches he has received from Lord Archer of Sandwell
requesting papers and information to help his inquiry into the
contamination of blood products; what information has been
supplied; what information is outstanding; and if he will make a
statement. [148620]
Dawn Primarolo: Officials met with members of the inquiry
team on 25 April 2007 to discuss what information the
Department may be able to provide to the inquiry. Following
that meeting the Department sent the inquiry team a chronology
on the screening of donors for evidence of transfusion
transmissible infections.

We have also made available a recently completed document on
the ‘Review of Documentation Relating to the Safety of Blood
Products 1970-1985 (Non A Non B Hepatitis)’, and the
supporting references. These documents are available in the
Library.

Lord Archer has been advised that the Department will release
all papers identified in the Review, in line with the Freedom of
Information Act. The papers will be released to Lord Archer’s
inquiry as quickly as possible, in monthly batches. The first set
of papers were sent to the inquiry team on 15 June.


                     26th July 07 CJD: Blood
Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if
he will make it his policy to make the use of prion removal
blood filters mandatory in the UK should the tests on prion
removal blood filters in blood transfusions in Ireland prove
successful. [153532]

Dawn Primarolo: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given
to the hon. Member for Kettering (Mr. Hollobone) 14 June
2007, Official Report, column 1298W.


26 July 2007 : Column 1282W
Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
what estimate he has made of the likely number of vCJD blood
transfusion transfer cases over the next two years. [153534]

Dawn Primarolo: No estimates have been made of the likely
number of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) cases
arising from blood transfusion over the next two years. However
the Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee (SEAC)
did issue a position statement on Transmissible Spongiform
Encephalopathies infectivity in blood in 2006. A copy of the
statement can be found on the SEAC website at:

 www.seac.gov.uk/statements

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
what studies have been carried out on prion removal of blood
filters in the UK; and if he will make a statement. [153535]

Dawn Primarolo: The United Kingdom blood services are
independently evaluating the efficacy of the prion reduction
filters that are currently available and which meet the qualifying
criteria laid down by the Advisory Committee on the
Microbiological Safety of Blood, Tissues and Organs.

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
how many cases of vCJD have been recorded in the UK as a
result of blood transfusions. [153536]

Dawn Primarolo: There have been three cases of Variant
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the United Kingdom
arising from blood transfusions from donors who subsequently
died of vCJD. All three patients have died. A fourth patient who
received a transfusion from a donor who subsequently died was
also found to have abnormal prion protein in the spleen and a
lymph node after dying of an unrelated illness.
    3rd Dec 07-Health: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Roberts of Conwy asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Which Ministers, from which departments of state, including
   the Ministry of Justice, the Scotland Office and the Wales
   Office, will be meeting the independent public inquiry,
   headed by Lord Archer of Sandwell, into the deaths of
   1,757 haemophilia patients infected with contaminated
   National Health Service blood and blood products.
   [HL358]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): There are currently no plans
for Ministers to meet Lord Archer's independent inquiry.
Officials from the department are co-operating fully with the
inquiry, have met the inquiry team twice and have supplied it
with copies of relevant official documents in line with the
Freedom of Information Act.


     18th Dec 07Health: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Jenkin of Roding asked Her Majesty’s Government:

 Further to the Written Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 23
     October, how they reconcile its claim that “no criticism of
     the Archer inquiry team was intended” with the assertion
     in the Department of Health’s letter of 14 August,
     prepared “using information supplied by the department’s
     blood policy team”, to Mrs Harriet Bullock of Southwold,
     Suffolk, the widow of a haemophilia patient infected with
     contaminated National Health Service blood products, that
     Lord Archer of Sandwell’s inquiry “ignored the
     department’s offer of a meeting with the inquiry”; on what
     date the department’s head of blood policy first saw the
     letter of 14 August; under whose supervision it was
     written and sent; and in how many other letters the same
     information was used. [HL36]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): As I said in my earlier reply
of 23 October, I am very sorry that the department’s letter of 14
August to Mrs Bullock was open to misinterpretation, and an
apology has been sent to Mrs Bullock, copied to the Archer
inquiry team. However, to avoid any possible misunderstanding,
I can assure the noble Lord that at no time did anyone in the
department claim that Lord Archer of Sandwell had “ignored the
department’s offer of a meeting with the inquiry”.

The letter of 14 August was prepared by the department’s
customer service centre, using information supplied by the
blood policy team. The letter of 14 August stated:

 “Department of Health officials met with members of the
    inquiry team on 25 April to discuss how the Department
    may assist. In the months since April, the Department has
    suggested further meetings with the inquiry team, but as
    yet Lord Archer’s team has not arranged to meet again”.



18 Dec 2007 : Column WA124

This was intended to convey that the department remained ready
to meet Lord Archer’s team and I am sorry if any other
interpretation was possible.

Mrs Bullock replied to the department on 24 August. Mrs
Bullock’s letter alerted us to the possibility that our own letter
may be capable of different interpretations, as Mrs Bullock’s
letter of 24 August stated:

 “You have written that for five months the Dep. of Health has,
     ‘suggested further meetings with the enquiry team’, but
     that these requests have been ignored or refused by Lord
     Archer’s team”.

Mrs Bullock requested information about contacts between the
department and Lord Archer’s inquiry team and her request was
brought to the attention of the blood policy team. A reply to Mrs
Bullock, copied to the Archer inquiry team, was sent from a
freedom of information officer in the department on 17
September and stated:

 “Thank you for your further letter of 22 August requesting
    information on the dates the Department wrote to Lord
    Archer’s inquiry team suggesting a meeting. We are
    treating your letter as a request under the Freedom of
    Information Act. Your letter has been passed to me for
    reply.

 I am sorry if our reply of 14 August to your letter of 9 July to
     Alan Johnson was misleading in this respect. For your
     information, I attach two e-mails between the inquiry team
     and the Department suggesting a meeting once the inquiry
     team has had an opportunity to hear all the evidence and
     review relevant documentation which we are making
     available. No criticism of the inquiry team was intended
     and I apologise for the unfortunate wording of the
     previous letter.

 As you know, officials met with the inquiry team on 25 April.
    We appreciate that the inquiry team is currently occupied
    in hearing evidence, and will no doubt contact the
    Department once it has completed this process”.

During the time that this further reply was in preparation, the
department’s head of blood policy received a letter from Lord
Archer of 4 September, stating that his attention had been called
to the department’s first reply to Mrs Bullock of 14 August and
that he was concerned that the letter could be taken to imply that
requests for a meeting had been ignored by the inquiry team. He
asked that the department take steps to avoid repeating any
misconception in future correspondence.

The head of blood policy immediately spoke to Lord Archer to
apologise for any misunderstanding. When a reply had been sent
to Mrs Bullock, the head of blood policy contacted Lord Archer
on 18 September to repeat his apology in the following terms:

 “The department’s initial response to Mrs Bullock was written
    by our customer service centre and they have written again
    to Mrs Bullock apologising for the misleading impression
    they gave that your inquiry team had ignored our offer of a
    further meeting. I apologise that the erroneous impression
    was given, in the original letter, that your team had
    ignored our offer: this is not the case and I too was
    concerned when I saw the initial reply to Mrs Bullock”.

The department has now met the inquiry team again, on 19
September. The department has also copied to the inquiry team,
in stages from June to October, several thousand official
documents identified in the Review of Documentation relating
to the Safety of Blood and Blood Products (1970-1985), which
was issued in May 2007. I can therefore assure the noble Lord
that our officials are co-operating fully with the inquiry team.



18 Dec 2007 : Column WA125

Officials have traced 11 pieces of correspondence in July and
August that used the same information. These were received and
replied to before we were aware of any possible
misunderstanding from the wording used. A follow-up letter has
been sent to clarify our position and prevent any further
misunderstanding.
16 Jan 2008 : Column 1365W
                    National Blood Service
Jim Cousins: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will
hold a meeting with hon. and rt. hon. Members with a National
Blood Service centre in their constituency to discuss the
McKinsey report into the National Blood Service as soon as it is
presented to Ministers. [178066]

Mr. Bradshaw: The National Blood Service (NBS) is an
operating division of NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT). The
chairman and chief executive of NHSBT have indicated that
they would be willing to meet with stakeholders, including any
hon. Members to explain any changes as a result of the work
carried out by McKinsey once they have been agreed.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
progress is being made in relation to the review of the National
Blood Service, with particular reference to the Colindale Centre.
[179091]

Dawn Primarolo: The National Blood Service (NBS) is an
operating Division of NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT).
The senior management team and the Board of the NHSBT are
currently considering the results of a review of the NBS
strategy.

Details of the proposals for NBS, including plans for the centre
in Colindale, will be published shortly. As part of this process,
NHSBT will write to all hon. Members.


17 Jan 2008 : Column WA279

         Health: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 What information they have on the apology made and
     agreement reached by the Government of Japan with
     people there infected with hepatitis C by contaminated
     blood products approved by that Government; and whether
     the agreement reached in Japan will in any way affect
     policy in the United Kingdom. [HL1222]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): Department officials have
received no information from officials representing the Japanese
Government about the recent announcement to provide blanket
relief to people infected with hepatitis C through contaminated
blood products.

The Government have great sympathy for people infected with
contaminated blood products following National Health Service
treatment in the United Kingdom.


          Japan: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the Written Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 17
     January (WA 279), whether they will seek via the United
     Kingdom's diplomatic representation in Tokyo the fullest
     possible information on the apology made and agreement
     reached by the Government of Japan with people there
     infected with hepatitis C by contaminated blood products
     approved by that Government, in order to decide whether
     the agreement reached in Japan could in any way affect
     policy in the United Kingdom; and whether they will place
     the information in the Library of the House. [HL1533]



30 Jan 2008 : Column WA127

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): The Government have great
sympathy for people infected with contaminated blood products
following National Health Service treatment in the United
Kingdom. The position in Japan does not affect UK policy,
therefore we have no plans to obtain further information about
the agreement in Japan.



   29th Jan 08  Contaminated Blood and Blood Products
                           Inquiry
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether
his Department has been asked to provide a witness by the
Inquiry Team for the Independent Public Inquiry into
contaminated blood and blood products; and if he will make a
statement. [182624]

Dawn Primarolo: The right hon. the Lord Archer of Sandwell
wrote to the former Secretary of State (Ms Hewitt) in February
2007 to invite the Department to give evidence at the
independent inquiry.

Officials met with members of the inquiry team on 25 April
2007 and 19 September 2007.


                     6th Feb 08 HEALTH
                   Blood Donors: Prisoners
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with
reference to the Answer of 29 October 2007, Official Report,
column 991W, on blood: prisoners, (1) what his Department’s
policy was on blood donations from prisoners in each year from
1978 to 1986; and if he will make a statement; [182618]

(2) what records are kept of communications between his
Department and regional transfusion centre directors over blood
donations from prisoners in 1980; and if he will make a
statement. [182619]
Mr. Ivan Lewis: We have established that Regional
Transfusion Directors in England started to phase out blood
collections from prisons from 1980.

The Department has now released, in line with the Freedom of
Information Act, all the documents referred to in the reply given
on 29 October 2007. These include documents relating to the
use of blood from prisoners. These papers are available in the
Library and on the Department’s website at:

dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Freedomofinformationpu
blicationschemefeedback/FOIreleases/DH_076693



     20th Feb 08 Health: Contaminated Blood Products
Lord Roberts of Conwy asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the Written Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 30
     January (WA 127), whether they will apologise to NHS
     haemophilia patients for supplying contaminated blood
     products that infected them with HIV and hepatitis C, and
     to the dependants of the 1,757 who have died since being
     infected; and whether they will reach agreement with the
     haemophilia community to provide compensation for pain,
     suffering and deaths that ensued. [HL1840]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): The Government deeply
regret that patients with haemophilia were infected through
contaminated blood products. We have great sympathy for
patients who contracted HIV and or hepatitis C, and fully
appreciate the hardship and pain experienced by families who
cared for those who have died.
In 1988, the Macfarlane Trust was set up to administer a fund to
assist people with haemophilia who had contracted HIV
infection through contaminated blood 
 
 products as a result of
National Health Service treatment. In 2004, the Skipton Fund
was established to administer an ex-gratia payment scheme for
people infected with hepatitis C through contaminated blood or
blood products following treatment on the NHS.


          Government: Health Responsibilities
Lord Owen asked Her Majesty's Government:

 What functions and responsibilities the Secretary of State for
   Health has that apply in Scotland, Wales and Northern
   Ireland. [HL1244]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): The Secretary of State for
Health is responsible principally for health issues relating to
England and for certain issues which are reserved in the
different devolution settlements for Scotland, Northern Ireland
and Wales. Reserved matters are for the United Kingdom
Parliament and in general any executive functions are exercised
by the Secretary of State for Health, other persons, bodies or
authorities. The current position in relation to each devolved
administration is detailed as follows.

Scotland

In relation to health, Schedule 5 of the Scotland Act 1998
specifies the following matters as reserved to the UK Parliament
and thus outside the legislative competence of the Scottish
Parliament:

regulation of the health professions which were regulated prior
to devolution; misuse of drugs; medicines, medical supplies and
poisons; embryology, surrogacy and genetics (including the
subject matter of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act
1990);welfare foods; abortion; xenotransplantation; and the
vaccine damage payment scheme.
Other health matters are generally within the legislative
competence of the Scottish Parliament, though there is some
flexibility in terms of functions and responsibilities.
Northern Ireland

Schedule 3 to the Northern Ireland Act 1998 sets out reserved
matters on which the Northern Ireland Assembly would not
normally legislate and could do so only with the Secretary of
State for Health's consent, and subject to parliamentary control:

human fertilisation, embryology, surrogacy and human genetics;
and

xenotransplantation.

Other health matters are within the competence of the Northern
Ireland Assembly.

Wales

The majority of functions in relation to the provision of health
services in Wales are now conferred directly on the Welsh
Ministers under the National Health Service (Wales) Act 2006,
the prime duty being that set out in Section 1, to continue the
promotion in Wales of a comprehensive health service.



22 Feb 2008 : Column WA93

Schedule 5 to the Government of Wales Act 2006 sets out fields
within which, with the agreement of the UK Parliament,
legislative competence may be devolved to the National
Assembly for Wales to make measures. The fields include
health and health services, and social welfare. The UK
Parliament retains legislative responsibility for such areas until
legislative competence has been conferred by adding matters to
the fields under Schedule 5. To date, legislative competence has
been conferred with respect to NHS Redress (a matter inserted
for field 9 (health and health services)).

Part 4 of the Government of Wales Act 2006 sets out the
framework under which the Assembly's legislative competence
may in future be broadened to encompass power to make Acts if
approval is given in a referendum. However, certain health
matters will still be reserved to the UK Parliament. These are
listed in Schedule 7 of the Government of Wales Act 2006:

regulation of the health professions which were regulated prior
to devolution; misuse of drugs; medicines, medical supplies and
poisons; human fertilisation, embryology, surrogacy and
genetics; welfare foods; abortion; xenotransplantation; vaccine
damage payments; standards for, and testing of, biological
substances; and Health and Safety Commission, Health and
Safety Executive and provision made by Health and Safety
regulations.
International Obligations

While the settlements make clear that in relation to devolved
matters, observing and implementing international obligations is
within the competence of the administrations concerned, the UK
Government are responsible for ensuring that international
obligations are met across the UK. The Secretary of State has
powers to enforce compliance with international obligations in
respect of health and social care across the UK, covering
devolved fields if necessary but, in the case of Scotland, the
consent of the Scottish Parliament would generally be sought. In
terms of the Scotland Act 1998 international obligations does
not include European Community law and there is separate
provision for this.



          Health: Contaminated Blood Products
Baroness Masham of Ilton asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Whether they will hold a public inquiry into the deaths of
     haemophiliacs who have died because of transfusions of
     blood products contaminated with HIV or Hepatitis C.
     [HL2284]



12 Mar 2008 : Column WA233

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of
Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): As previously stated, the
Government do not accept that any wrongful practices were
employed and therefore a public inquiry is not justified.

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

 What consideration they have given to the decision of Lord
   Mackay of Drumadoon in the Court of Session to overturn
   the ruling of the Lord Advocate not to hold a full public
   inquiry into the deaths of haemophilia patients through
   contaminated National Health Service blood products on
   the ground that the decision was not compatible with the
   European Convention on Human Rights; and what are the
   implications of the ruling for National Health Service
   patients elsewhere in the United Kingdom. [HL2387]

Lord Darzi of Denham: The decision of Lord Mackay was
against the Scottish Government and it is for the Scottish
Government to consider how to respond to it.



                  25th March 08Blood: CJD
Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
assessment he has made of the level of risk of transmission of
vCJD infection posed by blood transfusions. [194324]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department produced two assessments
of the risk of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (vCJD)
transmission via blood transfusion in 2002: “Exclusion of blood
component recipients from donation: the impact on potential
vCJD transmission risks”, and “On vCJD transmission through
blood components: reconciling modelled risks with case
evidence”.

The Department published a preface to these two documents,
“Risk Assessments for vCJD and Blood Transfusion: Preface to
Papers Produced by Dept of Health Analysts”, in June 2006.
This addresses the implications of the first three cases of vCJD
transmission via blood transfusion. Copies of these three
documents have been placed in the Library and can also be
found on the Department's website at:

 www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publichealth/Communicablediseases/CJD/
   CJDgeneralinformation/DH_4136944.

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many people have developed vCJD infection following a blood
transfusion in each year since 1990. [194325]

Dawn Primarolo: There have been four cases of variant
Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (vCJD) infection associated with blood
transfusion, three of whom died of clinical vCJD, the fourth
died from an unrelated medical condition. These patients
received blood transfusions between 1996 and 1999, from
donors who subsequently developed clinical vCJD. Since 1999
the Department has put a number of precautionary measures in
place to prevent the possible transmission of vCJD by blood
transfusion.



                31st March08 Blood Transfusions
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with
reference to the answer to the hon. Member for Kettering of 14
June 2007, Official Report, column 1298W, on blood
transfusions, what methodology his Department will use to
assess the costs and benefits of implementing prion filtration;
what the timetable is for the conduct of such an assessment; and
if he will make a statement. [195778]

Dawn Primarolo: Prion filtration is one of a number of
possible variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease risk reduction
measures which will be considered by the Advisory Committee
on the Safety of Blood Tissues and Organs, during 2008.
Independent efficacy and safety studies of the only prion filter
currently on the market are being conducted, based on advice
from the Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee and
the Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Blood, Tissues
and Organs. An impact assessment of the introduction of prion
filtration will be conducted when adequate data from these
studies are available. 
 31 Mar 2008 : Column 567W
 The
guidance on producing impact assessments can be found on the
website of the Department for Business Enterprise and
Regulatory Reform, at:

www.berr.gov.uk/files/file44544.pdf.

                        HIV Infection: Blood
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many haemophiliacs infected with HIV through contaminated
blood products administered to 
 25 Jun 2008 : Column
361W
 them under NHS treatment (a) are still alive and (b)
were still alive in (i) 2000, (ii) 2001, (iii) 2002, (iv) 2003, (v)
2004, (vi) 2005, (vii) 2006 and (viii) 2007; and if he will make a
statement. [213515]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department does not collect the data
requested. However, the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centres
Doctors’ Organisation has provided the following information:

     Number of haemophiliacs (types A and B) infected with            Total deaths re
     HIV                                                              1)
20   484                                                              23
00

20      461                                                         14
01

20      447                                                         14
02

20      433                                                         9
03

20      424                                                         9
04

20      415                                                         9
05

20      406                                                         7
06

20      399                                                         6
07
(1)
      This figure includes death by all causes for haemophilia A and B patients wit




30 Jun 2008 : Column 650W
                   Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many and what proportion of documents relating to the infection
of haemophiliacs by contaminated blood products that were
rediscovered by his Department have not been released to the
Independent Inquiry into Contaminated Blood and Blood
Products chaired by Lord Archer QC of Sandwell; under what
provisions in the Freedom of Information Act 2000 these
documents have been withheld; and if he will make a statement.
[214733]

Dawn Primarolo: Some 4,500 documents were discovered in
unregistered files, and subsequently issued to Lord Archer’s
Inquiry and placed onto the Department’s website.

In total 18 documents were withheld entirely, and 17 documents
partly withheld, under the following exemptions in the Freedom
of Information Act:

Exemption                          Document        Part of document   To
                                   withheld        withheld           wit
Section 38—Health and Safety       1               9                  10

Section 40—Personal                3               6                  9
information

Section 42—Legal professional      8               1                  9
privilege

Section 43—Commercial              6               1                  7
interests

Total                              18              17                 35


Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many and what proportion of documents returned to his
Department by Blackett, Hart and Pratt Solicitors have not been
released to the independent inquiry into contaminated blood and
blood products; under what provisions in the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 these documents have been withheld; and
if he will make a statement. [214734]
Dawn Primarolo: Of around 600 documents returned by the
firm of private solicitors, one document has been withheld under
Section 40 (personal information) of the Freedom of
Information Act.


                    Blood: Contamination
Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
estimate he has made of the number of NHS patients who
received infected blood products in each year since 1992.
[229594]

Dawn Primarolo: Joint surveillance by NHS Blood and
Transplant and the Health Protection Agency of transfusion
transmitted infections began on 1 October 1995. Data are
collated on transmission of viruses and bacteria. Since October
1995 the confirmed number of patients who have received
infected blood products is 61. A further two infections were
reported since October 1995 relating to transfusions that
occurred in 1991. Complete data for the years between 1992
and 1995 are not available.

Patients receiving infected blood
products
                 Number
1995             3

1996            6

1997            8

1998            5

1999            7

2000            9

2001            5

2002            3

2003            5

2004            1
2005            4

2006            2

2007            3


27 Oct 2008 : Column 646W




                           Hepatitis
Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
estimate he has made of prevalence of hepatitis B in each
primary care trust; and if he will make a statement. [229590]

Dawn Primarolo: Estimates of hepatitis B prevalence at
primary care trust level are not available. The Department
estimates that about 0.3 per cent. of the United Kingdom
population is chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (about
180,000 people).

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether
he plans to commission research in the next 12 months on the
anticipated incidence of all types of chronic hepatitis B over
the next decade; and if he will make a statement. [229591]

Dawn Primarolo: The Medical Research Council funds a
portfolio of basic and underpinning research relating to chronic
hepatitis B, which may lead to further understanding of the
condition. Research specifically related to the anticipated
incidence of chronic hepatitis B over the next decade in this
country is not currently being funded.

The Health Protection Agency gathers information on a sample
proportion of persons in the United Kingdom infected with and
affected by chronic viral hepatitis as part of its remit for
monitoring infectious disease in this country. This information
includes analysis of hepatitis B virus both for definition of the
type and for evidence of drug resistance.

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many notifications there were for (a) hepatitis A, (b) chronic
hepatitis B, (c) hepatitis C, (d) hepatitis 
 27 Oct 2008 :
Column 656W
 D, (e) hepatitis E, (f) hepatitis F, (g)
hepatitis G and (h) hepatitis H in each year since 2000; and if
he will make a statement. [229592]

Dawn Primarolo: The information requested for hepatitis A,
and acute and chronic hepatitis B and C is shown in the
following table.

Statutory notifications of hepatitis A, B and C, annual totals, England and Wa
       Hepatitis A notifications            Hepatitis B notifications        H
2000 1,271                                  1,035                            1

2001 1,138                                 1,028                                1

2002 1,381                                 1,073                                1

2003 1,194                                 1,151                                1

2004 784                                   1,215                                1

2005 513                                   1,325                                2

2006 433                                   1,165                                2

2007 333                                   1,265                                2

Notes:
1. Viral hepatitis is a notifiable disease. A registered medical practitioner atte
statutory requirement to notify cases or suspected cases of viral hepatitis to t
2. Data on hepatitis D are not collected. Hepatitis D is a defective virus that r
the hepatitis B virus.
3. Notifications of hepatitis E are not recorded separately and are included un
hepatitis.
4. Hepatitis F is a hypothetical hepatitis virus. Several hepatitis F virus candid
Further investigations failed to confirm the existence of the virus, and it was
hepatitis.
5. Data are not routinely collected on hepatitis G. Extensive worldwide invest
association between the hepatitis G virus and hepatitis, and its clinical signific
6. There is currently no virus designated as hepatitis H.
Source:
Health Protection Agency
                           Hepatitis
Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
estimate he has made of prevalence of hepatitis B in each
primary care trust; and if he will make a statement. [229590]
Dawn Primarolo: Estimates of hepatitis B prevalence at
primary care trust level are not available. The Department
estimates that about 0.3 per cent. of the United Kingdom
population is chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (about
180,000 people).

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether
he plans to commission research in the next 12 months on the
anticipated incidence of all types of chronic hepatitis B over
the next decade; and if he will make a statement. [229591]

Dawn Primarolo: The Medical Research Council funds a
portfolio of basic and underpinning research relating to chronic
hepatitis B, which may lead to further understanding of the
condition. Research specifically related to the anticipated
incidence of chronic hepatitis B over the next decade in this
country is not currently being funded.

The Health Protection Agency gathers information on a sample
proportion of persons in the United Kingdom infected with and
affected by chronic viral hepatitis as part of its remit for
monitoring infectious disease in this country. This information
includes analysis of hepatitis B virus both for definition of the
type and for evidence of drug resistance.

Mr. Laxton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many notifications there were for (a) hepatitis A, (b) chronic
hepatitis B, (c) hepatitis C, (d) hepatitis 
 27 Oct 2008 :
Column 656W
 D, (e) hepatitis E, (f) hepatitis F, (g)
hepatitis G and (h) hepatitis H in each year since 2000; and if
he will make a statement. [229592]

Dawn Primarolo: The information requested for hepatitis A,
and acute and chronic hepatitis B and C is shown in the
following table.

Statutory notifications of hepatitis A, B and C, annual totals, England and Wa
       Hepatitis A notifications            Hepatitis B notifications        H
2000 1,271                                  1,035                            1

2001 1,138                                 1,028                            1

2002 1,381                                 1,073                            1

2003 1,194                                 1,151                            1
2004 784                                   1,215                                1

2005 513                                   1,325                                2

2006 433                                   1,165                                2

2007 333                                   1,265                                2

Notes:
1. Viral hepatitis is a notifiable disease. A registered medical practitioner atte
statutory requirement to notify cases or suspected cases of viral hepatitis to t
2. Data on hepatitis D are not collected. Hepatitis D is a defective virus that r
the hepatitis B virus.
3. Notifications of hepatitis E are not recorded separately and are included un
hepatitis.
4. Hepatitis F is a hypothetical hepatitis virus. Several hepatitis F virus candid
Further investigations failed to confirm the existence of the virus, and it was
hepatitis.
5. Data are not routinely collected on hepatitis G. Extensive worldwide invest
association between the hepatitis G virus and hepatitis, and its clinical signific
6. There is currently no virus designated as hepatitis H.
Source:
Health Protection Agency




         Lords 11 Nov 08 Health: Haemophilia
Baroness O'Cathain asked Her Majesty's Government:

 Further to the answers by Baroness Thornton on 9 October
     (Official Report, House of Lords, cols. 331-32) on the
     extent and depth of deprivation in the haemophilia
     community and the cut of 70 per cent in the Haemophilia
     Society's core grant, what action they have taken to
     assist the society to resolve its financial problem.
     [HL6098]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham):
Departmental officials are hoping to arrange a meeting with
the society in early December, to see how the society can
most effectively utilise third-sector funding opportunities. The
department will fully support and advise the society in doing
this.


    Commons 11 Nov 08 Liver Diseases: Screening
Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
plans he has to introduce a national screening programme for
liver disease. [233661]

Ann Keen: The Government have no current plans to
introduce a national screening programme for liver disease.

We are concerned about the increasing incidence of and
mortality from liver disease. We are already taking action on a
number of fronts to combat its primary causes—alcohol
misuse, viral hepatitis and obesity.

We are now considering the possibility of developing a national
plan for liver disease, which would cover early detection and
health promotion as well as the full range of health services.


                Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
Harry Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
reports he has received of the prevalence of new variant CJD
in the population carrying the MV gene; and what steps he is
taking in response to such reports. [246359]

Dawn Primarolo: There have been a total of 167 cases of
clinical vCJD in the United Kingdom. All of these patients have
been of MM genotype. There has been one reported case of
sub-clinical vCJD in a person of MV genotype, who died of an
unrelated cause without having developed clinical symptoms of
vCJD.


12 Jan 2009 : Column 137W
In December 2008, BBC Newsnight reported a case of CJD in a
patient of MV genotype. As part of a well established system,
all known suspect cases of CJD are reviewed and followed up
by the National CJD Surveillance Unit in Edinburgh and the
National Prion Unit in London. To date, the National CJD
Surveillance Unit has not identified a definite or probable case
of vCJD in a non-MM genotype individual.

The measures that have been put in place to minimise the risk
of person to person transmission of vCJD are appropriate for
the whole population, irrespective of the genotype of the
patient.


PQ for answer on the 13th Jan 09


409 Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, how many haemophiliacs known to have been
infected with HIV through contaminated blood products
administered to them under NHS treatment are still alive; and if
he will make a statement. (247048)
410 Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, what account his Department is taking in its
policy on testing for vCJD infection amongst at-risk groups of
the recent completion of the trial of the EP-vCJD(TM) test by
Amorfix Life Sciences in collaboration with the National
Institute for Biological Standards and Control; and if he will
make a statement. (247049)
411 Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, what the estimated cost is of testing for vCJD
all those considered potentially at risk of having contracted
vCJD after using infected blood products under the NHS; and if
he will make a statement. (247050)

412 Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, how many and what proportion of those
considered to be potentially at risk of having contracted vCJD
after using infected blood products under the NHS have been
informed of their at risk status; and if he will make a statement.
(247051)

413Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, how many haemophiliacs are estimated to be
potentially at risk of having contracted vCJD after using
infected blood products under the NHS; and if he will make a
statement. (247052)
414 Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, how many people are estimated to be
potentially at risk of having contracted vCJD after using
infected blood products under the NHS; and if he will make a
statement. (247053)

415
Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of State
for Health, whether his Department is planning to respond to the
forthcoming report by Lord Archer on contaminated blood and
blood products and to its specific recommendations; and if he
will make a statement. (247054)

416 Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 16 December 2008,
Official Report, columns 675-6W, on the contaminated blood
and blood products inquiry, if he will publish the (a) date and
(b) title of each document wholly or partly withheld under the
Freedom of Information Act specifying in each case (i) the
section of the Act under which the document has been withheld
and (ii) whether it has been partly or wholly withheld; and if he
will make a statement. (247228)

417 Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central): To ask the Secretary of
State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 16 December 2008,
Official Report, columns 675-6W, on contaminated blood and
blood products inquiry, how many of the documents discovered
in unregistered files and subsequently withheld from release
under exemptions in the Freedom of Information Act were also
withheld from release from the documents returned to his
Department's solicitors in May 2006 by Blackett, Hart and Pratt.
(247231)


15 Jan 2009 : Column 962W
                   Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
many haemophiliacs known to have been infected with HIV
through contaminated blood products administered to them
under NHS treatment are still alive; and if he will make a
statement. [247048]

Dawn Primarolo: The number of haemophiliacs known to still
be alive after being infected with HIV through contaminated
blood products administered to them under national health
service treatment is 345. In addition, there is a very small
number of women with bleeding disorders still alive who have
acquired HIV through this route.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
whether his Department is planning to respond to the
forthcoming report by Lord Archer on contaminated blood and
blood products and to its specific recommendations; and if he
will make a statement. [247054]

Dawn Primarolo: We await Lord Archer's report with interest.
We will decide whether and how the Department may need to
respond when the report is available.


  Contaminated Blood and Blood Products Inquiry
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
pursuant to the answer of 16 December 2008, Official Report,
columns 675-76W, on contaminated blood and blood products
inquiry, how many of the documents discovered in
unregistered files and subsequently withheld from release
under exemptions in the Freedom of Information Act were also
withheld from release from the documents returned to his
Department's solicitors in May 2006 by Blackett, Hart and
Pratt. [247231]

Dawn Primarolo: Around 4,500 documents were discovered
in unregistered files, and 35 were withheld from release under
exemptions in the Freedom of Information Act, as set out in
my answer of 30 June 2008, Official Report, column 652W.
One document was withheld from release from around 600
documents returned by a firm of private solicitors. The one
document withheld from those returned by private solicitors
was also among those withheld from documents found in
unregistered files. The document was withheld under section
40 (personal information) of the Freedom of Information Act.

                Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
account his Department is taking in its policy on testing for
vCJD infection amongst at-risk groups of the recent completion
of the trial of the EP-vCJD(TM) test by Amorfix Life Sciences in
collaboration with the National Institute for Biological
Standards and Control; and if he will make a statement.
[247049]


19 Jan 2009 : Column 1186W
Dawn Primarolo: Advice on the use of this test will be sought
from the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood, Tissues
and Organs and from the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD)
Incidents Panel when additional independent ongoing studies
are completed.


22nd Jan 09
                Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1)
what the estimated cost is of testing for vCJD all those
considered potentially at risk of having contracted vCJD after
using infected blood products under the NHS; and if he will
make a statement; [247050]

(2) how many and what proportion of those considered to be
potentially at risk of having contracted vCJD after using
infected blood products under the NHS have been informed of
their at risk status; and if he will make a statement; [247051]

(3) how many haemophiliacs are estimated to be potentially at
risk of having contracted vCJD after using infected blood
products under the NHS; and if he will make a statement;
[247052]

(4) how many people are estimated to be potentially at risk of
having contracted vCJD after using infected blood products
under the NHS; and if he will make a statement. [247053]

Dawn Primarolo: There are between 4,000 and 5,000
people, mostly haemophiliacs, currently considered at risk of
variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease because of exposure or
potential exposure via blood products. The haemophiliacs have
been informed of their risk status by the haemophilia doctors
managing their care, and the general practitioners of those
who are not haemophiliacs have been informed of the need to
advise their patients appropriately. The cost of testing this
group, should suitable tests become available, has not been
estimated.


                    HIV Infection: Blood
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
pursuant to the answer of 15 January 2009, Official Report,
column 962W, on blood: contamination, and with reference to
the answer of 25 June 2008, Official Report, columns 362-3W,
on HIV infection: blood, what analysis his Department has
made of the reasons for the rate of reported deaths of
haemophiliacs who contracted HIV as a result of taking
contaminated blood products under the NHS between 2007.
[251167]


5 Feb 2009 : Column 1506W
Dawn Primarolo: The Department has not made any analysis
of the reasons for the rate of reported deaths of haemophiliacs
who contracted HIV as a result of contaminated blood products
between 2007 and January 2009.

The figures reported in the answer given on 25 June 2008,
Official Report, columns 362-3W (399 haemophiliacs alive in
2007) came from the United Kingdom haemophilia centre
doctors’ organisation (UKHCDO). The figures reported in the
answer given on 15 January 2009, Official Report, column
962W (345 haemophiliacs alive at the end of 2008), came
from the MacFarlane Trust. Neither source can be sure their
information is complete and accurate. UKHCDO acknowledge
that their figures are likely to be an overestimate, while not all
patients will have registered with the MacFarlane Trust.

These figures do not mean that over 40 patients died during
the period in question, because the organisations source their
data in different ways.

The UKHCDO and the MacFarlane Trust are aware of these
discrepancies, and both organisations have agreed to work
together in order to try to harmonise relevant data while
maintaining strict confidentiality.
  Contaminated Blood and Blood Products Inquiry
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with
reference to the Answer of 15 October 1990, Official Report,
column 662W, on haemophiliacs (Aids), (1) how many of the
documents that were withheld from the courts by the
Department were among those that were not released to the
independent inquiry into Contaminated Blood and Blood
Products chaired by Lord Archer QC of Sandwell; and if he will
make a statement; [253285]

(2) how many documents were withheld from the courts by
the Department; and if he will make a statement; [253286]

(3) which documents that were withheld from the courts by
the Department have been subsequently released to the
independent inquiry into Contaminated Blood and Blood
Products chaired by Lord Archer QC of Sandwell; and if he will
make a statement. [253287]

Dawn Primarolo: In July 1990, the then Permanent Under-
Secretary of State certified to the High Court that
approximately 600 documents enjoyed immunity from
disclosure in civil litigation with regard to haemophiliacs who
had contracted the AIDS virus in the course of national health
service treatment. A definitive list of the documents is no
longer available in the Department’s files, and it is not
therefore possible to state with confidence how many may also
have been withheld in line with the Freedom of Information
Act from the approximately 4,500 documents released to Lord
Archer in 2007.

The documents issued to Lord Archer had been rediscovered in
the Department stored in unregistered 
 10 Feb 2009 :
Column 1926W
 files, and 26 of these unregistered files
were marked as undisclosed in litigation. It is therefore
believed that these files contain the documents referred to in
the 1990 certificate. From those 26 files, 12 documents were
withheld in whole and nine in part from those released in
2007. These were withheld in line with exemptions in the
Freedom of Information Act 2000, and not in relation to
different decisions made in 1990 when different rules applied.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
whether his Department has received (a) a draft copy and (b)
an advance copy of the report of the Independent Public
Inquiry into Contaminated Blood Products; and if he will make
a statement. [255217]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department has not received a draft
copy or an advance copy of the report of the Independent
Public Inquiry into Contaminated Blood Products.




NATIONAL HEALTH
SERVICE
(COMPENSATION)
HC Deb 05 December 1990 vol 182 c304
304
§
Mrs. Rosie Barnes, supported by Mr. Jack Ashley, Mr.
John Cartwright, Mr. Tom Clarke, Mr. Frank Field, Ms.
Harriet Harman, Mr. Charles Kennedy, Mr. Archy
Kirkwood, Sir Michael McNair-Wilson, Mr. Alfred Morris,
Dr. David Owen and Mrs. Ann Winterton, presented a Bill
to provide that persons injured, distressed or subjected to
unnecessary pain or suffering during care by the National
Health Service may be awarded compensation without
having to prove negligence on the part of the National
Health Service; to define eligibility for compensation; to
establish a Medical Injury Compensation Board and to
make other provision for the assessment of eligibility and
payment of compensation; and for connected purposes:
And the same was read the First time; and ordered to be
read a Second time on Friday 1 February and to be
printed. [Bill 21.]



http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article57
48778.ece


23rd Nov 89
There is an issue which ought to be covered by legislation but
for which none is proposed. I refer to society's responsibility to
the people, a minority though they may be, who suffer as a
result of accidents and, often now, I regret, treatments
undertaken under the National Health Service.

It is typical of the way in which the Government conduct
themselves that attention has to be drawn to the fact that an
important statement has been made today in a written answer. It
concerns the 1, 200 haemophiliacs who have the human immune
deficiency virus. I have a copy of the answer, which says :

"The Government share the universal sense of shock at the
unique position of haemophiliacs who have been infected by the
AIDS virus". I share that shock, but we must not let the
Government get away with feeling that it is unique.
Unfortunately, others have been infected by viruses as a result
of being given treatment under the NHS. An example is
infective hepatitis as a result of blood transfusions.

I should observe, for the benefit of those who do not know, that
the Government have made £19 million available to a trust and,
by implication, suggested individual ex gratia payments of
£20,000 this year for people who have been infected with HIV.
That settlement is massively lower than they would expect to
get in the courts. That is the first thing that has to be said. The
second is that it is inadequate. The third is that the House bears a
great responsibility for those people being infected with HIV.

I feel personally responsible. On 22 January 1975, as a Minister
in the Department of Health and Social Security, I announced to
the House a programme to make us


Column 272

self-sufficient in blood products, particularly Factor VIII. I
repeated that pledge on 22 April 1975, when I said that I hoped
that it would be done in two to three years, and I repeated the
pledge again on 29 April 1976 in a speech to the World
Federation haemophilia congress. When I said that we hoped to
be self- sufficient in blood products by mid-1977, I was not
speaking in the House, so that that statement did not bind
successive Governments. But we are all responsible for the two
earlier pledges that were given in the House.

The targets were not achieved and we are still not self-sufficient
in blood products. I was told by a Minister of the present
Government that they made the decision to be self-sufficient in
1982. Was Baroness Trumpington unaware that the House had
already been told in 1975 that Britain would be self-sufficient?
What happened? I have tried to persuade the parliamentary
ombudsman to investigate this issue, but failed, for if ever there
has been a clear and graphic case of maladministration, this
must be it. We are all responsible. It is no use trying to buy off a
court case with an inadequate payment given grudgingly. In
Canada, sums as high as £150, 000 are being paid out. In
Germany, there have been supplements of more than £160,000. I
have constituents suffering from asbestosis who will get more
than £20,000.
Mr. Robert Key (Salisbury) : The written answer to which the
right hon. Gentleman has referred was made in response to my
question. I acknowledge the long interest that he has taken in
this matter. It is important to recognise that, leaving aside the
monetary value of this ex gratia payment, which is not intended
to be compensation, there are difficult legal issues involved
which make the situation here quite different from that in other
countries where individuals are suing drug companies. That is
not happening here. It is clear from discussions that I and others
had with my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister yesterday that
there is no intention of these payments precluding a court case.
It is not possible, thank goodness, to buy off court cases in
Britain.

Dr. Owen : I pay tribute to the efforts made by the hon.
Gentleman and many others of all parties to allow the
Government to behave generously, but I do not think that even
he agrees that they have yet behaved generously. I agree that
there are complications. My argument is that we should be
legislating for a proper system of compensation that covers
haemophiliacs who have been infected with HIV and others,
such as those treated with Opren and those affected by
thalidomide. We all remember from The Sunday Times and
elsewhere the fight that they had.

People do not want to sue the Government when they have been
through the NHS. They want a system of fair compensation.
They know that what has been done is nothing other than an
accident and that there has been no malevolence. Other
countries have a legislative system which gives people a
statutory right to be compensated fully without having to fight
their case in the courts.

Mr. Michael Lord (Suffolk, Central) : Does the right hon.
Gentleman agree that one of the crucial arguments which is
usually put forwad by Treasury solicitors and others is that there
might be an open-ended commitment? The essence of what he is
saying, with which I agree, is that, tragically, for haemophiliacs,
the time-scale could not be more limited.
Column 273

Dr. Owen : We know that only 1,200 people are infected but,
sadly, more than 100 have already died. I believe that it would
be possible to negotiate a compensatory arrangement that would
obviate the need for any legal cases. For them to be withdrawn,
the settlement would have to be generous--at least four times
what is currently proposed. The House must accept that it
should legislate to create a statutory protection so that people do
not have to take the NHS to the courts and so that there is an
honest, open and fair system. I hope that this will be covered by
the phrase : "Other measures will be laid before you" and that
we shall not have to wait for another Queen's Speech.

The Home Secretary rightly drew our attention to the problem of
drugs. It is the biggest social problem that this and many other
Governments face. It is the dominant issue on the domestic
scene in the United States and involves the President. I do not
yet sense the same sense of urgency here. I do not think that we
have yet grasped what a devastating drug crack is. A person who
uses it once is hooked for ever, and has very little chance of
successful treatment. Every effort to stop that initial dose is
therefore of utmost and critical importance. I welcome the
measures that have been announced, but I urge the new Home
Secretary to give the matter the highest possible priority.
I want to draw attention to another scandal surrounding AIDS.
We should be blunt about it--we are not doing what we ought to
do to prevent the spread of AIDS, especially among the drug
community. The biggest bridge of AIDS into the heterosexual
community is among drug addicts. There are focuses of
infection among drug addicts which we know about. Edinburgh
is by far the largest in Britain, but it is spreading. We are still
failing to do what we have done in the past when faced with
infectious illness--to conduct routine blood tests without the
need to have permission for them.
When asked whether they want HIV tests, many people will be
frightened and resist. We have confronted this problem before. I
understand the fear. The main focus of AIDS is in the
homosexual community and, because that community has been
savagely discriminated against over the years, it senses that new
discrimination is coming because of HIV testing, which would
be conducted mainly among homosexuals.
Fear of testing and of the unknown has also been experienced
before. Syphilis was on the point of becoming a pandemic, and
doctors were under tremendous pressure to conduct compulsory
blood tests, but they refused. They argued that it would be
possible instead to conduct routine testing without permission
and for the information to be completely confidential between
doctor and patient. That is the public health practice that has
been used successfully in the past. Why was it not used for HIV
testing? Why were we told that we could not have HIV blood
tests without permission and that not to have written permission
was an assault on a person? We did not need written permission
for a Wassermann test for syphilis. I suspect that most hon.
Members have had such a test, unknowingly, 10 or 12 times in
their life. In some parts of the United States, it is compulsory to
have such a test to get a marriage certificate.
The way to deal with this matter is to identify the focus of
infection. We will now have a great fanfare of publicity because
of anonymous testing. What will that do? A ludicrous situation
will exist where the doctors know that the result of a blood test
is positive but will not be able to

Column 274

trace it to the individual or counsel that person who, not
knowing that he has HIV, could be infecting his wife, girlfriend
or boyfriend. How can that make sense? It is utterly ludicrous.
The medical profession seems to be completely stymied. I
receive private, confidential letters from members of that
profession asking, "Can you not do something about this?" I
write back, saying, "What is the advice of the chief medical
officer?" We have persuaded ourselves that a civil liberty is
involved. Is it a civil liberty to have people unknowingly
infecting some of those closest and dearest to them? It is time
that we went back to proper public health prevention practice.
The problem exists not only in this country but around the
world. I do not know what scientific advice the Government
have received or what the chief medical officer has said. I beg
the Government to listen to some of the comments of some of
the wiser heads in the medical profession who are deeply
worried. They believe that we have gone up a blind alley and
they are appalled and horrified by what is happening.

I turn to some of the more controversial, and perhaps party
political, sides of my speech. I wish to deal with the legislation
which should never be placed on the statute book. Nevertheless,
that will probably happen. Yet Conservative Members can stop
it. The National Health Service legislation is an odious piece of
legislation that is wrong in principle and in practice. Few
matters unite the whole medical profession. Aneurin Bevan was
never able to unite the whole profession against him--
[Interruption.] The right hon. Member for Chingford (Mr.
Tebbit), who stands outside the Chamber but no doubt would
like to repeat his comment in the Chamber, mentioned self-
interest. I must declare an interest in this matter. I ceased to
practise medicine in 1968, but I am still able- - [Laughter.]
Were the right hon. Member for Chingford to be suddenly
knocked down in this place by some terrible disease, the police
would first look for all the proper doctors. If perchance there
were none around, I would be called to him. I would still be able
to treat him, although I am sure that, like me, he would be
extremely anxious about my capacity to do so.
Aneurin Bevan was incapable of uniting the medical profession
against the NHS. He managed to stuff the consultants mouths
with gold and kept them on his side all the time. Even Barbara
Castle--a figure unknown to controversy --failed to unite the
medical profession. I managed to persuade her to stuff the GPs'
mouths with gold, and we paid them for family practitioner
advice. At one stage, it looked ominously as though we would
have the whole medical profession against us. This Government
achieved a unique distinction of uniting hospital consultants,
general practitioners, junior hospital doctors, retired physicians,
the whole nursing profession--hardly a soul who can speak
authoritatively for the NHS is not opposed to the Government's
proposals on the NHS.


25th Feb 09 Lords

Motions for Balloted Debate
Ballot on 2 April for debate on 23 April. Time
limit 2½ hours
Lord Morris of Manchester to call attention to
the findings of the Independent Public Inquiry
headed by Lord Archer of Sandwell into the
infection and deaths of patients with HIV and
hepatitis C by contaminated National Health
Service blood and blood products; and to move for
papers.
                  Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
(a) correspondence and (b) meetings his Department has with
the inquiry team of the independent public inquiry into
contaminated blood products (i) prior to and (ii) subsequent to
the beginning of the inquiry; on which dates such meetings
occurred; and if he will make a statement. [256698]

Dawn Primarolo: A search of departmental records shows
approximately 50 items of correspondence between the
Department and the Independent Inquiry into Contaminated
Blood and Blood Products.

Only one piece of correspondence dates from before the start
of the inquiry (27 March 2007). This was a letter from Lord
Archer to the Secretary of State dated 16 February 2007.

Officials from the Department attended four meetings with the
Inquiry. These took place on 25 April 2007, 19 September
2007, 18 February 2008 and 12 June 2008. No meetings were
held prior to the start of the inquiry.

The following table shows the main correspondence between
the Department and the Inquiry team. The remaining items
consisted of e-mails discussing administrative arrangements
relating to meetings and the delivery of documents.


23 Feb 2009 : Column 199W
Date       Type     From            To              About
16         Letter   Inquiry         Department of   Inquiry being set up
February                            Health,
2007                                Secretary of
                                    State

30 March Letter     Department of   Inquiry         Reply to letter of 16 February 2007
2007                Health,
                    Minister of
                    State

10         E-mail   Department of   Inquiry         E-mail providing information on the chronology of
February            Health                          screening of blood donors
2007

22 May     Letter   Department of   Inquiry         Release of report “Review of documentation
2007                Health,                         relating to the safety of blood products 1970 -
                    Minister of                     1985 (non-A, non-B hepatitis)”
                    State

14 June    Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter plus copies of 20 volumes of official
2007       ts      Health                           documents

10 July    Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter plus copies of 20 volumes of official
2007       ts      Health                           documents

1 August   Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter plus copies of 20 volumes of official
2007       ts      Health                           documents

22         Letter   Department of   Inquiry         Letter providing information on prio n removal
August              Health                          technologies
2007

31         Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter plus copies of 20 volumes of official
August     ts      Health                           documents
2007

22         Letter   Inquiry         Department of   Reply to letter of 22 August 2007
August                              Health
2008

5          Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter plus copies of 20 volumes of official
Septemb    ts      Health                           documents
er 2007
                  Blood Transfusions: CJD
Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for
Health what testing will be offered to patients with bleeding
disorders exposed to the risk of infection of vCJD from
transfusions; and if he will make a statement. [258720]

Dawn Primarolo: At present there are no suitable blood
screening tests available, although there are tests under
development which are currently being assessed. Advice on
the suitability of candidate tests will be given by the UK Blood
Service's Prion Assay Working Group and by the Advisory
Committee on the Safety of Blood Tissues and Organs. If a
suitable test is identified the offer of such a test to individuals
will be for agreement between the individual and their
clinician.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for
Health (1) how many patients with bleeding disorders have
been contacted to inform them of the level of risk of infection
of vCJD they may have been exposed to from NHS
transfusions; and if he will make a statement; [258721]

(2) what communication strategy his Department has
undertaken in order to inform patients with bleeding disorders
of the risk of infection of vCJD from NHS transfusions; what
the cost of that strategy is; and if he will make a statement.
[258722]

Dawn Primarolo: In 2004, haemophiliacs were notified that
they were considered as ‘at risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob
Disease (vCJD) for public health purposes’. The Health
Protection Agency (HPA) wrote to all haemophiliac 
 27 Feb
2009 : Column 1164W
 care centres asking them to notify
haemophilia patients and give them the opportunity to discuss
the implications.

On the advice of the UK Haemophilia Centre Doctors'
Organisation (UKHCDO) and the CJD Incidents Panel, it was
agreed that all patients with bleeding disorders who had
received plasma product clotting factors between 1980 and
2001 should be managed as 'at risk' whether or not they were
known to have received specific product batches manufactured
from donors who subsequently developed clinical vCJD.
Haemophilia centre doctors were asked to give patients the
choice of finding out whether or not they had been treated
with products known to have been manufactured using plasma
from donors who developed vCJD. In 2006 when further
implicated batches were identified, doctors were asked to
notify those patients who had received these batches.

In February 2009, the HPA coordinated a patient notification
exercise about a finding at post mortem of abnormal vCJD
prion protein detected in the spleen of a patient with
haemophilia. The HPA and the UKHCDO wrote to centres
asking that a letter be sent to all patients informing them of
this finding and emphasising that it did not change the status
of patients already informed that they were 'at risk'. The
doctors were asked to give patients the opportunity to discuss
the finding if they wished.

The patient notification exercises were supported by a wider
communication strategy in which documentation was sent to
others, including medical directors of NHS trusts, general
practitioners and clinician and patient organisations, including
the Haemophilia Society, and information placed on the HPA
website.

There are thought to be approximately 4,000 patients who
received plasma products between 1980 and 2001, and these
patients were contacted by their clinicians. However, the
precise numbers of patients contacted in each exercises is not
collected centrally.

Expenditure on these notification exercises has not been
separately costed.

                 Blood Transfusions: CJD
Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for
Health when the National CJD Surveillance Unit informed his
Department of evidence of infection of a patient with a
bleeding disorder with vCJD transmitted by a transfusion; and
if he will make a statement. [258723]

Dawn Primarolo: The information on the finding of abnormal
prion protein associated with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease
(vCJD) in a spleen sample taken from a haemophilia patient at
post mortem, was presented to the Department by National
CJD Surveillance Unit on 6 January 2009. Before the finding
was made public on 17 February, it was important to find out
information about the patient’s possible routes of exposure to
abnormal prion protein associated with vCJD. The Health
Protection Agency and the UK Haemophilia Centre Doctors’
Organisation worked to prepare accurate information packs
and letters for haemophilia centre doctors and their patients.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for
Health what estimate he has made of the potential financial
liability to the NHS arising from claims from patients with
bleeding disorders infected with vCJD from NHS transfusions;
and if he will make a statement. [258724]

Dawn Primarolo: No such estimate has been made. The
vCJD Trust is available to pay compensation to patients with
clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) and their
families and carers. No patients with bleeding disorders have
been diagnosed with clinical vCJD.



                          HEALTH
                   Blood: Contamination
Danny Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if
he will hold a public inquiry into the infection of haemophiliacs
with hepatitis C and HIV due to the use of contaminated blood
by the NHS. [261080]

Dawn Primarolo: We have considered the call for a public
inquiry very carefully. However the Government do not
consider a further inquiry is justified as it would not add to
current knowledge about how infections happened or the steps
taken to deal with the problem.

Although the Government do not accept that any wrongful
practices were employed, successive Governments have
acknowledged the tragic circumstances surrounding infection
in recipients of blood and blood products. That is why ex-gratia
payment schemes were established.

Danny Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if
he will make it his policy to pay compensation to
haemophiliacs infected with hepatitis C and HIV following the
use of contaminated blood by the NHS. [261081]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department has set up three ex gratia
payment schemes for those infected with Human
immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or hepatitis C through national
health service treatment—the Macfarlane Trust, the Eileen
Trust and the Skipton Fund Ltd.

The Macfarlane Trust was set up in 1988 to establish a
hardship fund to assist haemophiliacs who contracted HIV
following treatment with blood products on the NHS.

The Eileen Trust was set up in 1993 as a charitable trust to
assist people other than those with bleeding disorders, who
had contracted HIV through NHS treatment with contaminated
blood products.

The Skipton Fund Ltd was set up in 2004 as an ex gratia
payment scheme for patients infected with hepatitis C through
NHS contaminated blood and blood products, provided the
patient was alive on 29 August 2003.

The Department is giving Lord Archer's report the
consideration it deserves and will respond as soon as it has
done so.
6 Mar 2009 : Column 1868W
  Contaminated Blood and Blood Products Inquiry
Danny Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
what consideration his Department gave to providing
witnesses to give evidence in public to the Archer Inquiry into
contaminated blood and blood products. [261082]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department has never received any
formal request to give evidence to the inquiry. There are no
serving officials who would have any first hand knowledge of
the events being investigated. However, the Department has
fully co-operated with the inquiry, meeting with Lord Archer's
team several times and supplying copies of relevant official
documents.
18         E-mail   Department of   Inquiry         Clarifying an is sue with private office
Septemb             Health                          correspondence
er 2007

26         Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter plus copies of 20 volumes of official
October    ts and  Health                           documents; Letter with copies of two further
2007       Letter                                   documents

2          Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter with copies of six official documents
January    ts      Health
2008

28 March Documen Department of      Inquiry         Letter with copies of three official documents
2008     ts      Health

1 April    Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter with copies of three official documents
2008       ts      Health

2 May      Documen Department of    Inquiry         Letter with copy of one official document
2008       ts      Health

16 June    E-mail   Department of   Inquiry         E-mail providing information on the timetable for
2008                Health                          heat-treatment

8          Letter  Department of    Inquiry         Letter with copies of 10 official documents
October    and     Health
2008       Documen
           ts

16         Letter   Inquiry         Department of   Reply to letter of 8 October 2008
October                             Health
2008



vvvv




          19th March 09 Contaminated Blood and Blood
                        Products Inquiry
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
consideration he has given to responding to the report from
the Archer Inquiry into contaminated blood and blood
products; if he will respond in full to its recommendations; and
if he will make a statement. [264205]

Dawn Primarolo: The Department is carefully considering the
recommendations made by Lord Archer. In recognition of the
seriousness we attach to this issue, my right hon. Friend the
Secretary of State for Health and I have met with Lord Archer
to discuss his recommendations.

           31st March 09 Hepatitis: Blood Transfusions
Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will
make it his policy to establish a public inquiry into the
transmission of hepatitis C and HIV through blood and blood
products; and if he will make a statement. [267049]

Dawn Primarolo: The Government have great sympathy for
those affected in this way, and are deeply sorry that this
happened as a result of national health service treatment that
was given in good faith. However, these events have been
the subject of long-concluded legal proceedings, and the
Government have established three schemes to provide
financial assistance to those affected.

Lord Archer of Sandwell has recently issued the report of his
independent inquiry into these issues. I have met with Lord
Archer to discuss his report, and will consider his conclusions
and recommendations very carefully.

Note;; she may think she has dealt with how this happened
but she avoids any reference to how the state have acted to
influence legal proceedings and actively collude to destroy or
hide any embarrassment by way of waivers and now they
ignore the actions after the infections took place?

Standards Committee ?


           2nd April 09 HIV Infection: Charities
Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how
much funding his Department provided for (a) the Eileen Trust
and (b) the MacFarlane Trust in 2008-09. [267738]

Dawn Primarolo: The funding from the Department for the
Macfarlane Trust and Eileen Trust in 2008-09 was £3,754,000
and £178,000 respectively.




       20th April 22, 2009 Blood: Contamination
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how
many inquests into the deaths of people who contracted (a)
HIV, (b) Hepatitis C or (c) variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
through contaminated blood products administered to them
under the NHS have been completed; and if he will make a
statement. [269757]

Bridget Prentice: The Ministry of Justice collects statistics on
the verdicts returned at inquests by coroners in England and
Wales during each calendar year, broken down into 15
categories of verdict and the sex of the deceased. No further
information is collected on the circumstances of each case. (In
a reformed system, the Chief Coroner is likely to review the
matters on which annual statistics are collected and published,
and is likely to consider whether there are specific issues on
which occasional research should be carried out.)

 22 April 09 Contaminated Blood and Blood Products
                           Inquiry
Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
pursuant to the answer of 19 March 2009, Official Report,
column 1302W, on contaminated blood and blood products,
what timetable he has set for responding to the
recommendations made by Lord Archer; by what mechanism
that response will be made; and if he will make a statement.
[269473]

Dawn Primarolo: Ministers have met Lord Archer to discuss
his recommendations. These recommendations are receiving
very careful consideration, and we will respond in due course.

              30th April 09 Blood Transfusions
Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what
assessment he has made of the effect of testing for variant
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in blood products on the supply of
red cells, platelets and plasma in the UK; and whether his
Department is assessing the merits of importing such
products. [271518]

Dawn Primarolo: At present, there is no validated test for
variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) suitable for the mass
screening of blood donations on the market, although the
technology is under development. The UK blood services have
already conducted research to assess the impact of introducing
such a test on blood supply. Further research is planned to
explore the potential impact of a vCJD test on the behaviour of
donors and potential donors. This will assist in decision making
and planning to ensure the future safety and sufficiency of the
blood supply for patients.

NHS Blood and Transplant has also conducted preliminary
research into whether red cells could be imported from
Europe, as under European Union law all donated blood must
meet the same standards of safety and quality. The
independent Advisory Committee on the Safety of Blood,
Tissues and Organs, which advises the Government on matters
of blood safety, will consider steps to reduce the risk of vCJD
disease, including importation of red cells and fresh frozen
plasma, at meetings in April and July 2009.


         Health: Contaminated Blood Products
                             Question
              Asked by Lord Roberts of Conwy

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the answers by
     Baroness Thornton on 5 March (Official Report, House of
     Lords, cols. 844—46), what representations they have
     received from Mrs Harriet Bullock of Reydon, Suffolk, the
     widow of a haemophilia patient fatally infected with
     hepatitis C by contaminated NHS products, about those
     answers. [HL2493]



5 May 2009 : Column WA101

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): It would
be inappropriate to give details of any correspondence which is
treated as confidential.



12 May 2009 : Column 677
T2. [274125] Bob Spink (Castle Point) (Ind): A number of
my constituents have been the victims of contaminated blood.
When will the Government respond to the Archer report, and
may we have a debate so that we can consider the report and
Tainted Blood’s document, “We Accuse”? This is a matter of
decency and fair play for those victims.
The Minister of State, Department of Health (Dawn
Primarolo): My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State and I
have met Lord Archer to discuss his report, and the
Government intend to respond to his findings before the House
adjourns for the spring bank holiday recess. The question of a
debate is a bit beyond my remit, Mr. Speaker, but I am sure
that you heard what the hon. Gentleman said.

                   Health: Haemophilia

                         Question

      Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

0.To ask Her Majesty's Government whether
     the Chief Medical Officer at the
     Department of Health has revised his
     description of any risk to haemophilia
     patients of contracting variant CJD from
     blood given from donors who have
     subsequently died of vCJD as being
     "hypothetical", in light of a recent post-
     mortem having found vCJD in the spleen
     of one such patient; and how many
     patients have received blood from donors
     who have subsequently died of vCJD.
     [HL3312]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of
State, Department of Health (Lord Darzi of
Denham): The department and the Health
Protection Agency acknowledged in 2004 the
possibility that all patients with bleeding
disorders who had been treated with United
Kingdom-sourced pooled plasma products

 
 14 May 2009 : Column
WA230
 
 between 1980 and 2001 were,
owing to potential variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob
disease (vCJD) infectivity from these products,
at risk of vCJD. The CJD Incidents Panel will
consider the evidence from the recent finding of
asymptomatic vCJD infection in a haemophiliac
who died of unrelated causes and the
implications for other haemophiliac patients
when they meet on 20 May 2009. Their advice
will be provided to the Chief Medical Officers,
the UK Health Departments and the UK blood
services.

To date, 802 haemophilia patients are
registered on the United Kingdom Haemophilia
Centre Doctors’ Organisation database as
receiving clotting factors made from UK plasma
pools containing a donation from a donor who
later went on to develop vCJD.

In addition, there are 22 living recipients of
blood components transfusion (this includes red
cells, platelets and fresh frozen plasma) from
blood donors who later went on to develop
vCJD. None of these 22 recipients is a person
with haemophilia.

Sixty-six people received blood components
transfusion (red cells, platelets and fresh frozen
plasma) from blood donors who later went on to
develop vCJD. Of these the majority of these
patients have died, three after contracting vCJD
and the others from unrelated causes, and 22
remain alive. None of these recipients was a
person with haemophilia.
                           Blood
Stephen Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Health
what assessment he has made of the likely effect on blood
supplies of implementing the recommendations contained
within the Archer Report on levels of contaminated blood
supplies; and if he will make a statement. [276385]


19 May 2009 : Column 1373W
Dawn Primarolo: The Department has given careful
consideration to the recommendations contained in Lord
Archer’s report. We expect to publish the Government
response to Lord Archer’s report by the end of May.

Written Questions lords for answer 15th June
Lord Morris of Manchester to ask Her Majesty’s
Government, further to the Written Answer by
Lord Darzi of Denham on 14 May (WA 229-30) on
the implications for haemophilia patients of a post-
mortem having found vCJD in the spleen of one
such patient, what was the outcome of the CJD
Incidents Panel’s consideration of the case and its
implications on 20 May; who attended the Panel’s
meeting; and why it was not held nearer to the
date of the post-mortem. HL3959
Lord Morris of Manchester to ask Her Majesty’s
Government, further to the Written Answer by
Lord Darzi of Denham on 14 May (WA 229-30),
whether it remains the view of the Chief Medical
Officer at the Department of Health that any risk
to haemophilia patients of contracting vCJD from
blood given from donors who subsequently died of
vCJD is hypothetical. HL3960
Lord Morris of Manchester to ask Her Majesty’s
Government what is their assessment of the
statement by Lord Thomas of Gresford on 23 April
(HL Deb, col 1613) in the debate on the use of
NHS blood products contaminated with HIV and
hepatitis C in the treatment of haemophilia
patients that if Ministers chose to back-date as
necessary the waiving of Crown immunity it would
still be possible for actions to be brought by those
afflicted or bereaved by the contamination.
HL3961


         Health: Contaminated Blood Products

                         Questions
            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate the
     Department of Health has made of the cost of the
     proposals set out in its response of 20 May to the report
     of the Independent Public Inquiry headed by Lord Archer
     of Sandwell into the infection of haemophilia patients
     with HIV and hepatitis C by contaminated NHS blood
     products; and whether they will provide a breakdown of
     the costs of each of the proposals in the response.
     [HL3891]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): The
estimated annual cost of honouring the Government's
commitment to increase financial assistance available to those
infected with HIV and their dependants is in the order of some
millions of pounds. Our intention is that the annual payment to
each infected individual should be double the average annual
payment at present. The details of payments to infected
individuals and to their dependants remain to be clarified
through detailed discussion with the trustees of the Macfarlane
and Eileen Trusts. Those discussions have commenced.

The estimated cost of the other proposals set out in the
Government's response to Lord Archer's independent inquiry
report on National Health Service supplied contaminated blood
and blood products is £100,000 per annum until March 2014
to support the Haemophilia Society; £10,000 per annum to
support twice-yearly meetings with the Haemophilia Alliance;
and £50,000 to fund a look-back exercise to identify other
patients with bleeding disorders who may have been infected
via their treatment.

It is not possible at present to estimate the additional costs
which may arise from Government's commitment to review, in
2014, the Skipton Fund, which makes payments to those
infected with hepatitis C.

3 Jun 2009 : Column WA92

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the remarks by
     Lord Darzi of Denham on 28 April (Official Report, House
     of Lords, col. 143) undertaking to assist in securing time
     for their response to the report of the Independent Public
     Inquiry headed by Lord Archer of Sandwell into the use
     of contaminated blood in the NHS treatment of
     haemophilia patients to be debated in the House of
     Lords, when the debate will take place; and whether they
     will indicate its timing, following their response to the
     Archer report being made by Written Statement.
     [HL3904]

Lord Darzi of Denham: The department would be happy to
debate this issue in the House of Lords. However, all debate
requests are subject to consultation and agreement with the
Government Whips Office and the usual channels of the House.
         Health: Contaminated Blood Products
                          Question
           Asked by Lord Corbett of Castle Vale

 To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will respond to
     the recommendation of the Independent Inquiry on NHS
     Supplied Contaminated Blood and Blood Products that
     the Government should review the conditions under
     which the widow of a patient infected by blood products
     now becomes eligible for financial assistance. [HL3972]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): The
Government responded to the recommendations of Lord
Archer’s report on 20 May 2009. We have committed to review
the Skipton Fund, for those infected with hepatitis C, in 2014.

Payments to widows of those infected with HIV are made at
the discretion of the trustees of the MacFarlane and Eileen
Trusts.

                   Health: Haemophilia
                         Questions
            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 14 May (WA 229—
     30) on the implications for haemophilia patients of a
     post-mortem having found vCJD in the spleen of one
     such patient, what was the outcome of the CJD Incidents
     Panel's consideration of the case and its implications on
     20 May; who attended the panel's meeting; and why it
     was not held nearer to the date of the postmortem.
     [HL3959]



15 Jun 2009 : Column WA180

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): The
Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (CJD) incidents panel, at its meeting
on 20 May 2009, reviewed all available information in relation
to the postmortem finding of abnormal prion protein
associated with variant CID (vCJD) in a sample from the
spleen of a haemophiliac.

The panel concluded that there is no evidence to change the
current advice to those patients who used United Kingdom
sourced pooled plasma products between 1980 and 2001
already notified as being at risk of vCJD for public health
purposes, or to notify any new groups of patients.

Letters confirming this conclusion will be sent to UK
Haemophilia Centre Doctors with information to pass on to
their patients.

The panel meeting was attended by:

Chairman

Mr David Pryer             Lay Chairman

Deputy Chairman

Professor Don Jeffries     Virology

Members

Dr Miles Allison           Gastroenterology

Dr Gerry Bryant            Public Health Medicine

Professor Geoff Craig      Dental Surgery

Dr Pat Hewitt              Blood Safety

Professor James Ironside   TSE Infectivity, Neuropathology

Mrs Diana Kloss            Law

Professor John Lumley      General Surgery

Mrs Caroline Ness          Lay Member

Dr Derek Norfolk           Haematology

Mr Ian Pearce              Ophthalmology
Dr Patrick Radford          Anaesthesiology

Dr Geoff Ridgway            Microbiology

Professor John Saunders     Medical Ethics

Ms Gillian Turner           Patient Support

Dr Hester Ward              Epidemiology

Professor Bob Will          Neurology

Ms Kate Woodhead            Theatre Nursing

Dr Tim Wyatt                Microbiology

Observers

                            HPIH&SD Analytical Team, Department of
Dr Peter Bennett
                            Health

                            HPIH&SD Analytical Team, Department of
Mr Stephen Dobra
                            Health

Dr Sara Hayes (from
                            National Assembly of Wales
fpm)

Miss Charlotte Mirrielees   Scientific Secretary, ACDP TSE Working Group

Mr Mark Noterman            Department of Health

Visitors

Prof Frank Hill             UK Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation

Dr Peter Rudge              Neurology

Secretariat

Dr Nicky Connor             Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections

Ms Dominique Brookes        Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections

Ms Helen Janecek            Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections

Dr Elizabeth Rudd           Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections
Dr Akram Zaman             Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections



15 Jun 2009 : Column WA181

The meeting was held after all the evidence in this case,
including multiple sets of case notes, hospital records and
records of blood product usage, had been collected and
reviewed and a full risk assessment prepared. Papers about
this case are being prepared for publication and the risk
assessment will be published on the department's website at
dh.gov.uk on 9 June 2009.

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 14 May (WA 229—
     30), whether it remains the view of the Chief Medical
     Officer at the Department of Health that any risk to
     haemophilia patients of contracting vCJD from blood
     given from donors who subsequently died of vCJD is
     hypothetical. [HL3960]

Lord Darzi of Denham: There have been no clinical cases of
vCJD amongst people with haemophilia who have been treated
with United Kingdom-derived pooled plasma products or UK-
derived coagulation factors. The view of the department, the
chief medical officer and the Health Protection Agency remains
that first set out in 2004, that patients who have been treated
with UK-sourced pooled factor concentrates and antithrombin
between 1980 and 2001 are at increased risk of vCJD for
public health purposes.

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their assessment
     of the statement by Lord Thomas of Gresford on 23 April
     (Official Report, House of Lords, col. 1613) in the debate
     on the use of NHS blood products contaminated with HIV
     and hepatitis C in the treatment of haemophilia patients
     that if Ministers chose to back-date as necessary the
     waiving of Crown immunity it would still be possible for
     actions to be brought by those afflicted or bereaved by
     the contamination. [HL3961]
Lord Darzi of Denham: Crown immunity did not protect from
civil suit, but only from prosecution under the Medicines Act.
Some affected persons did bring an action in 1990, which was
settled out of court. Affected persons did and do therefore
have rights of redress in civil law.

         Health: Contaminated Blood Products

                           Questions
            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Statement by Lord Darzi of Denham on 20 May (WS
     121—22), what meetings have taken place between
     officials at the Department of Health and the Macfarlane
     Trust to ensure that the department had the latest data
     on the number of surviving persons with haemophilia
     who had been infected with HIV and hepatitis C by
     contaminated National Health Service blood products.
     [HL4130]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham):
Departmental officials and officers of the Macfarlane Trust,
have met many times in the past to keep each other updated.
Most recently, officials met the chairman and officers of the
Macfarlane Trust on 27 May 2009.

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Statement by Lord Darzi of Denham on 20 May (WS
     121—22), what assessment they have made of how
     much it would cost for the provision of life insurance
     cover for patients infected with HIV or hepatitis C or both
     by contaminated National Health Service blood products
     to be at least as good as the provision made in the
     Republic of Ireland, as recommended by the Independent
     Public Inquiry headed by Lord Archer of Sandwell.
     [HL4132]

Lord Darzi of Denham: Officials discussed the general issue
of insurance for haemophiliacs with the Association of British
Insurers. They advised that it is not possible to calculate the
total cost of life insurance provision for patients infected with
HIV or hepatitis C or both by contaminated National Health
Service blood products as the premiums would vary for each
individual and would be dependent on their particular
circumstances.

The position in Ireland is different. The Irish Government set
up their hepatitis C compensation scheme, and insurance
arrangements, following the finding of a judicial inquiry, the
Finlay report, that “wrongful acts were committed”. It is
important to stress that the blood services in the United
Kingdom (UK) have not been found to be similarly at fault.
Payments are therefore being made in very different, specific
circumstances in Ireland that do not apply in the UK.



         Health: Contaminated Blood Products
                          Questions
            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Statement by Lord Darzi of Denham on 20 May (WS
     121—22), how the average annual payment of £6,400
     for the Macfarlane Trust's beneficiaries was determined;
     and whether any meetings between officials at the
     Department of Health and the trust have demonstrated
     that the sum may need adjusting. [HL4131]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): A broad
indicator of the annual level of benefit currently available
through the Macfarlane Trust was calculated by dividing the
total number of beneficiaries into the total expenditure of the
trusts, the result being an overall average of £6,400. Officials
also referred to information from the trust about the amounts
payable to individuals. There is no reason to adjust the £6,400
figure as the Government's response to Lord Archer's
recommendations makes clear that in future all infected
beneficiaries will receive £12,800 per annum.

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Statement by Lord Darzi of Denham on 20 May (WS
     121—22), when the average annual payment made to
     the Macfarlane Trust's beneficiaries will be increased;
     whether payments will be back-dated to 20 May; and
     whether any payments made between 20 May and the
     date the new level is introduced will be discounted.
     [HL4134]

Lord Darzi of Denham: The Macfarlane Trust will be enabled
to make flat rate payments to all infected beneficiaries of
£12,800 per year with effect from 20 May 2009.

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 5 May (WA 100—
     01), whether Lord Darzi of Denham will now act on the
     assurance given to him by Mrs Harriet Bullock, the widow
     of a haemophilia patient contaminated by National Health
     Service blood products, that she has no objection to the
     text of the letter referred to in the question by Lord
     Roberts of Conwy being published in full in the Official
     Report. [HL4186]

Lord Darzi of Denham: The department received an
assurance from Mrs Bullock on 11 May 2009 that she had no
objection to the text of her letter referred to in the Question
by Lord Roberts of Conwy being published in full. The date of
that letter was 9 March 2009 and a reply was sent on 21 April
2009, and copies of both of these are being placed in the
Library.



18 Jun 2009 : Column WA228

         Asked by Baroness Campbell of Surbiton

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Statement by Lord Darzi of Denham on 20 May (WS
     122), why they did not respond nor refer to the Archer
     report's recommendation (at page 109) calling for action
     to end the anomaly of basing entitlement to financial
     help of the widow of a fatally-infected haemophilia
     patient on the date of his death; and whether they will
     now respond to the recommendation. [HL4227]
Lord Darzi of Denham: The purpose of the Written
Ministerial Statement on 20 May 2009 (WS 122) was to inform
the House of the publication of the Government's response to
the Archer report. The Government's response contains a
commitment to review the Skipton Fund in 2014.

The Macfarlane and Eileen Trusts have always been able to
make payments on a case by case basis to dependents of
those entitled to financial relief, and that will remain the case.



                         Blood: Safety
Dr. Iddon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what
process his Department follows for approving medical products
designed to ensure the safety of blood prior to their adoption
for use by the National Blood Service; [279472]

(2) how many CE-marked medical products have subjected by
his Department to efficacy and safety validation procedures in
addition to those performed by manufacturers in (a) 2007, (b)
2008 and (c) 2009 to date. [279473]

Gillian Merron: The Medicines and Healthcare products
Agency (MHRA) which is the Competent Authority in the United
Kingdom for medical devices does not approve medical devices
designed to ensure the safety of blood before they are placed
on the market. Manufacturers of such medical devices must
meet the relevant essential requirements in the Medical
Devices directives prior to signing a declaration of conformity
and CE marking their products.

Such higher risk medical devices must obtain an EC Certificate
of Conformity from a Notified Body as part of this conformity
assessment process. As such MHRA has not carried out any
safety or validation procedures on any CE marked medical
devices in addition to those carried out by the manufacturer.
Since the UK Blood Services have a legal responsibility to
ensure the quality and safety of blood products, the Advisory
Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Blood, Tissues and
Organs (MSBTO) also recommended that clinical trials be
carried out, using blood which had been subjected to prion
filtration. The independent Advisory Committee on the Safety
of Blood, Tissues and Organs replaced MSBTO in 2008.
Dr. Iddon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what
reasons the P-Capt prion filter has been subjected to safety
and efficacy tests additional to those performed by the
manufacturer by his Department. [279474]


17 Jun 2009 : Column 377W
Gillian Merron: The Government's independent expert
scientific committee on variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (and
other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies), the
Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee,
recommended that the UK Blood Services should commission
an independent validation of such products. The UK Blood
Services have commissioned an independent assessment of
the efficacy of the filter.

Quality studies on filtered blood are being conducted in
accordance with UK Blood Services guidelines.

The need for safety studies was endorsed by the Advisory
Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Blood, Tissues and
Organs in 2006.

Dr. Iddon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the
cost to his Department of testing the efficacy and safety of the
P-Capt prion filter has been since such tests were required.
[279475]

Gillian Merron: Efficacy and safety tests on the P-Capt filter
have incurred no cost to the Department.

23rd June 09

Dr. Iddon: Why has my right hon. Friend rejected Lord
Archer’s recommendation that patients who have contracted
the hepatitis C virus from contaminated blood should receive
the same compensation as those who contracted HIV from
contaminated blood, as in the Irish Republic and several other
countries?

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Gillian
Merron): I deeply regret that patients have contracted serious
infections as a result of NHS treatment 20 or more years ago.
However, it is the different circumstances of patients that are
reflected in the different financial arrangements. We will
review the Skipton fund, which was set up for those infected
with hepatitis C, in 2014, 10 years after its commencement. I
cannot accept the comparison with Ireland, because the Irish
blood transfusion service was found to be at fault, and that
was not the case here.

                        Thalidomide
21. Danny Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for
Health if he will bring forward proposals for a new
compensation scheme for thalidomide victims in cases where
the drug was prescribed on the NHS; and if he will make a
statement. [281555]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: Thalidomide victims are already
compensated through a private settlement, agreed between
the Thalidomide Trust and Diageo plc.

It is the Department’s long-standing policy not to make ex-
gratia payments to patients whose health has been adversely
affected by the use of pharmaceutical products. Responsibility
rests with the pharmaceutical company concerned.

25th June09
         Health: Contaminated Blood Products
                          Question
              Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Statement by Lord Darzi of Denham on 20 May (WS
     121—22), whether all payments made to beneficiaries of
     the Macfarlane Trust in consequence of the Written
     Statement will be increased in line with inflation.
     [HL4133]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): This will
be kept under review in the light of prevailing priorities for
public expenditure.




         Health: Contaminated Blood Products
                         Questions
           Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 3 June (WA 92),
     what action Lord Darzi of Denham has taken since his
     assurance on 28 April (Official Report, House of Lords,
     col. 143) that he as a Minister would assist in securing a
     debate on the response to the Archer report; whether he
     asked or will ask for fulfilment of his assurance to be
     considered by the business managers and usual
     channels; and when the debate will take place. [HL4191]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): Further to
my previous Answer to you on this matter on 3 June, the
department has contacted the Whips’ Office about a further
debate on the Government's response to the Archer report. A
decision on whether to hold such a debate remains a matter
for the House business managers.

           Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 15 June (WA 179),
     whether they will now review the conditions under which
     the widow of a patient infected by contaminated NHS
     blood products becomes eligible for financial assistance.
     [HL4354]

Lord Darzi of Denham: I refer the noble Lord to my Answer
on 15 June 2009 (Official Report, col. WA179).



29 Jun 2009 : Column WA15

           Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 16 June (WA 198),
     what meetings took place between officials at the
     Department of Health and the Macfarlane Trust to
     retrieve and record the correct data to ascertain the
     average levels of disbursements paid to infected
     beneficiaries prior to the publication of the ministerial
     response on 20 May to the report of the Independent
     Public Inquiry headed by Lord Archer of Sandwell; and
     what records of such meetings were kept. [HL4450]

Lord Darzi of Denham: Departmental officials did not meet
the Macfarlane Trust to discuss financial or other details of the
government response to Lord Archer’s report, prior to the
publication of that response.

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 16 June (WA 198),
     whether officials in the Department of Health suggested
     to the Association of British Insurers that the association
     hold meetings with officers of the Macfarlane Trust.
     [HL4453]

Lord Darzi of Denham: The department has not suggested
to the Association of British Insurers that it should hold
meetings with the MacFarlane Trust. The association is free to
meet the trust if it chooses.

            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 16 June (WA 198),
     why the ministerial response on 20 May to the report of
     the Independent Public Inquiry headed by Lord Archer of
     Sandwell stated that “the increased payments we are
     making available will help people infected with HIV to
     meet higher insurance premiums they may face” when
     officials were advised by the Association of British
     Insurers that it was not possible to calculate the total
     cost of life insurance provision for patients with HIV or
     hepatitis C or both by contaminated blood products as
     the premiums would vary for each individual and would
     be dependent on their particular circumstances.
     [HL4454]

Lord Darzi of Denham: As stated in the Government's
response to the Archer report, we will be increasing the
amount of financial relief to those infected with human
immunodeficiency virus to £12,800 per annum. The
Government's response did not state that these heightened
levels of financial assistance would be sufficient to meet
insurance premiums, but that individuals will be able to use
this money to help meet their insurance premiums, should
they so choose.

                         Thalidomide
Rob Marris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1)
whether he plans to compensate those who have suffered
adverse effects as a consequence of drugs prescribed by the
NHS before the provisions of the Medical Safety Act 1968
came into effect; [279990]

(2) if he will bring forward measures for the financial
compensation of thalidomiders whose mothers were prescribed
thalidomide by the NHS. [280024]

Gillian Merron: Thalidomide victims are compensated
through a private settlement, which was agreed between the
Thalidomide Trust, which was established to administer annual
payments to victims, and Distillers, which is now part of
Diageo plc., the company that marketed the drug in the United
Kingdom. Compensation payments are therefore a matter for
the Thalidomide Trust and Diageo plc.

It is the Department’s policy not to make ex-gratia payments
to patients who believe their health has been adversely
affected by the use of pharmaceutical products. Responsibility
rests with the pharmaceutical company concerned.

Responsibility for the testing of thalidomide, including tests to
assess its safety, lies with Chemie Gr�  1/4nenthal, the original
developer of the drug. In the United Kingdom, Distillers also
undertook testing on thalidomide before its introduction to the
UK market.

Prior to the Thalidomide tragedy, there was no formal drug
regulation system in place to monitor the safety of medicines
in the UK. As a result of the tragedy, a complete review of the
machinery for marketing, testing and regulating drugs was
initiated, including enactment 
 29 Jun 2009 : Column
94W
 of the Medical Act 1968, which introduced stricter
testing for medicines prior to licensing to ensure that they
meet acceptable standards of safety and efficacy.
1st July Lords
         Health: Contaminated Blood Products
                          Questions
            Asked by Lord Morris of Manchester

 To ask Her Majesty’s Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 16 June (WA 198),
     whether officials at the Department of Health, when
     discussing with the Association of British Insurers the
     issue of insurance for haemophilia patients with HIV,
     were aware that almost all of them were co-infected with
     hepatitis C. [HL4451]

 To ask Her Majesty’s Government further to the Written
     Answer by Lord Darzi of Denham on 16 June (WA 198),
     whether the possible threat of vCJD infection to patients
     with haemophilia supported by the Macfarlane Trust was
     taken into account by officials at the Department of
     Health when discussing with the Association of British
     Insurers the general issue of insurance for such patients.
     [HL4452]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State,
Department of Health (Lord Darzi of Denham): The
department was aware of the fact that many haemophilia
patients were co-infected with both human immunodeficiency
virus and hepatitis C at the time of its discussions with the
Association of British Insurers (ABI). The Creutzfeldt-Jakob
disease (CJD) incidents panel has separately discussed with
the ABI, the issue of patients who might be at risk of having
been infected with vCJD, after receiving contaminated blood
and blood products.

6th July 2009 commons
                 Blood Transfusions: Ireland
Dr. Iddon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant
to the answer of 23 June 2009, Official Report, column 656,
what the evidential basis was for the Minister of State's
statement that the Irish blood transfusion service was at fault.
[283738]

Gillian Merron: There were two judicial inquiries in Ireland
relating to contaminated blood and blood products which found
that “wrongful acts were committed” by the Irish Blood
Transfusion Service.

Between 1977 and 1994, a large number of women in the Irish
Republic were infected with Hepatitis C from contaminated
Anti-D immunoglobulin produced by the Irish national Blood
Transfusion Service. An expert group set up by the Irish
Government found the Blood Service to have been at fault,
and the same conclusion was reached by a later judicial
inquiry chaired by the Honourable Mr. Justice T. A. Finlay. The
“Report of the Finlay Tribunal of Inquiry into the Blood
Transfusion Service Board” was published on 6 March 1997.

On 2 June 1999, both Houses of the Oireachtas passed a
Resolution that a further Tribunal of Inquiry should be
established to examine and report on certain matters of urgent
public importance relating to the infection with Hepatitis C and
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) of persons with
haemophilia. The “Report of the Tribunal of Inquiry into the
Infection with HIV and Hepatitis C of Persons with Haemophilia
and Related Matters” was published on 5 September 2002 by
Her Honour Judge Alison Lindsay.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:12
posted:9/26/2012
language:Unknown
pages:140