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            2010-2011
Academic Assessment at Lindenwood
            University


     Section 1II:
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Undergraduate Programs
           2010-2011
ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT AT LINDENWOOD
            UNIVERSITY
                  SECTION 3:
           UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
                                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 4
Assessing Programs and Majors ................................................................................................. 4
   Changing the System............................................................................................................... 5
   Assessing Advisors .................................................................................................................. 5
   Praxis University Wide ............................................................................................................ 8
School of American Studies ........................................................................................................ 9
   School of American Studies Analysis ...................................................................................... 9
School of Business and Entrepreneurship ................................................................................ 10
   SB&E Analysis ........................................................................................................................ 25
School of Communications ....................................................................................................... 26
   School of Communications Analysis ..................................................................................... 29
School of Education .................................................................................................................. 30
     Early Childhood B-3 ........................................................................................................... 31
     Elementary Education 1-6................................................................................................. 33
     Health Education K-12 ...................................................................................................... 36
     Athletic Training ................................................................................................................ 38
     Exercise Science ................................................................................................................ 47
     Physical Education ............................................................................................................ 73
   School of Education Analysis ................................................................................................ 80
School of Fine and Performing Arts .......................................................................................... 82
     Fine Arts ............................................................................................................................ 83
     Art History ......................................................................................................................... 87
     Dance ................................................................................................................................ 89
     Music ................................................................................................................................. 96
     Theatre ............................................................................................................................ 112
   School of Fine and Performing Arts Analysis ...................................................................... 124
School of Human Services ....................................................................................................... 126
     Christian Ministry Studies ............................................................................................... 126
     Criminal Justice ............................................................................................................... 130
     Nonprofit Administration ............................................................................................... 132
     Social Work ..................................................................................................................... 135
   School of Human Services Analysis..................................................................................... 164
School of Humanities .............................................................................................................. 166
     English ............................................................................................................................. 167
     English Preparedness Program ....................................................................................... 169
     Foreign Languages .......................................................................................................... 176
     French ............................................................................................................................. 179
     Spanish ............................................................................................................................ 190
     Geography....................................................................................................................... 200
     History ............................................................................................................................. 200
     International Studies....................................................................................................... 208
     Philosophy ....................................................................................................................... 210
     Political Science............................................................................................................... 214
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      Religion............................................................................................................................ 215        English (United States)
   School of Humanities Analysis ............................................................................................ 219
School of Sciences ................................................................................................................... 222
      Anthropology/Sociology ................................................................................................. 224
      Biology............................................................................................................................. 228
      Chemistry ........................................................................................................................ 236
   Results ................................................................................................................................. 237
      Computer Science ........................................................................................................... 250
      Earth Sciences ................................................................................................................. 253
      Mathematics ................................................................................................................... 254
      Physics and Pre-Engineering ........................................................................................... 258
      Psychology ...................................................................................................................... 266
   School of Sciences Analysis ................................................................................................. 281
LCIE .......................................................................................................................................... 284
   The LCIE Approach .............................................................................................................. 284
   LCIE Programs ..................................................................................................................... 291
      Bachelor of Science in Business Administration ............................................................. 291
      Health Management Programs....................................................................................... 297
Program Assessment Overview .............................................................................................. 300
   Summary of Assessment of Programs ................................................................................ 300
   Program Assessment Action Plan ....................................................................................... 301
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 3
Assessing Programs and Majors ................................................................................................. 3
   Changing the System............................................................................................................... 4
   Assessing Advisors .................................................................................................................. 4
   Praxis University Wide ............................................................................................................ 7
School of American Studies ........................................................................................................ 8
   School of American Studies Analysis ...................................................................................... 8
School of Business and Entrepreneurship .................................................................................. 9
   SBandE Analysis .................................................................................................................... 25
School of Communications ....................................................................................................... 26
   School of Communications Analysis ..................................................................................... 28
School of Education .................................................................................................................. 30
      Early Childhood B-3 ........................................................................................................... 31
      Elementary Education 1-6................................................................................................. 33
      Health Education K-12 ...................................................................................................... 35
      Athletic Training ................................................................................................................ 38
      Exercise Science ................................................................................................................ 38
      Physical Education ............................................................................................................ 38
   School of Education Analysis ................................................................................................ 38
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School of Fine and Performing Arts .......................................................................................... 38                 English (United States)
    Fine Arts ............................................................................................................................ 38
    Art History ......................................................................................................................... 38
    Dance ................................................................................................................................ 38
    Music ................................................................................................................................. 38
    Theatre .............................................................................................................................. 38
  School of Fine and Performing Arts Analysis ........................................................................ 38
School of Human Services ......................................................................................................... 38
    Christian Ministry Studies ................................................................................................. 38
    Criminal Justice ................................................................................................................. 38
    Nonprofit Administration ................................................................................................. 38
    Social Work ....................................................................................................................... 38
  School of Human Services Analysis....................................................................................... 38
School of Humanities ................................................................................................................ 38
    English ............................................................................................................................... 38
    English Preparedness Program ......................................................................................... 38
    Foreign Languages ............................................................................................................ 38
    French ............................................................................................................................... 38
    Spanish .............................................................................................................................. 38
    History and Geography ..................................................................................................... 38
    Geography......................................................................................................................... 38
    History ............................................................................................................................... 38
    International Studies......................................................................................................... 38
    Philosophy ......................................................................................................................... 38
    Political Science................................................................................................................. 38
    Religion.............................................................................................................................. 38
  School of Humanities Analysis .............................................................................................. 38
School of Sciences ..................................................................................................................... 38
    Anthropology/Sociology ................................................................................................... 38
    Biology............................................................................................................................... 38
    Chemistry .......................................................................................................................... 38
    Computer Science ............................................................................................................. 38
    Earth Sciences ................................................................................................................... 38
    Mathematics ..................................................................................................................... 38
    Physics and Pre-Engineering ............................................................................................. 38
    Psychology ........................................................................................................................ 38
  School of Sciences Analysis ................................................................................................... 38
Program Assessment Overview ................................................................................................ 38
  Summary of Assessment of Programs .................................................................................. 38
  Program Assessment Action Plan ......................................................................................... 38
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                               Introduction                                                     English (United States)




               Assessing Programs and Majors

Programs and activities at Lindenwood University flow from the Mission Statement,
which affirms that Lindenwood’s educational mission is to add value to the lives of our
students and community. Specifically, “Lindenwood is committed to
        providing an integrative liberal arts curriculum,
        offering professional and pre-professional degree programs,
        focusing on the talents, interests, and future of the student,
        supporting academic freedom and the unrestricted search for truth,
        affording cultural enrichment to the surrounding community,
        promoting ethical lifestyles,
        developing adaptive thinking and problem-solving skills,
        furthering lifelong learning.

Lindenwood accomplishes these goals through more than 71 day degree and pre-
professional programs (not including various degree emphases), as well as 12 evening
degree programs and 45 minors, all of which are distributed throughout nine academic
schools and two campuses.
       1. American Studies
       2. Business and Entrepreneurship
       3. Communications
       4. Education
       5. Fine and Performing Arts
       6. Human Services
       7. Humanities
       8. Sciences
       9. Lindenwood College for Individualized Education
       10. Lindenwood University-St. Charles
       11. Lindenwood University-Belleville

The University requires that all of its programs conduct assessment as a regular part of
their internal review process. In virtually all of the cases, the assessment tools are
internal to the programs and are designed to assess not only the general effectiveness of
the programs, but also specific areas of interest or concern. The University and program
faculty members are constantly assessing their assessment measure in order to ensure
that is giving them the information needed for continuous improvement. University
policy requires that new programs integrate assessment into the initial planning phases,
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which has improved the way programs approach assessment; however, we recognize                   English (United States)
that it takes time to create a useful set of assessment tools.

A number of programs are going, or have gone, through external evaluations for
additional professional accreditations, such as education, social work, business, and LCIE.
These accreditations will have a positive impact on the development of the assessment
programs in these areas as the programs will need to not only meet the traditional higher
education goals of assessment, but also assess the practical professional level of training.

While all the schools have at least one major program, not all of the programs are
sufficiently advanced or developed to have meaningful program assessments. This is
particularly true of newer programs or those that are too small to have assessment
beyond the individual class or student.

Overall, the University’s program assessment, which has been very good for years, is
growing and improving on a regular basis.

                             Changing the System
Over the next five years the University will be implementing a new system for assessing
our programs.

Every four years, each degree program will write a report based on ongoing assessment.
The reporting schedule will be determined by the Provost in consultation with the Dean
of Institutional Research. Some departments will submit program assessment reports
starting in 2012-13, some will start in 2013-14, some will start in 2014-15, and some will
start in 2015-16.

Every year, each department will also choose program-level student learning outcomes
(SLO) to assess.

                               Assessing Advisors
During the 2010-11 academic year, the University Retention Committee piloted a student
survey of the University’s academic advisors. The response rate for the survey was
approximately 10 percent.

All full-time faculty members act as advisors for students from their first semester to the
end of their time at the University. Students who matriculate to the University as
“undecided” as to their majors are often assigned to advisors in areas with lower
numbers of majors, especially to advisors in the humanities. Once students declare a
major, they are assigned to an advisor in their major.
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                                                                                                           English (United States)
Results of Student Survey of Academic Advisors

What is your academic status?
                                                      Response Percent
Freshman                                                    16.7%
Sophomore                                                   20.0%
Junior                                                      23.9%
Senior                                                      39.4%


Over 43 percent of the respondents were from the School of Education and the School of
Business and Entrepreneurship. Their responses to a variety of questions are tabulated
in the table below.

Please rank the following advisor responsibilities in order of importance to you.
                                         1 most           2          3          4      5 least    Rating
                                       important                                     important   Average
Choosing classes for each                37.99%       20.05%     16.09%     15.30%    10.55%      2.40
semester
Offering advice on how to be             16.85%       20.11%     17.66%     22.55%    22.83%      3.14
successful in college
Planning for graduation                  17.13%       30.94%     25.14%     18.23%    8.56%       2.70
Career planning                          21.95%       20.87%     28.46%     21.95%    6.78%       2.71
Preparing for graduate school             9.87%       10.39%     14.55%     20.00%    45.19%      3.80

On average, how many times per semester do you see your assigned advisor for academic advice?
                   Response Percent
0                           3.5%
1-2                         61.6%
3-4                         23.2%
5 or more                   11.7%

On average, how many times per semester do you see your assigned advisor for career advice?
                     Response Percent
0                         55.9%
1-2                       31.2%
3-4                       8.2%
5 or more                 4.7%

On average, how many times per semester do you see your assigned advisor for other matters?
                     Response Percent
0                         41.8%
1-2                       36.8%
3-4                       10.7%
5 or more                 10.7%
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                                                                                                          English (United States)
Please rate the following statements in terms of frequency:
                                       Never       Rarely   Sometimes       Often      Always      N/A
My advisor is accessible.              1.74%       2.99%      18.16%       37.31%      39.80%     0.00%
My advisor is knowledgeable
                                       1.00%       5.49%      11.72%       25.44%      55.86%     0.50%
about academic requirements.
My advisor is knowledgeable
about administrative                   2.01%       6.52%      14.29%       26.32%      47.62%     3.26%
requirements.
My advisor assists me with class
                                       4.52%      11.06%      12.81%       22.11%      48.24%     1.26%
selection.
My advisor helps me keep track
                                       6.75%      10.75%      13.75%       19.25%      47.00%     2.50%
of progress towards graduation.
My advisor is willing to help.         1.25%       3.50%      11.75%       14.25%      68.25%     1.00%
My advisor cares about my
                                       2.75%       6.00%      10.50%       12.75%      64.75%     3.25%
success.
My advisor cares about my future
                                       7.25%       8.50%      11.25%       13.25%      51.50%     8.25%
beyond Lindenwood.
My advisor helps me plan for my
                                      12.25%      11.50%      12.50%       16.25%      38.00%     9.50%
success beyond Lindenwood.

Based on this limited sample, the overall evaluation of advising at Lindenwood is positive,
but significant room exists for improvement in a number of areas. The need for
improvement is particularly noticeable in the areas that deal with the student’s life
beyond Lindenwood.

Students at Lindenwood report that they feel free to seek advice from faculty and staff
other than their assigned advisors, with a majority of those who responded indicating
they have sought such advice while at the University.

Do you see other professors or staff members for advice?
                      Response Percent
Yes                        60.7%
No                         39.3%

On average, how many times per semester do you see this additional advisor for advice?
                      Response Percent
0                            33.1%
1-2                          38.0%
3-4                          15.4%
5 or more                    13.5%

Which of the following types of assistance have you received from this person? (Choose all that apply)
                                                     Response Percent
Class selection and scheduling                            56.5%
Advice on how to be successful in college                 54.6%
Graduation planning                                       30.2%
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Career planning                                   56.5%                                         English (United States)
Graduate school preparation                       26.3%

While a majority of the respondents say they did not seek career planning advice from
their primary advisor, a majority also said they did seek career advice from another
member of the University staff and faculty.



                              Praxis University Wide

The PRAXIS exam is taken by those students seeking teaching certification at the
elementary or secondary level in Missouri. Those students who wish to teach at the
secondary level take the exam in a specific content area such as math or history. For this
reason, the programs that offer a teacher certification option use the PRAXIS as one area
for external assessment of their programs success.

The PRAXIS scores have been placed at the end of the discussion for each of the
appropriate programs.

The composite PRAXIS scores for each program have shown a great deal of consistency
over the last six years, with no program in the last year having an average under the
required score for passing the exam.

A number of factors limit the effectiveness of the PRAXIS as an assessment tool:
      1) Not all the students have taken the majority of their coursework at
         Lindenwood at the time they take the exam.
      2) Not all students have majored in the areas in which they take the PRAXIS.
      3) M.A.T. students (students who attend Lindenwood as graduate education
         students) are not differentiated from undergraduate students.
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                   School of American Studies                                                    English (United States)




The School of American Studies was formed during the 2007-08 academic year. In 2010,
it was prepared to do program assessment, but because it is currently undergoing a
series of revisions, it is not currently prepared to do effective assessment of the program.

Departments:
          American Studies
          Recreational Leadership

Degree programs offered by the School of American Studies

       Bachelor of Arts in
           American Studies
           Recreational Leadership

       Minors in
           American Studies
           Minor in Recreation Leadership



                 School of American Studies Analysis

Both the programs (American studies and recreational leadership) are working on
assessment tools for implementation during the 2011-12 academic year. While the
programs are small, this is good time to work assessment into the program before
implementation would be considered a problem.
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      School of Business and Entrepreneurship                                                  English (United States)




Degree programs offered by the School of Business and Entrepreneurship:

       Bachelor of Arts in
           Accounting
           Business Administration
           Arts Management
           Economics
           Entrepreneurial Studies
           Finance
           Human Resource Management
           International Business
           Management Information Systems
           Marketing
           Retail Merchandising
           Sport Management

       Minors in
           Business Administration
           Economics
           Retail Merchandising



ACBSP Accreditation
During the last academic year (May 6, 2010), after a three-year application and review
process, the School of Business and Entrepreneurship received accreditation from the
Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs, the premier accrediting
association for business schools and programs with a focus on teaching excellence.
Standard IV of the required self-study focused on assessment of learning outcomes, and
much work was accomplished in this area. As an outcome of the ACBSP self-study, the
SB&E has appointed a task force to implement a formal quality-management system,
which will establish processes, one of which is assessment, and appoint process owners
who are responsible for continuous improvement.

Statement of Mission
The mission statement of the School of Business and Entrepreneurship complements and
expands upon that of the University. The School of Business and Entrepreneurship is
committed to
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      providing a comprehensive core curriculum of business subjects,
      instilling a strong and enduring sense of ethical business practices,
      providing theoretical tools and analytical skills for lifelong use,
      offering major fields of study to equip students for specialized careers,
      developing the student’s communication and presentation skills,
      providing opportunities to supplement classroom education with real world
       experience,
      expanding the student’s geographical and cultural horizons for success in an
       increasingly global economy,
      instilling the entrepreneurial model as an essential component of American free
       enterprise.



Method of Assessment
Institutional Proficiency Survey

Each May since 2005, the University’s graduating seniors are asked to complete an
Institutional Proficiency Survey. Section III of the survey uses a five-point scale on which
students rate the quality of the education received at Lindenwood University. The results
of the survey for all students graduating with a business degree are used to assess the
overall performance of the SB&E. Twenty of the 30 questions in section III are
considered directly relevant to school assessment. Average scores for each of these 20
questions for May 2007, May 2008, and May 2009 were used to compute a baseline to
which the results for the 2010-2011 academic year are compared. Effective this academic
year, two important advances were made in relation to the Institutional Proficiency data
– (i) the survey was conducted twice - December 2010 and May 2011, and (ii) advanced
coding allowed the data for the SB&E to be disaggregated into graduates of the
undergraduate program and graduates of the graduate program.

Peer Institutions Comparisons

The SB&E is in the process of compiling a list of peer institutions in order to ensure more
meaningful school assessment baselines and benchmarks. Starting with a list of 30 similar
business schools, the goal is to arrive at a core of business schools that are ACBSP
accredited and also participate in assessment testing by Educational Testing Services,
Management Solutions Incorporated, and Ivy Services while also utilizing Educational
Benchmarking Incorporated services for graduate, alumni, and employer surveys.

Results
Institutional Proficiency Surveys - SB&E Undergraduate Students
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                                                                                                          English (United States)
                                          May          May-10    Dec-     Dec-     May-11   May-11
                                       '07/'08/'09      SB&E      10       10       SB&E    All LU
                                      SB&E Baseline              SB&E     All LU
No. of Students                         261 (Avg.)       218      149      289       51        93
Course Content                            3.87          3.95      3.87     3.87     3.85      3.9
Availability of courses when you
                                           3.5          3.61      3.56     3.46     3.62      3.57
need them
Availability of instructors outside
                                          3.89          3.94      3.85     3.85     3.71      3.89
of class
Instruction in your major field           3.89          3.94      3.97     4.04     3.88      3.98
Attitude of instructors toward
                                          4.07           4.2      3.99     4.07     3.91      3.97
students
Class Size                                4.28          4.47      4.25     4.21     4.21      4.16

Availability of your advisor              3.88          3.94      3.84     3.97     3.95      3.86
Preparation of world for
                                          3.68          3.62      3.67     3.7      3.6       3.6
work/future career
Admissions policies/procedures            3.58          3.67      3.55     3.66     3.79      3.66
Correctness of info supplied prior
                                          3.59          3.65      3.53     3.58     3.55      3.75
to enrolling
Policies regarding student
                                          3.43          3.61      3.53     3.59     3.63      3.61
conduct
Academic probation/suspension
                                          3.21          3.29      3.42     3.43     3.63      3.37
policies
Concern for you as an individual          3.67          3.81      3.62     3.65     3.51      3.71

Self-actualization while at LU            3.71          3.79      3.75     3.73     3.72      3.73

Spiritual growth while at LU              3.41           3.3      3.41     3.51     3.37      3.57
Development of personal values
                                          3.65          3.73      3.72     3.71     3.75      3.73
while at LU
Development of a desire for
                                          3.78          3.89      3.82     3.74     3.72      3.87
lifelong learning
Development of strong work
                                          3.81          3.96      3.83     3.72     3.7       3.87
ethic
Development of a desire to serve
                                          3.57           3.6      3.54     3.66     3.64      3.69
my community
Discovery path for my life                3.72          3.76      3.63     3.76     3.62      3.66
Average                                   3.71          3.79      3.72     3.75     3.72      3.76


Lessons Learned and Action Plans for Next Year
The need to share the above information on school assessment with all full-time faculty
members and the improved quality of discussions and suggestions that emanate because
of this sharing of information were the major lessons learned in this academic year.
Deans and division chairs have started placing all important summary data on a shared
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SB&E drive for discussion. For example, a summer 2011 project, which will investigate              English (United States)
alternative school assessment methods, arose from this discussion.

Program Assessment
University Goals and Objectives

Lindenwood University offers values-centered programs leading to the development of the whole
person—an educated, responsible citizen of a global community.

Lindenwood is committed to

      providing an integrative liberal arts curriculum,
      offering professional and pre-professional degree programs,
      focusing on the talents, interests, and future of the student,
      supporting academic freedom and the unrestricted search for truth,
      affording cultural enrichment to the surrounding community,
      promoting ethical lifestyles,
      developing adaptive thinking and problem-solving skills, and
      furthering lifelong learning.

All of the eleven undergraduate majors offered by the SB&E have a heavy focus on
meeting University goals 2, 3, 6, and 7. However, each of the majors encompass, to some
degree, goals 1, 4, 5, and 8. The University goals reflect the liberal arts training of the GE
part of the curriculum, and the business school concentrates on developing this
knowledge and applying it to the business environment.

Program Goals and Objectives

The following Student Learning Outcomes have been established for the undergraduate
majors offered by the SB&E. The school is currently in the process of reviewing and
revising the learning outcomes for each of its majors. The outcomes listed for the
business administration major are provisional and are being developed in conjunction
with Lindenwood’s LCIE business program.
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                                                                                                    English (United States)
     Major         Program Learning Outcomes
                   Students will
                        exhibit a knowledge and understanding of the process of recording
  Accounting
                           transactions and the process of maintaining accounting records,
                        use critical thinking skills to analyze data in order to make decisions.


                   Students will be able to demonstrate
                        effective written communications,
                        effective oral communications,
                        effective solutions through logical decision-making (critical thinking),
                        effective use of technology and information,
   Business
                        accurate analysis through quantitative reasoning,
 Administration
                        effective collaboration,
                        effective leadership,
                        ethical and responsible behavior,
                        effective application of principles to functional business areas,
                        effective management skills.




                   Students will
                        exhibit a thorough understanding of the basic theories and models
                           utilized in the field of economics,
                        demonstrate a capacity for performing analytical analyses,
   Economics
                        demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in
                           writing. in particular, students will be able to communicate complex
                           economic information in a coherent, cogent, and grammatically
                           correct manner.


                   Students will
                        demonstrate an understanding of financial management of new and
                           fast growing businesses,
                        demonstrate familiarity with early to late-stage equity finance as well
                           as with alternate forms of external finance,
                        demonstrate the ability to construct pro forma financial statements
                           for new or expanding ventures,
                        investigate financing resources and approaches,
                        demonstrate an ability to make entrepreneurial decisions based on
                           case studies,
Entrepreneurship
                        develop opportunity awareness and develop venture ideas,
                        set objectives, choose resources, and evaluate market research,
                        interpret the results of research and understand its limitations,
                        demonstrate a better understanding of the venture initiation process
                           and the mechanics of starting a new business,
                        gain insight into the process of identifying business opportunities,
                        demonstrate an understanding of the importance of effective
                           marketing, funding, and management to small businesses,
                        experience writing a business plan,
                        analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the entrepreneur.
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     Major        Program Learning Outcomes                                                        English (United States)
                  Students will
                       understand and be able to apply the basic concepts of business
                          finance, with an appreciation of the legal and ethical issues faced by
                          financial managers and investors;
                       understand and be able to ethically apply the major tools employed in
                          the financial management of the publicly traded corporation;
                       gain a strong understanding of the basics of investing, with an
                          emphasis on valuing the equity securities of the publicly traded
    Finance               corporation;
                       gain an understanding of the implications of macroeconomic policy
                          analysis with emphasis on the role of financial markets, financial
                          institutions, foreign exchange markets, and the monetary authority;
                       gain an in-depth understanding of the financial aspects of managing a
                          new business, including financing methods, working capital
                          management, external expansion, and exit strategies;
                       be able to use case studies and a life-cycle approach, beginning with
                          business startup and concluding with cashing out.
                  Students will
                       gain an understanding of the HR function and its place in modern
                          organizations,
                       develop knowledge of all facets of the HR function,
                       learn to recognize the relevance of current events in HR,
                       appreciate the importance of the changing nature of labor law,
                       gain a working knowledge of HR research methods,
                       practice presentation styles relevant to the subject matter,
                       gain an understanding of remuneration,
                       develop knowledge of types of pay,
                       learn to recognize aspects of pay fairness and competitive benefits,
Human Resources        demonstrate an appreciation for the importance of the changing
                          nature of labor law with regard to remuneration,
                       demonstrate a working knowledge of types of employee benefits,
                       identify the need for training and development in the modern
                          company in order to compete in a global economy,
                       identify methods and roles of training in the modern organization,
                       perform a needs assessment, design a training program, deliver
                          training, and evaluate training results,
                       analyze training scenarios for integrated learning theories and styles
                          addressed,
                       explain the changing nature of the employer–employee relationship
                          and the responsibility of both parties to provide for the personal and
                          business development of the employee.
                  Students will
                       demonstrate an understanding of how historical perspectives
                          influence and shape current events;
                       display understanding of the nature (and the pros and cons) of
  International           globalization; students will understand trade theories and the role of
    Business              governmental influence on trade and cross national trade
                          agreements;
                       understand how businesses interact with the cultural, political, legal,
                          and economic environments of multiple nations;
                       display an understanding of the international financial environment,
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      Major           Program Learning Outcomes                                                         English (United States)
                              including the study of exchange rates and international capital
                              markets;
                           have an awareness of the unique problems facing the financial
                              manager operating internationally, including foreign taxation, working
                              capital management, sources of funds, international and regional
                              financial institutions, commercial documents, and international trade
                              organizations;
                           exhibit an understanding of what is involved in organizing, staffing,
                              and managing the international enterprise and how to adapt
                              managerial decisions to different cultures and local conditions while
                              benefiting operations on an international scale;
                           be able to apply elements of a marketing program on a multi-
                              national/global scale and be able to identify and analyze opportunities
                              in these markets and develop specific plans for applying the elements
                              of a marketing program to international opportunities;
                           gain an appreciation for the complexity of cross-cultural
                              communication, which includes becoming more aware of their own
                              culturally-based perceptions and patterns of thinking and behaving, as
                              well as developing an understanding of other cultures and skills for
                              communicating in intercultural situations;
                           acquire, practice, and display skills regarding critical thinking and
                              communication (both written and oral).
                      Students will
                           describe and understand management concepts and how to ethically
                              and legally apply the concepts in real life and case situations,
                           demonstrate an understanding of the role of management in society
                              and organizations (for-profit and nonprofit),
                           understand and apply the concepts and methodologies of the various
                              functions of management and planning using oral and written
   Management
                              communication skills,
                           demonstrate the ability to analyze management, entrepreneurism,
                              and management functions using critical and analytical problem-
                              solving skills,
                           demonstrate the ability to utilize systematic approaches to diagnosing
                              and solving management problems and issues in addition to the
                              ability to develop and present business plan.
                      Students will
                           exhibit a basic understanding information systems; namely, students
                              will understand computer hardware, software, networking and their
    Management                relationship with people, data, and business processes;
Information Systems        exhibit an understanding of it project management, systems analysis,
                              systems design, and systems implementation;
                           exhibit an understanding of how to create software (including
                              application and database software), as a business solution.
                      Students will
                           describe and understand marketing concepts and how to ethically
                              apply the concepts in real life and case situations domestically and
    Marketing                 globally;
                           demonstrate an understanding of the role of marketing in society and
                              organizations (for-profit and nonprofit);
                           understand and apply the concepts and methodologies of the various
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       Major           Program Learning Outcomes                                                         English (United States)
                               functional areas of marketing including but not limited to market
                               research, pricing, advertising and promotions, public relations,
                               product management, entrepreneurism, and marketing management
                               and planning using oral and written communication skills;
                            demonstrate the ability to analyze the impact and results of market
                               research, pricing, advertising and promotions, public relations,
                               product management, entrepreneurism, and marketing management
                               and planning using critical and analytical problem-solving skills;
                            demonstrate ability to utilize systematic approaches to diagnosing
                               and solving marketing problems and issues in addition to the ability to
                               develop and present an organization-wide strategic marketing plan.
                       Students will
                            display a thorough understanding of the basic concepts of retail
                               operations and how they function in today’s economic environment,
                            be able to demonstrate the criteria used by retailers to determine
                               locations that will maximize profits,
Retail Merchandising
                            demonstrate a thorough understanding of the various marketing and
                               merchandising techniques used by retailers today to increase market
                               share and maximize return,
                            display a thorough understanding of how large retailing is and the
                               impact it has on supply chain management.
                       Students will
                            exhibit an understanding of how to apply the core business concepts
                               (accounting, finance, management, marketing, economics, hr) to the
                               business of sport,
Sport Management            understand the practical skills necessary to be a successful manager in
                               the business of sport,
                            demonstrate the ability to communicate, both orally and in writing,
                            exhibit an understanding of making ethical decisions and the
                               ramifications of ethical decision-making in the sport industry.


Assessment of Majors
All majors offered in the SB&E are assessed for their level of attainment of the above-
stated learning outcomes.

Methods of Assessment Used

Objective

A summative assessment is conducted using the external, nationally normed ETS Major
Field Test in Business. The test is taken at the end of the management policy course,
which serves as a capstone course for all majors other than HR management and sport
management.
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A supervisor’s form is used to assess all students who have taken an internship course for             English (United States)
the semester and all sport management majors who have completed their sports
practicum.

Subjective                                                                                             Comment [WJ1]: Roger is checking


Professional Associations: The SB&E has three of its majors closely aligned to their
respective professional associations – human resource management, accounting, and
sport management. For each of these programs, the department chair stays abreast of
developments in the field that affect curriculum. For example, the chair of the human
resource management program is currently working on AACSB recertification through
SHRM (Society of Human Resource Management), which ensures that the SB&E’s
program measures up to the national standards at the highest level and includes a review
of topics, methods, courses, and teaching credentials.

Results
                       Assessment of Majors Using ETS' Major Field Test
                           2008-2010           2008-09             2009-10            2010-11
                         National Mean*     fall      spring    fall    spring     fall   spring
No. of SB&E Students                        87         155      113      131       92      159

Overall Test Average          151.6        148         147      149      150      149       145

Accounting                    49.8          50          47       48       48       42       39
Economics                     47.8          46          43       48       48       42       42
Management                    54.5          50          48       52       54       56       52
Statistics                    46.1          43          43       43       45       40       39
Finance                        55           50          53       51       54       42       39
Marketing                     51.9          48          46       49       50       56       51
Legal and Social              45.9          44          43       46       46       54       51
Environ.
Information systems           57.7          51          53       54       52       43       42
International Issues          54.1          48          47       51       51       51       49
*The national mean is based on 618 institutions.
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Employer Feedback on Internships                                                                   English (United States)
                                   Baseline*       Fall 09    Spring 10     Fall 10    Spring 11
No. on Internships                     43            12          14           16           15


Communication                        4.52           4.55        4.79         4.56         4.58
Critical Thinking                    4.58           4.18        4.71         4.63         4.54
Problem Solving                      4.64           4.18        4.57         4.5          4.46
Initiative                           4.69           4.55        4.79         4.5          4.77
Leadership                           4.22            4          4.57         4.36         4.5
Responsibility                       4.77           4.91        4.93         4.66         4.92
Works well with others               4.93           4.73        4.93         4.88          5
Self Confidence                      4.68           4.55        4.79         4.56         4.77
Average Employer Satisfaction        4.63           4.46        4.76         4.58         4.69
*The baseline reflects 2008 and 2009

Employer Feedback on Sports Practicum

                                   Baseline*       Fall 09    Spring 10     Fall 10    Spring 11
No. on Sports Practicum                                           4           3            15


Communication                                                     4           5           4.4
Critical Thinking                                               4.75         4.67         4.47
Problem Solving                                                 4.25          5           4.07
Initiative                                                      4.25         4.67         4.4
Leadership                                                      4.25         4.67         4.13
Responsibility                                                    5           5           4.6
Works well with others                                            5           5            5
Self Confidence                                                  4.5          5           4.67
Average Employer Satisfaction                                   4.50         4.88         4.47
*The baseline reflects 2008 and 2009

Lessons Learned
At the time that the baseline was established for the internship data, there appeared to
be weaknesses in three assessment indicators – communication (-.11), critical thinking
(-.05), and leadership (-.41). The lesson learned was that interns need to meet with their
academic advisor on a more regular basis to discuss work-related issues and keep up job
motivation. For fall 2010 and spring 2011, the data reveal that students’ average scores
on assessment areas five and four (on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the best), were below
the average employer satisfaction score. Data on supervisors’ assessment for sports                Comment [WJ2]: Roger is checking
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practicums, the capstone course for sports management majors, were tabulated for                 English (United States)
three periods and will be used to construct a baseline for future evaluation.

Action Plan for Next Year
Tracking ETS results, feedback from internships and practicums, and standards of
professional organizations revealed several areas of the business curriculum that needed
improvement. Significant research was conducted on each proposed change, and,
following Deans’ Council approval, the following changes will take effect at the beginning
of the next academic year.

   1. Changes to the business core:
      a. Require Microeconomics as one of the two social science general education
         courses, thus allowing for the inclusion of Introduction to Business and Free
         Enterprise as part of the required business core.
      b. Remove Written Communications for Business (a course for which SB&E did
         not have academic oversight) from the business core and replace with Global
         Business and Society. This course has English Composition II as a prerequisite.
      c. Require all business core courses to include some writing assignments in their
         curriculum.
      d. Update the curriculum for Information Systems and Management Science –
         the two technology courses, and include a greater concentration on students’
         mastery of EXCEL.

   2. Other changes:

       a. Require one human resource course for all business majors.
       b. Require MGMT 36043 Principles of Operations Management for all Business
          Administration majors.
       c. Require all human resource majors to take MGMT 46082 Management Policy
          as their capstone course.
       d. Change certain course numbers down to a 20000 level, thereby ensuring that
          students meet the required number of 30000/40000 level courses at
          standards expected at that level.

Course Assessment

Methods of Assessment Used
   1. All classes taught in the SB&E are assessed through the instructor’s objective
      record of the distribution of grades that track growth in student learning based on
      performance on class assignments, written projects, and presentations.
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   2. During the 2010-11 academic year, a formative assessment using a pre- and post-                  English (United States)
      test instrument was employed in 15 SB&E courses.
   3. End-of-course evaluations: The SB&E, like all schools at the University, conducts
      end-of-course student evaluations. The evaluations have long been used for
      instructor and course critiques by students, but over the past five years, this
      source of data has been used increasingly for purposes of assessment of learning
      outcomes. Specifically, learning outcomes are assessed by asking undergraduate
      students to rate the course based on
          a. the extent to which the course syllabus and policies were clear,
          b. the extent to which the course goals and objectives of the course were
              clear,
          c. the extent to which the tests, quizzes, and assignments reflected the
              course material,
          d. the extent to which the grading system used in the course was fair, and
          e. the extent to which the instructor’s knowledge of the subject was
              appropriate and the instructor was able to answer questions.

Effective December 2009, the University moved to a system of completing the end-of-
course evaluations through its CAMS system. The information is presented to the Dean of
the SB&E for each section of each course for which the school has academic oversight.
This information is currently reviewed to ensure that courses are meeting their course
and program goals. At present this data is not summarized across sections and courses.

Results and Course Action Plans
Pre- and Post-Test Results for Academic Year 2010-2011

ACCT 21010 - Principles of Financial Accounting
                           Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011

            Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test    Post-test
 Section                           % Improvement                                 % Improvement
              Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.        Avg.
   11         37          72             95%              36            60             67%
   12         38          73             92%              32            54             69%
   13         36          67             86%              44            79             80%
   14         34          56             65%              42            75             79%
   15         35          54             54%
   21         36          59             64%              48            80             67%
   22         37          57             54%
   23         32           63             97%
  Actions Taken: Data for this academic year, which used a new pre- and post-test will form the
                                 baseline for improvement goals.
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ECON 23020 - Microeconomics                                                                             English (United States)
                           Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
            Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                           % Improvement                                % Improvement
              Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11          54         64            19%                45           65           44%
   12          50         64             28%               53           75              42%
   13          52         65             25%               47           73              55%
   14          52         60             15%               54           84              56%
   15          52         68             31%
   21                                                        42            57           36%
 Actions Taken: Greater use of Course-Mate with new textbook appears to be enhancing student
 learning and retention. The pre - and post-test will be revised for the 2011-2012 academic year.

MIS 24000 – Introduction to Information Systems
                           Fall 2010                                   Spring 2011
            Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                            % Improvement                                 % Improvement
              Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11          44         50             14%               46           59              28%
   12          47         54             15%               46           50               9%
   13          47         51              9%               45           55              22%
   14                                                      41           52              27%
   15                                                      48           55              15%
   16                                                      41           51              24%
   17                                                      44           53              20%
   21          45         57             27%
   22          42         57             36%
   23          41         58             41%
 Actions taken: The department added international business and ethics topics, real life/current
event examples, and assignments that relate to students' major. The means for this academic year
    are consistent with those of previous years. This course is being redesigned for fall 2011.

MRKT 35010 - Principles of Marketing
                           Fall 2010                                   Spring 2011
 Section    Pre-test   Post-test    % Improvement       Pre-test     Post-test    % Improvement
              Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11          49         70             43%               51           75              47%
   12          52         70             35%               50           64              28%
   13          52         70             35%               50           71              42%
   14          55         76             38%               50           72              44%
   15          55         73             33%               51           76              49%
   16          50         71             42%
   17          53         69             30%
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   21                                                       52           74              42%             English (United States)
   22                                                       51           67              31%
  Action Plan: Plan to administer post-test week before finals and give it the weight of a quiz. The
scores on each post-test indicate that more than half of the students in each class scored below the
  80th percentile. Also, great variability exists between the high and low performers in each class.

MGNT 36032 - Principles of Management
                            Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
             Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                            % Improvement                                % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   12           17         23            35%                47           66           40%
   13                                                       47           51               9%
   14                                                       41           55              34%
   21          15          24             60%               43           70              63%
   22          17          23             35%               46           68              48%
   23          14          21             50%
   24          17          26             53%
  Actions Taken: The department will consider using new textbooks and updating pre-post-test.


FIN 32000 - Principles of Finance
                            Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
             Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                            % Improvement                                % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11           43         75            74%                43           70           63%
   12          39          77             97%               41           75              83%
   13          40          77             93%               42           61              45%
   14          39          75             92%
   15          44          71             61%
   21          42          76             81%               33           78              136%
   22                                                       39           78              100%
   23                                                       41           65              59%


MGNT 36033 - Introduction to Management Science
                            Fall 2010                                   Spring 2011
             Pre-Test   Post-Test                        Pre-Test     Post-Test
 Section                            % Improvement                                 % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11           39         70            79%
   12          40          76             90%               47           74              57%
   13          44          78             77%               44           75              70%
   14                                                       43           65              51%
   21                                                       38           72
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   23          41           71            73%                                                            English (United States)
Actions Taken: The department will insure that the pre- and post-test questions are directly related
                    to the learning outcomes provided on the course syllabus.

RTAIL 15510 - Introduction to Retailing
                            Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
             Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                            % Improvement                                % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11           39         62            59%                29           43           48%
   12                                                       43            57             33%
   21          42          81             93%
  LS1         43          79              84%
  Actions Taken: More class time will be spent on problem-solving exercises. This will be done in
                  teams with students explaining their solutions to the class.

MRKT 45070 - Consumer Behavior
                            Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
             Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                            % Improvement                                % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11                                                       39           57           46%


Retail Communication
                            Fall 2010                                   Spring 2011
             Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                             % Improvement                                 % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11           70         82             17%


RTAIL 35530 - Retail Buying
                            Fall 2010                                   Spring 2011
             Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                             % Improvement                                 % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11           13         57             338%


MRKT 35040 - Advertising and Promotional Strategies
                            Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
             Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                            % Improvement                                % Improvement
               Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11                                                       60           77           28%
   12                                                       63            78             24%
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MRKY 35050 - Selling                                                                                   English (United States)
                           Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
 Section    Pre-test   Post-test   % Improvement        Pre-test     Post-test      % Improvement
              Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11          50         60             20%
   12          47       67              43%
     Actions Taken: Communicate with student as though he/she is the only one in the room.


SPMGT 27020 - Orientation to Sport Management
                           Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
            Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                           % Improvement                                    % Improvement
              Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11          58         79             36%               57           72              26%
                Actions Taken: The department will revise the pre- and post-test.


HRM 36500 - Organizational Behavior
                           Fall 2010                                  Spring 2011
            Pre-test   Post-test                        Pre-test     Post-test
 Section                           % Improvement                                % Improvement
              Avg.       Avg.                             Avg.         Avg.
   11                                                      34          68.1         100%
                Actions Taken: The department will revise the pre- and post-test.


Action Plans for next year
Based on the results of the pre- and post-tests, many action plans were created to improve the
achievement of learning outcomes. These actions are listed within the table presented above
alongside the respective course. With regard to the end-of-course evaluations, the SB&E is
working with the Office of CAMS Support to design a summary management report that extracts
information relevant to academic assessment from the students’ responses.


                                       SB&E Analysis
The SB&E has been very active in expanding both its assessment process and its
assessment report. The current version gives a greater level of detail about the process
the school is going through and its results. SB&E’s use of a third-party assessment tool,
the ETS tests, is a good source for outside validation of the school’s performance. Missing
details have led to questions. What about the drop in the MFT scores over time? What
efforts will be taken to discover areas of weakness? Why are internship scores better in
the spring than the fall? What information led to the redesign of the information system
program? While it is good that all the programs have their own student learning
objectives, the assessment needs to be tied to those SLOs.
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                    School of Communications                                                     English (United States)




Degrees offered by the School of Communications:

       Bachelor of Arts in
           Advertising and Media
           Corporate Communication
           Digital Cinema Arts
           Interactive Media and Web Design
           Journalism
           Mass Communications

       Bachelor of Fine Arts in
               Digital Cinema Arts

       Minors
           Communications
           Interactive Media and Web Design

During the 2010-11 academic year, the School of Communications at Lindenwood
University implemented revised curriculum for three majors that, in effect, created three
new degree programs: Journalism, Interactive Media and Web Design, and Digital
Cinema Arts. In addition, the Deans’ Council approved the merger of three current
majors—Corporate Communication, Advertising, and Mass Communication with a Public
Relations Emphasis resulting in a single new major titled Corporate Communication:
Advertising and Public Relations.

Consequently, in consultation with the University’s chief assessment officer, the Dean of
Institutional Research, and in conformity with the preferred format for assessment
distributed to each of the University’s schools, the School of Communications’
assessment report for the past academic year (2010-11) reflects the efforts of involved
faculty to establish four new assessment plans, one for each of the revised degree
programs.

Program Objectives
An original list of 12 core values and competencies proposed as the basis for the curricula
comprising all five majors in the School of Communication – values and competencies
derived from the curricular standards of the Accrediting Council on Education in
Journalism and Mass Communications – have been consolidated to six.
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   Students will
       demonstrate understanding and application of the principles relevant to
         major/discipline-specific theory, history, laws, and roles of communication
         professionals and institutions;
       demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of groups in a global society in
         relationship to the specific communication major/discipline;
       demonstrate an understanding of the concepts and theories, including
         principles of fairness and accuracy and their ethical application, relevant to
         the major/discipline-specific use and presentation of images and information;
       demonstrate independent, creative, and critical thinking in the
         major/discipline-specific conduct of research and evaluation, including
         evaluation of one’s own and others’ work for accuracy and effectiveness, by
         and according to appropriate professional methods and standards;
       demonstrate professional written, interpersonal, and public speaking/
         presentational skills relevant to the particular forms, styles, audiences and
         according to appropriate professional standards of the particular
         major/discipline;
       apply the tools and technologies appropriate to communication professionals
         in the particular major/discipline in which they work.

Results
Baseline results for spring 2011:

                          Competency 1
                      COM 46000 COM 13000        DIF
Overall                 67.49%        44.63%           22.85%
Basic Knowledge         81.30%        51.63%           29.67%
Advanced Knowledge      56.86%        39.25%           17.61%
                          Competency 2
Overall                 61.30%        44.70%           16.61%
Basic Knowledge         65.22%        51.70%           13.52%
Advanced Knowledge      59.63%        37.90%           21.73%
                          Competency 3
Overall                  65.1%         44.5%           20.6%
Basic Knowledge          74.7%         53.0%           21.8%
Advanced Knowledge       54.5%         35.2%           19.3%
                          Competency 4
Overall                 66.27%        44.73%           21.54%
Basic Knowledge         78.26%        59.62%           18.64%
Advanced Knowledge      49.84%        47.16%           2.69%
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                         Competency 6                                                            English (United States)
Overall                 81.74%       44.49%            37.25%
Basic Knowledge         76.09%       50.00%            26.09%
Advanced Knowledge      85.51%       40.82%            44.69%

                                                                                                 Comment [WJ3]: Where Jann left off
Method of Assessment
The school assessment committee approved a new, more compact objective pre- and
post-test to replace the obsolete 100-item test in use during the 2005-09 academic years.
The new test has been keyed to the revised list of six competencies and has been
administered during spring 2011 to sections of the initial major course for mass
communication and advertising, public relations, and corporation majors COM 13000
Survey of Professional Media and to the current capstone course for those majors, COM
46000 Mass Communication Theory.

Action Plan
A primary goal for fall 2010, identifying communication professionals in the greater St.
Louis region and Lindenwood communications alumni who might provide independent
input into the School of Communications’ assessment process, has only partially been
met and will remain in effect for the 2011-12 academic year. In spring 2011, one of
those counselors, Christopher Duggan, public relations and marketing coordinator,
contributed to the assessment plan for the new corporate communication – advertising
and public relations major. He will continue to have an expanded role in the coming
academic year. The interactive media and web design major has identified and surveyed
an initial sample of alumni regarding the relevance of specific aspects of their
undergraduate experience at the University to their current professional pursuits.

A primary goal for 2011-12 will be to devise an alumni survey instrument for all
graduates, to customize that survey for each major, and to integrate an interactive online
version of that instrument for initial implementation in the School of Communications
group site at LinkedIn.com. The interactive survey link is scheduled to be active by the
end of the 2011-12 academic year.

The individual assessment plans for the majors detail additional courses in which specific
assessment instruments have been applied. Additional courses will be identified for
assessment in each major, and the assessment committee anticipates, in addition to
having the process mapped out in greater detail, compiling and reporting the first
quantitative and qualitative assessment results for the 2011-12 academic year.

The school will provide ongoing assessment results for the 2011-12 academic year for the
general education courses in the curriculum and for additional core courses in each
major. Assessment for any remaining courses will be completed by the spring of 2013.
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                 School of Communications Analysis
The plans for seeking third-party accreditation have helped the School of
Communications find focus for assessment efforts. The current effort is a significant
improvement over previous years, but there is work needed in some areas. The school
needs to look at each major as a separate program and avoid creating outcomes so
general that they work for all of majors (If they all have the same outcomes, why are they
different degrees?). Not everything in communications can be effectively measured by
objective pre- and post-testing.
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                          School of Education

The School of Education has done a comprehensive assessment for a visit by the Missouri
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and is in the process of preparing
for a visit by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council.

The School of Education offers the following degrees:

       Bachelor of Arts in
           Early Childhood Education
           Early Childhood Special Education
           Elementary Education
           Educational Studies
           Middle School Education
           Physical Education
           Health

       Bachelor of Science in
           Athletic Training
           Exercise Science
           Physical Education

       Minors
           Education
           Sport and Fitness Management
           Health and Wellness
           Strength and Conditioning
           Coaching

Accreditation
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Lindenwood University teacher education programs are accredited by the Commission                    English (United States)
on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and
Schools and MDESE. The School of Education is also a member of the TEAC.

Reporting Cycle
The reporting cycle for the SOE and its certification programs to the MDESE is August to
August, which is a two-month difference from the University assessment reporting cycle
of June to June. This lag means the SOE data analysis is not completed until January. As a
result, the education assessment report follows other program reports by a year.

Nature of Education Degrees
At Lindenwood University, there is no degree in secondary education; all secondary
teaching students receive a degree in their field and a minor in education. Because of this
arrangement, the SoE does not control the content for the secondary education
students, and their assessment is rolled into the respective programs.

Early Childhood B-3

Results
CBASE

Prior to entry in the teacher education program, all undergraduate students must
successfully pass all areas of the CBASE exam, including the writing component. The
table below illustrates the results of all program completers taking the CBASE exam
during 2002-10.

CBASE Composite: Early Childhood B-3
Year          Program       Total # of Test   Avg. Score   Required   First-time   Overall
              Completers    Scores by                      Score      pass rate    Pass Rate
                            Completers

2005-06            15             19            289.55       235         89%        100.00%
2006-07            16             12             234         235         0%          100%
2007-08            12             22             251         235         25%         100%
2008-09            13             24             247         235         23%         100%
2009-10            14             34             252         235         21%         100%
Total              70            111            254.71       235        39.5%        100%


While earlier years reflect fluctuations in the first-time pass rate, the last few years show
a consistent trend with an average first-time pass rate of 21-25 percent.
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Cumulative GPA

The SoE documents cumulative GPA of all early childhood majors seeking certification.
The table below illustrates the cumulative GPA for all early childhood majors. The
University does not offer a degree option for early childhood education without
certification.

Cumulative GPA- Early Childhood B-3
Year       All Early              Early childhood majors               Early childhood
           childhood              seeking K-12 certification           majors seeking B.A.
           majors                 Content vs. Education                degree
2005-06           n/a                3.51              3.55                     n/a
2006-07           n/a                3.21              3.42                     n/a
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
TOTAL

Performance in Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

The table below illustrates the assessment data from the student-teaching experience
from cooperating teachers for early childhood program completers.

Cooperating Teacher Surveys- Early Childhood B-3
Year      1.2.1   1.2.2   1.2.3      1.2.4   1.2.5    1.2.6    1.2.7    1.2.8   1.2.9   1.2.10   1.2.11
2005-06    3.9     4.0     3.3        4.1     4.1      4.2      4.0      4.1     4.1      4.2      3.8
2006-07    4.1     4.1     4.0        4.0     4.1      4.6      4.5      4.0     3.8      4.0      4.2
2007-08    4.3     4.6     4.3        4.4     4.6      4.5      4.6      4.2     4.6      4.7      4.3
2008-09    4.9     4.7     4.7        4.9     4.9      4.8      4.9      4.6     4.9      4.9      4.7
2009010    4.8     4.7     4.7        4.7     4.9      4.9      4.9      4.7     4.9      4.9      4.7
Average    4.4     4.4     4.4        4.4     4.5      4.6      4.6      4.3     4.5      4.5      4.3


Exit Exam (PRAXIS)

The table below illustrates the results of all program completers taking the PRAXIS II
early childhood exam during 2006-10. From left to right, the columns represent the
corresponding year, total number of program completers, the total number of test scores
taken by those program completers, the average score from the first-time test, the state
required score, the first-time pass rate of the program completers, and the overall pass
rate. The University identifies program completers as those candidates who have
successfully completed student teaching and have passed the content area PRAXIS II;
therefore, the overall pass rate will reflect a 100 percent pass rate.

PRAXIS II - Early Childhood Pass Rate
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Year      Program       Total # of Test   Average         State        First-       Overall           English (United States)
          Completers    Scores by         Score from      Required     time         Pass
                        Completers        first-time      Score        pass         Rate
                                          test takers                  rate
2006-07       16              15                167           166         63%        100%
2007-08       12              18                170           166         83%        100%
2008-09       13              15                177           166         92%        100%
2009-10       14              26                168           166         86%        100%
Total         55              74              170.5           166         81%        100%

The data reflects an average first-time pass rate of 81 percent for early childhood
education majors. Several students took the exam prior to completing specific general
education, subject matter, and methods courses that provide the foundation and
knowledge to be successful on the PRAXIS II exam.

The table below illustrates similar results of all program completers taking the PRAXIS II
early childhood exam during 2006-10. From left to right, the columns represent the
corresponding year, total number of program completers, the total number of
completers who pass on the first attempt, completers who passed on the second
attempt, those who passed on the third attempt, total number of tests scores taken by
those program completers, and the overall pass rate.

PRAXIS II Early Childhood Multiple Attempts
Year       Program      Total # of      Completers      Completers    Total # of     Overall
           completers   completers      who pass        who passed    test scores    pass rate
                        who pass        second          third         by
                        first attempt   attempt         attempt       completers
2006-07        16            10               1               1            15           100%
2007-08        12            10               0               0            18           100%
2008-09        13            12               1               0            15           100%
2009-10        14            12               1               0            26           100%
Total          55            44               3               1            74           100%


Elementary Education 1-6

Results
CBASE

Prior to entry in the Teacher Education Program, all undergraduate students must
successfully pass all areas of the CBASE exam, including the writing component. The
table below illustrates the results of all program completers taking the CBASE exam
during 2005-10.

CBASE Composite: Elementary 1-6
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Year         Program         Total # of test      Avg.        Required       First-          Overall     English (United States)
             completers      scores by            Score       score          time pass       pass rate
                             completers                                      rate
2005-06           90                99            289.67           235          80%          100.00%
2006-07           58                28             263             235           7%           100%
2007-08           50                53             272             235          32%           100%
2008-09           66               118             258             235          42%           100%
2009-10           57                86            260.56           235          37%           100%
Total             321              384            268.65           235          40%           100%

While earlier years reflect fluctuations in the first-time pass rate, the last few years have
seen a first-time pass rate of 84 percent or above.

Cumulative GPA

The SoE documents cumulative GPA of all elementary education majors seeking
certification. The table below illustrates the cumulative GPA for all elementary education
majors. The University does not offer a degree option for elementary education without
certification.

Cumulative GPA - ELEMENTARY 1-6
Year         All Elementary       Elementary majors seeking K-           Elementary majors
             majors               12 certification                       seeking B.A.
                                  Content vs. Education                  degree
2005-06             n/a               3.35           3.39                        n/a
2006-07             n/a               3.13           3.18                        n/a
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
Total

Cumulative GPA indicates to the faculty in the SoE the overall achievement of students in
the elementary education (1-6) program. Based on the above data, it is evident that
those students who are seeking an elementary education (1-6) degree with K-12
certification are consistent and slightly above average for all students seeking a degree in
elementary education.

Performance in Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)

The table below illustrates the assessment data from the student-teaching experience
from cooperating teachers for elementary education program completers.

Cooperating Teacher Surveys- Elementary 1-6
Year      1.2.1   1.2.2   1.2.3   1.2.4   1.2.5   1.2.6    1.2.7   1.2.8    1.2.9   1.2.10     1.2.11
2005-06    3.9     4.0     4.1     4.1     4.1     4.1      4.0     4.0      4.1      4.2        3.9
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2006-07    4.1         4.2    4.5         4.0   4.1        4.6    4.3         4.0      3.9         4.4          4.2    English (United States)
2007-08    4.3         4.1    4.3         4.2   4.3        4.1    4.2         4.1      4.3         4.5          4.4
2008-09    4.7         4.8    4.7         4.8   4.7        4.7    4.8         4.7      4.9         4.8          4.9
2009-10    4.5         4.6    4.7         4.5   4.6        4.4    4.6         4.6      4.7         4.8          4.7
Average:   4.3         4.3    4.5         4.3   4.4        4.4    4.4         4.3      4.4         4.5          4.4

The data reflects that Lindenwood University pre-service teachers are evaluated as above
average and outstanding in their clinical experience in EDU41000 - Student Teaching.

Exit Exam (PRAXIS)

The table below illustrates the results of all program completers taking the PRAXIS II
elementary education exam during 2006-10.

PRAXIS II Elementary Education Pass Rate- Elementary Ed: Curriculum, Instruction, and
Assessment Composite
Year       Program           Total # of test     Average score     State            First-         Overall
           completers        scores by           from first-       required         time           pass rate
                             completers          time test         score            pass rate
                                                 takers
2006-07          58                  71                166              164           59%                100%
2007-08          50                  79                168              164           68%                100%
2008-09          66                 110                164              164           77%                100%
2009-10          57                 127                162              164           58%                100%
Total            231                387                165              164          65.5%               100%


The data reflect an average first-time pass rate of 65.5 percent or above for
undergraduate elementary education (1-6) majors.

The table below illustrates similar results of all program completers taking the PRAXIS II
elementary education exam during 2006-10.

PRAXIS Elementary Education - Elementary Ed: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
Composite Multiple Attempts
Year       Program           Total # of         Completers       Completers           Total # of           Overall
           completers        completers         passed on        who passed           test scores          pass rate
                             passed first       second           third attempt        by
                             attempt            attempt                               completers

2006-07          58                  34                7                3                     71                100%
2007-08          50                  34                5                7                     79                100%
2008-09          66                  51                6                3                    110                100%
2009-10          57                  33                9                7                    127                100%
Total            231                152               27                20                   387                100%
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Health Education K-12                                                                                English (United States)



Results
CBASE

Prior to entry in the Teacher Education Program, all students must successfully pass all
areas of the CBASE exam, including the writing component. The table below illustrates
the results of all program completers taking the CBASE exam during 2005-10.

CBASE Composite -Health K-12
Year       Program       Total # of test   Avg. score     Required      First-      Overall
           completers    scores by                        score         time pass   pass rate
                         completers                                     rate
2005-06    1             1                 255.00         235           100%        100.00%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
Total      1             1                 255            235           none        100.00%

Cumulative GPA

The table below illustrates the cumulative GPA for health education majors seeking
certification for content coursework and professional education coursework. The
University does not offer a degree option for health education without certification.




Cumulative GPA- Health K-12
Year       All health   Health majors seeking K-        Health majors
           majors       12 certification                seeking B.A.
                        Content vs. Education           degree
2005-06        2.77         3.1          2.55                 2.77
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
Total

Performance in Clinical Experience (Student Teaching)
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The table blow illustrates the assessment data from the student teaching experience                                        English (United States)
from cooperating teachers for health education program completers.

Cooperating Teacher Surveys- Health K-12
Year             1.2.1    1.2.2        1.2.3   1.2.4        1.2.5     1.2.6     1.2.7       1.2.8      1.2.9     1.2.10   1.2.11
2005-06           2.0      2.0          2.0     2.0          2.0       2.0       2.0         2.0        2.0        2.0      2.0
2006-07           n/a      n/a          n/a     n/a          n/a       n/a       n/a         n/a        n/a        n/a      n/a
2007-08           4.1      4.3          3.9     4.6          4.1       3.9       4.4         4.3        4.7        4.4      4.5
2008-09           4.5      4.6          3.9     4.7          3.8       4.3       4.2         4.5        4.9        4.7      4.8
2009-10           4.7      4.4          4.6     4.5          3.9       4.1       3.9         4.2        4.6        4.8      4.6
Average           4.4      4.4          4.1     4.6          3.9       4.1       4.1         4.3        4.7        4.6      4.6

Exit Exam (PRAXIS)

The table below illustrates the results of all program completers taking the PRAXIS II
health education exam during 2005-10.

PRAXIS II Health Education Pass Rate
Year        Program       Total # of test      Average              State         First-            Overall
            completers    scores by            score from           required      time              pass rate
                          completers           first-time test      score         pass rate
                                               takers

2005-06          1                 1              660.00                  620       100%            100.00%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
Total            1                 1                  660                 620       100%            100.00%

PRAXIS Health Multiple Attempts-Undergraduate
Year        Program       Total # of        Completers         Completers       Total # of           Overall
            completers    completers        who passed         who passed       test scores          pass rate
                          passed first      second             third            by
                          attempt           attempt            attempt          completers

2005-06          1             1                  0                   0                 1             100.00%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
Total            1             1                  0                   0                 1             100.00%


School Lessons Learned
While nothing has changed in health education certification program requirements, the recent
trend to promote healthy lifestyles in our public schools has prompted the University to add two
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new degree offerings under the Health and Fitness Sciences Department. Recently, the                  English (United States)
University was granted approval by the Deans’ Council and MDESE to offer a Bachelor of Arts in
Dance w/ K-12 certification. With the demand to keep children active in school, many public
schools are moving towards additional offerings for students, such as dance electives in addition
to coursework or in place of physical education courses. Additionally, there has been approval
for a spring 2008 offering of a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science. While this degree does not
carry an elementary or secondary certification, there is a demand for fitness professionals in
corporate wellness centers, personal training, cardiac rehabilitation, athletic enhancement, and
fitness management. Both of these new programs will complement the existing offerings under
the SoE at the University.

In spring 2007, the SoE faculty combined the educational psychology class with the
human development class to create a new class titled Psychology of Teaching and
Learning. With this change, the division was then able to insert the class measurement
and evaluation to enhance learning into the elementary education pre-service teacher
program. The course gave the students the opportunity to have a class in assessment
strategies early in their program to help them as they do lesson design.

The Dean of the School of Education and faculty members are looking at the possibility of
combining the orientation to education and history and philosophy of education classes
together at the undergraduate level for those in the elementary education pre-service
teacher program. By creating this merged class, Orientation to Teaching, the SoE will
then create a place in the students’ program for elementary education majors to take a
class in either behavior management or classroom instructional technology. The
University SoE faculty hopes to make this change in fall 2010.




Athletic Training


Accreditation
The program has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic
Training Education. In spring 2010, the program had a scheduled accreditation site visit
through CAATE. The program successfully passed all components of the team’s
evaluation process, including meeting all of the nationally-recognized standards for
entry-level athletic training education. Therefore, the program obtained continued
accreditation through CAATE until spring 2013. The program is designed to prepare
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athletic training students to succeed on the board of certification examination and              English (United States)
become Certified Athletic Trainers.

Objectives
Students will

      successfully complete the general education curriculum outlined by the
       University,
      successfully complete the major requirements for the degree,
      complete 1,210 contact hours with a certified athletic training and/or clinical
       instructor,
      complete the National Athletic Trainers Association’s Athletic Training Clinical
       Competencies and Proficiencies during the clinical experience.

Course Alignment to Competencies

All courses in the athletic training program are aligned to the 12 competency areas set
forth by the NATA.

The competency areas include the following:
    Risk Management
    Pathology
    Diagnosis
    Medical Conditions
    Acute Care
    Therapeutic Modalities
    Exercise
    Pharmacology
    Psychosocial
    Nutritional Aspects
    Administration
    Professional Development

Throughout the 2009-10 year, the faculty reviewed each competency and aligned it to
the courses in which the competency is met. The matrixes showing the alignment, and an
explanation of the competencies, are maintained in the athletic training offices as well as
the current course alignment to the competencies. Additionally, the athletic training
program has a strong emphasis on writing skills, communication skills, mathematics, and
science.

Methods of Assessment
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The University Athletic Training Education Comprehensive Assessment Plan is separated            English (United States)
into seven goals. The first two are identified as assessing the mastery of the educational
entry-level competencies and proficiencies. These are separated into the first two goals:
didactic and clinical.

      The first goal is the assessment of students’ didactic success. Assessment is
       accomplished using the overtime technique with courses exams, projects, an oral
       practical examination, etc.
      The second goal is the assessment of clinical education success and is
       accomplished by the use of checklists for each clinical experience. Students’
       clinical education success is further assessed by administering an exit oral
       practical exam. This exam is given upon completion of their clinical education
       requirements. This exam must be passed before they are allowed to set for the
       BOC exam.
      The third goal is quality of instruction, clinical experiences, supervision, and
       equipment. This is assessed by course evaluations at the end of each semester,
       clinical instructor evaluations, and clinical site evaluations.
      The fourth goal is the use of technology in entry-level education. This goal is
       assessed through the completion of various tests and projects using an
       assortment of tools such as injury tracking software, video presentation,
       PowerPoint projects, etc.
      The fifth goal is obtaining BOC certification. This is assessed by using the testing
       result data that is presented to our department on a yearly basis.
      The sixth goal is to provide athletic training students with opportunities to
       develop the skills and knowledge to be successful in any athletic training work
       settings they desire to pursue. This would include the pursuit of a graduate
       degree.
      The seventh goal is to promote ethical leadership, a values-centered education,
       and the development of the whole person: an educated, responsible citizen of the
       global community.

The sixth and seventh goals are assessed by the use of alumni surveys, employer surveys,
senior exit surveys, and student clinical evaluations and course evaluations. These
assessment tools provide our program with feedback as to the effectiveness of our
instruction and education. The results of these assessment tools are reviewed on a
yearly basis. The results are then put into an action plans, if need be, to enhance the
effectiveness of the the University Athletic Training Educational Program both
didactically and clinically.



Classes to be Assessed
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The benchmarks have been established to assess students’ learning through the                     English (United States)
curriculum from entry into the major through graduation.

Core Classes                             Hours   Benchmarks and other program comments
Acceptance into the Program                      Benchmark #1: All listed classes above must
                                                 be completed with at least a C. The student
                                                 must possess a cumulate grade point of 2.5
                                                 and complete an interview with the
                                                 department.
AT 39100 Lower Body Assess. Lab           2      Benchmark #2: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 39300 Clinical Exp. II                 3      Benchmark #2: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 39200 Upper Body Assess. Lab           2      Benchmark #3: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 39400 Clinical Exp III                 3      Benchmark #3: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 43500 Therapeutic Modalities Lab       1      Benchmark #3: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 43700 Football Experience              1      Benchmark #4: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 43600 Non-Orthopedic Injuries Lab      1      Benchmark #4: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 39500 Clinical Exp IV                  3      Benchmark #4: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 39000 Therapeutic Exer. Lab            1      Benchmark #5: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 42800 Clinical Exp. V                  3      Benchmark #5: Completion of course
                                                 competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 43100 Organization and                 3      Benchmark #6: Completion of course
Administration of Athletic Training              competencies and proficiencies with a C
AT 43900 Athletic Training Integrating    3      Exit Benchmarks: Final competency skills test
Experience                                       given; Case studies used to assess knowledge
AT 43800 Senior Seminar                   1      Exit Benchmarks: Final competency skills test
                                                 given


Methods of Assessment Used
    1. Students must complete the athletic training application and meet all
       requirements.
    2. Students are required to successfully pass (grade of C or better) the pre-requisites
       for all major requirements and maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA to complete the
       degree.
    3. The 1,210 clinical hours must be approved and documented by the clinical
       instructor.
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   4. Students must successfully complete the NATA’s Athletic Training Clinical                         English (United States)
      Competencies and Proficiencies.
   5. Students must obtain the American Red Cross Professional Rescuer Certification.

Subjective

      Prior to admission into the program, students interview with the respective faculty to
       review goals, career plans, and to ensure commitment to the field of athletic training.
      Students are provided an academic plan by an academic advisor in the respective area.
       At a minimum, each student meets with his/her advisor one time per semester to review
       academic progress, course sequencing, and overall success in the program.
      During clinical experiences, the clinical instructor serves as a role model for best practices
       in athletic training and provides students the opportunity for conversations about
       situations and unusual occurrences that may happen.

Student Attitude/Response

      Student responses are collected on the University’s course evaluations following
       each semester.
      Students are asked for feedback following each clinical rotation.
      Students are required to complete an exit interview survey during the last
       semester of senior year. These responses are collected each semester and
       discussed in the athletic training staff meetings at the end of each year.

Results
The current student enrollment is listed below. Currently there are 121 declared majors
in the Athletic Training Program. Each year an estimated 25 to 30 student are accepted
into the program following the application and interview process. Many students who do
not pursue athletic training choose other majors in the health and fitness sciences.

The cumulative GPA is above the required 2.5 for graduation and has increased slightly in
the 2009-2010 academic year.

Student Enrollment and GPA
                         2008-09         2009-10          2010-11
Student Enrollment          52             142              121
GPA                        2.89            2.89             3.07

The program is designed to prepare athletic training students to succeed on the BOC examination
and become certified athletic trainers. While students do not have to pass this exam to graduate
with a degree, the exam must be passed to obtain certification.

The BOC pass rates for the prior two years compared to national norms:
                     Program                          2009-10     2010-11          LU Improvement
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Lindenwood Athletic Training Students                     25.0%       50.0%               100%        English (United States)
National Average for Athletic Training Students           43.3%       60.7%               40%

The 2009-10 year reported a 50 percent first-time pass rate for students. While this was
slightly below the national average, it was a tremendous improvement from the previous
year by 25 percent. The department will continue to work to improve our pass rate to
above the national average.

Exit Interview Data

At the end of their senior year, students are given an exit interview. The instructions for
this interview are listed below:

“Please rate the following statements about your education at Lindenwood University.
All responses are used in our annual or bi-yearly evaluation of our accreditation process.
Use the five-point rating scale identified below for all responses, except questions # 26
(1-10).”

1 –Strongly Disagree         2 -Disagree           3 – Unsure        4 –Agree          5-Strongly
Agree
                                                                               2009-10  2010-11
                           Exit Interview Questions:                          Average  Average
                                                                              Response Response
1.    The University’s general education requirements rounded out my             4.1
      education.
2.    The academic standards of the athletic training program were high.        4.2
3.    I learned effective written communications skills.                        4.1
4.    I improved my ability to communicate orally.                              4.4
5.    I am confident in my abilities as an athletic trainer.                    4.5
6.    I feel confident in using the computer as a tool.                         3.7
7.    The athletic training facilities at Lindenwood University enhanced        4.25
      my education.
8.    In increased my ability to think critically about athletic training.      4.6
9.    My advisors were helpful to me throughout the athletic training           4.3
      program.
10.   The varieties of athletic training courses were appropriate.              4.3
11.   The variety of clinical experiences/rotations was appropriate.            4.0
12.   The overall instruction provided by the athletic training faculty was     4.3
      of high quality.
13.   My ability to recognize injuries/illness is appropriate.                  4.4
14.   My ability to treat injuries is appropriate.                              4.3
15.   My ability to refer athletes/patients is appropriate.                     4.0
16.   My ability to recognize and treat emergency situations is                 4.3
      appropriate.
17.   My ability to administer an athletic training/health care facility is     4.2
      appropriate.
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                                                                           2009-10  2010-11         English (United States)
                          Exit Interview Questions:                       Average  Average
                                                                          Response Response
18. My ability to utilize nutritional information and assessment             5.0
    techniques is appropriate.
19. My knowledge of the physiological responses of human growth               4.0
    development and the progression of pediatric injury/illness is
    appropriate.
20. My understanding of basic pharmacology,                                   4.2
    indications/contraindications, applicable laws, and the use of
    therapeutic medications are appropriate.
21. My understanding of professional responsibilities, including              4.3
    national and state regulatory acts, continuing educations
    requirements, etc., is appropriate.
22. My ability to recognize, intervene, and refer, when appropriate,          4.3
    social, mental, and emotional behaviors is appropriate.
23. My ability to identify and alter injury risk factors (i.e., prevent       4.4
    injury) is appropriate.
24. My ability to plan, develop, and implement a therapeutic exercise         4.4
    (rehab) program is appropriate.
25. My ability to plan, implement, and appropriately implement an             4.4
    injury/illness plan using therapeutic modalities is appropriate.
26. My overall ranking of my athletic training preparation at                 8.3
    Lindenwood University. (1-10 with 10 being the best)

Based on the above data, it is evident that students feel the Athletic Training Program
properly prepares them for the profession. However, this feedback is further used to
modify course content and course objectives based on the NATA competencies.




Lessons Learned
Strengths of the Program

       One of the most striking improvements has occurred in our clinical education
        program. Our clinical coordinator has taken the whole proficiency checklist and
        clinical experience class and turned it into a quality education experience for our
        athletic training students. Each student meets once a week with an ACI to check
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       off proficiency skills. Athletic training students are also assigned clinical/field      English (United States)
       experience to give them the opportunity to assess injuries they studied in the
       previous semester. We also initiated an oral practical exit exam for our graduating
       seniors. When the BOC began the computer-based test, we felt that we needed a
       way to test proficiencies one more time before our students were allowed to sit
       for the exam. Each senior athletic training student is required to pass our oral
       practical exam before we endorse the student to take the BOC exam. Our clinical
       coordinator has produced a reference that we use in our didactic classes and
       clinical classes that standardizes the special tests, palpations, and evaluation
       procedures.
      The on-campus clinical/field experience opportunities are implausible for our
       athletic training students. The University now offers 44 intercollegiate sports.         Comment [u4]:

      The department has also added two new ATCs in the last year to our staff. This           Comment [u5R4]: Something about this doesn't
                                                                                                seem right. One of the stengths of the program is that
       brings our staff to five ATC and five graduate assistants.                               opportunities are implausible?
           o The department continues to update our library and computer resources
                for all University students. A major goal of President Evans is to improve
                academic resources available to our students.
           o The University continues to evaluate each class and professor with an exit
                survey. This gives the faculty and staff a way to evaluate their subject
                matter and teaching techniques and make necessary changes.

Challenges

      The affiliated sites and general medical rotations continue to be a challenge. We
       have had several physician groups who have worked with us over the last five
       years. Each group has faced its own challenges and has discontinued our
       rotations. The affiliated sites have not been supervised as well as they could be,
       and we continue to have trouble receiving all their paperwork.
      The recruitment of certified graduate assistants has become difficult. The
       increase in the number of graduate assistants now covering sports at the NCAA
       Division I level has left the NAIA and other NCAA divisions at a disadvantage. We
       can usually recruit excellent candidates, but none with certification. Division I
       universities only accept certified candidates.
      The use of allied health and medical professionals is underutilized. We have many
       allied health and medical professionals available to the University and we should
       be recruiting and utilizing them more in our classes and at special presentations.
      The department will continue to need some other type of clerical help. We have
       one excellent administrative assistant but she has more than one department
       assigned to her. The department also uses work and learn students, but they are
       often not reliable.
      Alumni evaluations and surveys continue to have poor participation with only an
       average return rate of about 10 percent.

Strategies
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     The University has opened a student health facility on campus, staffed with a
      nurse practitioner and family practice physician. We are in discussions with the
      DePaul and SSM hospital groups about utilizing our athletic training students. The
      students would be able to accomplish their general medial rotation by assisting in
      the University health facility.
     The department has developed some new programs to assist incoming graduate
      assistants and to try to recruit certified candidates. We are also looking into using
      more of our own graduates who are certified. We continue to supervise the test-
      eligible graduate assistants but it would greatly help our program if they were
      certified so we could use them in CI positions in our clinical programs during their
      second year on staff.
     The department has begun to emphasize the utilization of more allied health and
      medical professionals within our classes each semester. The professors have
      started looking to professionals they have worked with in previous positions to
      present in their specific classes. We have been approached by different
      physicians groups wanting to work with the University, and we are looking at
      ways to utilize them within our academic and clinical programs.
     The department has asked for release time for our CIE to handle some clerical              Comment [u6]: What is this?

      responsibilities. The CIE also supervises the work and learn students assigned to
      assist with clerical responsibilities in our department.
     The department is in conversations with our IT department about how to best
      place our alumni surveys on our website. We have talked with several other
      athletic trainer programs that have put them online, and they seem to be getting
      a better return rate.

Impacts and Changes on Classes
     New course assessments based directly on the program's matrix will be used and
      completed by the students at the end of the semester to provide instructors with
      feedback on the topics that are well-covered and those not being retained.
     New objective assessments will be added to all clinical experience courses to
      grade the students’ ability to apply course-specific skills in actual situations. These
      evaluations will be completed using real patients in a clinical setting under the
      supervision of a clinical instructor.
     Pre-tests and post-tests will be added to many of the curriculum courses (i.e.,
      pathology, pharmacology, and exercise science).
     The program has added a BOC preparatory course over J-Term. Students enrolled
      in this course must also attend a workshop in January focusing on test-
      taking strategies, test topics, available study guides, proper preparation, and take
      multiple practice tests. Student performances on the practice tests are reviewed
      on-site with students. Each program director also receives a statement providing
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       information regarding the performance of his/her program's students, as well as a              English (United States)
       comparison to the national norms.

In order to ensure students are taking courses in the appropriate sequence, in the spring
of 2011 the faculty re-evaluated the current prerequisites for each course in the
curriculum.

Proposed changes to pre-requisites and the rationale for the change:
  Class Number and Name            2011-2012 catalog pre-         Proposed 2012-13 catalog pre-
                                         requisite                          requisite
     AT 42900 - Clinical       PE 31500, AT 42800, AT 30100,    PE 31500, PE 31600, AT 42800, AT
       Experience VI            AT 39000 with a C or better     30100, AT 39000 with a C or better
AT 43900 - Athletic Training     Concurrent AT 42900, AT        Concurrent AT 42900, pre req senior
  integrated Experience        43800, pre req senior standing                standing
                                       and AT 42900



Exercise Science


Mission
The Health and Fitness Sciences Department supports the University’s mission
statement:

       Lindenwood University offers values-centered programs leading to the
       development of the whole person – an educated, responsible citizen of a global
       community.

       The University is committed to
          • providing an integrative liberal arts curriculum,
          • offering professional and pre-professional degree programs,
          • focusing on the talents, interests, and future of the student,
          • supporting academic freedom and the unrestricted search for truth,
          • affording cultural enrichment to the surrounding community,
          • promoting ethical lifestyles,
          • developing adaptive thinking and problem-solving skills,
          • furthering lifelong learning.

Program Goals and Objectives
Goals for the Graduates in the Major
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The goal of the Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science at Lindenwood University is to           English (United States)
produce well-rounded students in professional areas such as corporate fitness, personal
training, and sport performance specialist. The exercise science program emphasizes
exercise testing, assessing, and knowledgeable instruction of healthy and non-healthy
individuals, seasonal and competitive athletes, and health-conscious individuals. The
students will graduate with knowledge in cardiovascular fitness, strength training and
endurance, body composition, and program development and will be able to sit for
strength and conditioning certifications.

The program does not require accreditation, however, the program is aligned with the
American College of Sports Medicine’s Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities competencies.

The exercise science program will also prepare the students for graduate work in athletic
training, physical therapy, exercise physiology, and as a physician’s assistant. The
program offers four minors: coaching, strength and conditioning, health and fitness
management, and health and wellness.

Objectives for Graduates in the Major

Students will

      successfully complete the general education curriculum outlined by the
       University,
      successfully complete the major requirements for the degree,
      complete 150-300 internship hours under the direction of a qualified cooperating
       supervisor and University supervisor,
      upon completion of the degree and the appropriate internship, be qualified to
       take the ACSM personal trainer, health fitness instructor, and/or exercise
       specialist certification examination,
      be prepared (if minoring in strength and conditioning ) to take the certified
       strength and conditioning specialist test through the National Strength and
       Conditioning Association.

Course Alignment to Competencies

In the summer of 2009, the faculty began the process of aligning all course objectives to
the ACSM KSAs. The alignment process involved all faculty evaluating each objective
stated on the syllabus and aligning it to all appropriate KSAs.

The 12 competency areas set forth by ACSM include the following:

      General field knowledge
      Pathophysiology and risk factors
      Health appraisal, fitness, and commercial exercise testing
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        Patient management and medications                                                                English (United States)
        Exercise prescription and programming
        Nutrition and weight management
        Human behavior and counseling
        Safety, injury prevention, and emergency procedures
        Program administration, quality assurance, and outcome assessment
        Cardiovascular: pathophysiology and risk factors
        Pulmonary: pathophysiology and risk factors
        Metabolic: pathophysiology and risk factors

The matrix below displays the current course alignments to the ACSM competencies.
The faculty members have met on a bi-weekly basis to evaluate the competencies and
identify what is touched upon in a course and what is tested upon in a course. This
process will help the faculty modify course objectives ton ensure alignment with the
competencies.

                                                              Touched
Competency                                                                  Tested
                                                              Upon
                                                                            PE 31500, AT
                                                                            29500
Knowledge of the basic structures of bone, skeletal           PE 35600      PE 31000, PE
muscle, and connective tissues.                               PE 31000      16000,
                                                                            BIO 22700 PE
                                                                            22000
                                                                            PE 31500, PE
Knowledge of the basic anatomy of the cardiovascular                        16000,
                                                              EXS 39000
system and respiratory system.                                              PE 31000, BIO
                                                                            22800
                                                                            EXS 31000, PE
Knowledge of the definition of the following terms:                         16000,
inferior, superior, medial, lateral, supination, pronation,                 PE 31000, AT
flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, hyperextension,     PE 35600      29500,
rotation, circumduction, agonist, antagonist, and                           EXS 10000, BIO
stabilizer.                                                                 22700,
                                                                            PE 31000
                                                                            PE 35600, EXS
                                                                            31000,
Knowledge of the plane in which each muscle action
                                                              PE 16000      AT 29500, BIO
occurs.
                                                                            22700,
                                                                            PE 31000
                                                              EXS 39000,
Knowledge of the interrelationships among center of
                                                              PE 35600,
gravity, base of support, balance, stability, and proper                    EXS 31000
                                                              PE 16000,
spinal alignment.
                                                              PE 31000
                                                                            AT 29500, PE
Knowledge of the following curvatures of the spine:           PE 16000,     20400,
lordosis, scoliosis, and kyphosis.                            EXS 43000     PE 30500, BIO
                                                                            22700
The ability to describe the myotatic stretch reflex.                        EXS 45000, EXS
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                                                             Touched                                       English (United States)
Competency                                                                  Tested
                                                             Upon
                                                                            31000,
                                                                            PE 31500
Knowledge of the fundamental biomechanical principles
that underlie performance of the following activities:       PE 35600,
                                                                            EXS 31000
walking, jogging, running, swimming, cycling, weight         BIO 22800
lifting, and carrying or moving objects.
                                                                            PE 31500, EXS
                                                             EXS 39000,     45000,
The ability to define aerobic and anaerobic metabolism.
                                                             EXS 40000      EXS 10000, BIO
                                                                            22800
                                                                            PE 31500, EXS
                                                                            40000,
Knowledge of the role of aerobic and anaerobic energy                       EXS 45000, EXS
                                                             EXS 39000
systems in the performance of various activities.                           31600,
                                                                            EXS 10000, BIO
                                                                            22800
Knowledge of the following terms: ischemia, angina
pectoris, tachycardia, bradycardia, arrhythmia, myocardial
                                                             PE 16000,      PE 31500, BIO
infarction, cardiac output, stroke volume, lactic acid,
                                                             EXS 43000      22800
oxygen consumption, hyperventilation, systolic blood
pressure, and anaerobic threshold.
Knowledge to describe normal cardiorespiratory
                                                             EXS 39000,
responses to static and dynamic exercise in terms of heart                  PE 31500
                                                             PE 16000
rate, blood pressure, and oxygen consumption.
Knowledge of how heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen                     PE 31500, EXS
                                                             EXS 45000,
consumption responses change with adaptation to                             45000,
                                                             EXS 40500
chronic exercise training.                                                  PE 30500
                                                                            PE 31500,
Knowledge of physiological adaptations associated with
                                                             EXS 39000      PE 30500,
strength training.
                                                                            EXS 45000
                                                                            PE 31500,
                                                                            EXS 45000,
Knowledge of the physiological principles related to         EXS 39000,
                                                                            AT 29500,
warm-up and cool-down.                                       EXS 40500
                                                                            PE 20400,
                                                                            BIO 22700
                                                                            PE 31500,
                                                                            PE 35600,
Knowledge of the common theories of muscle fatigue and       EXS 39000,
                                                                            EXS 10000,
delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).                        PE 16000
                                                                            AT 29500,
                                                                            PE 20400
Knowledge of the physiological adaptations that occur at
                                                                            PE 31500,
rest during submaxial and maximal exercise following         EXS 45000
                                                                            PE 35600
chronic aerobic and anaerobic exercise training.
Knowledge of the differences in cardiorespiratory
response to acute graded exercise between conditioned        EXS 43000      PE 31500
and unconditioned individuals.
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                                                               Touched                                      English (United States)
Competency                                                                   Tested
                                                               Upon
                                                                             PE 31500,
                                                               EXS 31000
Knowledge of the structure of the skeletal muscle fiber                      EXS 45000,
                                                               PE 16000
and the basic mechanism of contraction.                                      EXS 10000,
                                                               PE 31000
                                                                             BIO 22700
                                                                             PE 31500,
                                                                             EXS 45000,
Knowledge of the characteristics of fast and slow twitch
                                                               EXS 39000     EXS 10000,
fibers.
                                                                             BIO 22700,
                                                                             BIO 22800
                                                                             PE 31500,
Knowledge of the sliding filament theory of muscle                           EXS 45000,
contraction.                                                                 EXS 10000,
                                                                             BIO 22700
                                                                             PE 31500,
Knowledge of twitch, summation, and tetanus with
                                                                             AT 29500,
respect to muscle contradiction.
                                                                             BIO 22700
                                                                             EXS 39000,
Knowledge of the physiological principles involved in          EXS 40500,    PE 31500,
promoting gains in muscular strength and endurance.            PE 31000      EXS 10000,
                                                                             EXS 43000
Knowledge of muscle fatigue as it relates to mode,
                                                                             EXS 39000,
intensity, duration, and the accumulative effects of           EXS 20000
                                                                             PE 31500
exercise.
                                                                             EXS 39000,
Knowledge of the basic properties of cardiac muscle and        PE 16000      PE 31500,
the normal pathways of conduction in the heart.                EXS 43000     PE 16000,
                                                                             BIO 22800
Knowledge of the response of the following variables to
acute static and dynamic exercise: heart rate, stroke
                                                               EXS 39000
volume, cardiac output, pulmonary ventilation, tidal                         PE 31500
                                                               EXS 43000
volume, respiratory rate, and arteriovenous oxygen
difference.
Knowledge of blood pressure responses associated with          EXS 39000     PE 31500, BIO
acute exercise, including changes in body position.            EXS 43000     22800
Knowledge of and ability to describe the implications of
                                                                             EXS 39000, PE
ventilatory threshold (anaerobic threshold) as it relates to   EXS 40500
                                                                             31500
exercise training and cardiorespiratory assessment.
Knowledge of and ability to describe the physiological
                                                                             EXS 39000, PE
adaptations of the respiratory system that occur at rest
                                                               PE 35600      31500,
and during submaximal and maximal exercise following
                                                                             EXS 43000
chronic aerobic and anaerobic training.
                                                                             PE 31500, PE
Knowledge of how each of the following differs from the
                                                               BIO 22800     16000,
normal condition: dysnea, hypoxia, and hypoventilation.
                                                                             BIO 22700
                                                               EXS 20000,
                                                                             EXS 39000, EXS
Knowledge of how the principle of specificity relates to       PE 35600,
                                                                             31500,
the components of fitness.                                     EXS 31000,
                                                                             EXS 43000
                                                               EXS 40500
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                                                              Touched                                      English (United States)
Competency                                                                  Tested
                                                              Upon
                                                              EXS 39000,    PE 31500, EXS
Knowledge of the concept of detraining and reversibility
                                                              EXS 20000,    45000,
of conditioning and its implications in fitness programs.
                                                              PE 35600      EXS 43000
Knowledge of the physical and psychological signs of          EXS 39000,    PE 31500, EXS
overtraining and to provide recommendations for these         EXS 40000,    20000,
problems.                                                     EXS 43000     EXS 10000
Knowledge of and ability to describe the changes that
                                                                            PE 31500,
occur in maturation from childhood to adulthood for the
                                                                            PE 35600,
following: skeletal muscle, bone structure, reaction time,
                                                                            PE 16000,
coordination, heat and cold tolerance, maximal oxygen         EXS 39000
                                                                            BIO 22700,
consumption, strength, flexibility, body composition,
                                                                            PE 30500,
resting and maximal heart rate, and resting and maximal
                                                                            PE 22000
blood pressure.
Knowledge of the effect of the aging process on the
                                                              PE 16000,     PE 31500,
musculoskeletal and cardiovascular structure and function
                                                              EXS 43000     PE 35600
at rest, during exercise, and during recovery.
                                                                            PE 31500,
                                                                            EXS 20000,
Knowledge of the following terms: progressive, resistance,
                                                                            EXS 31000,
isotonic/isometric, concentric, eccentric, atrophy,           EXS 39000,
                                                                            AT 29500
hypertrophy, sets, repetitions, plyometrics, Valsalva         PE 31000
                                                                            PE 20400,
maneuver.
                                                                            EXS 10000,
                                                                            PE 30500
Knowledge of and skill to demonstrate exercises designed      EXS 39000,    PE 35600,
to enhance muscular strength and/or endurance of              EXS 40500,    EXS 38500,
specific major muscle groups.                                 PE 31000      PE 30500
                                                              EXS 39000,
                                                                            EXS 20000,
Knowledge of and skill to demonstrate exercises for           EXS 31000,
                                                                            PE 30500,
enhancing musculoskeletal flexibility.                        EXS 40500,
                                                                            EXS 45000
                                                              EXS 43000
Ability to identify the major bones and muscle. Major
                                                                            PE 35600,
muscles include, but are not limited to, the following:
                                                                            EXS 38500,
trapezius, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, biceps,
                                                              PE 16000      EXS 10000,
triceps, rectus abdominis, internal and external obliques,
                                                                            BIO 22700,
erector spinae, gluteus maximus, quadriceps, hamstrings,
                                                                            PE 31000
adductors, abductors, and gastrocnemius.
Ability to identify the major bones. Major bones to                         EXS 31000,
include, but not limited to the clavicle, scapula, sternum,                 PE 16000,
humerus, carpals, ulna, radius, femur, fibula, tibia, and                   AT 29500,
tarsals.                                                                    PE 31000
                                                                            EXS 31000,
                                                                            AT 29500,
Ability to identify the joints of the body.                   PE 16000
                                                                            BIO 22700,
                                                                            PE 31000
                                                              PE 35600,
Knowledge of the primary action and joint range of                          BIO 22700,
                                                              EXS 38500,
motion for each major muscle group.                                         PE 31000
                                                              EXS 31000
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Competency                                                                        Tested
                                                                  Upon
                                                                                  PE 16000,
Ability to locate the anatomic landmarks for palpation of
                                                                                  AT 29500
peripheral pulses.
                                                                                  BIO 22800

Pathophysiology and Risk Factors
Competency                                                           Touched Upon     Tested

Knowledge of the physiological and metabolic responses to
                                                                                      PE 31600,
exercise associated with chronic disease (heart disease,
                                                                                      EXS 43000
hypertension, diabetes, mellitus, and pulmonary disease).

                                                                                      EXS 39000,
Knowledge of cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, and
                                                                                      EXS 40500,
musculoskeletal risk factors that may require further
                                                                                      PE 16000,
evaluation by medical or allied health professionals before
                                                                                      EXS 43000,
participation in physical activity.
                                                                                      PE 22000
Knowledge of the risk factors that may be favorably modified                          EXS 39000,
by physical activity habits.                                                          EXS 43000
                                                                                      EXS 39000,
Knowledge to define the following terms: total cholesterol
                                                                                      EXS 40000,
(TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), TC/HDL-C
                                                                                      EXS 40500,
ratio, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides,
                                                                                      BIO 22800,
hypertension, and atherosclerosis.
                                                                                      EXS 43000
                                                                                      EXS 39000,
Knowledge of plasma cholesterol levels for adults as
                                                                     EXS 43000        EXS 40000,
recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program.
                                                                                      BIO 22800
                                                                                      EXS 39000,
Knowledge of the risk factor concept of CAD and the influence                         EXS 40500,
of heredity and lifestyle on the development of CAD.                                  BIO 22800,
                                                                                      EXS 43000
Knowledge of the atherosclerotic process, the factors involved
in its genesis and progression, and the potential role of            EXS 4300
exercise in treatment.
Knowledge of how lifestyle factors, including nutrition,
                                                                     EXS 39000,
physical activity, and heredity influence lipid and lipoprotein                       EXS 40000
                                                                     EXS 43000
profiles.


Health Appraisal, Fitness, and Commercial Exercise Testing
                         Competency                                  Touched Upon        Tested
Knowledge of and the ability to discuss the physiological basis      EXS 45000,       EXS 39000,
of the major components of physical fitness: flexibility,            EXS 43000        EXS 20000,
cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular                                   EXS 10000,
endurance, and body composition.                                                      PE 30500
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                       Competency                                    Touched Upon       Tested              English (United States)
Knowledge of the importance of health/medical history.               PE 35600, EXS   EXS 39000,
                                                                     40000, EXS      EXS 20000,
                                                                     45000, EXS      PE 16000, AT
                                                                     43000           29500, PE
                                                                                     20400, PE
                                                                                     30500, EXS
                                                                                     40500
Knowledge of the value of a medical clearance prior to               PE 35600,       EXS 39000,
exercise participation.                                              EXS 45000,      EXS 20000,
                                                                     EXS 43000       AT 29500, PE
                                                                                     20400, PE
                                                                                     30500, EXS
                                                                                     40500
Knowledge of the categories of participants who should                               EXS 39000,
receive medical clearance prior to administration of an                              PE 30500,
exercise test or participation in an exercise program.                               EXS 40500,
                                                                                     EXS 43000
Knowledge of relative and absolute contraindications to                              EXS 39000,
exercise testing or participation.                                                   PE 30500,
                                                                                     EXS 40500,
                                                                                     EXS 43000,
Knowledge of the limitations of informed consent and medical         EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
clearance prior to exercise testing.                                                 PE 30500,
                                                                                     EXS 40500,
                                                                                     PE 16000
Knowledge of the advantages/disadvantages and limitations of         EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
the various body composition techniques including air                                PE 31500
displacement, plethysmography, hydrostatic weighing,
skinfolds and bioelectrical impedance.

Skill in accurately measuring heart rate, blood pressure, and                        EXS 39000,
obtaining rating of perceived exertion (RPE) at rest and during                      PE 31600,
exercise according to established guidelines.                                        PE 30500,
                                                                                     EXS 40500,
                                                                                     EXS 43000
Skill in measuring skinfold sites, skeletal diameters, and girth     EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
measurements used for estimating body composition.                                   PE 31600, PE
                                                                                     30500, EXS
                                                                                     40500
Skill in techniques for calibration of a cycle ergometer and a
motor-driven treadmill.
Ability to locate the brachial artery and correctly place the cuff   EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
and stethoscope in position for blood pressure measurement.                          PE 31600,
                                                                                     PE 30500,
                                                                                     BIO 22800
Ability to locate common sites for measurement of skinfold           EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
thickness and circumferences (for determination of body                              PE 31600,
composition and waist-hip ratio)                                                     PE 30500,
                                                                                     EXS 40500
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                           Competency                                Touched Upon      Tested               English (United States)
Ability to obtain a health history and risk appraisal that                          EXS 3900, PE
includes past and current medical history, family history of                        31600, PE
cardiac disease, orthopedic limitations, prescribed                                 16000, EXS
medications, activity patterns, nutritional habits, stress and                      40500
anxiety levels, and smoking and alcohol use.
Ability to obtain informed consent.                                                 EXS 39000,
                                                                                    PE 16000,
                                                                                    EXS 40500
Ability to explain the purpose and procedures for monitoring         EXS 43000      EXS 39000,
clients prior to, during, and after cardiorespiratory fitness                       EXS 40500
testing.
Ability to instruct participants in the use of equipment and test                   EXS 39000,
procedures.                                                                         EXS 40500,
                                                                                    EXS 38500
Ability to describe the purpose of testing, determine an                            EXS 39000,
appropriate submaximal or maximal protocol, and perform an                          EXS 40005
assessment of cardiovascular fitness on the cycle eggometer
of the treadmill.
Ability to describe the purpose of testing, determine                               EXS 39000,
appropriate protocols, and perform assessments of muscular                          EXS 40500,
strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility.                                      EXS 38500,
                                                                                    PE 30500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Ability to perform various techniques of assessing body                             EXS 39000,
composition, including the use of skinfold calipers.                                PE 31600,
                                                                                    PE 30500
Ability to analyze and interpret information obtained from the       EXS 43000      EXS 39000,
cardiorespiratory fitness test and the muscular strength and                        EXS 38500,
endurance, flexibility, and body composition assessments for                        PE 30500,
apparently healthy individuals and those with stable disease.                       EXS 40500

Ability to identify appropriate criteria for terminating a fitness   EXS 43000      EXS 39000,
evaluation and demonstrate proper procedures to be followed                         PE 30500,
after discontinuing such a test.                                                    EXS 40500
Ability to modify protocols and procedures for                       EXS 38500      EXS 39000,
cardiorespiratory fitness tests in children, adolescents, and                       PE 30500,
older adults.                                                                       EXS 40500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Ability to identify individuals for whom physician supervision is                   EXS 39000,
recommended during maximal and submaximal exercise                                  PE 30500,
testing.                                                                            EXS 40500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000




Electrocardiography and Diagnostic Techniques
                      Competency                                 Touched Upon          Tested
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Knowledge of how each of the following differs from the             EXS 39000,                             English (United States)
normal condition: premature atrial contractions and                 BIO 22800
premature ventricular contractions.
Ability to locate the appropriate sites for the limb and chest      BIO 22800       EXS 39000
leads for resting, standard, and exercise (Mason Likar)
electrograms (ECGs), as well as commonly used bipolar
systems (e.g., CM-5).


Patient Management and Medications
                      Competency                                  Touched Upon         Tested


Knowledge of common drugs from each of the following                EXS 43000
classes of medications and describe the principal action and
the effects on exercise testing and prescription: antianginals,
antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics, bronchodilators,
hypoglycemics, psychotropics, and vasodilators.

Knowledge of the effects of the following substances on             PE 16000 EXS
exercise response: antihistamines, tranquilizers, alcohol, diet     40000 EXS
pills, cold tablets, caffeine, and nicotine.                        43000


Exercise Prescription and Programming
                          Competency                                Touched Upon       Tested
Knowledge of the relationship between the number of                 EXS 40500       EXS 39000,
repetitions, intensity, number of sets, and rest with regard to                     EXS 45000
strength training.                                                                  PE 30500
Knowledge of the benefits and risks associated with exercise        EXS 20000,      EXS 39000,
training in prepubescent and post pubescent youth.                  EXS 45000       PE 35600
Knowledge of the benefits and precautions associated with           EXS 20000,      EXS 39000,
resistance and endurance training in older adults.                  EXS 45000       PE 35600,
                                                                                    PE 30500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Knowledge of specific leadership techniques appropriate for         PE 16000, EXS   EXS 39000
working with participants of all ages.                              43000
Knowledge of how to modify cardiovascular and resistance            EXS 20000,      EXS 39000,
exercises based on age and physical condition.                      EXS 45000,      PE 35600,
                                                                    EXS 38500       PE 30500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Knowledge of the differences in the development of an               EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
exercise prescription for children, adolescents, and older                          PE 35600
participants.                                                                       PE 30500
Knowledge of and ability to describe the unique adaptations                         EXS 39000,
to exercise training in children, adolescents, and older                            PE 35600,
participants with regard to strength, functional capacity, and                      PE 30500,
motor skills.                                                                       EXS 43000
Knowledge of common orthopedic and cardiovascular                   EXS 39000       EXS 43000
considerations for older participants and the ability to
describe modifications in exercise prescription that is
indicated.
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                         Competency                               Touched Upon       Tested               English (United States)
Knowledge of selecting appropriate testing and training           EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
modalities according to the age and functional capacity of the                    EXS 20000
individual.

Knowledge of the recommended intensity, duration,                 EXS 40500       EXS 39000,
frequency, and type of physical activity necessary for                            PE 30500
development of cardiorespiratory fitness in an apparently
healthy population.
Knowledge of and the ability to describe exercises designed to    EXS 39000,      PE 35600,
enhance muscular strength and/or endurance of specific            EXS 40500,      EXS 38500
major muscle groups.                                              EXS 20000       PE 30500

Knowledge of the principles of overload, specificity, and         EXS 20000,      EXS 39000,
progression and how they relate to exercise programming.          EXS 40500,      PE 31500, PE
                                                                  EXS 45000       22000
Knowledge of the various types of interval, continuous, and       EXS 45000       EXS 39000,
circuit training programs.                                                        EXS 20000
                                                                                  EXS 43000
Knowledge of appropriate METs for various sport,                                  EXS 39000
recreational, and work tasks.
Knowledge of the components incorporated into an exercise         EXS 45000,      EXS 39000,
session and the proper sequence (i.e., pre-exercise evaluation,   PE 35600, EXS   EXS 20000
warm-up, aerobic stimulus phase, cool-down, muscular              38500           AT 29500, PE
strength and/or endurance and flexibility).                                       20400
Knowledge of special precautions and modifications of             EXS 45000
exercise programming for participation at altitude, different
ambient temperatures, humidity, and environmental
pollution.
Knowledge of the importance of recording exercise sessions        EXS 20000,      EXS 39000,
and performing periodic evaluations to assess changes in          PE 35600,       EXS 40500,
fitness status.                                                   EXS 38500       EXS 43000
Knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of                  EXS 20000, PE   EXS 39000,
implementation of interval, continuous, and circuit training      35600, EXS      PE 31500
programs.                                                         38500
Knowledge of the types of exercise programs available in the      EXS 39000       EXS 43000
community and how these programs are appropriate for
various populations.
Knowledge of the concept of "Activities of Daily Living" (ADLs)                   EXS 39000,
and its importance in the overall health of the individual.                       AT 29500,
                                                                                  PE 30500,
                                                                                  EXS 43000
Skill to teach and demonstrate the components of an exercise                      EXS 39000,
session (i.e. warm-up, aerobic stimulus phase, cool-down,                         PE 30500,
muscular strength/endurance, flexibility).                                        EXS 40500
Skill to teach and demonstrate appropriate modifications in       PE 35600        EXS 43000
specific exercises for the following groups: older adults,
pregnant and postnatal women, obese persons with low back
pain.
Skill to teach and demonstrate appropriate exercises for          EXS 43000       EXS 39000
improving range of motion of all major joints.
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                            Competency                              Touched Upon       Tested               English (United States)
Skill in the use of various methods for establishing and            EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
monitoring levels of exercise intensity, including heart rate,                      EXS 40500
RPE, and METs.
Ability to identify and apply methods used to monitor exercise      EXS 45000,      EXS 39000,
intensity, including heart rate and rating of perceived exertion.   EXS 43000       EXS 40500
                                                                                    AT 29500, PE
                                                                                    20400
Ability to describe modifications in exercise prescriptions for                     EXS 43000
individuals with functional disabilities and musculoskeletal
injuries.
Ability to differentiate between the amount of physical activity    EXS 43000       EXS 39000
required for health benefits and the amount of exercise
required for fitness development.
Ability to determine training heart rates using two methods:        EXS 45000,      PE 31600,
percent of age-predicted maximum heart rate and heart rate          EXS 43000       EXS 3900
reserve (Karvonen).
Ability to identify proper and improper technique in the use of     EXS 20000,      EXS 40500,
resistive equipment such as stability balls, weights, bands,        PE 35600, EXS   EXS 43000
resistance bars, and water exercise equipment.                      38500
Ability to identify proper and improper technique in the use of     EXS 20000 PE    EXS 40500
cardiovascular conditioning equipment (e.g., stair climbers,        35600
stationary cycles, treadmills, elliptical trainers).
Ability to teach a progression of exercises for all major muscle    PE 35600        EXS 38500,
groups to improve muscular strength and endurance.                                  EXS 40500
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Ability to communicate effectively with exercise participants.                      EXS 40500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Ability to design, implement, and evaluate individualized and                       EXS 39000,
group exercise programs based on health history and physical                        EXS 40500
fitness assessments.                                                                EXS 43000
Ability to modify exercises based on age and physical               PE 35600, EXS   EXS 39000,
condition.                                                          38500           EXS 40500
                                                                                    PE 30500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Knowledge and ability to determine energy cost, VO2, METs,                          EXS 39000,
and target heart rates and apply the information to an                              EXS 40500
exercise prescription.

Ability to convert weights from pounds (lb) to kilograms (kg)       EXS 39000, PE   PE 31600, PE
and speed from miles per hour (mph) to meters per minute            35600, EXS      30500
(m/Min-1).                                                          38500

Ability to convert METs to VO2 expressed as mL/kg-1/min-1,                          EXS 39000,
L/min-1, and/or mL/kg FFW-1/min-1.                                                  PE 31600

Ability to determine the energy cost in METs and kilocalories       EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
for given exercise intensities in stepping exercise, cycle                          PE 31600
ergometer, and during horizontal and graded walking and
running.
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                          Competency                                 Touched Upon      Tested               English (United States)
Ability to prescribe exercise intensity based on VO2 data for        EXS 43000      EXS 39000,
different modes of exercise, including graded and horizontal                        EXS 40500
running and walking, cycling, and stepping exercise.

Ability to explain and implement exercise prescription                              EXS 39000,
guidelines for apparently healthy clients, increased risk clients,                  EXS 40500,
and clients with controlled disease.                                                EXS 43000
Ability to adapt frequency, intensity, duration, mode,                              EXS 39000,
progression, level of supervision, and monitoring techniques in                     EXS 43000
exercise programs for patients with controlled chronic disease
(e.g., heart disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension),
musculoskeletal problems, pregnancy and/or postpartum, and
exercise-induced asthma.
Ability to design resistive exercise programs to increase or                        EXS 39000,
maintain muscular strength and/or endurance.                                        PE 35600,
                                                                                    EXS 40500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Ability to evaluate flexibility and prescribe appropriate            EXS 20000      EXS 39000,
flexibility exercises for all major muscle groups.                                  EXS 40500,
                                                                                    PE 30500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Ability to design training programs using interval, continuous,                     EXS 39000,
and circuit training programs.                                                      EXS 20000,
                                                                                    EXS 40500,
                                                                                    EXS 43000
Ability to describe the advantages and disadvantages of              EXS 31000,
various commercial exercise equipment in developing                  EXS 43000
cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, and muscular
endurance.
Ability to modify exercise programs based on age, physical           EXS 39000,     EXS 40500,
condition, and current health status.                                EXS 20000,     EXS 43000
                                                                     PE 35600,
                                                                     EXS 45000


Nutrition and Weight Management
                         Competency                                  Touched Upon      Tested
Knowledge of the role of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins as        EXS 39000      PE 31500,
fuels for aerobic and anaerobic metabolism.                                         EXS 40000,
                                                                                    EXS 45000,
                                                                                    EXS 10000,
                                                                                    BIO 22800,
                                                                                    PE 30500
Knowledge to define the following terms: obesity,                    EXS 45000,     EXS 40000,
overweight, percent fat, lean body mass, anorexia nervosa,           PE 16000       BIO 22800,
bulimia, and body fat distribution.                                                 PE 30500
Knowledge of the relationship between body composition and           PE 16000,      EXS 39000,
health.                                                              EXS 43000      EXS 40000,
                                                                                    PE 31500, PE
                                                                                    30500
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                        Competency                                  Touched Upon       Tested               English (United States)
Knowledge of the effects of diet plus exercise, diet alone, and     EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
exercise alone as methods for modifying body composition.                           EXS 40000,
                                                                                    PE 31500, PE
                                                                                    30500
Knowledge of the importance of an adequate daily energy             EXS 43000       EXS 39000,
intake for healthy weight management.                                               EXS 40000,
                                                                                    PE 31005,
                                                                                    EXS 10000
Knowledge of the difference between fat-soluble and water-                          PE 31500,
soluble vitamins.                                                                   EXS 40000,
                                                                                    EXS 10000
Knowledge of the importance of maintaining normal hydration         EXS 39000, PE   PE 31500,
before, during and after exercise.                                  35600, PE       EXS 40000,
                                                                    16000, EXS      EXS 38500,
                                                                    43000           EXS 10000,
                                                                                    BIO 22800
Knowledge of the USDA Food Pyramid.                                 PE 35600, EXS   PE 31500,
                                                                    40000           EXS 10000
                                                                                    BIO 22800
Knowledge of the importance of calcium and iron in women's          PE 31500        EXS 40000
health.
Knowledge of the myths and consequences associated with             EXS 39000,
inappropriate weight loss methods (e.g., saunas, vibrating          EXS 40000, PE
belts, body wraps, electrical stimulators, sweat suits, fad         31500
diets).
Knowledge of the number of kilocalories in one germ of              EXS 39000       PE 31500,
carbohydrate, fat, protein, and alcohol.                                            EXS 40000,
                                                                                    EXS 45000,
                                                                                    EXS 10000,
                                                                                    BIO22800
Knowledge of the number of kilocalories equivalent to lose 1                        EXS 39000,
pound of body fat.                                                                  EXS 40000
                                                                                    PE 31500,
                                                                                    EXS 10000
Knowledge of the guidelines for caloric intake for an individual    EXS 45000,      EXS 39000,
desiring to lose or gain weight.                                    EXS 43000       EXS 40000,
                                                                                    PE 31500,
                                                                                    EXS 10000
Knowledge of common nutritional ergogenic aids, the                 EXS 43000       PE 31500,
purported mechanism of action and any risk and/or benefits                          EXS 40000
(e.g., carbohydrates, protein/amino acids, vitamins, minerals,
sodium bicarbonate, creatine, bee pollen).
Knowledge of nutritional factors related to the female athletes                     PE 31500,
triad syndrome (i.e., eating disorders, menstrual cycle                             EXS 40000
abnormalities, and osteoporosis).
Knowledge of the NIH Consensus statement regarding health           EXS 39000,
risks of obesity, Nutrition or Physical Fitness Position Paper of   EXS 40000,
the American Dietetic Association, and the ACSM Position            EXS 43000
Stand on proper and improper weight loss programs.
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                           Competency                               Touched Upon      Tested                English (United States)
Ability to describe the health implications of variation in body    EXS 40000      EXS 39000
fat distribution patterns and the significance of the waist to                     PE 31500
hip ratio.

Human Behavior and Counseling
                          Competency                                Touched Upon      Tested
Knowledge of at least five behavioral strategies to enhance         EXS 43000      EXS 40000,
exercise and health behavior changes (e.g., reinforcement,                         EXS 10000
goal setting, social support).
Knowledge of the five important elements that should be             EXS 43000      EXS 40000,
included in each counseling session.                                               PE 32000
Knowledge of specific techniques to enhance motivation (e.g.,       EXS 40000      EXS 10000,
posters, recognition, bulletin boards, games, competitions).                       PE 32000,
Define extrinsic and intrinsic reinforcement and give examples                     EXS 40500,
of each.                                                                           EXS 43000
Knowledge of extrinsic and intrinsic reinforcement and give         EXS 40000,     PE 32000,
examples of each.                                                   EXS 43000      EXS 40500
Knowledge of the stages of motivational readiness.                  EXS 43000      EXS 40000,
                                                                                   PE 32000
Knowledge of three counseling approaches that may assist less       EXS 43000      PE 32000
motivated clients to increase their physical activity.
Knowledge of symptoms of anxiety and depression that may                           EXS 40000,
necessitate referral to a medial or mental health professional.                    PE 32000
Knowledge of the potential symptoms and causal factors of           EXS 43000      PE 32000
test anxiety (i.e., performance, appraisal threat during exercise
testing) and how it may affect physiological responses to
testing.

Safety, Injury Prevention, and Emergency Procedures
                          Competency                                Touched Upon      Tested
Knowledge of and skill in obtaining basic life support and          EXS 30000      PE 16000
cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification.
Knowledge of appropriate emergency procedures (i.e.,                               PE 16000,
telephone procedures, written emergency procedures,                                AT 29500,
personnel responsibilities) in a health and fitness setting.                       PE 20400
Knowledge of the basic first aid procedures for exercise-           EXS 30000      PE 16000,
related injuries such as bleeding, strains/sprains, fractures,                     AT 29500,
and exercise intolerance (dizziness, syncope, heat injury).                        PE 20400
Knowledge of basic precautions taken in an exercise setting to                     EXS 30000
ensure participant safety.
Knowledge of the physical and physiological signs and               EXS 20000      EXS 45000,
symptoms of overtraining.                                                          EXS 10000,
                                                                                   PE 32000
Knowledge of the effects of temperature, humidity, altitude,                       PE 16000
and pollution on the physiological response to exercise.
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                           Competency                             Touched Upon      Tested                 English (United States)
Knowledge of the following terms: shin splints, sprain, strain,   PE 31000       PE 16000,
tennis elbow, bursitis, stress fracture, tendonitis, patellar                    AT 29500
femoral pain syndrome, low back pain, plantar fasciitis, and
rotator cuff tendonitis.
Knowledge of hypothetical concerns and potential risks that       PE 35600
may be associated with the use of exercise such as straight leg   EXS 31000
sit-ups, double leg raises, full squats, hurdle stretch, yoga
plough, forceful back hyperextension, and standing bent-over
toe touch.
Knowledge of safety plans, emergency procedures, and first                       EXS 30000
aid techniques needed during fitness evaluations, exercise
testing and exercise training.
Knowledge of the heath/fitness instructor's responsibilities,                    EXS 30000
limitations, and the legal implications of carrying out
emergency procedures.
Knowledge of potential musculoskeletal injuries(e.g.,                            PE 16000
tachycardia, bradycardia, hypotension/hypertension,
tachypnea) and metabolic abnomalities (e.g.,
fainting/syncope, hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia,
hypothermia/hyperthermia).
Knowledge of the initial management and first aid techniques      EXS 30000      AT 29500,
associated with open wounds, musculoskeletal injuries,                           PE 20400
cardiovascular/pulmonary complications, and metabolic
disorders.
Knowledge of the components of an equipment                       EXS 45000      EXS 30000
maintenance/repair program and how it may be used to
evaluate the condition of exercise equipment to reduce the
potential risk of injury.

Knowledge of the legal implications of documented safety          EXS 45000      PE 16000,
procedures, the use of incident documents, and ongoing                           AT 29500,
safety training.                                                                 PE 20400,
                                                                                 EXS 30000
Skill to demonstrate exercises used for people with low-back      EXS 30000
pain.
Skills in demonstrating appropriate emergency procedures
during exercise testing and or training.
Ability to identify the components that contribute to the         EXS 45000      EXS 30000
maintenance of a safe environment.




Program Administration, Quality Assurance, and Outcome Assessment
                         Competency                               Touched Upon       Tested
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                         Competency                                Touched Upon      Tested                 English (United States)
Knowledge of the health/fitness instructor’s role in                              EXS 40500,
administration and program management within a                                    EXS 30000
health/fitness facility.
Knowledge of and the ability to use the documentation                             EXS 40500,
required when a client shows signs or symptoms during an                          EXS 30000
exercise session and should be referred to a physician.
Knowledge of how to manage a fitness department (e.g.,                            EXS 30000
working within a budget, training exercise leaders, scheduling,
running staff meeting).
Knowledge of the importance of tracking and evaluating                            EXS 30000
member retention.
Ability to administer fitness-related programs within                             EXS 30000
established budgetary guidelines.
Ability to develop marketing materials for the purpose of                         EXS 30000
promoting fitness-related programs.
Ability to create and maintain records pertaining to participant                  EXS 30000
exercise adherence, retention, and goal setting.
Ability to develop and administer educational programs (e.g.,      EXS 30000      EXS 40000
lectures, workshops) and educational material.


Cardiovascular: Pathophysiology and Risk Factors
                           Competency                              Touched Upon      Tested
Knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors or conditioned that       PE 16000       EXS 39000,
may require consultation with medical personnel before                            PE 31600
testing and training, including inappropriate changes of resting                  EXS 43000
or exercise heart rate and blood pressure, new onset
discomfort in chest, neck, shoulder or arm, changes in the
pattern of discomfort during rest or exercise, fainting or dizzy
spells, and claudication.
Knowledge of the causes of myocaridal ischemia and                 EXS 39000      PE 31600,
infarction.                                                        PE 16000       BIO 22800
                                                                   EXS 43000
Knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertension, obesity,         PE 16000       PE 31600
hyperlipidemia, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary                           BIO 22800
diseases, arthritis, osteoporosis, chronic disease, and                           EXS 43000
immunosuppressive disease.
Knowledge of the effects of the above diseases and conditions                     PE 31600,
on cardiorespiratory and metabolic function at rest and during                    EXS 43000
exercise.


Pulmonary: Pathophysiology and Risk Factors
                         Competency                                Touched Upon      Tested
Knowledge of respiratory risk factors of conditions that may       PE 16000       EXS 39000,
require consultation with medical personnel before testing or                     PE 31600
training, including asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm,                        EXS 43000
extreme breathlessness at rest or during exercise, bronchitis,
and emphysema.
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Metabolic: Pathophysiology and Risk Factors                                                                English (United States)
                          Competency                              Touched Upon      Tested
Knowledge of metabolic risk factors or conditions that may                       EXS 39000,
require consultation with medical personnel before testing or                    PE 31600,
training, including body weight more than 20 percent above                       EXS 43000
optimal, BMI>30, thyroid disease, diabetes or glucose
intolerance, and hypoglycemia.

Orthopedic/Musculoskeletal: Pathophysiology and Risk Factors
                           Competency                             Touched Upon      Tested
Knowledge of musculoskeletal risk factors or conditions that                     EXS 39000,
may require consultation with medical personnel before                           PE 31600,
testing or training, including acute or chronic back pain,                       EXS 43000
osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, tendonitis,
and low-back pain.

The alignment of competencies was the first step in developing pre-test and post-test
assessments for the program. Beginning in the fall 2010, all students in EXS 10000
Foundations of Exercise Science, EXS 39000 Exercise Testing and Prescription, EXS 40500
Program Implementation, and EXS 44000 Internship will be given the assessment test on
the ACSM KSA competencies.

Below are the instructions given to each faculty member:

    1. Copy the competencies only and ask each student the first week of class to list
       from 1 to 10 (1 – no knowledge of subject, 10 – mastery of skill/knowledge) how
       competent they feel with those skills. Use the following definitions when rating
       the KSAs for the class:
              1 No knowledge or understanding of the words.
              3 Lots of review of topic.
              5 Familiar with topic, could explain to a beginner what it is about.
              7 Slight review of topic.
              10 Mastery of skill/knowledge – would feel comfortable
                  performing/would feel comfortable presenting on this topic.
    2. Before turning the survey into the department chair, review student responses.
       Use the responses for course development and to determine what needs to be
       reviewed at the beginning of each semester.

Following the collection of data during the spring 2011 semester, the faculty will further
develop the pre-test and post-test process in order to properly prepare students to meet
all competencies upon completion of major coursework.
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Classes Assessed                                                                                    English (United States)



The table below outlines the benchmarks being developed for this degree program. The
benchmarks have been established to assess students’ learning through the curriculum
from entry into the major to graduation.

Core Classes                         Hours   Benchmarks and other program comments
EXS 10000 Foundations of Sport and     3     Benchmark #1: Initial pre-test given in this course
Exercise Science                             beginning fall 2011.
PE 31500 Exercise Physiology           3     Benchmark #2: same test from EXS 10000 given.
EXS 40500 Program Implementation       3     Benchmark #3: same test from EXS 10000 given.
EXS 44000 Internship                  3-6    Evaluation from internship site is given at the
                                             culmination of the internship.


Methods of Assessments
       Core coursework grades
       Cumulative GPA
       Comments/feedback from clients in EXS 40500 Program Implementation class
       Completion of 150-300 clinical hours and degree requirements
       Evaluation forms from the EXS 44000 Internship

Objective

       Students are required to successfully pass (grade of D or better) the major
        prerequisites and maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA to complete the degree.
       Beginning in fall 2011, students must get a grade of C or better in CHM 10000,
        BIO 10000, BIO 22700, and BIO 22800 to graduate.
       The 150-300 internship hours must be approved and documented by the
        cooperating supervisor and University supervisor.
       Students must successfully pass PE 16000 First Aid and CPR and maintain active
        certification through the American Red Cross or other approved organizations.

Subjective

       Students are provided an academic plan by their academic advisor. At a
        minimum, each student meets with his/her advisor one time per semester to
        review academic progress, course sequencing, and overall success in the
        program.
       During the internship experience, the cooperating supervisor serves as a role
        model for best practices in the field of exercise science and provides students the
        opportunity to discuss how to handle unique situations and unusual occurrences.
        Additionally, the supervisor completes an evaluation form that accompanies the
        internship packet completed by each student during the internship experience.
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Student Attitude/Response

      Student responses are collected on the University’s course evaluations following
       each semester.
      Students are asked for feedback following each clinical experience and internship
       site. The form is currently being modified to reflect quantifiable responses to be
       used in data collection and analysis.

Results
The table below represents the exercise science students’ cumulative GPAs for 2007-10.
The cumulative GPA is above the required 2.5 for graduation and has increased slightly in
the 2009-10 academic year.

Cumulative GPA and Enrollment
                                         2008-09           2009-10            2010-11
            Enrollment                     110               188                192
               GPA                         2.87              2.91               2.96

EXS 40500 Program Implementation

The senior level course, EXS 40500 Program Implementation, is intended to be the
culminating course for exercise science students.

During fall 2009, there were five students enrolled in this course, and the numbers
increased over three times to 16 students in the spring 2010. The 2010 and 2011 spring
semesters had an average of 25 students. The students in this class work with
faculty/staff to develop a comprehensive fitness program that uses pre- and post-test
fitness assessments. The instructor ensures all programs are safe and effective for each
client. Currently, the instructor of this course is collaborating with other faculty at the HIT
Center to develop quantifiable evaluation forms to be used in the course. However, some
general comments and feedback were gathered during the last semesters. More than 80
percent of clients reported improvements in cardiovascular fitness, body composition,
muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and overall mental health and well-being.

EXS 44000 Internship Evaluations

Beginning in fall 2010, a new internship agreement and evaluation form for supervisors
for all students enrolled in EXS 44000 will be implemented.

The instructions for this evaluation form are listed below:
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Please rate the following statements about your exercise science intern at Lindenwood                            English (United States)
University. All responses are used in our annual or bi-yearly evaluation for course
alignment to ACSM KSAs and for overall program improvement. Please use the four-
point rating scale identified below for all responses.

Area                     Excellent                  Good               Needs Improvement        Unacceptable
                             (1)                      (2)                        (3)                   (4)
Client Relations   95-100 percent          85-94 percent clients      75-84 percent clients     Below 75
                   clients finish their    finish their initial       finish their initial      percent
                   initial contract, and   contract, and/or 20        contract, and /or 10      clients finish
                   30 percent              percent continuing on      percent continuing on     their initial
                   continuing on           independent contract       independent contract      contract
                   independent
                   contract
Work Quality       Keeps facility and      Keeps facility and         Keeps facility and        Keeps facility
                   equipment clean,        equipment clean,           equipment clean,          and
                   shows up on time,       shows up on time,          shows up on time,         equipment
                   encourages other        encourages other           encourages other          clean, shows
                   clients besides         clients besides their      clients besides their     up on time
                   their own, follows      own, follows protocol,     own, follows protocol,
                   protocol, sets          sets effective goals for
                   effective goals for     clients
                   clients, performs
                   research according
                   to the HIT Center
                   protocols
Communication      Speaks clearly and      Speaks clearly and         Speaks clearly and        Speaks
Skills             concisely,              concisely, listening to    concisely, listening to   clearly and
                   motivates clients       the needs of clients,      the needs of clients      concisely
                   well, able to           motivates clients well
                   translate the
                   clinical results in
                   layman terms
Tour Knowledge     Able to cite            Able to cite mission       Able to cite mission      Able to cite
                   mission statement,      statement, and goals       statement, and goals      mission
                   and goals and           and objectives of HIT      and objectives of HIT     statement,
                   objectives of HIT       Center, know what          Center, know what         and goals and
                   Center, know what       each equipment piece       each equipment piece      objectives of
                   each equipment          does and able to sell      does, able to sell        HIT Center
                   piece does and          contract to 75 percent     contract to 50 percent
                   how to modify the       of those toured            of those toured
                   protocol for
                   individual goals of
                   clients, able to sell
                   contract to 90
                   percent of those
                   toured
Initiative         Asks for help when      Asks for help when         Asks for help when        Accomplishes
                   needed, sees            needed, sees things        needed, accomplishes      job
                   things that need to     that need to be done       things that need to be    description
                   be done and does        and does them,             done when asked
                   them, initiates         initiates recruitment
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Area                  Excellent                   Good            Needs Improvement       Unacceptable   English (United States)
                          (1)                      (2)                    (3)                 (4)
                recruitment of          of clients
                clients, initiates
                projects on their
                own
Gym Equipment   Knows names of          Knows names of            Knows names of          Knows names
Knowledge       equipment, able to      equipment, able to        equipment, able to      of equipment
                safely challenge        safely challenge          safely challenge
                clients on the          clients on the            clients on the
                equipment, able to      equipment, able to        equipment
                explain why             explain why
                equipment is used       equipment is used in
                in client’s routines,   client’s routines
                and how to modify
                the protocol for
                individual goals of
                clients,
Speed Up        Able to perform         Able to perform test,     Able to perform test,   Able to
Knowledge       test, read results of   read results of test,     and read results of     perform test
                test, able to           able to explain what is   test
                explain what is         occurring during the
                occurring during        test, and why the test
                the test, and why       is important for this
                the test is             individual
                important for this
                individual, make
                goals according to
                test, and make
                appropriate
                protocols for each
                given client
Lighten Up      Able to perform         Able to perform test,     Able to perform test,   Able to
Knowledge       test, read results of   read results of test,     and read results of     perform test
                test, able to           able to explain what is   test
                explain what is         occurring during the
                occurring during        test, and why the test
                the test, and why       is important for this
                the test is             individual
                important for this
                individual, make
                goals according to
                test, and make
                appropriate
                protocols for each
                given client
HIT FIT         Able to perform         Able to perform test,     Able to perform test,   Able to
Knowledge       test, read results of   read results of test,     and read results of     perform test
                test, able to           able to explain what is   test
                explain what is         occurring during the
                occurring during        test, and why the test
                the test, and why       is important for this
                the test is             individual
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Area                  Excellent                 Good              Needs Improvement       Unacceptable   English (United States)
                         (1)                     (2)                      (3)                 (4)
                important for this
                individual, make
                goals according to
                test, and make
                appropriate
                protocols for each
                given client
VO2Max          Able to perform         Able to perform test,     Able to perform test,   Able to
Knowledge       test, read results of   read results of test,     and read results of     perform test
                test, able to           able to explain what is   test
                explain what is         occurring during the
                occurring during        test, and why the test
                the test, and why       is important for this
                the test is             individual
                important for this
                individual, make
                goals according to
                test, and make
                appropriate
                protocols for each
                given client
AAA Knowledge   Able to perform         Able to perform test,     Able to perform test,   Able to
                test, read results of   read results of test,     and read results of     perform test
                test, able to           able to explain what is   test
                explain what is         occurring during the
                occurring during        test, and why the test
                the test, and why       is important for this
                the test is             individual
                important for this
                individual, make
                goals according to
                test, and make
                appropriate
                protocols for each
                given client
RMR             Able to perform         Able to perform test,     Able to perform test,   Able to
Knowledge       test, read results of   read results of test,     and read results of     perform test
                test, able to           able to explain what is   test
                explain what is         occurring during the
                occurring during        test, and why the test
                the test, and why       is important for this
                the test is             individual
                important for this
                individual, make
                goals according to
                test, and make
                appropriate
                protocols for each
                given client
Bod Pod         Able to perform         Able to perform test,     Able to perform test,   Able to
Knowledge       test, read results of   read results of test,     and read results of     perform test
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Area                 Excellent               Good              Needs Improvement   Unacceptable     English (United States)
                        (1)                    (2)                     (3)             (4)
               test, able to        able to explain what is   test
               explain what is      occurring during the
               occurring during     test, and why the test
               the test, and why    is important for this
               the test is          individual
               important for this
               individual, make
               goals according to
               test, and make
               appropriate
               protocols for each
               given client

Current internship sites include DASA, Fitness Studio, HIT Center, The Lab Gym, SLU-Care,
Fitness Edge, DASA@HIT and Smith Performance Systems, YMCA, LU Golf team, Ortho
and Rehab Assoc., Dynamic Fitness Management, Boys and Girls Club, Excel Sports and
PT, LU football team, BJC WellAware, and the St. Louis Rams.

Over the past year, there was a significant increase in the number of graduates from the
B.S. in Exercise Science degree program. In spring 2010, there were 10 graduates, and in
spring 2011 the program graduated 40 students. Below is a list of career placements and
continuing education programs students went on to:

      Fitness Studio
      Master of Education in Athletic Administration
      Graduate assistants at Lindenwood University
      Club Fitness -- facility management
      St. Charles YMCA
      Corporate Wellness-Boeing
      Fitness Edge
      PRN Exercise Physiologist for St. Luke's Cardiac Rehab
      Nursing school, physical therapy school, and physician assistant school

Lessons Learned
Based on the competency matrix, the faculty recommended to the Deans’ Council to
remove PE 20000 Health and Nutrition from the curriculum beginning in fall 2011. The
competencies in that course are covered in the newly added EXS 20000 Concepts of
Conditioning, Methods of Weight Training, and the EXS 38500 Advanced Weight Training
classes that are required as of fall 2010.

In order to keep the degree requirements in line with the University’s required hours, the
faculty recommended removing EXS 42000 Current Issues in Exercise Science from the
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core curriculum and adding the course as a recommended elective for juniors and                     English (United States)
seniors.

The competencies for electrocardiography and diagnostic techniques are listed below:

   1.4.1 Knowledge of how each of the following differs from the normal condition:
         premature atrial contractions and premature ventricular contractions.
   1.4.2 Ability to locate the appropriate sites for the limb and chest leads for resting,
         standard, and exercise (Mason Likar) electrograms (ECGs), as well as
         commonly used bipolar systems (e.g., CM-5)

The faculty did not feel there was a course that sufficiently covered these competencies
for those students interested in the field of cardiac rehabilitation. Additionally, those
students seeking internships in this area did not have the necessary skills upon entry into
internships.
Therefore, a late-start course, EXS 39999 EKG Interpretation, was developed to meet the
needs of those students. This course will continue to be offered each semester and is a
recommended elective for all students.

Action Plan for Next Year
The faculty is currently working on the competency matrix to align all KSAs to current
course objectives. Currently, the exercise science courses are taught by three full-time
and four adjunct faculty members. The department recently hired two additional adjunct
professors and one full-time faculty member to cover the fall and spring class schedules
due to student enrollment, additional course sections, and the new Master of Science in
Human Performance approved in June 2010. The new master’s degree will further
enhance the educational offerings and opportunities for students interested in the field
of health and fitness sciences.

The strategic plan below has been developed for the University HIT Center and outlines
the expansion plan to include additional educational opportunities and programs,
athletic enhancement, and community and wellness programs.

Impacts and Changes on Classes for the Following Year
The faculty is discussing the removal of PE 30500 Measurement and Evaluation of Physical
Education as there is a proposal being developed to add an advanced exercise
physiology/metabolism course to the curriculum. This course would build on knowledge gained
in anatomy and physiology and exercise physiology. Additionally, this course would help students
transition from PE 31500 Exercise Physiology into the exercise testing course. Currently, the
department coordinators are gathering information from other accredited exercise science
programs to develop a course syllabus and objectives for this course. This proposal will be
submitted to the Deans’ Council in late fall for addition in the 2012-13 catalog.
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After careful evaluation, the faculty decided to restructure the exercise testing and prescription
course and the program implementation course. The new courses separate exercise testing into
a single course and combine the prescription and implementation courses into one course. The
newly approved course descriptions are below:

        EXS 39500 Exercise Testing (4) This course is designed to provide students with the skills
         necessary to conduct laboratory and field tests used for assessing physical fitness
         components. It will focus on cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness, body
         composition, flexibility, and balance. It integrates concepts, principles, and theories
         based on research in exercise physiology, measurement and evaluation, psychology, and
         nutrition to provide a direct and straightforward approach to physical fitness assessment.
         This course is offered in the fall/spring. Prerequisites: PE 30500, PE 31000, PR 31500, PE
         31600.

        EXS 41000 Exercise Prescription and Implementation (4) This course is designed for the
         student to explore techniques and strategies used for designing, implementing, and
         managing specific exercise, health and wellness, and athletic development programs. The
         students will apply the knowledge and skills learned in previous courses to administer
         appropriate evaluations and use the test results to develop an exercise prescription and
         properly implement the program. This course is offered in the fall/spring. Prerequisites:
         EXS 39000.

In order to ensure students are taking courses in the appropriate sequence, in spring 2011 the
faculty re-evaluated the current prerequisites for each course in the curriculum. The table below
shows the proposed changes to prerequisites and the rationale for the changes.

Class Number and        2011-12 Catalog Pre-     Proposed 2012-13        Rationale for update
Name                    requisite                Catalog Pre-requisite
EXS 32500               PE 31000, PE 31500,      PE 31000                Course builds on PE 31000
Biomechanics            PE 31600, EXS 31600                              concepts
EXS 33000 Current       PE 31500 or permission   Junior Standing
Issues in Exercise      of Instructor
Science
EXS 34000 Nutrition     Bio 12100 and Junior     No Change
for Performance         Standing
EXS 39000 Exercise      PE 30500,PE31000, PE     PE 31500, PE 31600      Course builds on PE 31500
Testing                 31500, PE 31600                                  and PE 31600
EXS 41000 Exercise      EXS 39000                EXS 39500               EXS 395000is the updated
Prescription                                                             course number for the old
                                                                         EXS 39000
EXS 43000 Physical      EXS 39500 and Senior     PE 31500 and            Course builds on PE 31500
Activity for Specific   Standing                 PE 31600                and PE 31600
Populations
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Physical Education                                                                                  English (United States)




Mission
The Health and Fitness Sciences Department supports the University’s mission
statement:

Lindenwood University offers values-centered programs leading to the development of
the whole person – an educated, responsible citizen of a global community.

       Lindenwood is committed to
           • providing an integrative liberal arts curriculum,
           • offering professional and pre-professional degree programs,
           • focusing on the talents, interests, and future of the student,
           • supporting academic freedom and the unrestricted search for truth,
           • affording cultural enrichment to the surrounding community,
           • promoting ethical lifestyles,
           • developing adaptive thinking and problem-solving skills,
           • furthering lifelong learning.

Program Goals and Objectives
Goals for the Graduates in the Major

The goal of the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education degree is to prepare students to
work in a non-traditional teaching setting in community health, community fitness
centers, coaching, and health and wellness areas.

Objectives for Graduates in the Major

Students

      will successfully complete the general education curriculum outlined by the University,
      will successfully complete the major requirements for the degree,
      will complete a minimum of 150 practicum hours under the direction of a qualified
       coach/instructor and University supervisor,
      with a minor in strength and conditioning will be prepared to take the Certified Strength
       and Conditioning Specialist test through the National Strength and Conditioning
       Association.
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Course Alignment to Competencies                                                                              English (United States)


While this is a non-teaching degree, the department has aligned the coursework to the Missouri
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education content standards. These standards are
aligned with the Missouri Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance and
the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, the leaders in health and physical
education.

MDESE’s standards for physical education are listed below and are divided into three areas, each
with stated objectives:
     Content knowledge
     Development and diversity
     Collaboration and community involvement

Content Knowledge
1. Fundamental movement skills (locomotor, non-locomotor, manipulative) and movement concepts;
   personal fitness and wellness concepts.
2. The bioscience (anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical) and psychological concepts of
   movement, physical activity, and fitness.
3. Developmental, individual, dual, and team activities and developmental games, including outdoor
   activities and non-competitive physical activities, as well as various types of rhythmic and dance
   activities.

4. The relationship of physical activity and exercise, nutrition, and other healthy living behaviors to a
   healthy lifestyle.
5. Analysis and refinement of basic movement patterns, skills, and concepts.
6. Conditioning practices and principles; frequency, intensity, time/duration; the short- and long-term
   effects of physical training.
7. Safety, injury prevention, and how to perform and/or access emergency procedures/ services.
8. Effects of substance abuse and psycho-social factors on performance and behavior.
9. Current technologies and their application in physical education, communication, networking, locating
   resources, and enhancing continuing professional development.
10. Consumer health issues related to the marketing, selection, and use of products and services
   (including the effects of mass media and technologies) that may affect health and physical activity
   involvement.
11. Approved state and national content standards.
12. History and philosophical issues in physical education.


Development and Diversity
1. Biological, psychological, sociological, experiential, and environmental factors (e.g., physical growth
   and development; neurological development, physique, gender, socio-economic status) that impact
   readiness to learn and perform.
2. Individual differences as related to optimal participation in physical activity, including concepts such
   as diversity, disability, multiculturalism, development, gender differences, and learning styles.
3. Accessing and selecting appropriate services and resources to meet diverse learning needs.
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Collaboration and Community Involvement                                                                               English (United States)
1. Selecting and accessing community resources to enhance physical activity opportunities and
   involvement.
2. Strategies for advocating in the school and community to promote a variety of physical activity
   opportunities.
3. Statutes, regulations, policies, and curriculum guidelines related to physical education, including
   knowledge of how to access and to advocate for policy development.
4. Career opportunities in related fields, e.g., wellness, athletic training, exercise science, and sport-
   related careers.


Below is the alignment of the above objectives to the content courses offered in physical
education for this degree. These competencies are reviewed each year, and objectives
are added to individual courses as approved by the faculty of that course.


              PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE    PE
Competency    15000 16000 20700 20000 20300 22000 30000 30500 31000 34900 32000 40000 31800 31500 35600 1xx00
1. Physical Education Content
          1              x       x      x       x                   x             x      x                        x
          2 x            x                      x                   x                                  x      x
          3                             x       x                                 x                               x
          4               x      x              x                   x
          5                             x       x                   x                    x                        x
          6               x      x                                                                     x      x
          7         x     x      x                                                                            x
          8               x      x
          9                                                   x                   x
         10                      x                     x
         11 x                                                              x
         12 x                                                              x
2. Development and Diversity
          1 x                                                                     x      x
          2 x                                                                     x      x      x
          3 x                                          x                          x      x
3. Collaboration and Community Involvement
          1                      x                     x                          x      x      x
          2                                            x                          x      x      x
          3 x                                          x                                 x
          4 x                                          x                                        x




Classes to be Assessed
The table below outlines the core course requirements for the B.S. in Physical Education degree.
The benchmarks being developed for this degree are noted below. The purpose of the
benchmarks is to assess students’ learning through the curriculum from entry into the major
through to graduation.

Core Classes                   Hours        Benchmarks
PE 15000 Found of PE             3          Initial pre-test being developed to assess knowledge at entry
                                            into the program.
PE 31500 Exercise                 3         This course is one of the last courses taken during the senior
Physiology                                  semester. The same post-test given in PE 15000 will be given to
                                            assess student learning.
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PE 31800 Coaching with      3      This degree has an emphasis on coaching principles; therefore, a   English (United States)
Character                          final written exam on the student’s coaching philosophy is given
                                   to assess the student’s understanding of theory and methods of
                                   coaching.
PE Methods of Coaching      3      The faculty is working with the instructors to develop a written
                                   exam, specific to each sport to assess the students’
                                   understanding of theory and methods of coaching for a
                                   particular sport.


Methods of Assessments
    1.   Core coursework grades
    2.   Cumulative GPA
    3.   Completion of a minimum of 150 practicum hours and degree requirements
    4.   Course alignment to national standards

Objective

        Students are required to successfully pass (grade of D or better) the prerequisites
         for all major requirements and maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA to complete the
         degree.
        A minimum of 150 practicum hours must be approved and documented by the
         cooperating coach/instructor and University supervisor.

Subjective

        Students are provided an academic plan by their academic advisor. At a
         minimum, each student meets with his/her advisor one time per semester to
         review academic progress, course sequencing, and overall success in the
         program.
        During the practicum experience, the cooperating coach/instructor serves as a
         role model for best practices in the field of physical education and provides
         students the opportunity to discuss how to handle unique situations and unusual
         occurrences.

Student Attitude/Response

        Student responses are collected on the University’s course evaluations following
         each semester.
        Students are asked for feedback following each practicum experience.
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Results
The Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education was approved in fall 2007. The
current student enrollment is listed below. Many students interested in physical
education choose to pursue certification in K-12; therefore, enrollment in this particular
degree remains consistently lower than other areas in the health and fitness sciences.

The table below represents the Physical Education student’s cumulative GPAs for 2008-
11. The cumulative GPA is above the required 2.5 for graduation.

Student Enrollment and Cumulative GPA
                 2008-09         2009-10        2010-11
Enrollment          9              12              10
GPA                3.02            2.67           2.85


Lessons Learned
This degree has an emphasis in coaching through the core classes and requirements in
theory and methods of coaching courses. In fall 2010, the faculty planned to add pre- and
post-test information based on the standards to PE 15000 Foundations of Physical
Education, PE 30000 Community Health, PE 34900 Organization and Administration of
Physical Education, PE 40000 Adaptive Physical Education, and PE 35600 Methods of
Weight Training.

However, after further conversations with faculty, the department has decided to pre-
/post-test in PE 15000 and PE 31500 because these courses are offered in the Bachelor of
Arts in Physical Education as well. Both the B.A. and B.S. degrees are aligned to MDESE’s
standards; therefore, using the same pre- and post-test in all sections of these courses to
remain consistent with our assessment procedures makes sense.

Action Plan for Next Year
The Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education is a relatively new degree, approved
in fall 2007. The future strategic plan will be based on a needs assessment, current
resources, and future resources. Based on student feedback, the department is currently
assessing the electives required for the degree. Currently, 18 credits are electives in the
major, with one course being a science (partially meeting the University’s requirement of
three sciences for a bachelor’s degree), and nine credits being above the 30000-40000
level (partially meeting the University’s requirement of 42 hours of upper-level
coursework).
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The majority of students pursuing this degree will work in a setting that requires                English (United States)
coaching/instructing a variety of sports. This fact has prompted the department to assess
whether additional coaching methods courses or lifetime activity courses should be
required, lowering the number of electives for this major. Additionally, the department
offers a minor in coaching, of which many courses are already included in the Bachelor of
Science in Physical Education. Therefore, students are now strongly recommended to
declare a minor with this degree.

In spring 2009, the Health and Fitness Science Department assessed prerequisites for
coaching methods courses. All coaching methods courses are at a 30000 level, which
means students should be a junior and have introductory courses completed prior to
enrollment in a methods course. Therefore, appropriate prerequisites were added to
ensure students are properly prepared for and successfully complete these courses. This
change will be evaluated in upcoming semesters by student feedback, instructor
comments, and overall grades and GPA changes within the major. Additionally, the
course PE 42000 Practicum in Coaching is being considered as a core requirement in this
degree. As stated previously, many of these students are interested in pursuing coaching,         Comment [u7]: As careers?
and this additional practicum experience would benefit these students.

In fall 2010, the faculty plan to add pre- and post-test information based on these
standards to PE 15000 Foundations of Physical Education, PE 30000 Community Health,
PE 34900 Organization and Administration of Physical Education, PE 40000 Adaptive
Physical Education, and PE 35600 Methods of Weight Training. These assessments will be
used to further modify the program based on the student responses and course
evaluations. However, after further conversations with faculty, the department has
decided to pre- and post-test in PE 15000 and PE 31500 because these courses are
offered in the Bachelor of Arts degree in Physical Education as well. Both the B.A. and
B.S. degrees are aligned to MDESE’s standards; therefore, using the same pre- and post-
test in all sections of these courses makes sense to remain consistent with our
assessment procedures. Monthly meetings in the summer months were held with full-
time faculty to develop these pre-tests for pilot use in fall 2011.

Impacts and Changes on Classes for the Following Year
Based on the results of the pilot pre- and post- tests, the faculty will make a plan of
action to implement pre- and post-tests each academic semester in PE 15000
Foundations of Physical Education and PE 31500 Physiology of Exercise.

This degree has an emphasis on coaching principles; therefore, a final written exam on
the student’s coaching philosophy will be given to assess the student’s understanding of
theory and methods of coaching in PE 31800 Coaching with Character. Additionally, the
department is working with the individual instructors in each specific theory and
methods of sports course to develop a written exam, specific to each sport, to assess the
student’s understanding of theory and methods of coaching for a particular sport.
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In order to ensure students are taking courses in the appropriate sequence, in spring
2011 the faculty re-evaluated the current prerequisites for each course in the curriculum.
The table below shows the proposed changes to pre-requisites and the rationale for the
change.

                      2011-2012        Proposed 2012-
 Class Number
                     catalog pre-     2013 catalog pre-              Rationale for update
   and Name
                       requisite          requisite
PE 30000                                                  Course is required in the Health and
                     PE 15000 or
Community                                                 Wellness minor which includes non-majors.
                     AT 29500 or       Junior Standing
Health                                                    Also required in the Social Service
                      EXS 25000
                                                          Emphasis.
PE 30500
Measurement                                               MTH 14100 is a recommended (not
                     MTH 14100         Junior Standing
and Evaluation in                                         required) math course for PE majors.
PE
PE 31000            MTH 14100,
                                      PE 20700 or BIO     MTH 14100 is a recommended (not
Kinesiology of PE   PE 20700 or
                                           22700          required) math course for PE majors.
                     BIO 22700
PE 31800            AT 29500 or
Coaching with       EXS 25000 or                          Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                       Junior Standing
Character           PE 15000 or                           also for non-majors.
                      PE 20400
PE 32000            PE 15000 or
Psychological       AT 29500 or                           Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                       Junior Standing
and Sociological    EXS 25000 or                          also for non-majors.
Aspects of PE        PSY 10000
PE 33100
                     EDU 10000,
Analysis and                                              Course is required in the B.S in PE (non-
                     EDU 20200,        Junior Standing
Teaching of                                               teaching degree).
                     EDU 30400
Lifetime Sports
PE 33500
Methods of           EDU 10000,
                                                          PE 22000 covers the basic movement skills
Elementary           EDU 20200,           PE 22000
                                                          needed to develop effective lesson plans.
Physical             EDU 30400
Education
PE 33600             EDU 10000,
                                                          PE 22000 covers the basic movement skills
Methods of           EDU 20200,           PE 22000
                                                          needed to develop effective lesson plans.
intermediate PE      EDU 30400
PE 34900
Organization and       PE 15000,                           Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                       Junior Standing
Administration      junior standing                                   also for non-majors.
of Health and PE
PE 35000 Theory
and Methods of       PE 20400 or                           Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                       Junior Standing
Coaching              AT 29500                                        also for non-majors.
Football
PE 35100 Theory
and Methods of       PE 20400 or                           Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                       Junior Standing
Coaching              AT 29500                                        also for non-majors.
Basketball
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 Class Number
                    catalog pre-   2013 catalog pre-             Rationale for update
   and Name
                      requisite        requisite
PE 35200 Theory
and Methods of      PE 20400 or                        Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                    Junior Standing
Coaching Softball     AT 2950                                     also for non-majors.
and Baseball
PE 35300 Theory
and Methods of      PE 20400 or                        Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                    Junior Standing
Coaching Track       AT 29500                                     also for non-majors.
and Field
PE 35400 Theory
and Methods of      PE 20400 or                        Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                    Junior Standing
Coaching             AT 29500                                     also for non-majors.
Volleyball
PE 35500 Theory
                    PE 20400 or                        Course is required in the Coaching minor,
and Methods of                      Junior Standing
                     AT 29500                                     also for non-majors.
Coaching Soccer
PE 35600 Theory
and Methods of      PE 20400 or                        Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                    Junior Standing
Coaching Weight      AT 29500                                     also for non-majors.
Training
PE 35700 Theory
and Methods of      PE 20400 or                        Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                    Junior Standing
Coaching             AT 29500                                     also for non-majors.
Wrestling
PE 35800 Theory
and Methods of      PE 20400 or                        Course is required in the Coaching minor,
                                    Junior Standing
Coaching Aquatic     AT 29500                                     also for non-majors.
Sports
PE 40000            PE 33500 or                        Course is required in the B.S. in PE (non-
                                    Senior Standing
Adapted PE           PE 33600                                      teaching degree).
EDU 32500
                                                         Course is required for PE and Health
Perceptual          EDU 10000,
                                      EDU 10000          teaching majors (EDU 31700 is early
Motor               EDU 31700
                                                                  childhood course).
Development



                        School of Education Analysis

Health Science Programs
        The programs have in place a number of items that will greatly strengthen their
        assessment efforts — getting student responses to classes, collecting the clinical
        exam results, collecting the results of evaluations, as well as class and alumni
        survey results. The clinical experience class has a lot of assessment going on, but
        there is a need to integrate the data into the reporting process. Goals and
        objectives need to reflect what we want students to learn. The programs need to
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      develop techniques of measuring what students have learned while at                      English (United States)
      Lindenwood. The list of competencies is long and professionally necessary, but
      how is the department measuring them? GPA and course grades are not
      considered an effective assessment measure as there are many factors other than
      student learning that can impact the grades a student receives. In exercise
      science, competency 1.3.10, there is no class that teaches that proficiency, which
      is something the department will wish to examine and possibly explain.

Teacher Education

      The teacher education program has a very comprehensive reporting system that
      is required by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
      The school is still working through the process of determining what data is
      interesting and what is useful. The use of an example program is good at this
      point, but all the programs should eventually be included, especially those that
      are primarily housed in the school of education, such as elementary education. It
      is necessary to look at the impacts that assessment is having on the program and
      changes made based on the data. The program has been dealing with a great deal
      of data for the last few years and is only now getting caught back up, but future
      reports need to reflect current data. The school’s DESE cycle does slow up its
      reporting somewhat and, thus, it will be data from as much as a year behind most
      of the programs at the University.
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            School of Fine and Performing Arts

The School of Fine and Performing Arts offers 21 undergraduate majors in the areas of
dance, studio arts, theatre, and music. The performing arts center has expanded the
ability of the University to offer both quality professional and student productions for the
campus and the community.

The school offers the following degrees:

       Bachelor of Fine Arts in
           Studio Art
           Fashion Design
           Acting
           Directing
           Technical Theatre/Design
           Musical Theatre

       Bachelor of Arts in
           Studio Art                                         Music (Vocal/Choral)
           Art History                                        Music Performance
           Arts Management–Art History                        Music Business
           Arts Management–Studio Art                         Arts Management-Music
           Dance                                              Performing Arts
           Arts Management—Dance                              Theatre
           Fashion Design                                     Arts Management – Theatre
           Music (Instrumental)

       Minors in
           Art History
           Studio Art
           Graphic and Computer Art
           Dance
           Fashion Design
           Music
           Performing Arts
           Theatre
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Fine Arts

Program Goals and Objectives
Knowledge: The student who successfully completes the studio art major at Lindenwood
University will understand and experience the practice of art and will understand the role of
art as a force in human knowledge. The student will know

      the visual language of art and design,
      fundamental studio practice; techniques, procedures, and theory shared across
       studio disciplines,
      major achievements in the history of art, Western, and non-Western,
      varied approaches to the role of art in human experience.

Skills and Reasoning Processes: The student who successfully completes the studio art
major at the University will understand the integration of technical proficiency and critical
thinking. The student will be able to competently

      manipulate art, craft, and design media utilizing traditional and contemporary
       technologies,
      organize, analyze, and interpret visual phenomena using problem-solving skills,
      communicate clearly about art in oral and written form,
      evaluate their own art making and that of their peers through critical reasoning
       about the use of materials, formal elements, and content,
      create a body of work, which joins ideas and process-oriented learning.

Application: The studio art major who graduates from the University will have acquired
knowledge, skills, and reasoning abilities that will enable him/her to apply this experience in
a variety of ways. The student will be able to

      synthesize knowledge from many fields into studio practice,
      engage in substantive self-directed artistic activity,
      direct these learned abilities to thoughtful practice in any arena,
      contribute to the cultural, intellectual, and educational life of the community.

Classes Assessed
ART 10000 - Fundamentals of Drawing and Design, ART 18100 - Intro to Photography, ART
18101 - Intro to Digital Photography and ART 24000 - Intro to Ceramics
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Methods of Assessment Used                                                                            English (United States)



Assessment in these courses involves objective (quantifiable) answers on exams and essays
and critiques of art work, as well as class discussion, subjective (qualitative) improvement
on essays, and, finally, student response — the feedback on evaluations and those taken in
class on the effectiveness of different modes of delivery in the classroom.

Results (include a comparison with previous years when
possible)
ART 24000 – Introduction to Ceramics

The faculty rates each student’s demonstrated abilities in specified areas on a 1-5 scale
based on his/her final critique. The following percentages represent students who received
high ratings of (4-5): a rank of 4 is considered a success.

                                 2006      2007        2008       2009        2010       2011
Historical context               50%       50%         54%        48%         54%        64%
Recognition of kitsch            33%       33%         45%        38%         38%         n/a
Use of construction techniques   46%       46%         64%        65%         68%        74%
Light, shadow, proportion        25%       33%         64%        65%         48%        52%
Surface preparation              50%       50%         64%        53%         48%        58%
Glaze and slip application       65%       70%         72%        65%         54%        64%

ART 18100 - Intro to Photography Assessment

The faculty rates each student’s demonstrated abilities in specified areas on a 1-5 scale
from the work presented as the final outside-of-class assignment. The following represents
the abilities assessed and the percentage of students who received high marks (4-5) for
their demonstrated abilities.

                                 2006      2007        2008       2009        2010       2011
Printing technique               45%       48%         50%        54%         48%        54%
Print quality                    40%       45%         50%        59%         45%        60%
Composition                      54%       41%         45%        54%         45%        54%
Focus                            61%       63%         70%        66%         70%        60%
Depth of field                   41%       51%         50%        49%         48%        54%
Originality                      31%       35%         35%        42%         35%        54%
Technical knowledge              33%       30%         40%        54%         45%        60%

ART 18100 - Intro to Photography-Digital Assessment begun in 2007

The faculty rates each student’s demonstrated abilities in specified areas on a 1-5 scale
from the work presented as their final outside-of-class assignment. The following
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(4-5) for their demonstrated abilities.

                                               2007      2008       2009       2010         2011
Printing technique                             30%       40%        56%        53%          54%
Print quality                                  30%       35%        43%        43%          58%
Composition                                    32%       50%        43%        65%          60%
Focus                                          75%       80%        76%        NA*           NA
Depth of field                                  NA        NA         NA         NA           NA
Originality                                    27%       40%        43%        48%          54%
Technical knowledge - Photography              31%       30%        56%        43%          54%
Technical knowledge – Adobe Photoshop          68%       75%        65%        68%          60%
    *With the technological advancements in image stability on digital cameras, mastery of
    focus techniques has become irrelevant.

In 2007-08, we initiated ART 10000 - Fundamentals of Drawing and Design as a new GE
studio course. It took us a year to fully eliminate ART 13000 - Intro to Drawing and ART
10600 2-D Design as GE offerings.

ART 10000 - Fundamentals of Drawing and Design

The faculty rates each student’s demonstrated abilities in specified areas on a 1-5 scale
from the work presented as the final outside-of-class assignment. The following represents
the abilities assessed and the percentage of students who received high marks (4-5) for
their demonstrated abilities.

                                        2009          2010       2011
Understanding of concepts               56%           74%        68%
Organization of space                   74%           74%        64%
Quality of execution                    63%           63%        72%
Linear Perspective                      56%           65%        68%
Presentation                            53%           56%        60%
Creativity/risk-taking                  48%           53%        60%
Modeling                                63%           74%        64%
Composition                             56%           77%        76%
Shading/Value                           56%           63%        76%

LU Art Major Assessment -– B.F.A. Exhibition Thesis Assessment

The faculty rates each student’s demonstrated abilities in specified areas on a 1 – 5 scale
from the work presented in the thesis exhibition. The following represents the abilities
assessed and the percentage of students who received high marks (4-5) for their
demonstrated abilities.
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Year                          2005    2006     2007      2008     2009      2010      2011
Number of Students Assessed   (19)    (18)     (13)      (21)     (24)      (29)      (23)
Drawing                       47%     50%      46%       52%      52%       44%       38%
Quantity                      63%     44%      69%       52%      58%       68%       64%
Technical Knowledge           52%     39%      69%       57%      58%       72%       64%
Presentation/Craftsmanship    37%     22%      31%       38%      72%       72%       68%
Color                         47%     28%      47%       38%      42%       52%       52%
Composition                   63%     39%      54%       33%      64%       47%       44%
Content                       37%     39%      31%       38%      38%       47%       38%


Lessons Learned
   1. Students need increased studio time.
   2. Students need more exposure to art theories and practices through additional studio
      courses in their majors.

Action Plan
      Beginning in fall 2011, all studio classes will have increased contact hours to double
       the credit hours in order to come in line with the national average. The department
       is expecting this to be a major improvement.
      For fall 2011, the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design has increased the number
       of credit hours required from 60 credits to 75 credits in order to complete the
       degree.
           o The same is being planned for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art for fall
                2012.
      The department will develop a mid-program evaluation of each art major to assess
       the efficacy of the foundation courses as well as to determine the viability of the
       students’ continuation in the major. This has been a desire for a couple of years, but
       the logistics of scheduling such mid-program evaluations for 180 majors and four            Comment [u8]: "with" instead of and?

       faculty members has precluded its inception.
      The art department is working with the administration to secure new full-time
       faculty member in 3-D and graphic design.

Impacts and Changes on Classes for the Following Year
The restructured and created courses will be available for majors and non-majors beginning
fall 2011. With consistency in our GE surveys, we can ensure that all students are receiving
the same information, skill sets, and experiences. University-wide availability of study-
abroad opportunities will improve exposure to other cultures and broaden their collegiate
and life experience. Higher expectations for upper-level courses ensure strict academic rigor
is enforced and our students are challenged in the classroom.
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Art History

Mission
The course of study in art history at the University is devoted to the study of visual
materials, from painting and sculpture to photography and digital art. The department
endeavors to give students a broad foundation in and critical understanding of visual
culture in art historical context in a diverse selection of courses in the art of Europe and
America, as well as the non-Western arts of Africa and Asia. Students are taught to analyze
works of art as products of the cultures in which they were created, exploring such
questions as why the object was created, how it was made, who might have seen and
appreciated it, and what it might have meant to its owners and its audience. The faculty at
the University believes that training in the study of art history consists of a balance between
a sound disciplinary foundation and innovative methodological approaches. The courses
place the methods and objectives of art history in their many contexts. In the course of
study, relationships among cultures over time, including our own, become apparent.
Students develop an appreciation for the innate desire to create that is basic to the human
experience; they also learn to communicate these concepts effectively in written, oral, and
visual presentations.

Program Objectives
Students will

   develop as more complete human beings, who think and act freely as individuals and as
    members of the community,
   acquire the intellectual tools and the range of perspectives needed to understand
    human cultures, as they are, as they have been, and as they might be,
   refine and apply the basic skills needed for productive study and communication of
    ideas (These skills include listening, speaking, reading, writing, researching, observing,
    and reflecting),
   develop and use the higher levels of thinking, including analysis, synthesis, evaluation,
    and integration (Whenever feasible, students’ efforts in the areas of divergent and
    creative thinking are also encouraged and supported),
   reason analytically about both qualitative and quantitative evidence,
   develop personal guidelines for making informed, independent, socially-responsible
    decisions that are respectful of other people and of the environment.

The art history major is for those students who want to work in the curatorial, educational,
public relations or registration areas of a museum or gallery or who wish to go on to
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graduate school in the art history field. The major is also for students who plan to pursue          English (United States)
careers in art conservation, museum exhibition preparation, and exhibition design. Each of
these generally require an M.A. or Ph.D. To this end, the program is designed to expose
students to as wide a range of methodologies as possible, culminating with a course on the
methods of art history, their introduction to graduate study. Each research paper required
of them helps them more clearly develop their writing skills and understand how to better
utilize the research tools available to them. Presentations also develop their oral skills and
their ability to communicate an argument clearly and effectively.

Classes Assessed
ART 21000 - Concepts in the Visual Arts
ART 22000 - History of Art (Course replaced by ART 22200 and ART 22400)
ART 38600 - Special Topics: Beauty, Gender, and Art in Early Modern Italy
ART 35700 - Ancient Art
ART 35400 - 19th-Century Art

Methods of Assessment Used
Assessment in these courses involves objective (quantifiable) answers on exams, essays,
and research papers, as well as class discussion subjective (qualitative) improvement on
essays and research papers, and, finally, student response, the feedback on evaluations and
those taken in class on the effectiveness of different modes of delivery in the classroom and
online.

Testing in these courses (especially the surveys ART 22200 and ART 22400) should have
students demonstrating their mastery of the relevant vocabulary, identification of artists
and movements (i.e., artist, title, and date of works), and ability to communicate their ideas
clearly in the form of essays. Assignments in these courses should foster the development
of these skills in the form of verbal presentations and/or, especially, written work
demonstrating knowledge of the material covered as well as the students’ ability to reason
critically about the artworks covered.

      Exams should test for knowledge of vocabulary, works of art, and ability to reason in
       essays.
      Exams should test a knowledge of works through identification, including artist, title,
       and date.
      In surveys, students must be tested on 150 works of art divided into groups of 50 for
       three exams or 75 for two exams.
      Essays on exams should test for contextual information and critical thinking skills.
      Paper assignments/ presentations should foster the development of writing and
       reasoning skills.
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Results
As it was the professor’s first year with the University, the data to work with was as limited
as his predecessor’s assessment efforts were limited.

Lessons Learned
The department did not have enough data this year regarding student learning, but by
reviewing the program and doing comparisons with programs at other universities a
number of changes have been made for the following years.

Action Plan for Next Year
The course offerings for art history were unstructured and not unified when the new
professor began in fall 2010. The actions taken over the last year have been to regularize
the curriculum, expand course offerings for the degree, ensure consistency in course
delivery through guidelines distributed to all art history faculty (full- and part-time), expand
online offerings (ART 22200 and ART 22400), develop study-abroad program to be offered
annually (Lindenwood in Italy), and make hiring protocol stricter for adjuncts with a
requirement that they be, at least, ABD.

Impacts and changes on classes for the following year
Eight newly restructured and created courses will be available for majors and non-majors
beginning fall 2011. With consistency in our GE surveys, we can ensure that all students are
receiving the same information, skill sets, and experiences. University-wide availability of
study abroad will improve exposure to other cultures and broaden their collegiate and life
experience. Higher expectations for upper-level courses ensure strict academic rigor is
enforced and our students are challenged in the classroom.


Dance


Mission Statement
Dance, a key component of the university arts program, encompasses a range of course and
performance opportunities that enable students to contribute to our society as dance
performers, choreographers, educators, and knowledgeable audiences who appreciate the
unique ability of the arts to promote understanding. The dance program takes into account
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student activities, educational trends such as multi-cultural and interdisciplinary studies,         English (United States)
and the objectives of the School of Fine and Performing Arts.

The dance major focuses on three major areas: creative, technical, and
historical/theoretical. The B.A. program in dance serves students by recognizing that there
are many potential careers available to them with a dance major. Examples include
professional performer or choreographer, educator, arts manager, and educator/consultant
in the health and fitness industry. The dance program also serves as preparation for dance
study at the graduate level for those interested in careers in higher education.

Program Goals and Objectives
Students will develop in the areas of

      technical skills,
       o In performances and in technique classes, students will develop the technical
            skills necessary to the variety of dance careers delineated in the mission
            statement. Each style of dance has specific criteria.
      creativity,
       o Choreographic assignments increase creativity, enhancing student abilities to
            meet the many career and personal challenges of today’s society.
      communication and cooperative skills,
       o These skills are cultivated through participation in choreography and
            performance (projects).
      intellectual stimulation,
       o Developing the background necessary for the development of critics and
            scholars is enhanced through the study of dance history, theory, written exams,
            research, and performance analysis papers.
      critical thinking.
       o Critical thinking is employed in all aspects of dance study. Students constantly
            evaluate their progress in relation to technical ideals and make stylistic and
            historical evaluations of technique and choreography.

Classes Assessed
      Advanced Ballet (spring 2011)
      Intermediate Modern (fall 2010)
      Intermediate Jazz (fall 2010)
      Advance Tap (fall 2010)
      Dance Teaching Methods (spring 2011)
      Dance Theory and Composition II (spring 2011)
      Advanced Ballet (spring 2011)
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         Advanced Jazz (spring 2011)                                                                   English (United States)



Methods of Assessment Used
The Dance Department is in the process of creating a dance major exit exam that will
include everything the B.A. dance majors should know and have accomplished in order to
graduate. This exam will allow the department to work backward to establish better
methods of assessment.

Objective Assessment

The pre- and post-tests address basic knowledge related specifically to each course. Below
are samples of tables used to compare the pre- and post-tests.

Subjective Assessment

Students are asked to establish goals at the beginning of the semester and then address the
goals (self-evaluate) again at midterm and at the end of the semester. Included are scoring
elements such as those that are used for dance programs and professional auditions.
Instructor scores are added after the student scores. Evaluations are handed back to the
students so they can see the instructor’s ratings and comments and hopefully help with
further evaluation.

Results
Objective Assessment

         Dance technique courses are repeated several times. Assessing individual student
          progress is difficult unless more information is given, such as how many times a
          student has taken a particular style at the University. Comparing current to previous
          years is difficult because the assessment methods were not the same.
         Classes that included assessment testing as part of the curriculum (and the student’s
          grade) had better results.

Advanced Ballet – spring 2011 - terminology tests
      Ex.: “Name the seven movements of ballet in French and English.”

                          Pre-test %     Post-test %       Improvement %
Overall Averages            68.20           79.00               10.80
Freshman                    67.67           74.67                7.00
Sophomores                  49.00           58.00                9.00
Juniors                     53.00           88.00               35.00
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Seniors                  82.00             90.50                 8.50                                   English (United States)
Non-dance majors         76.00             87.33                11.33
Dance majors             64.86             75.43                10.57


Intermediate Modern Dance – fall 2010 - basic knowledge of modern techniques and
choreographers
      Ex.: “When using imagery of a tassel, what part of the body starts the movement?”

                        Pre-test %         Post-test %       Improvement %
Overall Average           35.38               81.25               45.88
Non-dance majors          23.17               82.17               59.00
Dance majors              42.70               80.70               38.00


Intermediate Jazz Dance – fall 2010 – basic questions about jazz technique*
Ex.: “Name two ways a chainé turn can be executed in jazz class.”
*This assessment test was written by an adjunct and will not be used in the future.

                       Pre-test %         Post-test %        Improvement %
Averages                 86.18              96.12                  9.94
Non-Dance majors         83.20              93.40                 10.20
Dance majors             95.00              100.00                 5.00
Unknown major            84.33              100.00                15.67


Advanced Tap Dance – fall 2010 – pre-test and post-test on general knowledge of tap
technique, styles, and dancers.
       Ex.: “Describe poly-rhythms.” “Who is Fred Astaire?”

                        Pre-test %         Post-test %        Improvement %
Averages                  60.00               74.83                14.83
Non-Dance majors          58.75               77.00                18.25
Dance majors              64.33               79.50                15.17
Unknown major             49.50               56.50                 7.00


Dance Teaching Methods – spring 2011 – pre-test and post-test
      Ex.: “Name 2 of the 9 intelligences in Howard Gardner’s theory.”

                             Pre-test %        Post-test %              Improvement %
Averages                         41.10              91.70                   50.60
Sophomores                       35.00              85.00                   50.00
Juniors                          51.25              96.25                   45.00
Seniors                          31.67              90.00                   58.33
Non-Dance Majors                 35.00              80.00                   45.00
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Dance Majors                                          41.88                            93.13                                        51.25                                          English (United States)
        There was only one non-dance major.

Dance Theory and Composition II – spring 2011
      Ex.: “Describe the difference between theme and variation.”

                                         Pre-test %                 Post-test %            Improvement %
Overall Average                            73.93                      94.00                                    20.07
Non-dance major                            50.00                      95.00                                    45.00
Dance Major                                75.64                      93.93                                    18.29
        There was only one non-dance major.

Subjective Assessment

       The new self-assessment forms are extremely helpful in tracking student progress in
        technique classes. Making students write about their personal progress throughout
        the semester helps keep them goal/objective oriented.

Advanced Ballet Technique - Self Evaluation
      There were seven students in the class.
                  Alignment/ Placement




                                                                                                                                Grand Allegro




                                                                                                                                                             Terminology
                                                                                               Petit Allegro




                                                                                                                                                Sequencing
                                                                                                                   Pirouettes
                                                      Flexibility
                                            Turnout




                                                                       Balance


                                                                                  Adagio




                                                                                                                                                                           Total




Average Faculty
                   6.92                     6.50       7.42             7.00      6.92          6.25               6.42          6.50            6.58         6.25         66.75
1 Evaluation
Average Faculty
                   5.86                     5.57       6.71             5.86      5.86          5.64               5.79          5.93            5.71         6.43         59.36
2 Evaluation
Average Faculty
                   6.79                     6.50       7.50             7.14      7.00          6.14               6.79          7.00            6.71         6.86         68.43
3 Evaluation

Average Student
                   5.75                     5.75       6.42             6.00      5.25          5.08               5.83          5.83            5.92         6.08         57.92
1 Evaluation
Average Student
                   5.14                     5.43       6.64             5.07      5.00          4.93               5.57          5.64            5.71         6.29         55.43
2 Evaluation
Average Student
                   5.71                     5.43       6.57             5.79      5.71          5.00               5.64          6.00            6.07         6.64         58.57
3 Evaluation
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Advanced Jazz Technique Evaluation
      There were 12 students in this class.
                               Contraction and release




                                                                       Flat back lateral work


                                                                                                Lyrical contemporary




                                                                                                                                                           Large leaps and jumps
                                                                                                                            Musical Theatre




                                                                                                                                                                                                Terminology
                                                                                                                                                                                   Sequencing
                                                                                                                                              Pirouettes
                                                         Flexibility
                  Isolations




                                                                                                                                                                                                              Totals
Average Faculty
                   6.75          6.45                     6.15           5.75                     6.45                       6.30              5.35          5.90                   6.45         6.75         62.30
1 Evaluation
Average Faculty
                   7.28          7.06                     6.44           6.39                      N/A                        N/A              6.33          6.67                   7.11         7.50         54.78
2 Evaluation
Average Faculty
                   7.71          7.54                     6.79           6.75                     7.13                       6.83              6.33          7.00                   7.17         7.96         71.21
3 Evaluation

Average
Student 1          6.40          6.30                     5.80           6.05                     6.25                       5.15              5.60          5.55                   6.35         5.65         59.10
Evaluation
Average
Student 2          6.89          6.89                     5.94           6.11                      N/A                        N/A              6.00          6.17                   6.67         6.83         51.50
Evaluation
Average
Student 3          7.38          7.21                     6.63           6.63                     6.25                       6.33              6.42          6.46                   7.00         7.63         67.92
Evaluation


Lessons Learned
       The most important part of the assessment tests and evaluations is that the
        information leads to quality feedback, advising, and conferences between
        instructors and students. Students need to receive feedback quickly.
       Adjunct instructors need to be aware of the importance of assessments for all
        classes and should be held accountable when assessment reports are incomplete or
        not properly formatted.

Objective Assessment

       Ballet terminology is used for other styles of dance, including jazz and modern, and
        should be incorporated into the jazz and modern technique lessons and assessment.
       Assessment should be built into the curriculum. If students know they are not
        receiving a grade, they will not apply themselves. When post-tests are part of the
        final exam, most scores are higher.
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Subjective Assessment

      Having the students assess themselves at the beginning of the semester not only
       allows the student to set individual goals for the semester, but also gives the
       instructor insight into where the student sees himself/herself in relation to what the
       student believes to be the level of the course.
      The midterm evaluations revealed that many students do not know how to self-
       assess, and perhaps some of the courses need to include a section on self-
       assessment.

Action Plan
Starting in fall 2011, the Dance Department will have a new, full-time faculty member.

      All current assessment tools/methods will be reviewed, updated, and restructured
       where necessary as determined by both full-time dance faculty members. In
       addition, adjunct faculty will be asked for input in their individual areas of expertise.

The dance program has already begun work on a dance major exit exam, which should help
with developing assessment methods that include finite course-specific goals and
objectives.

      This will allow each dance major to work with his/her advisor to schedule classes
       that best fit the student’s individual educational needs.

Assessing dance is primarily subjective.

      With additional faculty involvement in both assessment preparation and evaluation,
       students are more likely to feel that they are being properly assessed and not just
       receiving one instructor’s personal opinion about their progress.

Impacts and Changes on Classes for the Following Year
Assessment tests and evaluations must be carefully scheduled to allow time for instructor
feedback and student conferences where needed.

      Dance classes will have scheduled days for assessment tests, self-evaluations, and
       student-instructor conferences.

      Assessment guidelines will be given to departmental faculty — full time and adjunct
       — prior to the beginning of each semester.
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Music


Mission
The mission of the Lindenwood University Music Department is to support the missions of the
University through the discipline of music.


Departmental Goals and Objectives
The music department is committed to the following goals:

Education
    Developing adaptive music education, performance, and business professionals —
       graduates who are well equipped to
          o develop as more complete human beings who think and act freely both as
              individuals and as community members,
          o gain the intellectual tools and apply the range of perspective needed to
              understand human cultures as they have been, as they are, and as they
              might become,
          o apply the basic skills — listening, speaking, reading, writing, researching,
              observing, reflecting, and other forms of intellectual interaction needed for
              productive study and communication of ideas,
          o acquire the propensity for and ability to engage in divergent and creative
              thinking directed toward synthesis, evaluation, and integration of ideas,
          o apply analytical reasoning to both qualitative and quantitative evidence,
          o acquire guidelines for making informed, independent, socially-responsible
              decisions, respectful of others and the environment, and develop a
              willingness to act accordingly.

Enrichment
    Enriching the University and surrounding community through music — see the music
       section of the student life report.

Retention
    Sustaining enrollment and participation throughout the department.

Recruitment
    Recruiting students who excel in scholarship and musicianship.
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Excellence                                                                                          English (United States)
    Exceeding the highest standards of quality and efficiency in all facets of the
       department.

Program Goals and Objectives
In addition to these department-level goals, program-level goals for students majoring in
music (instrumental or vocal/choral) w/secondary education minor, music performance,
and music business are as follows:

Music Performance

The music performance graduate will demonstrate knowledge of and/or competency in the
following areas of study:

      Music performance — performing music artistically and reading music proficiently in
       contexts of diverse structure and sophistication.
      Listening Comprehension: Music Theory
           o Aural identification of musical intervals, triads, chord quality, scales, cadence
               types, rhythmic patterns, meter mode, and harmonic progressions.
           o Error detection
           o Phrase structure
           o Tonality and key relationships
           o Contrapuntal devices
           o Instrumentation
      Listening Comprehension: Music History
           o Historical style analysis
           o Composer identification
           o Genre > style
           o Stylistic elements of music from the following style periods: Medieval;
               Renaissance; Baroque; Classical; Romantic; Late 19th Century/Early 20th
               Century; After 1920; Jazz/Popular; World Music
      Non-aural music theory
           o Rudiments (including key signatures, clefs, terminology, symbols, intervals,
               chords, scales, modes, time signatures, note values, rest values, harmonic
               series, dynamics)
           o Instrumentation and orchestration (including range of instruments and
               transposition)
           o Harmonic practices — common practice period (e.g., analysis, cadences,
               modulation, non-harmonic tones, voice leading, figured bass, altered chords,
               reductive analysis)
           o Contrapuntal practices (procedures such as fugue, canon, passacaglia;
               motivic structure and development; terms such as episode, stretto, etc.)
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          o Forms — homophonic textures (e.g., phrase relationships, small forms,                   English (United States)
              sonata form, rondo, variation forms)
          o Twentieth-century techniques (e.g., scales, modes, polytonality, polyrhythm,
              mixed meters, aleatory, minimalism, serial procedures, pitch class sets,
              electro-acoustic music, jazz/pop music notation and symbols)
      Non-aural music history, including the contributions of women and of American
       minority musicians
          o Music history and literature (including biography, chronology, composers,
              forms, genres, instruments, repertoire, aesthetic and cultural concepts,
              notation, and performance practices)
          o Stylistic characteristics of music produced in each style period: Medieval;
              Renaissance; Baroque; Classical; Romantic; Late 19th Century/Early 20th
              Century; After 1920; Jazz/Popular; World Music
          o Terminology and definitions

Music Business

The Music Business graduate will demonstrate knowledge of and/or competency in the
following areas of study:

   Music

      Listening Comprehension: Music Theory
           o Aural identification of musical intervals, triads, chord quality, scales, cadence
               types, rhythmic patterns, meter mode, and harmonic progressions.
           o Error detection
           o Phrase structure
           o Tonality and key relationships
           o Contrapuntal devices
           o Instrumentation
      Listening Comprehension: Music History
           o Historical style analysis
           o Composer identification
           o Genre > Style
           o Stylistic elements of music from the following style periods: Medieval;
               Renaissance; Baroque; Classical; Romantic; Late 19th Century/Early 20th
               Century; After 1920; Jazz/Popular; World Music
      Non-aural Music Theory
           o Rudiments (including key signatures, clefs, terminology, symbols, intervals,
               chords, scales, modes, time signatures, note values, rest values, harmonic
               series, dynamics)
           o Instrumentation and orchestration (including range of instruments and
               transposition)
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       o Harmonic practices — common practice period (e.g., analysis, cadences,                English (United States)
           modulation, non-harmonic tones, voice leading, figured bass, altered chords,
           reductive analysis)
       o Contrapuntal practices (procedures such as fugue, canon, passacaglia;
           motivic structure and development; terms such as episode, stretto, etc.)
       o Forms — homophonic textures (e.g., phrase relationships, small forms,
           sonata form, rondo, variation forms)
       o Twentieth-century techniques (e.g., scales, modes, polytonality, polyrhythm,
           mixed meters, aleatory, minimalism, serial procedures, pitch class sets,
           electro-acoustic music, jazz/pop music notation and symbols)
   Non-aural Music History, including the contributions of women and of American
    minority musicians
       o Music history and literature (including biography, chronology, composers,
           forms, genres, instruments, repertoire, aesthetic and cultural concepts,
           notation, and performance practices)
       o Stylistic characteristics of music produced in each style period: Medieval;
           Renaissance; Baroque; Classical; Romantic; Late 19th Century/Early 20th
           Century; After 1920; Jazz/Popular; World Music
       o Terminology and definitions

Business

    Accounting

   Financial Accounting
        o Conceptual foundations
        o Income statement and Statement of Retained Earnings
        o Balance sheet
        o Statement of cash flows
   Managerial Accounting
        o Cost concepts
        o Product costing systems
        o Activities-based costing
        o Cost, volume, and profit analysis
        o Budgeting (not including capital budgeting)
        o Standard costing
        o Non-routine decision making
   International accounting

    Economics

   Basic Economic Concepts
       o Scarcity and opportunity cost
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        o Production possibilities frontier                                                     English (United States)
        o Comparative advantage and specialization
        o Economic systems
   Microeconomics
        o Supply and demand
        o Models of consumer choice
        o Production and costs
        o Product market structures
        o Resource markets
        o Market failure and the role of government
   Macroeconomics
        o Measurement of economic performance
        o Aggregate demand and aggregate supply
        o Money and the banking system
        o Monetary policy and fiscal policy
        o Economic growth
   International economics
        o International trade and policy
        o Exchange rates
        o Balance of payments

    Management

   Management process
        o History and theory
        o Functions (organizing, leading, planning, and controlling)
        o Group/team dynamics
        o Total quality management
   Organizational behavior
        o Leadership and motivation
        o Communication
        o Managing diversity
        o Human resource management
   Strategy and policy
        o Strategic analysis
        o Policy determination
   International/cross-cultural management
   Entrepreneurship

    Quantitative Business Analysis

   Probability and statistics
       o Measure of set operations
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      o Conditional/joint probabilities                                                        English (United States)
      o Counting rules
      o Measures of central tendency and dispersion
      o Distributions (including normal and binomial)
      o Sampling and estimation
      o Hypothesis testing
      o Correlation and regression
      o Time-series forecasting
      o Statistical concepts in quality control
   Management science
      o Linear programming
      o Project scheduling (including PERT and CPM)
      o Inventory and production planning
      o Managing continuous improvement
      o Special topics (including queuing theory, simulation, and decision analysis)

    Information Systems

   Information Systems in Business and Society
        o Information management in a global society
        o Security, Privacy, and Ethical Issues
   Information Technology Concepts
        o Hardware Technology
        o Software Technology
        o Database Management Systems
        o Network and Internet Technology
   Business Information Systems
        o Automation and Support Systems
        o Transaction Procession Systems
        o Management Information Systems
        o Decision Support and Expert Systems
        o Strategic Information Systems
   Systems Development
        o Systems Investigation and Analysis
        o Systems Planning Development and Implementation

    Finance

   Corporate Finance
       o Time value of money
       o Capital budgeting
       o Wording capital management
       o Financial statement analysis
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        o Cost of capital and capital structure                                                English (United States)
   Investments
        o Risks and Returns
        o Valuation of securities
        o Financial markets and environments

    Marketing

   Identifying attractive markets
        o Strategic marketing planning
        o Scanning marketing environment
        o Marketing research and information technology tools
        o Consumer and organizational buyer behavior
   Marketing institutions
        o The marketing mix (product, price, place, and promotion)
        o Segmenting consumer and organizational markets
        o Marketing services
        o Marketing for nonprofit organizations
        o Marketing of social causes
   International marketing

    Legal and Social Environment

   Legal environment
        o Courts and legal systems
        o Constitution and business
        o Administrative law
        o Tort law
        o Crimes
   Regulatory environment
        o Employment law
        o Labor law
        o Antitrust law
        o Consumer protection
        o Environmental and international law
        o Security regulation
   Ethics and Social Responsibility
        o Ethics
        o Social responsibility
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Methods of Assessment Used
To measure achievement of department and program goals, the music faculty embarked on
a complete revision of assessment practices during the 2009-10 academic year. This
initiative was driven by the following beliefs:

       The purpose of assessment is continuous improvement.
       Improvement initiatives should be data-driven.
       The data collected, reported, and used for improvement must be easily measurable
        and clearly aligned with (reflective of) department-level and program-level goals.
       The data collected, reported, and used for improvement must be within the music
        faculty’s reach — we can only measure what we can manage; we can only change
        what we can control.

Recent changes to the PRAXIS exam and a unanimous decision to pursue accreditation by
the National Association of Schools of Music were also factors that influenced revisions to
our assessment practices.

Overview of Music Department Assessment Plan

Edu=Education, Enr=Enrichment, Ret=Retention, Rec=Recruitment, Exc= Excellence
Indicator                              Data Reporting    5-Year Target                 Evidence
(How will we measure success?)                            (May 2014)        1     2        3     4     5
                                                                           Edu   Enr      Ret   Rec   Exc
1. Data from MUS-GE courses: (a)         Begin May
   pre- and post-surveys and (b)         2011, then
                                                         (a) 90% > 50%
   student performance on                every May                         X
                                                         (b) 90% > 80%
   assessment-tasks aligned with GE      thereafter.
   objectives
2. Data from 3/4 hour MUS courses:     (a) Begin May
   (a) pre- and post-surveys             2012, then
   (b) student performance on            every May
   assessment-tasks aligned with         thereafter.
                                                           90% > 80%       X
   essential content, standards, and   (b) Begin May
   educational priorities (as per        2011, then
   Curriculum Matrix)                    every May
                                         thereafter.
3. Student performance on PRAXIS         Begin May         (a) 95% first
   exam (Music Education Majors)         2010, then      time pass rate
                                                                           X
                                         every May        (b) > 75% per
                                         thereafter.         category
4. Student performance on ETS            Begin May
   Major Field Test (Music               2012, then
                                                          100% > 70%       X
   Performance and Business              every May
   Majors)                               thereafter.
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Indicator                            Data Reporting     5-Year Target                Evidence              English (United States)
(How will we measure success?)
5. Sophomore review data               Begin May         (May 2014)
                                       2010, then        > 80% meet
                                                                          X
                                       every May        each criterion
                                       thereafter.
6. Performance data; musical           Begin May
enrichment of campus and               2010, then
                                                           Variable              X
community                              every May
                                       thereafter.
7. Student participation in major      Begin May
   ensembles                           2010, then       + 50% from fall
                                                                                        X       X
                                       every May         2009 baseline
                                       thereafter.
8. Major/minor retention and           Begin May       (a) Retention: >
   recruiting data                     2010, then            90%
                                       every May        (b) Recruiting:                 X       X
                                       thereafter.      +75% from fall
                                                        2009 baseline
9. Graduate survey data               Begin May
                                      2012, then         100% > 80%
                                                                          X                           X
                                       every May       (each indicator)
                                      thereafter.
10. Advising survey data              Begin May
                                      2011, then         100% > 75%
                                                                          X                           X
                                       every May       (each indicator)
                                      thereafter.
11. Faculty self-assessment of        Begin May
  professional performance            2011, then
                                                            100%          X                           X
  indicators (IDP)                     every May
                                      thereafter.
12. Evaluation of ensemble            Begin May
  performance artistry by external    2012, then           MMEA
                                                                          X                           X
  experts                             every other        Acceptance
                                     May thereafter.
13. NASM accreditation                    n/a                 Full
                                                                                                      X
                                                         accreditation


Results, Lessons Learned, and Action Plan
Results (data), lessons learned (discussion), and action plans (strategic action) for each
indicator are presented collectively in relation to each indicator.

Indicator 1

Data, discussion, and strategic action for Indicator 1 are included in the music department
GE assessment report.
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Indicator 2

Unit-Level Assessments (2010-11) – MUS 13100 EDU 32300, MUS 25700, MUS 36500, and
MUS 38600
      Term               n         80-89%          90-100%            Total 80-100%        2014 Target

  Total 2010-11          492             23             401              86.18%            90% > 80%
     F 2010              105             7              80               82.86%            90% > 80%
     S 2011              387             16             321              87.08%            90% > 80%


Indicator 3

PRAXIS

Between fall 2009 and spring 2011, 10 students (instrumental performance) took the
PRAXIS. Of those 10, eight passed on the first effort (80 percent), one (10 percent) on the
fifth try, and one has not passed (10 percent).

Between fall 2009 and spring 2011, nine choral performance students took the PRAXIS. All
nine passed on their first effort (100 percent).

Average PRAXIS Results by Categories
                                                                                  PRAXIS Category
                                                                          Theory                  Ped, Prof
                 Number         Passed
                                              Average     Hist and         and                     Issues,    Listening
                    of          on 1st                                                Perf Avg.
                                               Score      Lit Avg.        Comp                    and Tech       Avg.
                 students      attempt
                                                                           Avg.                      Avg.
Home
                    8           100%          165.00          70.47       59.27        70.30        73.22      63.04
Grown
Transfers           3           67%           165.50          93.70       57.80        75.00        79.50      74.00
Instrumental        8           75%           163.71          70.93       54.48        73.45        71.88      64.03
Choral              3           100%          168.33          77.60       65.17        67.67        79.05      66.55
Fall 2010           4           100%          164.25          77.60       65.17        67.67        79.05      66.55
Spring 2011         7          71.50%         165.67          70.93       54.48        73.45        71.88      64.03
Overall             11           90%           165.1          73.79       59.06        70.97        74.27      64.87
2014 targets                   >95%                                                    >75%
          Note: Passing score is 151.




            Average Scores on PRAXIS                                    Average Scores
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        Fall 2009 and             Instr         159.0                                               English (United States)
                                                                    161.1
         Spring 2010             Choral         163.3
                                  Instr         152.0
          Fall 2010
                                 Choral         168.3
                                                                    161.9
                                  Instr         165.6
        Spring 2011
                                 Choral          n/a

Strategic Action

      An online version of the practice PRAXIS was completed during the summer of 2010
       and is available to students in EDU 21500/51500 or by request.
      An updated paper version of the practice PRAXIS test was created in spring 2011.
      Revised theory deployment for fall 2011 (Theory I and II will be taught by full-time
       vocal faculty for improved ear training and sight-singing instruction. This should help
       to raise the theory and listening scores).
      Added practice PRAXIS test to EDU 33800/53500.

Indicator 4

Data collection will begin in spring 2012.

Indicator 5

A formal review of student progress after completing four semesters of study as a music
major (a sophomore review) is conducted for each music major. Students who meet the
following criteria will be granted full acceptance into their respective degree program.


Criteria for Full Acceptance into music education, music performance, and music business
degree programs

After four semesters of study, the student has
     earned a C or better in all MUS, EDU, and/or SB&E courses,
     earned a minimum of 50 credits,
     earned a minimum GPA of 2.5,
     passed performance benchmarks 1, 2, and 3,
     passed the piano proficiency exam,
     passed all sections of C-BASE test (music education only).




Sophomore Review (2009-10)
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       The student has                           2009-10                     2014 Target
Earned a C or better in all MUS,                    9/9
   EDU, and/or SBE courses                        (100%)
                                                    6/9
   Earned a min. of 50 credits
                                                 (66.6%)
                                                    7/9
 Earned a GPA of 2.5 or above
                                                 (77.7%)
                                                                               > 80%
      Passed performance                            7/9
        benchmarks 1-3                           (77.7%)
 Passed piano proficiency exam                      6/8
          (if applicable)                          (75%)
Passed all sections of the C-BASE                   4/8
       test (if applicable)                        (50%)


Sophomore Review (Fall 2010)
                                                                                                                  Passed all sections
                                                                                                                  of the C-BASE test
                   better in all MUS,




                                                                                               proficiency exam
                   EDU, and/or SBE


                                        Earned a min. of



                                                           Earned a GPA of




                                                                              benchmarks 1-3



                                                                                               (if applicable)



                                                                                                                  (if applicable)
                   Earned a C or




                                                                                               Passed piano
                                                                              performance
                                                           2.5 or above
                                        50 credits
                   courses




                                                                              Passed




       TOTAL %        87.5%               100%              93.7%     100%                     13.3%              33.3%
    2014 Target                                                 > 80%


As of spring 2011, passing the piano proficiency exam is now a prerequisite for MUS 49000
Senior Recital.

Indicator 6

See music section of the Student Life report

Indicator 7

See music section of the Student Life report

Indicator 8

The retention and recruiting rate for majors/minors.




Results
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Major/Minor Baseline - Fall 2009
                                 Major                                                                                                                                                Fall 2009
B.A. Music (no certification)                                                                                                                                                              5                         .04
Contract-Instrumental                                                                                                                                                                      1                        .008
Minor- Instrumental                                                                                                                                                                        1                        .008
Music Bus- Instrumental + Contract- Instrumental                                                                                                                                           1                        .008
Music Bus- Instrumental                                                                                                                                                                   22                         .17
Music Bus-Vocal                                                                                                                                                                            7                         .05
Music Ed- Instrumental                                                                                                                                                                    32                         .25
Music Ed- Instrumental + Music Performance- Instrumental                                                                                                                                   4                         .03
Music Ed- Instrumental w/Vocal Endorsement + Music Performance-                                                                                                                            1                        .008
Instrumental
Music Ed- Instrumental w/Vocal Endorsement                                                                                                                                               1                          .008
Music Ed-Vocal w/ Instrumental Endorsement                                                                                                                                               2                           .02
Music Ed-Vocal                                                                                                                                                                           15                          .12
Music Ed-Vocal + Music Performance-Vocal                                                                                                                                                 1                          .008
Music Performance- Instrumental                                                                                                                                                          5                           .04
Music Performance-Vocal + Music Bus-Vocal                                                                                                                                                2                           .02
Music Performance-Vocal                                                                                                                                                                  8                           .06
MA Tw/K-12 cert in Music                                                                                                                                                                 18                          .14
MA Type II: Music Education                                                                                                                                                              4                           .03
Total                                                                                                                                                                                   130                         1.00
        Note: Baseline reported in 2009-10 assessment report was flawed due to inaccurate
        roster of majors/minors. The table above is correct.

Major/Minor Retention and Recruiting (Fall 09 to Fall 10)                                                                                                                                                                                    + or – from Fall 09 baseline;
                                                                                                           Major Change in 09-10 AY




                                                                                                                                                          Total Returning (Fall 10)




                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Distribution (Fall 10)
                                                 Drop LU in 09-10 AY




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Recruiting Data (%)
                                                                                   Retention Data (%)




                                                                                                                                      Grads in 09-10 AY
                              Fall 09 Baseline




                                                                                                                                                                                                  Total (Fall 10)
                                                                       Sub-Total




                                                                                                                                                                                         New




                                   1                   2                 3             4                           5                       6                7                             8        9                      10                      11
                                                                        1-2           3:1                                                                  3-5                                    7+8                                             9:1
                                                                                                                                                          and 6
                     TOTALS   130                 15                   115         .88                       10                        15                  90                            58       148               1.00                      .13
B.A. Music (no cert)           5                   1                    4           .80                       0                        2                    2                            4         6                 .04                      .20
Contract-Instr                 1                   0                    1          1.00                       0                        1                    0                            0         0                  0                      (1.00)
Minor-Instr                    1                   0                    1          1.00                       0                        0                    1                            2         3                 .02                      2.00
Mus Bus                        0                   0                    0            0                        0                        0                    0                            1         1                .007                      1.00
Mus Bus-Instr + Contract-      1                   0                    1          1.00                       0                        0                    1                            0         1                .007                        0
Instr
Mus Bus-Instr                  22                      3                 19           .86                          2                       1                           16                 7           23                .16                       .04
Mus Bus-Voc                    7                       2                 5            .71                          2                       1                           2                  9           11                .07                       .57
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Mus Ed-Instr                 32     3      29     .91       3     3     23       12     35      .24        .09   English (United States)
Mus Ed-Instr + Mus Perf-     4      0      4     1.00       0     0     4        0       4      .03         0
Instr
Mus Ed-Instr w/Voc En +       1     0      1     1.00       0     0      1       1         2    .01    1.00
Mus Perf-Instr
Mus Ed-Instr w/Voc Endors    1      0      1     1.00       0     0     1        3       4      .03    3.00
Mus Ed-Voc w/Instr Endors    2      1      1      .50       0     0     1        0       1     .007    (.50)
Mus Ed-Voc                   15     1      14     .93       0     3     11       11     22      .15     .47
Mus Ed-Voc + Mus Perf-Voc    1      0      1     1.00       0     0     1        0       1     .007      0
Mus Perf-Instr               5      4      1      .20       0     0     1        1       2      .01    (.60)
Mus Perf-Voc + Mus Bus-      2      0      2     1.00       0     1     1        1       2      .01      0
Voc
Mus Perf-Voc                 8      0      8     1.00       3     1     4        3       7      .05    (.13)
M.A.T.w/K-12 cert in Music   18     0      18    1.00       0     1     17       2      19      .13     .05
M.A. Type II: Music Edu      4      0      4     1.00       0     1     3        1       4      .03      0

Cumulative Major/Minor Retention
        Term             Retention Rate            Cumulative                2014 Target
  Fall 09 to Fall 10          88%                                              > 90%
  Fall 10 to Fall 11


Cumulative Major/Minor Recruitment
        Term             Increase from Fall 2009 Baseline       Cumulative               2014 Target
  Fall 09 to Fall 10                  13%                                                 > 50% from
  Fall 10 to Fall 11                                                                  Fall 2009 Baseline


In spring 2011, the department used advising lists from CAMS to verify accuracy of
majors/minors.

Indicator 9

The analysis of the data from a graduate survey and profile.

Data collection will begin in spring 2012.

Actions Taken

Fall 2010 — the department
      needs to schedule themed concerts for solo musicians in the Emerson Black Box
        Theater as venue permits,
      needs a more efficient system of managing piano accompaniment,
      needs to establish clinical experiences for music ed. majors that are supervised by
        music faculty,
      needs to incorporate a committee-supervised project in MUS 33000 for music
        business majors,
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     needs to capitalize on shadowing opportunities in conjunction with professional              English (United States)
      shows,
     needs to add MUS 40100 Performance Practicum to music performance degree plan
      with assessment that targets finding and building audiences,
     needs to increase holdings of literature for solo and small ensemble,
     needs to request approval for GA librarian,
     needs to ensure that core academic classes are taught by full-time faculty.

Spring 2011 – the department
     needs to consider establishing a central music library, perhaps moving all of the
       current Wenger library systems to the back wall of FPA 2095, which would free up
       space for storage and provide space for additional library systems to be added.
       Library holdings could be categorized as follows:

          o    Choral: large ensemble: SATB, SSAA, etc.
          o    Choral chamber
          o    Instrumental: large ensemble: band, orchestra, etc.
          o    Instrumental chamber
          o    Solo: piano, voice, flute, etc.

Strategic Action

In fall 2010, the department revised degree plans for music education, music performance,
and music business in response to PRAXIS test and NASM standards. These revisions were
approved by the Deans’ Council. The department also proposed new minor in music
composition which was also approved by the Deans’ Council.

In spring 2011, the department established criteria for four department awards:
musicianship, service, perseverance, and reliability. The faculty initiated a departmental
honors recital. The department re-submitted a purchase request to complete the inventory
of instruments and equipment that are typically school-provided. The new request was
divided into three phases. The request was approved by the administration, and a pro-type          Comment [u9]: should this be prototype?
survey was designed.

Indicator 10

Data from a comprehensive advising survey (distributed at the last department meeting in
spring semesters).
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Results 2010-11                                                                                                     English (United States)
  Faculty      Surveys            SA               A            U            D                SD
     1            9              79.36           16.4          3.17         1.05               0
     2            6              90.47           5.55          2.38         1.58               0
     3           13              76.92           13.18         5.49         2.93             1.46
     4            5               80             19.04         .95            0                0
     5            3              96.82           1.59            0          1.59               0
      Totals     36              81.61           12.56         3.3          1.71              .52
                                         94.17
       2014 Target
                                      100% > 80%


Action

The department needs to provide easy access to comprehensive degree completion plans
by providing access to up-to-date program planning worksheets with comprehensive
information and links.

In fall 2010, the department reconfigured faculty advising assignments — specializations —
for improved consistency and more equitable loads.

Indicator 11

The faculty members do a self-assessment of the IDP quality indicators — personal
accountability and commitment to excellence.

Results (2010-11)
  ID      n               Always              Often        Sometimes                   Rarely           Never
   A      73         41       56.16      22       30.13    3      4.10             5        6.84    2       2.73
   B      73         55     75.34     15     20.54         3         4.10          0         0.0    0         0.0
   C      72         35     48.61     32     44.44         4         5.55          1        1.38    0         0.0
   D      72         43     59.72     18     25.0          5         6.94          2        2.77    4        5.55
  Averages             59.95%           30.02%                  5.17%                  2.74%            2.07%
    Total                       89.97%                                                 9.98%
 2014 Target                     100%                                                    0%


Lessons Learned

During fall 2010, the department considered a student-nominated faculty award for
excellence in music teaching with final selection by school deans. The department also saw
the need to host an annual workshop for adjunct faculty to discuss University expectations,
e.g., meeting deadlines as a condition of employment.




Action
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In fall 2010, the department created a new syllabus template aligned with MoSTEP 1.2
standards — a syllabus template that asks faculty to demonstrate the standards that our
education majors are working to achieve. The department also hosted a kick-off meeting
and reception for adjunct faculty to discuss University policies and key expectations.
Attendance was poor.

During the summer of 2011, the department will update the syllabus template, which will
include simplified information from the curriculum matrix.

Indicator 12

External experts evaluate the department’s recordings.

Actions

In spring 2011, the department arranged for professional recordings to submit with MMEA
performance applications (wind ensemble, jazz band, voices only).

Indicator 13

The department will seek accreditation from the National Association of Schools of Music.

Actions
In spring 2011, the department needed to begin preparations to submit an initial
application and to create a precise database of department expenditures.

The department is working on common forms/documents, as well as, common
performance/audition scoring guides.

In fall 2010, the department revised degree plans for music education, music performance,
and music business in response to PRAXIS test and NASM standards (2011-12 catalog). It
was approved by the Deans’ Council.

During the summer of 2011, the department will work on the preparation of initial
application.




Theatre
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Mission
The mission of the Lindenwood University Theatre Department is to support the missions of
the University through the discipline of theater.

University Goals and Objectives Met by the Program
The Lindenwood University Theatre Department is committed to the following goals:

      Education
          o Developing adaptive theatre education, performance, and business
              professionals— graduates who are well equipped to

                  •   develop as more complete human beings, who think and act freely
                      both as individuals and as community members,
                  •   gain the intellectual tools and apply the range of perspective needed
                      to understand human cultures as they have been, as they are, and as
                      they might become,
                  •   apply the basic skills — listening, speaking, reading, writing,
                      researching, observing, reflecting, and other forms of intellectual
                      interaction — needed for productive study and communication of
                      ideas,
                  •   acquire the propensity for and ability to engage in divergent and
                      creative thinking directed toward synthesis, evaluation, and
                      integration of ideas,
                  •   apply analytical reasoning to both qualitative and quantitative
                      evidence,
                  •   acquire guidelines for making informed, independent, socially-
                      responsible decisions, respectful of others and the environment, and
                      develop a willingness to act accordingly.
      Enrichment
           o Enriching the University and surrounding community through theatre.
      Retention
           o Sustaining enrollment and participation throughout the department.
      Recruitment
           o Recruiting students who excel in scholarship and performance, direction, or
              design.
      Excellence
           o Exceeding the highest standards of quality and efficiency in all facets of the
              department.
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Program Goals and Objectives                                                                         English (United States)


In addition to these department-level goals, the following program-level goals for students
majoring in theater (acting or performance), technical theater/design, theater education,
and musical theater have been adapted from the Missouri Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education Teacher Preparation and Certification Standards:

Knowledge of Theatre (AATE II, VIII)

Students will understand

      the basic vocabulary of the theatre and its application,
      through critical analysis, develop an appreciation by exposure to diverse theatrical
       productions,
      statutory and regulatory issues relating to directing responsibilities (e.g., copyright,
       censorship, royalties, ethical standards of behavior),
      safety precautions, rules, and procedures for theatre facilities,
      awareness of vocational and avocational opportunities in theater, film, television,
       and electronic media as well as other careers which utilize theatre skills,
      the process of creating dramatic structure in playmaking and playwriting.

Applicable Courses

TA 10000/20000/30000/40000-Theatre Practicum
TA 1010/20100-Acting I and II
TA 20700-Introduction to Theatrical Design
TA 21000-Stage Management
TA 30400-Script Analysis
TA 30500-Scenography
TA 30600/35000 - Directing and Directing II
TA 40600-Advanced Directing
TA 37000-History of Theatre
TA 40400-Applied Design and Technical Theatre Studio
TA 40700-Advanced Set Design
TA 40800-Advanced Lighting Design Studio
TA 43000-Theatre Workshop
TA 46500-Professional Internship
TA 48000-Senior Seminar



Theatre History/Styles (AATE II, VIII)*
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Students will                                                                                      English (United States)


    gain awareness of theatre history and how cultural and historical context affects
     artistic choices,
    understand the lives, works, and influences of theatre artists in various cultures and
     historical periods,
    direct actors in their work with plays of representative periods, genres, and styles in
     a variety of mediums,
    analyze, critique, and construct meaning from formal and informal theater (e.g.,
     radio, film, television, stage, improvisation, creative dramatics, and oral
     interpretation).

Applicable Courses

TA 20400-Stage Voice and Movement
TA 20700-Introduction to Theatrical Design
TA 20900-Intro to Costume Design
TA 31700-History of Costume and Fashion
TA 21200-Beginning Costuming and Fashion Design Studio
TA 40900-Advanced Costume Design Studio
TA 40500-Advanced Costume and Fashion Design Studio
TA 30100-Acting Studio
TA 40100-Advanced Acting Studio
TA 30300-Seminar in Musical Theatre
TA 30500-Scenography
TA 30600/35000-Directing and Directing II
TA 40600-Advanced Directing
TA 33500-Modern Drama
TA 33600-Survey of Dramatic Literature
TA 33700-Seminar in American Drama
TA 37000 History of Theatre
TA 43000 Theatre Workshop

Process and Performance Skills (AATE IX-XI)*

Students will learn

      strategies for directing, including analysis, conceptualization, casting, conducting
       rehearsals, and coordinating formal and informal dramatic literature production,
       strategies for selecting materials appropriate to community standards and student
       needs,
      strategies for creating a director’s concept through understanding philosophies of
       theater, theater forms, and major styles of acting and production.
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      design and production techniques including scenery, properties, lighting, sound,            English (United States)
       costumes, makeup, stage management and business management,
      theater skills related to physical movement interpretation, staging techniques, and
       their interrelationships,
      acting skills through improvisation, imagination, focus, listening, voice,
       concentration, breath control, diction, use of the body, and characterization.

Applicable Courses

TA 1010/20100-Acting I and II
TA 20400-Stage Voice and Movement
TA 30100/40100-Acting Studio and Advanced Acting
TA 30300-Seminar in Musical Theatre
TA 30600/35000-Directing and Directing II
TA 40600-Advanced Directing
TA 30400-Script Analysis
TA 21000-Stage Management
TA 21600-Stage Make-up
TA 11100/11200-Introduction to Technical Theatre I and II
TA 20700-Introduction to Theatrical Design
TA 40400-Applied Design and Technical Theatre Studio
TA 40700-Advanced Set Design
TA 40800-Advanced Lighting Design Studio
TA 30500-Scenography
TA 20900-Intro to Costume Design
TA 21200-Beginning Costuming and Fashion Design Studio
TA 40500-Advanced Costume and Fashion Design Studio
TA 23000/23500-Patternmaking I and II
TA 31700-History of Costume and Fashion
TA 40900-Advanced Costume Design Studio
TA 43000-Theatre Workshop
TA 46500-Professional Internship
TA 10000/20000/30000/40000-Theatre Practicum
TA 10300-Oral Interpretation




Aesthetics (AATE II)*

Students will understand
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   •   theater as a collaborative art form and its relationship to the other arts (i.e., dance,      English (United States)
       music, visual arts, and new art forms),
   •   elements of critiquing aesthetics in theatre performance,
   •   the responsibility of the individual in a free society to establish ethical standards,
       promote ethical behavior, and acknowledge freedom of artistic expression.

Applicable Course

TA 10000/20000/30000/40000-Theatre Practicum
TA 37000-History of Theatre
TA 30300-Seminar in Musical Theatre
TA 30500-Scenography
TA 20700-Introduction to Theatrical Design
TA 20900-Intro to Costume Design
TA 31700-History of Costume and Fashion
TA 21200-Beginning Costuming and Fashion Design Studio
TA 40500-Advanced Costume and Fashion Design Studio
TA 33500-Modern Drama
TA 33600-Survey of Dramatic Literature
TA 33700-Seminar in American Drama
TA 30600/35000-Directing and Directing II
TA 40600-Advanced Directing
TA 30400-Script Analysis
TA 40400-Applied Design and Technical Theatre Studio
TA 40700-Advanced Set Design
TA 40800-Advanced Lighting Design Studio
TA 40900-Advanced Costume Design Studio
TA 43000-Theatre Workshop
TA 46500-ProfessionalInternship
TA 48000 Senior Seminar

   * Teacher Preparation and Certification Standards: Speech/Communication/Theatre
   Teachers, a collaborative project of American Alliance for Theatre and Education (AATE)
   and Speech Communication Association (SCA) abbreviated as: AATE X =
   Speech/Communication/Theatre Teachers Standard 10.




Methods of Assessment
       Areas of Assessment                  Data Collection Dates               5-Year Target
                                                                                 (May 2014)
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           Areas of Assessment                      Data Collection Dates                   5-Year Target          English (United States)
A. Data from TA-GE courses:                (a) Begin May 2012, then every May                (May students
                                                                                     (a) 90 percent2014)
     (a) pre- and post-surveys and         thereafter.                               scoring at least 50 percent
     (b) student performance on            (b)Includes some data from May            (b) 90 percent students
     assessment-tasks aligned with GE      2011. All courses to be assessed in       scoring at least 80 percent
     objectives                            May 2012 and every May thereafter.
B. Data from 3/4 hour TA courses:          (a) Begin May 2012, then every May        (a) 90 percent students
     (a) pre- and post-surveys and         thereafter.                               scoring at least 50 percent
     (b) student performance on            (b)Includes some data from May            (b) 90% students scoring
     assessment-tasks aligned with         2011. All courses to be assessed in       at least 80%
     essential content, standards, and     May 2012 and every May thereafter.
     educational priorities
C. Sophomore review data                   Begin May 2012, then every May            At least 80% of students
                                           thereafter.                               meet each criterion
D. Performance data; enrichment of         Fall 2010 and Spring 201. Will            Varies, see explanation
campus and community                       continue May 2012 and every May           below (E)
                                           thereafter.
E. Major/minor                             Begin May 2012, then every May            (a) Retention: at least 90%
     (a) retention and                     thereafter.                               (b) Recruiting: +75% from
     (b) recruiting data                                                             fall 2011 baseline
F. Graduate survey data                    Begin May 2012, then every May            100% rate at least 80% on
                                           thereafter.                               each criterion
G. Advising survey data                    Begin May 2012, then every May            100% rate at least 80% on
                                           thereafter.                               each criterion
H. Faculty self-assessment of              Begin May 2012, then every May            100% of faculty complete
professional performance indicators        thereafter.                               IDP
(IDP)


Results
         Course                                  Artifacts                                2010-11 Data*
TA 37000                     One paper every two weeks choosing different         61% = superior work
History of Theatre           topic areas of approach to the one of the two        29% = good work
                             periods previously covered for a total of eight      9.7% = average work
                             papers, using two text citations.                    1 incomplete
TA 53000                     As above, but longer and with three-five             50% = superior work
Seminar in Theatre           external citations.                                  25% = good work
History                                                                           25% = average work
TA 20700                     Students produce a stage model in scale in           14% = superior work
 Introduction to             which they create dimensional set designs for a      71% = good work
Theatrical Design            basic single set interior from a play, and a unit    14% = average work
                             set design for a play requiring several locations.
                             Students also produce basic scale lighting plot
                             for the single set interior project.
TA 48000                     Students research and present written weekly         23% =superior work
Senior Seminar               reports on the following week’s topic area as a      35% = good work
                             contribution to in class lecture and discussion.     13% = average work
                             Topics are focused on post-graduation business
                             and personal strategies for in the live
                             entertainment industry.
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        Course                                   Artifacts                             2010-11 Data*          English (United States)
TA Scenography              Students produce a stage model in scale and         66% = superior work
                           are then divided into groups of three in which       33% = good work
                           each student rotates through the roles of set,
                           lighting, and costume designer in a modern
                           realistic, an historically correct, and a fanciful
                           Shakespearean project. Each group presents
                           and is critiqued.
TA51500                    Students produce a stage model in scale and are         100% = superior work
Graduate Scenography       then divided into groups of three in which each
                           student rotates through the roles of set,
                           lighting, and costume designer in a modern
                           realistic, an historically correct, and a fanciful
                           Shakespearean project. Each group presents
                           and is critiqued.
TA 10300                   -Written analysis for prose, poetry, solo             Begin May 2012, then every
Oral Interpretation        dramatic and final project selections                       May thereafter.
                           -Performances: Prose, Poetry Children’s Book,
                           Solo Dramatic
                           Reader’s Theatre, Final Project
TA 20400                   Quizzes (Streetcar, Raisin and Shape)                 Begin May 2012, then every
Stage Voice and         Production Critiques (Stoops, Urinetown and                   May thereafter.
Movement               Cuckoo)
                        Leading Warm-Ups
                        Journals (Entries 1-12, 13-18, 19-24, and 25 –
                       33)
                        IPA Translation Exercises
                        IPA Exam
                        Observation Project
                        Final Performance
TA 21000                Prompt Book with Contents (Script, action chart,        Begin May 2012, then every
Stage Management       research, contact sheet, rehearsal schedule,                    May thereafter.
                       production meeting report, rehearsal report, prop
                       list, rehearsal journals, cue sheets, shift change
                       charts, pre-set checklist)
                        Stage manager kit
                        Calling a show
                        Quizzes (Thyestes, School, Machinal, Steady             Begin May 2012, then every
TA 30100               Rain)                                                           May thereafter.
Acting Studio: Voice    Production Critiques (Stoops, Urinetown,
and Diction            Cuckoo)
                        Journals (Entries 1-12, 13-24, and 25-36)
                        Performances (Monologue, Scene and Final
                       Exam)
                        Observation Project (Part One and Part Two)
TA 30300                Text Analysis (Solo and Duet)                           Begin May 2012, then every
Seminar in Musical      Music Analysis (Solo and Duet)                                May thereafter.
Theatre: Acting the     Performances (Solo and Duet)
Song                    Production Critique
                        Final Exam
TA 30300                Persona Project                                         Begin May 2012, then every
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        Course                                   Artifacts                           2010-11 Data*          English (United States)
Seminar in Musical          Portfolio Checkpoints (1900-1930, 1931-1950,            May thereafter.
Theatre: Auditioning for   1951-1980, 1981-present, and monologues)
Musical Theatre             Auditions (same as above)
                            Production Critique (Urinetown)
TA 30400                    Quizzes (Over scripts read for class)             64% = No Pre-Knowledge of
Script Analysis             Group Projects                                    course content
                            5 Analysis papers                                 36% = Minor Pre- Knowledge
                                                                               of course content
                                                                               End Result:
                                                                               70% = Superior Work
                                                                               18% = Passing work
                                                                               2% = Failing work
TA 30600                    Mid-Term                                          38% = Superior Work
Directing 1                 Direct 2 scenes using 2-3 Acting 2 students       62% = Passing/Average work
                            Paperwork for scenes: Script Analysis, Ground
                           plan, and production book
TA 10100                    To be submitted at a later date                   Begin May 2012, then every
Acting I                                                                       May thereafter.
TA 11100                    To be submitted at a later date                   Begin May 2012, then every
Introduction to                                                                May thereafter.
Technical Theatre I
TA 11200                    To be submitted at a later date                   Begin May 2012, then every
Introduction to                                                                May thereafter.
Technical Theatre II
TA 20100                    To be submitted at a later date                   Begin May 2012, then every
Acting II                                                                      May thereafter.
TA 20900                       - Pre and Post-test                             Begin May 2012, then every
Intro to Costume              -Construction of small garments                 May thereafter.
Design                          (hat, shirt)
                              -Completed sampler, to demo
                                knowledge of equipment and
                                hand-sewing
                              -Completed costume chart for full
                                length play
                              -3 large projects: 4 renderings
                                including written descriptions
                                 with documented research
                              -Thrift store → Historic garment
                                 reconstruction project
                              -Final miniature costume design
                                and construction
TA 21600                       - Pre and Post-test                             Begin May 2012, then every
Stage Make-up               -12 in-class make-up applications                 May thereafter.
                            -Compete morgue including 12 renderings and
                           at least two reference images per style
                            - Final project including 10 rendered designs
                           from a play, written descriptions with documented
                           research and two in-class applications
TA 40400                    To be submitted at a later date                   Begin May 2012, then every
Applied Design and                                                             May thereafter.
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        Course                                Artifacts                             2010-11 Data*         English (United States)
Technical Theatre
TA 40700                 To be submitted at a later date                    Begin May 2012, then every
Advanced Set Design                                                          May thereafter.
TA 40800                 To be submitted at a later date                    Begin May 2012, then every
Advanced Lighting                                                            May thereafter.
Design Studio
TA 40900                    -Pre and Post-test                               Begin May 2012, then every
Advanced Costume         Construction of complete period undergarment       May thereafter.
Design Studio           set, including chemise, corset, corset-cover and
                        panniers
                         Construction of hats from 4 different periods
                         Construction of accessories, including purse and
                        Elizabethan neck ruff
                         -Group project: design and detailed
                        reconstruction of historic garment from portrait
TA 49900                 Script or Character analysis paper                 100% superior work
Senior Project           Journal of project
                         Performance, Directing, or technical project
TA 30100                    - Pre and Post-test                              Begin May 2012, then every
Acting Studio: Period    -Performance of Greek messenger or chorus          May thereafter.
Styles                  monologue
                         -Performance of Shakespearean monologue
                         -Performance of 2 Shakespeare scenes
                         -Performance of scene from Pinter play
                         -Research paper describing and contrasting
                        construction of the Greek and Elizabethan theaters
*Five-year goals to be determined by the department during strategic assessment meetings.
Anticipated to be in place by May 2012.

Sophomore Review Data

There is no data available at this time. The department plans to establish sophomore review
criteria and implement assessment of all sophomores in May 2012 and every May
thereafter.

Performance Data: Enrichment of Campus And Community

This data is included in the student life assessment report.

Major/Minor Retention and Recruiting Data

       Retention: 2011-12 will be the first year we measure retention. The department
        anticipates a retention rate of 90 percent from the fall to spring semester.
       Recruiting data: The department plans to determine the fall 2011 baseline and
        achieve a 75 percent increase by fall 2014.

Graduate Survey Data
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No data is available at this time. The department plans to create and implement a graduate
exit survey by May 2012. By May 2015, we expect 100 percent of graduates to rate at least
80 percent on each criterion.

Advising Survey Data

No data is available at this time. The department plans to create and implement an advising
survey by May 2012. By May 2015, we expect 100 percent of graduates to rate at least 80
percent on each criterion.

Faculty Self-Assessment of Professional Performance Indicators

We expect 100 percent compliance in May 2012.

Action Plan
The department has identified three critical areas needing improvement: departmental
objectives, measurement methods, and production logistics.

The theater department’s academic standards and expectations need to be more clearly
defined for both faculty and students.

Currently, the department has a lack of consistency in course objectives. Each instructor has
established his or her own set of objectives, which may or may not align with the
overarching departmental goals. We have already begun taking steps to manage this
problem.

From this point forward, the following procedures will be followed:

      All instructors, including adjuncts, will be informed of the department objectives and
       curriculum and required to provide relevant classroom instruction that meet specific
       goals of our program. As evidence of their compliance, instructors must present a)
       course syllabuses and b) program benchmarks that support the departmental
       objectives.
      Students will be given access to the department objectives and their program’s
       benchmarks. They will be expected to reach clearly defined goals by the time they
       reach sophomore and senior status. They will receive personalized guidance from
       advisors to help them achieve these benchmarks, and will experience consequences
       if they fail to meet the required objectives by the set deadlines. They will be made
       aware of and expected to adhere to strict academic and behavioral standards.

The theater department needs a more concrete method of measuring success.
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While we can point to specific factors that might indicate success, we currently lack a
thorough, accurate system for evaluating the quality of the education we are providing. To
address this issue, we plan to dedicate the 2011-12 academic year to creating and
implementing several tools of assessment and setting five-year goals.

      The department will design uniform data collection documents for instructors so
       instructors know a) what data we expect them to collect and b) what format to use
       when presenting that data. To draft these documents, we will consider the
       assessment tools currently in use by other departments, review the assessment
       samples provided by University administration, and research other means of
       evaluation that have proven to be effective. Once we have formatted assessment
       documents finalized, they will be distributed to faculty members so instructors’
       consistency across all courses will allow us to efficiently analyze our level of success.
       In areas of assessment that have never been formally considered, including
       recruiting and retention, graduate surveys, IDP compliance, advising surveys and
       sophomore reviews, we will begin from scratch defining what criteria we want to
       measure and devising a way to collect the necessary data.

      Five-year goals for every course and area of assessment not yet finalized by the dean
       and associate dean will be discussed and set by the department faculty under the
       supervision of the dean and associate dean. This will be a major, department-wide
       project. While faculty members expect the dean and associate dean to set academic
       standards and program objectives, we believe all faculty members have a voice in
       the discussion regarding data collection and assessment criteria. Weekly meetings
       will be planned to review progress and deliberate.

Production logistics need to be standardized and streamlined.

While certain steps are expected in the production process, no functional model method of
operation has ever been established. To amend this situation, a formal production process
was drafted and approved by the dean, associate dean, and executive director. Beginning
with the first production of fall 2011, all production teams will be required to comply with
the process. This means meeting deadlines according to a firm schedule and maintaining
open and methodical communication with necessary parties. The faculty, staff, and
students will be operating according to this procedure, which will enable a predictable
production schedule with fewer complications. Having a standard of production with
defined benchmarks will also allow faculty to accurately assess student success.

The department wants to foster a culture of collaboration, creativity, and respect. Faculty
and students will be expected to engage fully and comply with department standards.
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             School of Fine and Performing Arts Analysis                                             English (United States)




Art
The idea of adding a mid-program checkpoint for students’ progress toward their goals will
be a useful addition to the program. The majority of the assessment was done in the GE
courses. Were the majors specifically taken out and assessed separately? What did this data
tell the department about the success in achieving the programs objectives?

Art History
This is the first time art history has reported as a separate program. This means that there is
very limited history from which the department can work. This year’s analysis of the
program has led to a series of changes for the 2011-12 academic year. The program needs
to develop more defined outcomes and work on methods of measuring the success of the
program in meeting those outcomes.

Dance
The program is doing an individualized evaluation of each student each semester; this is a
good way to get a baseline as well as create data to monitor progress. The concern for a
uniform assessment system and tracking of majors are issues that can be addressed. The
data being collected has the potential for being interesting, but needs to be de-identified
and can be broken down in order to see what impacts the program is having. This leads to
several questions: How is the department using this data? Is the data showing areas of
strength or weakness? Has the assessment led to any changes in the program? What are
the comments from outside assessors?

Music
The program has made major efforts at creating a viable assessment program. Seeking
specialized accreditation is having a positive impact on the program both from assessment
and program-design standpoints. There are some issues to deal with: Can completing
students have their admissions performances compared to their senior recital? It is great
that there is a high rate of passing both the program and the PRAXIS, but are there program
strengths and weaknesses being noted through this recital/ assessment process? Be more
specific about the assessment being done in the music business program; this may require
some coordination with the School of Business and Entrepreneurship. There are a lot of
objectives, especially in music business; is it possible to effectively assess all of them? Be
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sure to focus on student learning in assessment. Beware of tables that have a lot of                English (United States)
information but little explanation of the contents, such as in indicator 11.

Theatre
The department is working on a comprehensive assessment program, much of which is yet
to be implemented. But the department has continued to do assessment in those areas it
had been working on over the last few years. The department ideas are interesting, and it is
worth waiting before making too many comments on their planning. They do need to
beware of not falling into the trap of using grades as assessment.
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                       School of Human Services                                                      English (United States)




The School of Human Services offers hands-on degrees in what we call the helping
professions. Each of these programs is designed to allow students to take their education
and apply it directly to society. These programs include Christian ministry studies, military
science (ROTC), criminal justice, nonprofit management, and social work.

The School of Human Services offers the following degree programs:

Bachelor of Arts in
            Christian Ministry Studies
            Criminal Justice
            Nonprofit Administration

Bachelor of Social Work

Bachelor of Science in
            Fire and Paramedic Science

Minors in
               Christian Ministry Studies
               Criminal Justice
               Military Science
               Nonprofit Administration
               Social Welfare


Christian Ministry Studies


Goals
The goals of the Christian ministry studies program overlap with LU’s mission statement in
the following ways:

      Providing an integrative liberal arts curriculum
          o The program encourages students to not only value their liberal arts
              education but also to learn how to synthesize their biblical knowledge with
              their liberal arts education to evaluate, expand, and hone their worldviews.
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   Focusing on the talents, interests, and future of the student                                English (United States)
       o CMS focuses on the talents, interests, and future of its students in two
           concrete ways:
           • The department teaches a class titled “Professional Orientation,” which
              helps students discover their talents, passions, and interests. In
              particular, we assist students to evaluate if their gifts and talents are
              commensurate with vocational ministry work.
           • The department promotes CMS as a place where a student can explore
              his/her calling. That is, we realize that a student may be uncertain about
              his/her life’s vocation upon entering the University, so we serve as a
              sounding board to help guide students to a discipline or major that is in
              line with his/her gifts, passion, and talents.

   Promoting ethical lifestyles
       o CMS classes are taught from a Judeo-Christian worldview. In our all classes,
          the Christian Bible is presented as the highest authority for both doctrine and
          ethical living. In this way, we teach CMS students that biblical knowledge is
          not an esoteric activity, but rather biblical knowledge must be applied in all
          areas of their lives.

   Developing adaptive thinking and problem-solving skills
       o Many of our CMS classes present real-life case studies to help students
          connect the dots or apply their bible knowledge to real-life problems. And
          we specifically offer classes to achieve this end. For example, we offered a
          course called “Church and Society” in spring 2011. This class showed
          students the church’s role in eradicating or solving some of the societal ills in
          our American cities and in other countries.

   Affording cultural enrichment to the surrounding community
        o CMS internships and class projects transport our students from the
           classroom to Lindenwood’s surrounding communities, which not only afford
           cultural enrichment and education for our students but also enrich our
           surrounding communities.

   Furthering lifelong learning
       o The CMS program is designed to whet the appetite of our students as we
           cannot exhaust the depths of theological education in four years. So, the
           faculty strongly encourages our students to be lifelong learners, and we
           model the importance of formal and informal lifelong learning. For example,
           the professors often attend conferences and workshops, and they bring back
           lessons learned for their students. Some of our students have been
           persuaded about the virtues of lifelong learning as many have applied to and
           matriculated at seminaries.
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                                                                                                     English (United States)

Methods of Assessment
Several assessment strategies will be employed throughout this 2011-12 academic year.
Each one is delineated and explained below.

“The Vine”

All freshmen CMS students are required to take this one-credit-hour class. As such, this class
provides an excellent forum to collect baseline assessment metrics on writing skills,
discerning skills, biblical knowledge, and the ability to apply biblical knowledge throughout
their education at Lindenwood. Assessment tools will be developed to assess students’
writing skills, discerning skills, biblical knowledge, and ability to apply biblical knowledge.

Administer CATs – Classroom Assessment Tools

Instructors will be encouraged to administer CATs or classroom assessment instruments as
the semester progresses. These CATS could take many forms such as minute papers. As the
name suggests, this assessment should take a few minutes. Questions previously asked
have included: What did you hear the professor saying? What needs further clarification?
What did you learn that was new? Assessment measures will be administered also to
evaluate group-work related assignments. For instance, the following questions might be
asked: Overall, how effectively did your group work together on this assignment? Suggest
one change the group could make to improve its performance. Email will also be used to
solicit feedback from students.




Host Informal Meetings with CMS Majors for Real-Time Feedback

The department chair plans to host two informal meetings with CMS students — one each
during the fall and spring semesters. In general, these gatherings will be used to solicit real-
time feedback from students. Feedback rendered will focus upon knowledge content in
CMS classes, the ease or difficulty of adjusting to campus life, changes in attitude and biases
as the result of the curriculum, increased critical thinking skills, and other areas to be
determined.

Analyze Semester-End Evaluations

Students are allowed to evaluate professors and classes at the end of each semester. This
data will be used to assess and make changes to our delivery content vehicles,
methodology, and process knowledge management. We regard process knowledge just as
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significant as content knowledge. Process knowledge includes such factors as the lighting of         English (United States)
the room, the comfort of the chairs, etc.

Conduct Exit Interviews with CMS Seniors

Graduating CMS seniors will have an informed viewpoint about the CMS program and
Lindenwood, so we plan to develop a list of questions to poll this group. Questions might
include the following: Which class or classes were the most memorable and why? Which
class or classes were the least memorable and why? These interviews may be one-on-one,
or we may opt to hold focus groups.

Post-Graduate Feedback

We plan to either convene focus groups or interview CMS graduates and their supervisors
three years post-graduation. Questions such as the following will be asked of graduates:
What classes were the most helpful and why? Which classes were the least helpful and
why? Based on your three years of experience, which classes need to change and why?
Similarly, questions such as the following will be asked of their supervisors: How well is this
CMS graduate performing? What are his or her strengths? What are his or her weaknesses?
In addition to the classes we offer, which classes would you offer and why?

Action Plan
The department will also pursue two curricular changes to position the CMS to better
educate and equip our students for their future vocations. We will pursue adding a
capstone course to the CMS curriculum. This course will be designed in such a way that
students can synthesize their liberal arts education and bible knowledge to real life
problems that they may face in vocational ministry. Additionally, we want to make the one-
credit-hour course, “The Vine,” a two-credit-hour course. This change will allow us to make
this course a bit more substantive and robust for the purposes of using it to again collect
baseline assessment metrics and to use it as a forum to acclimate students to the
University’s culture.

The data collected from the varied assessment techniques will be analyzed and used
ultimately to tweak classes, add classes, or retire some classes. Some of the data collected
will be used to make immediate corrections or adjustments in the classroom. Additionally,
this data analysis will also be used to give feedback to professors so that they might think
about and tweak their teaching methodology and practice.

Impact
Valid and reliable assessment tools will be developed and piloted during fall 2011 with input
and feedback from the School of Human Services assessment committee. We believe this
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plan of action will not only better position CMS graduates to perform at a superior level in        English (United States)
their chosen vocations but also will help the University achieve its mission of forming
responsible citizens who have integrity and who are educated for the betterment of our
global community.


Criminal Justice


Mission
The mission for the Criminal Justice Program at Lindenwood University is to educate
students in the field of criminal justice in an effort to produce prepared employees within
the field. We do so by utilizing a variety of courses that we feel accurately represents the
most up-to-date information relative to the criminal justice field.

Objectives and Goals of the Program
The faculty of the program feels that each student should possess similar knowledge of
criminal justice in an effort to provide a knowledgeable, professional, and educated
employee within the criminal justice system. The following goals and objectives adequately
represent the most up-to-date education within this field:

Students will

          demonstrate an understanding of the historic, social, and political forces that
           have shaped the current American criminal justice system,
          demonstrate an acceptable level of knowledge in the core courses offered,
          learn to refine and apply the basic skills needed for productive study and
           communication of ideas within and without the criminal justice system, including
           the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, researching, observing, and
           reflecting,
          demonstrate an understanding of the major theories of scientific study of crime
           as an individual and social phenomenon,
          develop and use the higher levels of thinking, including analysis, synthesis,
           evaluation, and integration,
          improve their ability to reason analytically about both qualitative and
           quantitative evidence,
          understand the development and importance of the Bill of Rights and other
           amendments to the Constitution of the United States that have significant and
           continuing impact on the functioning of the criminal justice system,
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          understand the theoretical and practical roles and functions of public and private       English (United States)
           correctional facilities in the United States today,
          identify the major forms of deviance and crime in the United States,
          understand the increasing importance of the role of victims in the criminal
           justice process.

Classes Assessed
In an effort to effectively measure learning within the program, we currently administer an
assessment instrument in CJ21000 Criminal Justice Systems and CJ 44000 Senior Seminar.
The assessment is typically given at the beginning of CJ 21000 and at the end of CJ 44000.

Method of Assessment
The instrument that has been used for program assessment is a 50-question, multiple-
choice exam administered to students who are majoring in criminal justice. This document
is titled Criminal Justice Program Information Assessment. This instrument is given to
students in CJ 21000 Criminal Justice Systems, as it is typically their first course taken
toward the completion of the major. The exam is also administered to students who enroll
in CJ 44000 Senior Seminar. It is administered in this fashion in an effort to measure student
learning upon entry and then exit of the program. When a student is administered the exam
in CJ 44000, he or she would have been exposed to all core course requirements to attain a
criminal justice degree. The department is currently tracking the results of each student so
that his or her learning within the program can be measured individually. This approach
began at the start of fall 2010.




Results
Over the course of the 2010-11 academic year, the criminal justice program information
assessment was administered to 94 students in four courses of CJ21000. The average mean
score for all students was 24.85 (based on 50 questions). Since this assessment instrument
is not very old, we do not have individual data on specific students to measure program
learning. We expect the individual learning results to start appearing at the end of spring
2012. For this year, we only have one class of CJ 44000 that was administered the criminal
justice program information assessment. There were 29 students who were administered
the exam in spring 2011, and the average mean score was 26.03 (based on 50 questions).
The fall 2010 class of CJ 44000 was not administered the exam, and thus no records exist to
incorporate into this document.
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Lessons learned/Action Plan                                                                         English (United States)



During spring 2011, a student/faculty group was convened in an effort to discuss
improvements for the criminal justice program. The faculty felt it is important to get
student feedback from pending graduates. It was determined that this will be an annual
occurrence with graduating seniors and an additional assessment instrument will be crafted
to measure student opinions of the program as a whole. Faculty members also discussed
whether each criminal justice course will have a pre- and post-test in an effort to measure
learning in each course. However, it has still not been decided if this policy will be
implemented for fall 2011.


Nonprofit Administration


Mission
The NPA program, both graduate and undergraduate, provides students with the
knowledge and skills needed for a career in the nonprofit sector. This is a professional
studies program designed to provide students with an understanding of the nonprofit
sector and its many areas of management and leadership, its areas of services to society
and individuals, and the significant role it plays in improving the quality of life of all
members of society.

Goals and Objectives
      Provide knowledge of the creation, operation, and role in society of a nonprofit
       organization.

       Objectives
          o To define and explain what constitutes a nonprofit organization both legally
              and operationally.
          o To learn all the components that comprise the six core competencies
              associated with nonprofit management.
          o To understand the many forms and service areas of NPOs.
          o To gain knowledge of management and leadership of volunteers and staff,
              budgeting, program evaluation, marketing, fundraising, and organizational
              structure.

      To gain useful skills for employment and volunteering in the nonprofit sector.

       Objectives
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          o   To teach decision making and critical-thinking skills.                               English (United States)
          o   To learn how to manage personnel both paid and volunteer.
          o   To learn the steps needed for fundraising events and activities.
          o   To prepare a budget and analyze financial statements.
          o   To learn how to develop into a leader for the nonprofit sector.
          o   To learn how to organize and operate a division or program.

      To offer opportunities that would enhance a student’s ability to gain employment in
       the nonprofit sector.

       Objectives
          o To provide an internship experience in a nonprofit organization.
          o To offer a student association experience that would simulate an operating
              NPO.
          o To allow independent study in an area of particular interest for the student.

Methods of Assessment
      We continue to utilize pre- and post-tests for all undergraduate courses.
      We have researched national data regarding employer needs and core competencies
       for the nonprofit sector.
      We have developed an extensive program evaluation process for which a copy is
       provided. Topics included instructional delivery, course content, quality of teaching,
       etc.
      We continue to assess knowledge and skills in the key required and elective courses
       such as the management of nonprofit organizations, volunteer management,
       fundraising, and leadership courses by the tests and papers required. We also test
       skill level by providing hypothetical and field-based situations requiring the student
       to respond to the situation.
      In the senior seminar, we added a case study approach requiring the students to
       demonstrate the knowledge and skills required to resolve management, budgeting,
       personnel, program, and volunteer staff issues.
      We continue to use alumni survey data from the Survey Institute to help shape
       programming.

Lessons Learned
The department needs to ensure that current courses qualify for course-level designations
as proposed by EPC/ASPC and needs to develop more career preparation training.

Action plan for next year
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    Program Goals         Supporting Objectives / Timeline / Method of Assessment                        English (United States)
Define and uphold          By June 1, 2011, the entire NPA faculty members will engage in a
quality teaching             strategic planning session that result in the following ‘products:’ 1) an
methods                      agreement on what constitutes ‘good teaching;’ 2) a review of student
                             survey results re: the definition of ‘good teaching;’ 3) a means by
                             which to consider additional methods of teaching quality; and 4) the
                             creation of an evaluation method based on current course evaluations;
                             creation of individual goals.
                           By September 1, 2011, NPA faculty members will engage in ongoing
                             evaluation practices as agreed upon and as monitored by the
                             department chair to support quality teaching that may include self-
                             monitoring, audio/video taping, information from students, and/or
                             outside observation. Outcomes/practices will be shared with Dean of
                             the School of Human Services for possible use in annual performance
                             reviews, etc.
Develop and uphold         By April 30, 2011, the NPA faculty members will critically evaluate,
quality course               through peer review, all existing course syllabi against NPA course
development                  evaluation scoring rubric with a particular focus on the category of
techniques                   Instructional Rationale and Delivery Plan.
                           By August 1, 2011, all NPA faculty members will ensure that all course
                             syllabi reflect/demonstrate that which represents an “Exemplary”
                             scoring, as defined by the NPA course evaluation scoring rubric.
Define and uphold fair     By April 30, 2011, all NPA faculty members will critically evaluate,
and effective                through peer review, all existing course syllabi against NPA course
assessment techniques        evaluation scoring rubric with a particular focus on the category of
                             Course Assessment Plan.
                           By August 1, 2011, all NPA faculty members will ensure that all course
                             syllabi reflect/demonstrate that which represents an “Exemplary”
                             scoring, as defined by the NPA course evaluation scoring rubric.
                           By September 1, 2011, all NPA faculty members will adopt three ‘new’
                             classroom assessment techniques recognized as ‘effective’ by Angelo
                             and Cross’s Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College
                             Teachers. Examples may include, but not be limited to, Approximate
                             Analogies, Focused Autobiographical Sketches, Group-Work
                             Evaluations, Classroom Opinion Polls, Pro and Con Grid (per Table 6.2,
                             CAT’s Indexed by Disciplines in the Brief Examples).
Develop and maintain       By April 30, 2011, all NPA faculty members will critically evaluate,
a rigorous and relevant      through peer review, all existing course syllabi against NPA course
curriculum                   evaluation scoring rubric with a particular focus on the category of
                             Course Assessment Plan and Appropriate for Course Level.
                           By August 1, 2011, all NPA faculty members will ensure that all course
                             syllabi reflect/demonstrate that which represents an “Exemplary”
                             scoring, as defined by the NPA course evaluation scoring rubric.
Support critical           By April 30, 2011, al NPA faculty members will critically evaluate,
linkages to real world       through peer review, all existing course syllabi against NPA course
application                  evaluation scoring rubric) with a particular focus on the category of
                             Instructional Rationale and Delivery Plan.
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                           By August 1, 2011, all NPA faculty members will ensure that all course       English (United States)
                            syllabi reflect/demonstrate that which represents an “Exemplary”
                            scoring, as defined by the NPA course evaluation scoring rubric.
                           On an ongoing basis, the department chair will continue to evaluate
                            internship offerings to ensure that they support the six core
                            competencies for our degree program.
Support linkages to        By fall 2011, supported by a student research project and under the
career development          direction of the department chair, we will conduct an analysis of best
and placement               practices regarding career development services for students in NPA-
                            oriented programs across the country and develop a program model
                            for execution.
                           By fall 2011, with support from the department chair, a graduate
                            assistant will create a workplace survey of area NPA professionals to
                            assess the relevancy of our current core competencies against market
                            need. Survey results will help to inform both course development and
                            career development services immediately, as practical, and for 2012-
                            13, as needed.
                           All NPA faculty members will continue to review alumni survey results
                            to enhance course ancillary services and course development that is in
                            part responsive to career needs, while also upholding academic rigor
                            as expected in a degree-granting program.
                           Beginning in fall of 2011, through the support of a graduate assistant
                            and under the direction of the department chair and with support of
                            the Office of Career Services (where possible), the NPA program will
                            conduct a series of meaningful career development programming
                            efforts (i.e., networking reception, professional mentors, job fair, post-
                            graduate consulting projects, etc.). In addition, a more effective means
                            to track graduate placement success will be executed in cooperation
                            with the Director of Alumni Programs and the Director of Career
                            Services.


Impact and/or changes to classes and program
The department has redesigned our core and elective classes to enhance knowledge and
skill development of students taking classes in the nonprofit administration program. The
faculty will work to improve our testing instrument for the undergraduate program.


Social Work


Department of Social Work Mission
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Lindenwood University Department of Social Work’s mission is to prepare undergraduate                                   English (United States)
students for ethical and effective entry-level generalist social work practice with individuals,
families, groups, organizations, and communities and to promote societal responsibility and
social justice.

Classes to be Assessed
SW 11000 -Introduction to Social Work , SW 31000 - Social Work Practice I , SW 31100 –
Social Work Practice II, SW 32000 - Social Welfare Policy and Service, SW 32500 - Social
Work Research Methods, SW38100 - Human Behavior and Social Environment II, SW41200 -
Social Work Practice III, SW42100 - Social Welfare Policy and Services II, SW45000 - Field
Practicum

Program Goals and Objectives
Goals for the Graduates in the Major

        Graduates of the the University Department of Social Work will demonstrate
         competencies for entry-level practice with diverse individuals, families, groups,
         organizations, communities, and society in changing social contexts.
        Upon completion of the program, students will be prepared for graduate study in
         social work and/or will be employed in the broad field of human services.

Social Work Program Objectives

Based on overall program evaluations as well as term-to-term course evaluations, a variety
of instruments are utilized to measure students’ knowledge, skills, values, and professional
identity development. The first column contains the objective. The second column is the
assessment tools used to measure outcomes.

Consistent with our goals, graduates will demonstrate the ability to do the following:

                                    Program Objectives                                                Measures
1. Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional social work practice.     B, C, D, E, F, G, J
2. Understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and                   A, B, C, D, E, G, I, J
principles and practice accordingly.
3. Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related             A, B, C, D, E, F, I, J
client age, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status,
national origin, race, sex, and orientation.
4. Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and                    A, B, C, D, E, G, I, J
apply strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and economic
justice with particular concern for populations at risk.
5. Understand and interpret the history of the social work profession and its                  A, B, D, I, J
contemporary structures.
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                                 Program Objectives                                            Measures          English (United States)
6. Apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice with systems of    B, D, F, G, I, F, J
all sizes.
7. Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand             A, B, D, G, I, J
individual behavior and development across the life span and the interactions
among and between diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and
communities.
8. Analyze, formulate, and influence social policies with a particular concern for      A, B, C, D, E, I, J
populations at risk.
9. Evaluate research studies, apply research findings to practice, and evaluate their   A, B, D, I, J
own practice interventions at levels appropriate to baccalaureate level generalist
social work practice.
10. Use communication skills differently across diverse client populations,             A, B, C, D, E, F, I, J
colleagues, and communities.
11. Use supervision and consultation appropriate to generalist social work practice     A, B, D, F, G, J
at the baccalaureate level.
12. Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems and     B, D, F, G, J
seek necessary organizational change.


How Each Program Objective is Measured

                 Pre-post course content test
                 Course assignments and grades
                 Professional values self-assessment
                 Knowledge/skills self-assessment
                 Qualitative questions
                 Surveys (alumni, agencies)
                 Advisory council consultation
                 Overall program assessment (interview)
                 Overall program assessment (content test)
                 Field evaluation



MMethods of Assessment Used
Each semester student achievement is measured for each course for the purposes of
program evaluation and improvement. Course objectives are directly related to one or more
program objectives. These relationships allow for analysis of students’ perception of their
professional growth and provide an opportunity to contrast and interpret their actual
knowledge/skills/values upon completing the course(s). These mixed methods provide data
and insight into how effective courses are in meeting program objectives. Benchmarks are
established by faculty as indicators of attaining program objectives.

Pre- and Post-Test Multiple Choice Course Content Assessment
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When evaluated:        Beginning and end of each semester                                          English (United States)
Who is evaluated:      Students enrolled in social work courses (all courses)
What is evaluated:     Specific course objectives and other aspects of the course
How evaluated:         Multiple choice test

Questions are directly related to one or more program objectives. Data is also used to
examine the effectiveness of instructors in the classroom, the adequacy of the textbooks
being utilized, and determine if the assignments and course requirements assist in meeting
program objectives.

Benchmarks: Overall students should demonstrate knowledge/skill changes from pre- to
post-test scores with a 20 to 30 percent aggregate growth, plus a post-test aggregate score
of 60 to 70 percent or more. Course content expectations dealing with knowledge and skills
will vary considerably across the curriculum.

Quizzes/Exams, Reflection/Scholarly Papers, Video Taping, other Methods Determined by
Professor

When evaluated:       Throughout the semester
Who is evaluated:     Students enrolled in social work courses
What is evaluated:    Students’ knowledge/skill levels
How evaluated:        Multiple methods

Each professor designs course tools to measure student growth and achievement of course
objectives, which are tied to program objectives.

Benchmarks: Overall students should demonstrate knowledge/skill/value changes from pre-
to post-test scores determined by each faculty member. Course content expectations
dealing with knowledge/skills/values will vary considerably across the curriculum.


Professional Values Response: Pre- and Post-Likert Scale Self Evaluation

When evaluated:       Beginning and end of each semester
Who is evaluated:     Students enrolled in social work courses (selected courses)
What is evaluated:    Students’ self- assessment of professional values
How evaluated:        Likert scale self-evaluation

Students evaluate their knowledge and implementation of professional values based upon
course objectives tied to a program objective. These relationships allow for analysis of
students’ perception of their professional growth and provide an opportunity to contrast
and interpret their actual knowledge/skills/values growth with their perceptions.
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Benchmarks: Overall students should demonstrate value changes from pre- to post-test               English (United States)
scores with .5 to 1.0 growth. Professional values are measured according to the NASW Code          Comment [TT10]: is this a percent?
of Ethics promoted by the accrediting board of the Council on Social Work Education.

Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills: Pre- and Post-Likert Scale

When evaluated:        Beginning and end of each semester
Who is evaluated:      Students enrolled in social work courses (selected courses)
What is evaluated:     Students’ self-assessment of knowledge/skill levels
How evaluated:         Likert scale self-evaluation

Students are surveyed regarding their perceived capabilities on each course objective tied
to program objectives. Each course objective is directly related to one or more program
objectives. These relationships allow for analysis of students’ perception of their
professional growth and provide an opportunity to contrast/interpret their actual
knowledge/skills/values growth with their perceptions.

Benchmarks: Overall students should demonstrate knowledge/skills/values changes from
pre- to post-test scores within a .5 to 1.0 growth range.                                          Comment [TT11]: percent?



Qualitative Questions Post-Course Student Evaluation

When evaluated:        Beginning and end of each semester
Who is evaluated:      Students enrolled in social work courses (selected courses)
What is evaluated:     Students’ self-assessment of course objectives
How evaluated:         Qualitative responses to select questions

In selected courses students are given questions pertaining to course objectives, which
provides in-depth qualitative data for assessing program objectives.

Benchmarks: Qualitative data will be coded and reviewed by faculty for course
improvement. Responses are coded with the 12 program objectives in mind.

Survey of Alumni and Agencies

When evaluated:        Every three years
Who is evaluated:      Students, alumni, and program (faculty)
What is evaluated:     Students’ performance in field, employment, and graduate school
How evaluated:         Surveys and interviews

An alumni survey is completed every three years involving students who graduated during
that period of time. Social work faculty conducts telephone interviews and/or sends surveys
to alumni and agencies.
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Benchmarks: Data will be coded and presented to the faculty and Social Work Advisory
Council for assessment. Qualitative responses are coded with the 12 program objectives in
mind.

Feedback of Course/Program Evaluations from Social Work Advisory Council

When evaluated:        Every year
Who is evaluated:      Students, alumni, and program (faculty)
What is evaluated:     Program curriculum, policies, and practices
How evaluated:         Interviews and questionnaire

The faculty meets with the Social Work Advisory Council at the end of the academic year to
discuss program evaluation, curriculum development, and overall department
policies/practices.

Benchmarks: Qualitative data will be coded and presented to the faculty for assessment.
Responses are coded with the 12 program objectives in mind.

Overall Program Assessment-Objective

When evaluated:        Beginning and end of program
Who is evaluated:      Social work majors
What is evaluated:     Program objectives and other aspects of the program
How evaluated:         Multiple-choice test

Each student majoring in social work enrolled in SW 120000 Social Service Agency
Observation completes a multiple-choice examination composed of questions taken from
the content based pre-tests for each required course. At the close of SW 45000 Practicum
Field Seminar each student completes the same multiple-choice content based program as
a post test. This allows for a cohort analysis of student progress from beginning to end of
program.

Benchmarks: Overall students should demonstrate knowledge/skill/value changes from pre-
to post-test scores with a 25 to 30 percent growth.

Overall Program Assessment- Subjective

When evaluated:        End of program
Who is evaluated:      Social work graduates
What is evaluated:     Program objectives and other aspects of the program
How evaluated:         Interview with department chair
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Graduating students complete face-to-face interviews with the department chair and a                English (United States)
questionnaire is given, which solicits their experiences and evaluation of the curriculum and
what they assess as the strengths and challenges of the program. Students are asked open-
ended questions that describe aspects of the program and their overall learning
experiences.

Benchmarks: Qualitative data will be coded with the 12 program objectives in mind and
presented to the faculty and advisory council for assessment.

Field Evaluation

When evaluated:        End of practicum
Who is evaluated:      Students enrolled in practicum
What is evaluated:     Practice behaviors related to 10 core EPAS competencies
How evaluated:         Likert scale questions

The practicum coordinator and field instructors assess students and provide qualitative
feedback based upon students’ applied knowledge and professional behaviors in the field
outlined in the evaluation policies and accreditation standards (www.CSWE.org).

Benchmarks: Students should demonstrate knowledge/skill/values to meet and/or exceed
program expectations. These data are figured into the overall strategies to determine if
program benchmarks are being met.

These assessment methodologies seek to improve program outcomes and to reach program
benchmarks by keeping in focus each program objective:
    How and if it is being achieved.
    What criteria are used to measure achievement?
    What are the benchmarks that indicate achievement?
    What valid and reliable methods are utilized to generate data to measure successful
       achievement?
    What structures are in place to maintain program standards?
    What action plans are implemented when benchmarks are not reached?

Results
Each of the nine social work courses being assessed use a variety of measurements, which
link self-assessment and pre/post content test questions to program objectives. These are
highlighted below. Faculty examines both aggregate scores from each course and individual
assessment questions for analysis in order to link course outcomes to program objective(s).

The following charts report the pre- and post-data collected for the nine core curriculum
courses.
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SW 11000 - Introduction to Social Work

                             Pre-test                Post-test               Change
Fall 2010                      52%                     74%                    +22%
Spring 2011                    50%                     78%                    +28%
Combined                       51%                     76%                    +25%


Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills
1 = No ability 2 = Some ability 3 = Average ability 4 = Good ability 5 = Exceptional ability
                                  QUESTION                                            Pre      Post
                                                                                                         Change
                                                                                      Avg.     Avg.
1. demonstrate a basic knowledge of generalist social work practice and
                                                                                      2.07      3.63      +1.56
social policy
2. differentiate the perspective of social work as different from others in the
                                                                                      2.50      3.78      +1.28
helping professions
3. recognize the uniqueness of social work history and the emergence of
                                                                                      2.37      3.59      +1.22
social work as it related to social welfare and services to those in need
4. identify at-risk populations across the life span in U.S. society                  2.63      3.75      +1.12
5. can develop critical thinking skills, assess personal values, beliefs and
                                                                                      3.10      3.59      +.49
ethics so as to integrate those into best practices of social work services
6. can gain an appreciation of the diversity of social work in its many settings
                                                                                      3.30      3.91      +.61
and environments
Averages:                                                                             2.66      3.71      +1.05

    Measurement              Pre/Post Content %        Pre/Post Content % Correct            Self-Assessment
                                   Change                       Answers                           Change
         Score                      +25%                          78%                              +1.05
                                  (20 - 30%)                   (60 – 70%)                        (.5 – 1.0)
      Benchmark
                                     Met                       Surpassed                        Surpassed

Data Analysis

All benchmarks were met or exceeded. What is noteworthy is that the content and self-
assessment change pre and post are congruent and consistent with previous year’s data.
Both measurement tools support the following program objectives two, four, and five. The
majority of students enrolled are non-social work majors. Closely examining each question,
it appears that course objectives are successfully being met, which in turn supports
University objectives promoting ethical lifestyles and developing adaptive thinking and
problem-solving skills.

SW31000 - Social Work Practice I

Semester                                Pre-test           Post-test       Change
Fall 2010                               42%                63%             +21%
Fall 2009                               43%                58%             +15%
Fall2008-Spring 2009                    42%                58%             +16%
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Semester                             Pre-test            Post-test       Change                               English (United States)

Average                              42.5%               59%             18%

Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills
1 = No ability 2 = Some ability 3 = Average ability 4 = Good ability 5 = Exceptional ability
                                    Question                                          Pre     Post
                                                                                                     Change
                                                                                      Avg.    Avg.
1. social work practice with individuals as defined within the Lindenwood
University definition of generalist social work practice and as anchored in the       3.00    4.38    +1.38
purposes and missions of the social work profession
2. analyze ethical dilemmas and the ways in which they affect practices, services,
                                                                                      3.00    4.38    +1.38
and clients
3. define, design and implement practice strategies with persons from diverse life
                                                                                      2.33    3.75    +1.42
situations
4. knowledge of factors that contribute to and constitute being at risk               3.44    4.5     +1.06
5. awareness of the common strengths and resource capacities of individuals           3.22    4.25    +1.03
6. knowledge and skills to effectively develop client-worker relationships with
                                                                                      2.67    3.88    +1.21
individuals
7. knowledge and skills related to collecting and assessing information with
                                                                                      2.56    4.13    +1.57
regard to work with individuals
8. identify issues, problems, needs, resources, and assets common to individuals      3.11    4.13    +1.02
9. use communication skills, supervision, and consultation with regard to practice
                                                                                      2.89    4.38    +1.49
with individuals
10. identify, analyze, and implement empirically based interventions with
                                                                                      2.33    3.63    +1.30
individuals
11. apply empirical knowledge and technological advanced information with
                                                                                      2.44    3.38     +.94
individuals
12. evaluate program outcomes and practice effectiveness with individuals             2.22    3.88    +1.66
13. use of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies to build practice
                                                                                      2.33    3.88    +1.55
with individuals
14. use research knowledge to provide high quality services; to initiate change; to
improve practice, policy, and service delivery; and to evaluate their own practice    2.44    3.75    +1.31
with individuals
15. understand and interpret the history of the social work profession and its
                                                                                      3.22    4.13     +.91
contemporary structural issues
Average                                                                               2.75    4.03    +1.28

     Measurement               Pre Post Content %           Pre Post Content %           Self-Assessment
                                     Change                  Correct Answers                  Change
           Score                      +21%                         63%                         +1.28
                                    (20 - 30%)                  (60 – 70%)                    .5 – 1.0
       Benchmark
                                       Met                         Met                      Surpassed

Data Analysis

Strong student growth is demonstrated in the data and improved when comparing last
year’s pre/post content aggregate scores (58 percent) with this year’s (58 percent and 63
percent). Students’ knowledge of course content and self-assessment are meeting and
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exceeding benchmarks. This course is integral to preparing social work students for                          English (United States)
competent and effective professional lives and supports program objectives one, two,
three, four, six, 10, and 11, and supports LU’s mission of educating responsible citizens of a
global community.

SW 31100 – Social Work Practice II

                     Pre-Test            Post-Test          Change
Fall 2010            73%                 78%                +5%
Fall 2009            69%                 78%                +9%

Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills Fall 2010
1 = No ability 2 = Some ability 3 = Average ability 4 = Good ability 5 = Exceptional ability
                                Question #                                   Pre Avg.   Post Avg.   Change

1. have learned about social work practice with groups and families as
defined within the Lindenwood University definition of generalist social
work practice and as anchored in the purpose and mission of the social        2.25        3.89      +1.64
work profession
2. analyzed ethical dilemmas and the ways in which they affect practice,
                                                                              3.25        3.89       +.64
services, and clients
3. have learned to define, design, and implement practice strategies with
                                                                              3.38        3.78       +.40
persons from diverse life situations
4. have increased knowledge of factors that contribute to and constitute
                                                                              3.75        3.89       +.14
being at risk
5. have increased awareness of the common strengths and resource
                                                                              3.63        3.89       +.26
capacities of individuals
6. been presented with knowledge and skills to effectively develop client-
                                                                              2.25        3.67      +1.42
worker relationships with groups and families
8. learned to identify issues, problems, needs, resources, and assets
                                                                              2.25        3.67      +1.42
common to groups and families
9. learned to use communication skills, supervision, and consultation with
                                                                              2.50        3.67      +1.17
regard to practice with groups and families
10. learned to identify, analyze, and implement empirically based
                                                                              2.00        3.33      +1.33
interventions with groups and families
11. learned to apply empirical knowledge and technological advanced
                                                                              2.25        3.22       +.97
information with groups and families
12. learned to evaluate program outcomes and practice effectiveness
                                                                              2.25        3.78      +1.53
with groups and families
13. learned the use of qualitive and quantitative research methodologies
                                                                              2.25        3.44      +1.19
to build practice with groups and families
14. learned to use research knowledge to provide quality services; to
initiate change; to improve practice, police, and service delivery; and to
evaluate their own practice with groups and families                          2.25        3.44       1.19


15. understand and interpret the history of the social work profession
                                                                              3.25        3.56       0.31
and its contemporary structural issues.
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                                Question #                                     Pre Avg.   Post Avg.    Change

Averages
                                                                                 2.65       3.66        +1.01


                               Pre Post Content %           Pre Post Content %            Self-Assessment
     Measurement
                                     Change                  Correct Answers                   Change
            Score                      +5%                         78%                          +1.01
                                    (20 - 30%)                                                 .5 – 1.0
       Benchmark                                           (60 – 70%) Surpassed
                                     Not Met                                                 Surpassed

Data Analysis

Even though data indicate five percent change between the pre-test and the post-test
scores, students entered this course immediately following SW 31000 with a strong
foundation in social work practice (78 percent). A post score of 78 percent these past two
years surpasses benchmarks, as does students’ self-assessment of their capacity for
professional work with groups. Both SW 31000 and SW 311000 support program objectives
one, two, three, four, six, seven, nine, 10, 11, and 12. With these solid and consistent
scores, along with further data demonstrated in the subsequent section of this report, it
appears that program objectives are being met and surpassed in significant ways in practice
courses.

SW 32000 - Social Welfare Policy and Service I

                            Pre-test         Post-test     Change
Fall 2010                   43%              69%           +26%
Fall 2009                   24%              55%           +31%

Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills Fall 2010
1 = No ability 2 = Some ability 3 = Average ability 4 = Good ability 5 = Exceptional ability
                                                                                 Pre      Post
                                Question #                                                            Change
                                                                                 Avg.     Avg.
recognize how group membership includes access to resources                      3.09     4.16        +1.07
analyze the dynamics of risk factors that contribute to and constitute being
                                                                                 3.18     3.95         +.77
at risk and strategies to redress them
demonstrate increased knowledge of social and economic justice                   3.00     4.16        +1.16
understand distributive justice, human, and civil rights and global
                                                                                 2.86     3.84         +.98
interconnections of oppression
identify an awareness of strategies to combat discrimination, oppression,
                                                                                 3.00     4.05        +1.05
and economic deprivation
display knowledge of advocacy for nondiscriminatory social and economic
                                                                                 2.73     4.16        +1.43
systems
demonstrate an awareness of how social systems promote or defer
                                                                                 2.91     4.05        +1.14
maintaining or achieving health and well being
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                                 Question #                                                       Change
                                                                                 Avg.    Avg.
display knowledge of the history of social work and history as well as
                                                                                 2.73    4.11      +1.38
current structures of social welfare services
identify an awareness of the role of policy in service delivery and practice
                                                                                 2.50    4.16      +1.66
and attainment of individual and social well being
demonstrate knowledge and skills in understanding and analyzing major
                                                                                 2.45    4.32      +1.87
policies
demonstrate awareness of how to analyze organizational, local, state,
national, and international issues in social welfare policy and social service   2.41    3.84      +1.43
delivery
display an awareness of policy practice skills in regard to economic,
                                                                                 2.23    4.00      +1.77
political, and organizational systems
recognize an awareness of financial, organizational, administrative, and
                                                                                 2.36    3.89      +1.53
planning processes required to deliver social services
use knowledge of issues, problems, needs, resources, and assets in the
                                                                                 2.59    4.05      +1.46
general area of social policy
Average                                                                          2.72    4.05      +1.34

    Measurement              Pre/Post Content %            Pre/Post Content %           Self-Assessment
                                   Change                   Correct Answers                  Change
         Score                       26%                          69%                         +1.34
                                  (20 - 30%)                   (60 – 70%)                    .5 – 1.0
      Benchmark
                                     Met                          Met                      Surpassed


Data Analysis

Policy courses distinguish the social work program from psychology and some of the other
helping professions. Students often are not interested in policy practice and thus are not
eager to take this course. Data indicates that a paradigm shift occurred for the majority of
students. The above data indicates a level of mastery expected for bachelor level
professional social workers and some improvement from last year in pre/post content (55
percent to 69 percent). It is important to note that pre-tests in 2009 were extremely low (24
percent) and a plus-31 percent improvement took place. These scores are quite high and
supports the University’s mission of the development of the whole person–an educated,
responsible citizen of a global community. Students mastering/understanding their
professional roles in advocacy directly support program objectives one, two, three, four,
seven, eight, nine, 10, and 12.

SW 32500 - SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODS
                             Pre-test       Post-test       Change
Spring 2010                  37%            60%             +23%
Fall 2010                    36%            58%             +22%

      Measurement                 Pre/Post Content %             Pre/Post Content %
                                        Change                    Correct Answers
           Score                         22%                            58%
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       Benchmark
                                         Met                         Not Met


Data Analysis

Students’ grasp of course content falls slightly short of benchmarks (58 percent), however
pre/test scores were exceptionally low (36 percent) when comparing pre-test scores with
other courses. This is consistent with last semester’s scores. A 22 to 23 percent change is
significant. Research methods course is a challenge for undergraduate students. Many
students do not see the need to know research methods and how research informs
practice. But this knowledge is critical for meeting program objectives seven and nine. With
current post-course assessment scores slightly below benchmarks, new strategies, lesson
plans, and assignments will be incorporated to connect practice and research. Further
assessment tools will be needed to assist in measuring how this course meets program
objectives; specifically objectives two, seven, and nine.

SW 38100 – HUMAN BEHAVIOR and SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II

                      Pre-test         Post-test        Change
Spring 2011           59%              77%              +18%
Spring 2010           45%              72%              +27%

Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills Spring 2011
1 = No ability 2 = Some ability 3 = Average ability 4 = Good ability 5 = Exceptional ability
                                                                                  Pre        Post
                                  Question #                                                         Change
                                                                                  Avg.       Avg.
Populations-at-risk and the factors that contribute to and constitute being at
                                                                                  3.63       4.22      +.60
risk
how group membership includes access to resources                                 3.31       4.22      +.91
recriprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments          3.56       4.61     +1.05
empirical theories and knowledge about the interaction between and among
                                                                                  3.13       4.17     +1.04
systems
theories and knowledge of a range of social systems                               3.19       4.11      +.92
how social systems promote, maintain, deter, or achieve health and well-being     3.25       4.33     +1.08
theoretical frameworks in relationship to effective generalist social work
                                                                                  3.00       4.06     +1.06
practice
the integration of values and principles of ethical decision making               3.25       4.17      +.92
the development, use, and communication of empirically based knowledge            3.00       3.89      +.89
theoretical frameworks related to values of the profession of social work         3.25       3.94      +.69
analyzing ethical dilemmas and the ways in which they affect services and
                                                                                  3.19       4.22     +1.03
clients
Averages                                                                          3.25        4.18     +.93
                                 Pre/Post Content            Pre/Post Content            Self-Assessment
     Measurement
                                    % Change                 % Correct Answers                Change
          Score                        18%                          77%                        +.93
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                                      (20 - 30%)                   (60 – 70%)                   .5 – 1.0           English (United States)
       Benchmark
                                     Almost Met                    Surpassed                   Surpassed

Data Analysis

The 18 percent change falls slightly below benchmark, but post content knowledge is well
above benchmark, which is the score that ultimately matters. As in last year’s post content
score (72 percent), students are well above benchmarks in retaining knowledge of course
content. Also, students report exceptionally high pre-course skills, which may be attributed
to many of the students being seniors. In post-course scores students report good ability in
almost all of the measurements. This course is the theoretical foundation for professional
practice and thus directly supports the University mission of developing ethical and
competent professionals and supports program objectives one, six, and seven.

SW 41200 - Social Work Practice III

Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills
1 = No ability 2 = Some ability 3 = Average ability 4 = Good ability 5 = Exceptional ability
                                                                                        Pre     Post
                                     Question #                                                        Change
                                                                                        Avg.    Avg.
1. learned social work practice with organizations and communities as defined
within the Lindenwood University definition of generalist social work practice and
as anchored in the purposes and mission of the work profession                          2.57    3.64       +1.07


2. advanced knowledge of the dynamics of risk factors and strategies to redress
                                                                                        2.79    3.86       +1.07
them
3. advanced knowledge of distributive justice, human and civil rights, and global
                                                                                        2.93    3.71       +.79
interconnections of oppression
4. advocacy knowledge, values, and skills related to nondiscriminatory social and
                                                                                        2.64    3.64       +1.00
economic systems
5. advanced knowledge of ways socials systems promote or deter maintaining or
                                                                                        2.86    3.79       +.93
achieving health and well-being
6.advanced knowledge of the role of macro-practice in service delivery and
                                                                                        2.57    3.64       +1.07
practice in relation to the attainment of individual and social well-being
7. advanced knowledge and skills related to analysis of organizational, local,
state, national, and international issues in social welfare policy and social service   2.64    3.43       +.79
delivery.
8. ability to understand and demonstrate macro-practice skills in regard to
                                                                                        1.93    3.50       +1.57
economic, political, and organizational systems
9. ability to demonstrate macro-practice skills to influence, formulate, and
                                                                                        1.93    3.57       +1.64
advocate for policy consistent with social work values
10. ability to identify financial, organizational, administrative, and planning
                                                                                        2.29    3.57       +1.29
processes necessary to deliver social services.
11. ability to apply empirical knowledge and technologically advanced
                                                                                        2.07    3.50       +1.43
information with organizations and communities
12. ability to evaluate program outcomes and practice effectiveness with
                                                                                        2.14    3.79       +1.64
organizations and communities
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13. learned to use communication skills, supervision, and consultation with                                   English (United States)
                                                                                       2.14    3.79   +1.64
regard to macro-practice
14. ability to use qualitative and quantitative research methodologies to build
                                                                                       2.07    3.57   +1.50
macro-practice
15. ability to define, design, and implement practice strategies with persons from
                                                                                       2.43    3.57   +1.14
diverse backgrounds
16. ability to understand and interpret the history of the social work profession
                                                                                       2.29    3.86   +1.57
and its contemporary structural issues.
                                       Average                                         2.39    3.65   +1.26

     Measurement              Self-Assessment       Pre/Post Change       Pre/Post Content %
                                   Change                                      Correct
          Score                     +1.26                  20%                   60%
                                  (.5 – 1.0)
       Benchmark                                           Met                       Met
                                 Surpassed
                       Pre-test         Post-test         Change
Spring 2011              40%               60%             +20%
Spring 2010              42%               48%              +6%

Data Analysis

Students demonstrated excellent retention of course knowledge (60 percent) as well as
growth pre- and post-course (20 percent), meeting and surpassing benchmarks. This is a
considerable difference from previous year’s post-course content knowledge (48 percent)
and may be attributable to the instructor adding bi-weekly quizzes for content review. Also,
benchmarks were surpassed in students’ self-assessment of meeting course objectives, thus
meeting program objectives one, two, three, four, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, and 12.
This course directly integrates policy and practice courses, linking the two together, thus is
integral to preparing students for the social work profession.

SW 42100 - Social Welfare Policy and Services II
                       Pre-test         Post-test        Change
Spring 2011              25%              87%             +62%
Spring 2010              42%              58%             +16%

      Measurement                 Pre/Post Content %          Pre/Post Content %
                                        Change                 Correct Answers
          Score                          +62%                        +87%
                                       (20 - 30%)                 (60 – 65%)
       Benchmark
                                       Surpassed                   Surpassed


Results
When analyzing individual pre-course questions, students showed an adequate knowledge
of policy history and theory, however, based upon pre-course content scores there were
deficits for putting this knowledge into practice, which is the objective of Policy II. The
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instructor piloted a new assessment method with students being administered the post-test            English (United States)
as their final exam grade. This may have motivated students in some way to account for the
62 percent change. Pre/post content data for 2010 was based upon a different
measurement tool based upon the new text and revised syllabus.

Students also have the option of attending NASW advocacy day at the Missouri state
capital, which supports course objectives that promote students’ skills in policy practice,
which are aligned with program objectives four and eight.

The following pilot project was initiated in this course with qualitative data collected and
coded at the end of the semester with 50 percent (eight) of the students volunteering to
contribute.

      Students will reference the NASW code of ethics for ethical decision making and
       clarity for ethical professional behavior as demonstrated by classroom discussion
       and case-scenario role plays, video presentations and recordings, term papers, and
       research projects. Students consistently report that the code was thoroughly
       integrated into the class. Here are some comments that demonstrate this:
           o “The six core values outlined by the NASW were discussed thoroughly and
                regularly.”
           o “This class fulfilled the criteria of referencing the NASW code of ethics for
                decision making and professional behavior to its full extent. There was not a
                single class in which one of the values was not brought up or discussed.”
           o “This course did a great job of expressing how the code applies to ethical
                decision making in the policy arena. A step-by-step process was offered of
                how to make ethical decisions.”
           o “The code was appropriately applied to Missouri bills, current issues, and to
                case studies.”
           o “This class provided me with time to learn the code and then to apply them
                to situations like newspaper reports, case studies, or campus issues.“

      Students will analyze social policy and evaluate current trends affecting social
       welfare policy and social programs through in-class small group discussions, debates,
       and research papers. Students consistently report that they gained skills and
       knowledge regarding analyzing policies that impact at-risk and marginalized
       populations they will be serving.
          o “Through lecturing and small group discussions, we discussed how policies
              are formed, how stakeholders and lobbyists influence policies, how policies
              go through the legislative process, how to go about advocating and changing
              policies, as well as several other components to analyzing social policies.”
          o “A final paper was required that asked us to analyze a current Missouri house
              or senate bill including the sections of; an overview, history of the bill, laws
              setting precedent to the bill, financing, values and beliefs held within a bill,
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             eligibility criteria, and proposals for advocacy. I feel the course curriculum          English (United States)
             covered this requirement well. “
           o “We discussed how policy affects current events; how policy created the
             problem, how policy could solve the problem, and how the policy process
             would go if it were to be implemented. “
           o “As a result of this class, I learned how various policies that may appear not
             to impact the people we serve actually do impact them.”
           o “Every class period students were provided with current events. These
             events helped me used my analysis skills being learned in this class.”

      Students will evaluate the impact of social policies on client systems, workers, and
       agencies as demonstrated through critical thinking via in-class discussions, small
       group exercises and research papers, and practicum experience. Students
       consistently report that they learned critical thinking skills, coalition building, and
       policy practice strategies.

           o “During the semester we discussed at length the impact of social policies on
             client systems, social workers, and agencies. Every class meeting we had in-
             class discussions to evaluate how social policies affect a wide array of
             individuals. “
           o “The class was given the tools to analyze situations in the world and often.
             This discussion almost always included the effects the bill might have on
             people on both sides of the conflict. I feel this criterion was met to its full
             extent. “
           o “This class was excellent for evaluating the impact of social policy on client
             systems and agencies. This was achieved mainly through in class discussions
             and critical thinking application quizzes.”
           o This class helped me understand the ways to evaluate and what to look for in
             my evaluations, because the materials being discussed helped me be able to
             know how to apply the information.

Data Analysis

These qualitative questions were piloted to demonstrate if program objectives are being
met, rather than the traditional Likert-scale questions. The above pre/post course content
outcomes, along with the qualitative data, indicate that students in general are highly
knowledgeable and will have the foundation to develop the necessary policy practice skills
to meet benchmarks. This course supports program objectives one, two, three, four, six,
seven, eight, nine, and 10.

SW 45000 - Field Practicum

Student Assessment of Course Objectives
                        Pre Avg.     Post Avg.      Change
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Spring 2011                   3.58            4.18              +.60                                             English (United States)
Fall 2010                     3.50            3.79              +.29

Student Self-Assessment of Knowledge/Skills - Fall and Spring Combined
1 = No ability 2 = Some ability 3 = Average ability 4 = Good ability 5 = Exceptional ability
                                                                                   Pre      Post
                                     Question #                                                     Change
                                                                                   Avg.     Avg.
1. apply critical thinking skills within the context of social work practice       3.79     3.96      +.17
2. understand and act upon the value base within the context of social work
                                                                                   3.88     4.17      +.29
practice
3. practice and act upon the value base of the profession, its ethical
                                                                                   3.92     4.17      +.25
standards and principals and act accordingly
4. understand and act upon the forms and mechanisms of oppression and
discrimination and apply strategies of advocacy and social change that
                                                                                   3.54     4.13      +.59
advance social and economic justice with particular concern for populations-
at-risk
5. understand and interpret the history of the social work profession and its
                                                                                   3.08     3.88      +.80
contemporary structural issues
6. apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice with
                                                                                   3.50     4.04      +.54
systems of all sizes
7. use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to
understand the individual behavior and development across the life span
and the interactions among and between diverse individuals, families,              3.46     3.58      +.12
groups, organizations, and communities
8. analyze, formulate and influence social policies with particular concern for
                                                                                   3.29     3.71      +.42
populations-at-risk
9. evaluate research studies, apply research findings to practice, and
evaluate my own practice interventions at levels appropriate to                    3.13     3.83      +.70
baccalaureate level generalist social work practice.
10. use communications skills differently across diverse client populations,
                                                                                   4.00     4.25      +.25
colleagues and communities
11. use supervision and consultation appropriate to generalist social work
                                                                                   3.38     4.04      +.66
practice at the baccaureate level
12. function within the structure of organizations and service delivery
                                                                                   3.54     4.08      +.54
systems and seek necessary organizational change.
Averages                                                                           3.54     3.99      +.44

Data Analysis

Students’ self-assessment of mastering practice behaviors falls just slightly below
benchmarks (plus .5) when measuring the amount of change, but students report good
ability (plus .44) post practica. However, pre-test scores are above average (3.54). What is
important to note is the post score. The significance of field education in the social work
curriculum is clearly stated in the accreditation standards. Practice primacy emphasizes
competencies in measurable behaviors. Pre- and post-content assessments have been
revised and will be piloted this upcoming academic year to validly and reliably capture
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measurable outcomes that will reflect if program objectives are being met.                         English (United States)


Final Field Education Evaluations

Final field education evaluations are conducted with field instructor, field education
coordinator (faculty member), and student present during the last week of the practicum
experience. The final field evaluation contains 62 scaled objectives in eight broad
competency-based categories (example: Basic Work Skills and Attitudes, or Social Work as
a Profession). The scale is a five-point Likert scale, ranging from one (poor) to five
(excellent) as a rating for the students’ attainment of each objective. There is also the
request for the field instructor to describe behaviors in each section that illustrate
behavioral competency in meeting the major program objectives.

Spring 2011 (six students)

Program Objective                         Average    Average                  # Of
                                           Score      Score      Change      Scaled
                                           2010       2011                   Items
Basic Work Skills and Attitudes            4.62        4.47       -.15          9

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student was positive and engaging, she gained valuable insight into a troubled
     population.”
    “Student is independent and actually handled a portion of field instructor’s caseload
     while on leave.”
    “Student was independent and related very well to work team.”
    “Student is professional and acts in accordance with agency policy.”
    “Student has great initiative, is a quick study, and performs her responsibilities in a
     timely fashion.”
    “Student managed 5 programs very well, doing a great job of moving from one to
     another all within a day.”

Field Objective                           Average    Average                   # Of
                                           Score      Score      Change       Scaled
                                           2010       2011                    Items
Social Work as a Profession                 4.40      4.50         +.10          5

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student integrated strengths-based perspective with clients.”
    “Student applied her learning in our context and worked consistently to learn about
     our setting.”
    “Student is able to identify how one person’s behavior can change dependent upon
     the environment.”
    “Student is good at assessing clients’ needs and finding appropriate resources.”
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       “Student was able to establish and implement a behavior modification plan.”                            English (United States)
       “Student did a wonderful job with the use of her social work skills and knowledge.”

                                                    Average     Average                            # Of
                                                     Score       Score        Change              Scaled
                                                     2011        2011                             Items
Organizational Context of Social Work Practice        4.54        3.94            -.60               6

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student understands the need for programming to provide direct accountability.”
    “Student was appropriately engaged with our organization as a member of our
     team.”
    “Student has been engaged in learning agency policy and practices.”
    “Student was effective in removing obstacles for clients’ goals.”
    “Student set up and implemented the school parent portal.”
    “Student learned how to make referrals for outside services.”




Field Objective                                          Average        Average                        # Of
                                                          Score          Score       Change           Scaled
                                                          2010           2011                         Items
Community Context of Social Work Practice                  4.38           4.05            -.33           6

Comments from field instructors:
    “Lots of good understanding of court processes in delinquency.”
    “Student’s ability to strategically engage to initiate positive change was obvious.”
    “Student expressed a lot of interest and eagerness to learn about the community we
     serve.”
    “Student helped clients find housing through several avenues.”
    “Student was able to approach employers, advocate for clients and advise them on
     interview skills.”
    “Student successfully learned about our program for adolescents.”

Field Objective                                               Average     Average                    # Of
                                                               Score       Score         Change     Scaled
                                                               2010        2011                     Items
Assessment, Planning, Intervention and Evaluation               4.1         4.33          +.22        15

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student is skilled in assessing the strengths and concerns for our youth and how to
     intervene.”
    “Student soaked up information through reading, discussion, and supervision to gain
     understanding.”
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           “Student uses agency assessment tools to identify client/family strengths and              English (United States)
            appropriate services.”
           “Student has shown interest in learning backgrounds of clients to better understand
            their behaviors.”
           “Student was able to provide crisis intervention with a suicidal client.”
           “Student learned how relationships affected the system and prepared training for
            eating behaviors.”

Field Objective                                    Average   Average             # Of
                                                   Score     Score     Change    Scaled
                                                   2010      2011                Items
Social Policy                                      4.27      4.05      -.22      6

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student is able to identify specific policies, such as safe school act, which negatively
     affects youths.”
    “Student was fully engaged about approaches to systems changes in our setting.
    “Student learned about fundraising and policies.”
    “Student was able to see the effects of poverty, lack of education, and guidance and
     the impact.”
    “Student is adept in identifying how macro policies affect the work she does with
     clients.”
    “Student learned how to access public assistance if employed.”

Field Objective                                    Average   Average               # Of
                                                    Score     Score    Change     Scaled
                                                    2010      2011                Items
Diversity                                            4.64      4.53      -.11        5

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student has shown great ability to modify his assessments based on the sensitivity
     of our clients.”
    “Student engaged quite well with all clients.”
    “Student is able to articulate the diverse influences on human behavior.”
    “Student was respectful of everyone, even our difficult clients.”
    “Student’s professional attitude exemplified sensitivity.”

Field Objective                                    Average   Average               # Of
                                                    Score     Score    Change     Scaled
                                                    2010      2011                Items
Communication Skills                                 4.54      4.50      -.04        5

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student engages delinquent youth to think about their behavior and whether it is
     calm, relaxed, and appropriate.”
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       “Student integrated communication training into her interventions in the mediation         English (United States)
        program and was quite successful in difficult conversations.”
       “Student’s acceptance of diversity allows her to effectively communicate with those
        different from her.”
       “Student related well to clients of varying ages and ethnic groups.”
       “The families who worked with her came to respect her.”

Field Objective                                Average   Average               # Of
                                                Score     Score    Change     Scaled
                                                2010      2011                Items
Knowledge And Use Of Self                        4.48      4.37      -.11        5

Comments from field instructors:
    “Student uses supervision to get guidance and grow and to self-evaluate.”
    “Student has a teachable spirit and combines this with a thirst for learning that will
     serve her goals.”
    “Student was open to supervision, and actively engaged in the process.”
    “Student is open to learning and eager to gain as much knowledge as she can.”
    “Student was able to take feedback to be more assertive and was open to
     suggestions.”
    “Student used supervision to bounce ideas off of me.”

Data Analysis

Data from students and field supervisors surpass benchmarks and indicate that students are
succeeding in field and meeting all program objectives, especially 11 and 12.

SW 39900 - SERVICE LEARNING

Through assessment data during the past few years, faculty, students, and field supervisors
noted that some students were not as prepared for field work as program benchmarks
required. As a result, SW 39900 Service Learning became a required course in fall 2009 for
all social work majors. Students spend 100 hours in the field under the supervision of a
human service professional. On-campus seminars assist students with integrating program
and field objectives. Since 2009 several course enhancements have occurred:
          Requirement of meeting bi-weekly for eight class sessions (previously none were
            expected).
          Course content added on critical areas for skill development:
                o Professional writing
                o Professionalism (dress, comportment)
                o Time management and organizational skills
                o Ethics – how to handle ethical dilemmas
                o Expectations of social work students in field settings
                o Self-care
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                o Continuing self-development                                                         English (United States)
                o Resume development
          Skills applications (homework) added as graded assignments along with
            attendance and participation, as additional methods of preparing students for
            practicum experience.
          Evaluative measures implemented for both student and service learning
            supervisor.
          Integration of University recognition of students completing 500 hours of field
            service.
As a new requirement, the course has been closely monitored and qualitative assessment
data indicates that this experience is an overwhelming success. Students report going into
practica with 3.44 level of ability to serve in the field. With each semester, the course is
more defined and enhanced. The result is that students are increasingly better equipped
for field education practica. Some students use this 100-hour experience to gain valuable
correlated experience with their targeted career or population of choice. Others gain
exposure to populations and roles that they are aware they do not want to ultimately work
with, yet will help them in understanding their chosen population/arena. The faculty has
been able to use this experience to better gauge student needs in preparation for
practicum. Supervisor feedback enables faculty to review areas of concern as well as
strengths and areas for continued growth, allowing for the best possible curricular
enhancements for their final year of study (example: adding a writing lab or a public
speaking workshop or suggesting conference participation). Since the initiation of this
course as a requirement, no student field education placement has been compromised.
Our expectation is that the final field evaluations of students from field supervisors
completing the practicum will show a steady improvement forward, partially due to this
course requirement.

Exit Survey

The following data was collected from graduates in an interview with the department chair.
There were six interviewees, and the interviews were conducted on 04/29/2011.
They were asked to answer question on a five-point scale and to give additional comments
on their experiences in the program.

The scale used was as follows:
1= Disappointed, 2= Somewhat Disappointed, 3= No Opinion/No Experience, 4= Somewhat
Satisfied, 5= Satisfied

Question                                                                     Score
What is your experience of social work faculty mentoring?                    5.0

Student comments:
    “Liked having everyone in the faculty as instructors.”
    “Very satisfied: advisor great, helpful, and supportive.”
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       “I love that the faculty are approachable people you can talk to.”                               English (United States)
       “Not just my advisor, but all faculty open and approachable.”
       “All of the faculty approachable and gave response in timely manner.”

Question                                                                        Score
What is your experience of class offerings                                      4.5

Student comments:
    “Education 1st – switched in sophomore year – I liked the courses, very interesting.”
    “Flowed well, overlap some, enough to help you remember.”
    “Small school can only offer one section at a time.”
    “Span in the middle when scheduling was off – delayed him by a semester.”
    “Want more electives, may not have had time.”
    “Child welfare, addictions (couldn’t take conflict) more electives would have been
      great.”

Question                                                                        Score
What is your experience of class schedules?                                     4.83

Student comments:
       “Worked well for me.”
       “Never had an issue with scheduling.”
       “Haven’t had a problem.”
       “Worked out.”
       “Policy and Research in the same semester.”

Question                                                                        Score
What is your experience of block courses (Practice I and II)?                   4.50

Student comments:
    “Good, able to retain information better.”
    “Went well, liked classes, harder to do this way, but learned more.”
    “Did not have.”
    “Don’t have a point of reference but thought it was an effective teaching method.
      Sometimes overwhelming.”
    “I really liked the way it was set up: we talked about it and then practiced. It worked
      for my learning style. Liked not losing info between two classes.”
    “Practice I and II loved block, more time at once, learn, and practice.”

Question                                                                        Score
What is your experience of block courses (Policy I and II)?                     3.33

Student comments:
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        “Not enough processing time, so much work, reading overwhelming, too hard too                               English (United States)
         much info, needed more of a background.”
        “Needed to be tweaked, 1st class to do, unorganized, I learned but it didn’t flow
         well.”
        “Felt jumped in the deep end in policy i didn’t like Policy i as much, too intense, too
         much reading.”
        “Policy I and II hated as a block, paper okay, didn’t mind doing, *too much at once –
         too overwhelming from a good student.”

Questions                                                                                  Score
Average                                                                                    4.43

Data Analysis

Data indicates students are very satisfied with the program, with most scores ranging in the
satisfaction category, which indirectly supports all program objectives. Comments and scores are
consistent with course and program evaluations.


Lessons Learned and Action Plan
             Lessons Learned                            Action Plan                  Date and Responsibilities
A. SW 39900 has been integrated into          A. Benchmarks and                  A. Field coordinator, along with
the curriculum. Assessment                    assessments that measure           faculty, advisory council, and
measurements are now needed to                program objectives will be         selected field supervisors will
determine how and if this course is           designed.                          complete draft assessments and
meeting program objectives.                                                      benchmarks by January 2012.
B. Offering Practice I and II during fall     B. New texts were used this        B. Faculty who teach Social
semester and Social Welfare Policy I and      year for Social Welfare Policy I   Welfare Policy I and II will meet
II during spring semester as block            and II with course objectives      prior to Spring 2012 semester to
courses has received both positive and        directly linked to core            re-evaluate course objectives
negative responses from students.             competencies. Ongoing              and assignments, looking for
Practice I and II receive high student        coordination between the two       overlap and gaps in the policy
satisfaction and these two courses have       courses will continue to take      curriculum.
been offered as a block for a longer          place to improve course
period of time than Policy I and II. The      outcomes, thus supporting          Faculty attended workshop at
latter did receive much better                program objectives 6 and 8.        CSWE on teaching policy.
evaluation this year as the second time                                          Faculty will continue to attend
offered as a block. With the block            Faculty are considering offering   APM and BPDD during the
format, faculty find that students retain     SW 28000 (HBSE I) and SW           upcoming year.
foundation material and supports              38100 (HBSE II) in a similar
program objectives.                           format.                            Department chair will lead
                                                                                 discussion of the development
Faculty who teach HBSE II are requesting                                         of the HBSE sequences.
that we examine if the appropriate level
(30000) is assigned to this course
C. It is significant that the vast majority   C. A comprehensive                 C. The ongoing development of
of post course data indicate that             methodology will continue to       a valid and reliable matrix that
benchmarks were met and/or                    be developed to demonstrate        will meet both University and
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             Lessons Learned                            Action Plan                 Date and Responsibilities      English (United States)
surpassed. The department has a solid        how pre-post course content        CSWE standards for program
curriculum with students gaining the         tests, along with student self-    assessment is targeted for the
knowledge, skills, and values needed for     assessments, and qualitative       upcoming academic year, which
effective social work practice.              data collection can be used to     will continue to demonstrate
                                             measure whether program            how course assessment
                                             benchmarks are being met.          questions and other
                                                                                measurements are linked to a
                                                                                specific program objective.
                                                                                Program Director will obtain
                                                                                input from faculty.
D. Combining department chair and            D. The roles of department         D. Chair and director will meet
director of B.S.W. Program roles may         chair and program director         this summer with the Dean to
not have been the most efficient and         were divided between two           assess how this structure is
effective way to organize the                faculty members. The former is     working and how this structure
department. The latter role is required      responsible for curriculum         can support program objectives
for accreditation standards. The faculty     development, overseeing of
met with the Dean to discuss                 program objectives, and
reorganization.                              administrative duties assigned
                                             by the dean. The program
                                             director is responsible for
                                             maintaining accreditation
                                             standards and the gathering,
                                             analysis, and reporting of all
                                             assessment data.
E. Combining field supervisors’ annual       E. The faculty will continue to    E. Schedule for next academic
training with professional workshops         offer annual trainings and         year will be determined by the
presented by faculty has been favorably      professional workshops to field    department chair and field
received. Participants report that           supervisors and other social       coordinator
trainings are very helpful for their roles   workers in the area.
as field supervisors and workshops are
quite beneficial. For the two workshops
offered this past academic year
participants reported scores of 4.60 and
4.72 out of a possible 5.0.
F. After examining course objectives and     F. New assessment                  F. New assessment
recorded benchmarks, the data indicate       measurements will be created,      measurements will be in place
that the curriculum is meeting program       linking course and program         before the beginning of the fall
objectives. One area that needs ongoing      objectives. The faculty assigned   2011 semester spearheaded by
attention is meeting benchmarks for          to research will attend CSWE       program director
research. Often undergraduate students       workshop(s) on teaching
with limited experiences in the field do     research and access other
not immediately understand the need to       resources as needed.
know researcher methods and the
importance of employing empirical
methods when practicing their
professions.
G. There is a need to capture pre and        G. A new assessment tool has       G. Pre and post program
post program knowledge and skill levels.     been created with each faculty     assessment tool will be
The previous tool was not linked to          member contributing items for      administered at the beginning of
program objectives thus a new tool is        measurement in the entire          Social Work Observation course
needed. The question arose, at what          core curriculum. Data will be      and again upon completing field
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             Lessons Learned                            Action Plan               Date and Responsibilities         English (United States)
point in the program should data be         analyzed by cohorts rather         practicum.
collected and how do we create valid        than individual student scores
and reliable instruments that will          as it will be difficult to track
measure whether benchmarks are being        student scores since our
met?                                        students do not remain in the
                                            same cohort as they
                                            matriculate through the
                                            curriculum.
H. The University is encouraging            H. Student portfolios will be      H. Students entering the social
departments and schools to experiment       piloted among a few students       work program this fall semester
with diverse assessment methods in          in the social work program. The    will be given the opportunity to
order to validly measure program            intent is to link this process     create an electronic portfolio.
outcomes. One method that is being          with program objectives.           This will be on a volunteer basis.
promoted by the University is student
portfolios currently being used in the
School of Education. Whether portfolios
would enhance social work students’
abilities to meet program benchmarks
and obtain employment is under
discussion.
I. Alumni and agency surveys were           I. Surveys will be developed by    I. Alumni and agencies will be
beneficial three years ago in clarifying    the Program Director with          surveyed this summer (2011) by
program objectives and improving the        input from faculty linking         faculty. The exit interview will
curriculum. It is our primary program       survey questions with program      be redesigned by department
objective to prepare students with the      objectives in mind. The exit       chair before the end of the fall
behaviors, knowledge and values             interview for students will be     semester and be used for
needed for successful and effective         similarly revised to more          graduates.
careers.                                    clearly align with program
                                            objectives.
J. The Social Work Program Advisory         J. Roles and responsibilities of   J. The department chair will
Council, consisting of graduates of the     the board were identified and      present this assessment report
LU BSW program, local master level          placed in writing during the       to the Advisory Council in 2011
social work practitioners, and field        past academic year.                for their input and feedback
directors are eager to play an advisory                                        regarding evaluating program
role in the ongoing development of the                                         objectives and meeting program
social work program. Their input has                                           benchmarks. Date to be
assisted faculty with improving program                                        determined by chair.
admissions policies and practices,
aligning field objectives with program
objectives, and curriculum development.
K. The admissions process continues to      K. Feedback from the interview     K. Department chair will review
be refined with the assistance of the       is provided in writing to the      application process with
Advisory Council. The objectives for this   students. For those students       Advisory Council at a date to be
interview experience for our students       where concerns surfaced they       determined by the chair.
are to enhance program objectives 2, 5,     receive a letter and a personal
7, 8, 10. Students prepare an admission     feedback session, either with
packet consisting of professional goal      their advisor and/or the
statement, reference letters, and           department chair. A success
resume. Each applicant is interviewed by    plan is developed with the
faculty and advisory board members.         student to address those
This experience prepares students for       concerns. In the case of
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             Lessons Learned                             Action Plan               Date and Responsibilities         English (United States)
their practicum and post-graduation          someone not accepted to the
career interviews.                           program there is a face to face
                                             meeting with the chair to
                                             evaluate the situation and
                                             determine if they should
                                             reapply or to help direct them
                                             to a more suitable major.
L. St. Charles County has the fastest        L. Infusion of gerontology         L. Future offering of an
growing aging population in the              content throughout the             interdisciplinary elective in
metropolitan area according to the 2010      curriculum will better prepare     gerontology will be discussed at
census (ages 65-74, increased +58            our students for the regional      a date to be determined by the
percent). These facts will impact job        employment market. Faculty         department chair.
opportunities for our students and           will meet to discuss how this
require knowledge and skills for             can be emphasized in human
effective practice.                          behavior, practice, research,
                                             and policy courses.
M. Changes in course design,                 M. Faculty will revisit            M. Per Department Chair
assignments, lesson plans, activities, and   assignments and readings in        directives, faculty will revisit
guest speakers are an ongoing process.       each course and practicum to       each syllabus and text book to
Most courses have new textbooks since        assess how program objectives      evaluate for measureable
academic year 2009 – 2010, which are         are being met. The NASW Code       outcomes aligned with program
written and designed to support EPAS         of Ethics and ethical case         objectives and core
core competencies. As faculty become         studies will continue to be        competencies. The curriculum
more familiar with these competencies,       integrated, with the goal of       will be identified and assesses as
course outcome measurements will be          achieving program benchmarks       Implicit and Explicit categories
more aligned with program objectives.        2, 3, 4, 8, 10.                    per EPAS.
N. Students are required to meet with        N. Being aware of this has         N. Per department chair
faculty advisors prior to registration.      reinforced the need for clear      guidelines, faculty will review
However, once the faculty signs off on       communication with students        class rosters prior to the
students’ registration they can access       that any changes in registration   beginning of the semester to
the system and change their                  need to be approved by their       ensure that students have met
registration. This creates problems for      faculty advisor.                   pre-requisites and are taking
students taking courses in sequence and                                         courses in sequence; a rubric for
meeting pre-requisites.                      Secondly, faculty advising will    advising procedures will be
                                             require a rubric for linking       developed by program director
                                             advising to program objectives.    with faculty input and approved
                                                                                by the chair by October 1, 2011.

Current and Emerging Issues:

SW45000 Field Practicum

Since field education is the signature pedagogy for program assessment, the 10 core competencies
are operationalized into foundational behaviors demonstrated in the field during both the service
learning and the practicum.

The following practices are being put into place for academic year 2011-12.

Revised Rubric
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During the summer of 2011 we will update the final field evaluation form to become more user              English (United States)
friendly by moving the scored items into a rubric format more clearly aligned with the CSWE core
competencies. This will hopefully aid the field instructors and students to more easily evaluate the
students’ strengths and weaknesses related to areas of competency.

Educational Learning Agreement Guideline

The ELA is a formal document with two basic elements: Part I has a description of agency and
expectations of student and field instructor in terms of hours and supervision. Part II is to include
for each learning goal, (1) specific tasks and activities designed to demonstrate learning, and (2)
behavioral monitoring/evaluation criteria designed to demonstrate how the field instructor will
know the student has mastered this learning.

Specific tasks and activities

An identification of these activities evolves in consultation with the field instructor. The activities
should provide an opportunity for the student to assume the role of a social worker under the field
instructor’s guidance and supervision. A minimum of two activities are required for each learning
goal.

        Example of activities

                    Related to attaining knowledge:
                     o Reading and/or formal research
                     o Systematic observation and/or consultation
                     o Discussions with producers or consumers of service
                     o Attending meetings
                     o Interviews
                    Related to attaining skills:
                     o Observing or co-conducting interventions
                     o Practice in simulated situations
                     o Engaging in planned interactions with clients
                    Related to clarifying/attaining values:
                     o Observing how other professionals resolve value conflicts
                     o Writing about one’s values
                     o Discussions with others regarding values/ethical issues or controversies

Behavioral monitoring/evaluation criteria

Criteria are the expectations that will be used by the field instructor to determine if the activities
have been adequately performed and/or performed with excellence. Criteria should relate to both
the quality of the performance and to the student’s ability to integrate the learning of the activity
specified with its learning objective. Sometimes a product may be specified (e.g., a paper, a
presentation, a report). Evaluation methods are the means for measuring performance factors.
They should be observable and include such things as student/instructor conferences, direct
observation of the student’s work, audiovisual tapes, case files, presentations, and other written
material submitted by the student. Evaluation criteria and methods must be explicit and as detailed
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as possible in the ELA. Criteria should be stated in such a way that an outside observer could assess    English (United States)
the student’s level of performance.

          Examples of behavioral monitoring/evaluation criteria are as follows:
                 Field instructor will review case files for thoroughness and accuracy.
                 Field instructor will observe student at staff meetings, to assess professional
                     conduct and presentation.
                 Field instructor will assess student’s value clarification in weekly supervision
                     meetings.
                 Field instructor will observe student in client interactions.

The field instructor will randomly monitor students’ computer data entries for accuracy and
timeliness.




Surveys

Alumni and agency survey questions are directly linked with the 12 program objectives. Since the
last surveys were conducted in 2008 and surveys are conducted every three years, the summer of
2011 surveys will be conducted. Revised survey questions will be directly linked to each program
objective based upon the CSWE accreditation standards.



                       School of Human Services Analysis

Christian Ministry Studies

          A change in the leadership of the CMS program has led to a complete restructuring
          of the program’s assessment efforts, but there are areas for further consideration.
          Assessment in the core courses on a regular basis would be valuable. Program
          objectives need to be created that are more specific and measurable. The program
          needs to ask if there is a level of improvement the department looks for in classes or
          a level of overall achievement. Is there a level of knowledge that the program wishes
          to reach in each of its classes, such as 70 percent of students scoring 60 percent or
          more on the post-test? The program also needs to ask how assessment impacts the
          courses. Is the department seeing any strengths or weaknesses? And how will the
          weaknesses be address once they have been identified? When doing a graduation
          survey, asking if a course was “memorable” may not get the department the
          information it is looking for.
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Criminal Justice                                                                                English (United States)



    The CJ program is makings strides toward creating a comprehensive system for
    looking at the program. The use of comprehensive pre- and post-tests, given in the
    first required course and given again in the capstone, will provide some useful
    information as cohorts are compared at the beginning and the end of the program.
    But this likely only measures knowledge and other skills required for CJ students.
    There are some areas for improvement. Assessment needs to be tied to the
    program’s desired outcomes. There is little discussion of specifics in assessment.
    How has assessment led the program to change its classes? Or has it? The faculty
    should look at more qualitative issues such as improvements in writing; this is of
    particular concern for CJ majors. What does the department expect as levels of
    achievement in classes and in the program? How will the faculty measure the
    success of the program? Make sure that assessment tools reflect the program and
    class goals, so it is professor-proof; assessment tools should work for any professor
    who teaches the class.

Nonprofit Administration
    The faculty has made adjustments to classes and the program but the comments
    tend to be very general and give limited insight into the process or the results. What
    specifically were the results for assessment? What did the faculty members learn
    about their classes from this year’s assessment? What are the program’s strengths
    and weaknesses? How will assessment lead to changes in the classes or the
    program? The student outcomes can be better defined to make measurement
    clearer.

Social Work
    The department has a comprehensive student assessment program, which it has had
    in place for a number of years and is providing good data on students. What was
    learned about the program from the number of students being employed or going to
    grad school? On the students’ self-assessments, are there any particular areas in
    each class in which students feel stronger or weaker? What are the program’s
    strengths and weaknesses based on assessment, and what is the program going to
    do about the results?
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                          School of Humanities                                                      English (United States)




The School of Humanities is made up of seven departments: English, English Preparedness,
Foreign Languages, History, Philosophy, Political Science, and Religion. The school prepares
students for graduate education and for employment in these fields. Three departments in
particular - English, Foreign Languages, and History - prepare a large number of students for
work in secondary education. The School of Humanities offers the largest number of GE
classes and also supports the largest number of student enrollments in the traditional day
programs.

Degrees offered by the School of Humanities:

Bachelor of Arts in
    English
    French
    General Studies
    History
    International Studies
    Philosophy
    Political Science
    Public Administration
    Religion
    Spanish

Teacher Certification in
    English 9-12
    Social Sciences 9-12
    French K-12
    Spanish K-12

Minors
    Creative Writing                                    Philosophy of Religion
    English Literature                                  Social and Political Philosophy
    French                                              History of Ideas
    Spanish
    History
    Social Studies
    Philosophy
    Political Science
    Public Management
    Religion
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English                                                                                                    English (United States)



Program Objectives
Graduates of the degree program in English (with emphases in literature or creative writing)
should demonstrate

      a clear, mature prose style that contains sentence variety, appropriate diction, and
       concrete detail,
      critical acumen through sophisticated research, insightful interpretation of materials
       and creative approaches to problem solving,
      mastery of grammar, usage, punctuation, spelling, and mechanics,
      competence in a variety of written forms (depending on the emphasis), including the
       critical essay, short fiction, poetry, drama, technical reports, magazine writing, and so
       forth,
      factual knowledge of literary history and tradition, including major authors and works,
       literary movements and periods, schools of literary criticism, and the chronology of this
       history.

Method of Assessment Used
Senior Assessment

In English courses numbered 200 and above, two copies of assigned papers are collected from English
majors: one is graded and returned to the student; the other is placed in the student’s portfolio.

We have instituted a scoring rubric whereby individual portfolios can be assessed directly using
elements from our program objectives to make the results quantifiable and to reflect clearly those
objectives. Faculty members (privately and anonymously) read the portfolios and rate them on a scale
of 1 to 5 (1=unacceptable, 2=below average, 3=average, 4=good, and 5=excellent) in the following six
areas: variety of style, critical acumen, sophistication of research, command of language, growth as a
writer, and capacity for graduate study.
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Results                                                                                                                   English (United States)



The following results are drawn from the 10 literature majors who graduated in May of 2011:

Area                                 Average Score by Area
Variety of Style                               3.7
Critical Acumen                                3.5
Sophistication of Research                     3.4
Command of Language                            3.5
Growth as a Writer                             3.4
Capacity for Graduate Work                     3.5
Average Score                                  3.5


Lesson Learned

Evaluations of this year’s portfolios evidenced some dramatic divergence in scoring.

Among this year’s graduates, four of 10 showed the ability to do graduate-level work. Overall, students
exhibit a lack of commitment to learning as shown in the analysis below.

The following statement from 2009-10 still applies to this year’s graduates: “Again, these results
correspond with individual faculty comments throughout the year regarding the lower quality of our
majors. Among the weaknesses was a lack of critical and creative comment. Thesis statements were
seldom strongly asserted. There was frequently a dependence on secondary sources and inadequate
analysis of the primary text.” Readers noted “the continued presence of idiosyncratic weaknesses on
the part of individual students (unfocused paragraphs, incorrect pronoun reference).”

Additional observations include a lack of synthesis and development of both primary and secondary
source materials, a tendency toward formulaic expression in phrasing and vocabulary (“In this paper, I . .
.”; “relatable”; “in order to . . . , one must . . .”; “in conclusion, I . . .”), a lack of sophistication in research,
and inattention to grammar (e.g., pronoun agreement and case, and misuse of prepositions), and the
mechanics of MLA documentation.


Action Plan
English faculty should continue to encourage English major advisees to enroll in English 30200,
Advanced Writing and Research, as soon as possible after completing English Comp. II. This step might
help students improve their mechanics, formatting, and writing ability. Additionally, the plan in progress
to include more literary analysis in the freshman composition sequence should address some
weaknesses.

As soon as this report is complete, we will forward it to the English faculty with the request that it be on
the agenda for the next department faculty meeting. In the meeting, we plan to discuss the meaning of
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terms on the assessment rubric, for example, “growth as a writer” and “command of language.” We will       English (United States)
also discuss whether we should be more strident in our responses to and evaluations of student essays
in every class. We will address the problem of essay collection by consulting with IT about establishing
an electronic folder for each English major, into which faculty will deposit student essays from
Turnitin.com each semester. And we will continue to solicit input from M.A. faculty for additional
perspective in the assessment process.

The department will also consult with faculty from other departments of humanities concerning their
assessment methods and results for comparison.

The department also recommends that faculty redouble our efforts to recruit strong English majors by
encouraging prospective students from composition and survey classes to join the department as well as
improving outside recruitment.



English Preparedness Program

Our recommendations for the placement of non-native speakers depend on their placement
test scores, their writing sample, and their previous experience in institutions of higher
education in the United States. Students may move up to other levels depending on exit exam
scores, portfolio review, and professor recommendations. All EPP Writing courses require a C
or better to move to the next level.

Courses Assessed
EPP 10000 Basic English Grammar, EPP 10100 Advanced English Grammar for Non-Native
Speakers, EPP 10500 Reading and Writing for Non-Native Speakers, EPP 10600 Reading and
Writing for Non-Native Speakers II, EPP 11000 Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers EPP
12000 Spoken Communication and Pronunciation for Non-Native Speakers EPP 15000 English
Composition I for Non-Native Speakers

Important Changes to the English Preparedness Program
In fall 2010, all courses in the English Preparedness Program became 10000 level, credit-bearing
courses. At its inception, the EPP offered non-credit bearing classes in Level I (the level
designed to meet the needs of the most basic English speakers and writers). This important
change was made for three major reasons:

          To correct discrepancies in transfer credits
           o EPP courses now mirror ESL courses offered by similar colleges and universities
               in credit-bearing capacity. Before, discrepancies arose from students who
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               transferred in equivalent ESL courses that counted as credit-bearing classes,            English (United States)
               while many of our courses did not.

          To encourage academic seriousness
           o Making all courses 10000 level, credit-bearing classes may also have a
               psychological effect. Students tend to take courses more seriously, and view
               them as academically necessary, if they count towards their degree.

          To improve student attitude
           o We want students to see the English Preparedness Program as an opportunity to
               improve their English skills, not as a punishment for performing poorly on
               placement tests. Anecdotal evidence suggests offering all courses at the 10000
               level has greatly improved students’ attitudes and enthusiasm.

Method of Assessment
Similar to the two previous years, all first-year incoming international non-native English
speakers were tested with the English Placement Test (an objective 100-question test) and
asked to give a writing sample via the computer program criterion. From these two results,
each student was placed in the appropriate level of EPP. At the end of the semester, each
student who tested into Level I: Beginning took another version (the same format and difficulty
level) of the English Placement Test and were asked to write another short essay in response to
a similar writing prompt, again using the criterion computer program.

Results
Level I: Beginning Students

This program was designed and developed to meet the academic needs of those non-native
speakers who struggle the most with their English language abilities. The four courses designed
for Level I, EPP 10500 - Reading and Writing for Non-Native Speakers, EPP 10600 - Reading and
Writing for Non-Native Speakers II, EPP 10000 - Basic Grammar for Non-Native Speakers, and
EPP 12000 - Spoken Communication for Non-Native Speakers will be evaluated as a whole.

EPP 10500 - Reading and Writing for Non-Native Speakers

Course Goals

To develop a mature writing style, aiming at clarity, cohesion, and correctness; to learn how to
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apply the rules of grammar and punctuation; to increase reading comprehension and learn                  English (United States)
various reading strategies.

Course Objectives

   This course will focus on

              developing and applying knowledge of standard English grammar and
               mechanics,
              practicing and using brainstorming techniques to generate paper topics,
              fostering the importance of revision and peer-critiques,
              becoming an independent writer who can write with confidence every time you
               are impelled or challenged to write,
              developing and employing reading strategies,
              increasing reading comprehension and vocabulary.

EPP 106: Reading and Writing for Non-Native Speakers II

Course Goals

To develop a mature writing style, aiming at clarity, cohesion, and correctness; to read and
respond critically to a variety of topics; to develop reading and writing strategies effective for
future study.

Course Objectives

   This course will focus on

              continuing to develop a knowledge of standard English grammar and mechanics,
              fostering the importance of revision and peer-critiques,
              becoming an independent writer who can write with confidence,
              utilizing strategies to increase the speed and comprehension of reading.

EPP 10000 - English Grammar

Course Goal

English 10000 will improve students’ understanding of English grammar and mechanics to make
coherent and cohesive academic work.
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Course Objectives                                                                                         English (United States)


         Establish the use of English within the content-based instruction.
         Identify and correct specific grammar errors.
         Apply English grammar to writing and subsequent courses.

EPP 12000 - Spoken Communication for Non-Native Speakers

Class Objective:

The purpose of this class is to improve listening and speaking skills of non-native speakers.
Speaking skills include pronunciation, inflection, stress, and projection. This class will also
address cultural differences and expectations of a Western audience based on certain
standards of body language such as eye contact and comprehensible physical gestures. This
class will incorporate individual work, small group work, and class work to improve skills which
are vital socially and academically in American society.

Results

In 2008-09, the average score for incoming non-native speakers who tested into Level I:
Beginning was 62 percent. Last year (2009-10), that average fell to 55 percent. This academic
year (2010-11), the average fell once more to 53.6 percent. Once again, the numbers suggest
that the group of students this past year was, on average, lower in language abilities than the
previous groups. However, by the end of the year, most students made impressive gains, and
the post-test scores show an 11.8 percent improvement, higher than the years before.

The results below show the promise and success of the English Preparedness Program.

As stated earlier, all incoming non-native speakers were tested using two methods: the EPT
(100-point objective test) and a writing sample using criterion. The results of the pre- and post-
EPT tests are given below.

The English Placement Test:

The English Placement Test contains four different sections:
    Listening (20 questions)
    Grammar (30 questions)
    Vocabulary (30 questions)
    Reading Comprehension (20 questions)
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                                                                                                                      English (United States)
English Placement Test Averages
                              Pre-Test %                 Post-Test %                  Change %
All Students                   53.627                        65.294                    11.862


English Placement Test Averages by Section
                                 Pre-Test             Post-Test          Pre-Test %      Post-Test %   Change %
                                 Correct               Correct
       Listening                  12.039               13.529              60.19            67.65        7.46
       Grammar                    15.137               19.078              50.45            63.59       13.14
      Vocabulary                  17.843               20.941              59.47            69.80       10.33
    Reading Comp.                  9.38                12.66               46.90            63.30       16.40


First Semester Students
 Pre-Test %        Post-Test %            Change %
   53.09              65.91                 12.82


EPP 10600 Second Semester Students (those who have completed two semesters of EPP)
 Pre-Test %         Post-Test %            Change %
    57.00             61.428                 4.43


Comparative English Placement scores, 2008-2011
                        2008-09               2009-10                 2010-11
Pre-Test %               61.68                 54.97                   53.627
Post-Test %              71.68                 66.32                   65.294
Change                   10.00                 11.35                   11.862

Program Improvement
                   2008-09        2009-10           2010-11       Change %
 Change %          10.00 %         11.35%           11.862             1.862


Criterion Writing Sample

Using criterion has allowed for more transparency and accuracy when placing students in the
appropriate level of EPP. In addition, criterion can be used to examine different aspects of
student writing, from the number of specific errors to word count and cohesion.

Criterion Essay Results - Word Count

The results below are both quantitative and qualitative. Most students were able to produce
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more writing in the same time limit, proving that they had grown more comfortable and prolific             English (United States)
as writers in English.

               Pre-Test      Post-Test        Change
Average         324.48        443.09          118.70

Criterion Essay Results - Scores

The students’ writing developed more description and detail, their sentence structures became
more varied and comprehensible, their grammar mistakes decreased, and their organization
became clearer and more direct over the period studied. Student improvement was
widespread with 12.5 percent (seven out of 56) of students increased their scores by 33
percent; 29 percent of students increased their scores by 50 percent; 25 percent of students
increased their scores by 100 percent; and approximately nine percent (five students) increased
their scores by 200 percent. Even the writing of the students who, according to the computer
program, did not increase their scores numerically improved in terms of comprehensibility and
word count.

              Pre-Test    Post-Test      % Increase
Average         2.09         3.11          1.02


Lessons Learned Beginning Level I
As the numbers show, this was a challenging year for the program. Of the 51 students who
tested into Level I, 65 percent scored 60 or lower on the English placement test, and 36 percent
scored 50 or below (a good indicator of student need). The students admitted required a good
deal of assistance, intervention, skill development, and academic adaptation.

Most students showed marked improvement in all areas.

The grammar score continues to climb with students improving their scores by 13 percent on
average. EPP 10000: English Grammar became one of the required courses for all students who
tested into Level I in fall 2009. The grammar course has been refined to include more practical
assignments in writing and reading in order to recognize and use correct grammar in academic
settings.

Both the vocabulary and reading comprehension scores rose by 10 percent and 16 percent
respectively. The two reading and writing courses now include reading a novel as an
assignment, giving students a more sustained reading experience. Longer novels force students
to practice many of the reading strategies introduced in the course, especially those dealing
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with unfamiliar vocabulary and comprehending main ideas.                                                 English (United States)


Some of the most profound improvements can be seen in those whose initial scores were well
below the 65-70 percent cut-off score. Some of these students saw a 10-38 percent change in
their scores. Many students who had scored in the intermediate to high-intermediate initially
also showed improvement, albeit less dramatic.

The scores reinforce and reaffirm the need for many students, who tested into EPP 10500, to
take EPP 10600 as well, before they move onto to EPP 11000 and additional GE mainstream
courses.

The department is even more gratified with the improvement in student writing as seen by the
criterion test scores. Most students showed remarkable improvement, both in the quantity
and quality of their writing with 30 percent scoring four out of six, the score needed to test into
ENG 15000 or EPP 15000.

Level II: Intermediate

EPP 11000: Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers

Course Goals

The primary goal of Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers is to prepare students in the
fundamentals of written English. The philosophy behind EPP 11000 is to refresh and instill
competencies to assure success in the next level of education and life.

Course Objectives

This course will help students to

              generate writing using specific methods for inventing and elaborating ideas, for
               arranging these ideas to achieve a specific rhetorical purpose, for producing clear
               style, for revising, and for editing,
              develop prose that is well-organized and appropriate to a given situation,
              improve the style of sentences and paragraphs in order to meet the needs and
               purposes of audience,
              demonstrate understanding of the ways that language and communication
               shape experience, construct meaning, and foster community,
              increase self-awareness and confidence about writing.
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This course prepares the majority of students well enough to pass ENG 15000 with a C or                English (United States)
better, but the number could be higher. The department is currently developing a more
specific assessment tool to better evaluate the needs of non-native speaking students, and how
well EPP 11000 - Academic Writing and the newly added EPP 10100 - Advanced Grammar
course address those needs. This assessment tool will be piloted in fall 2011.

Office of Institutional Research Report

A report researched and written by the Office of Institutional Research in 2010 showed that
students who tested into Level II: Intermediate did not have the same level of success as those
who tested in and passed Level I.

The research discovered that students who successfully pass Level I and Level II of the program
pass ENG 15000 at the same rates as students who test into ENG 15000. Of the students who
successfully passed through Level I and then Level II of the program, 84 percent passed ENG
15000 with a C or better, a number that is comparable (85 percent) to those who tested into
ENG 15000. This discovery was profoundly gratifying, reaffirming that even those who enter
with very low scores and English language abilities, with enough determination and help, can
succeed at higher level English courses.

The report also reveals a possible area of improvement. Those students who tested directly into
Level II do not succeed in ENG 15000 at the same rate as those who pass through both Levels I
and II. According to the report, 73.3 percent of students who took EPP 11000 passed ENG
15000 with a C or better, 11 percent fewer than those who took both levels. The department
has long believed that students at the Intermediate Level II could benefit from additional hours
of English assistance (especially in the areas of writing and grammar).

In fall 2011, EPP 10100: Advanced English Grammar for Non-Native Speakers will be added to
the required course load for students testing into the Intermediate Level of EPP. We hope that
this course, which will stress practical grammar awareness and usage in academic reading and
writing assignments, will further develop student skills and writing abilities.

Level III: Advanced

Level III currently offers only one course: EPP 15000: English Composition for Non-Native
Speakers. We do not have assessment material for this course. We would like to use the same
or similar assessment tool as ENG 15000, and will do so once that assessment tool has been
finalized.

Foreign Languages
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Mission
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One of the distinguishing features of a liberal arts education is the study of a culture through its
language. Such a study offers insights into unfamiliar worlds that cannot be realized in any
other way. Current economic and political changes in the world have made the teaching and
learning of foreign languages even more necessary than before. According to the philosophy
statement of the Standards for Foreign Language Learning: Preparing for the 21st Century,
“language and communication are at the heart of the human experience,” and we “must
educate students who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in
a pluralistic American society and abroad.”

The department’s broader mission is to provide our students with the intercultural competence
necessary for this global society. In so doing, we can instill in our students informed and critical
perspectives regarding other cultures as well as our own.

Program Goals and Objectives
In keeping with the general principles outlined in our mission statement, our primary goal is to
prepare our students for citizenship in a multi-cultural, multi-lingual global community, with a
curriculum designed to meet the varying needs for linguistic competence in today’s world.
“Current trends in foreign language pedagogy emphasize the need to develop not only the
students’ oral proficiency, but their cultural literacy, as well” (C. Kramsch, “Foreign Languages
for a Global Age,” ADFL Bulletin 25:1 [Fall 1993]: 11). To this end, the Foreign Language
Department offers a comprehensive program of studies in French and Spanish, as well as a two-
year foundation course in German and two semesters of elementary Mandarin Chinese.

The aims of our program are

      in the first two years of study, the acquisition of functional language skills and the
       development of students’ understanding of the foreign culture and civilization through
       training in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in the target
       language,
      beyond the intermediate level, the refinement of language skills to achieve an advanced
       language proficiency and cultural awareness through significant exposure to the
       literature and culture of the country or countries studied,
      the opportunity to experience literary masterpieces in their original languages,
      enhanced knowledge of the traditions, achievements, and lifestyles of the international
       community and an appreciation of the differences and similarities among peoples,
      encouragement of travel and study in foreign countries,
      enhancement of students’ professional qualifications by fostering double majors, such
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       as language/education or language/business,                                                     English (United States)
      a foundation for graduate study in foreign languages and literatures,
      preparation of those who wish to become foreign-language teachers to meet the
       professional standards represented by the PRAXIS examinations.

With regard to the University’s mission statement, there are four major points that the Foreign
Language Department does particularly well:

      LU offers programs leading to the development of the whole person–an educated,
       responsible citizen of a global community.
           o Most well-educated people directly involved in the global community are able to
              communicate in more than just one language and to participate knowledgeably
              and responsibly in the community’s affairs. With our language, literature, and
              culture courses, we offer our students the opportunity to become such a person.
      Lindenwood is committed to providing an integrative liberal arts curriculum.
           o Most well-rounded liberal arts programs require students to complete one to
              two years of a single foreign language for graduation. Our department offers
              that possibility to all students.
      Lindenwood is committed to developing adaptive thinking.
           o Learning to speak a foreign language and to understand its culture is generally
              recognized as one of the most effective ways of freeing the individual from
              habitual, unreflected modes of thinking and speaking, opening him/her up to an
              appreciation of new ideas and situations and lending him/her flexibility in
              dealing with others.
      Lindenwood is committed to furthering lifelong learning.
           o The abilities mentioned in the preceding point are, of course, essential to lifelong
              learning.

French
FLF 31100 - French Conversation and Composition I

Methods of Assessment

      Pre-test given at the beginning of each semester containing items imbedded in the unit
       exams
      Analysis of scores on unit exams
      Student perception survey
      End-of-semester evaluations of the course
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Results

Assessment was based on seven students who took both the pre- and post-tests.
    On the pre-test, no students scored 50 percent or higher,
    On the two post-tests the scores were as follows:
         o Unit one - the average score was 82 percent, with two students earning an A,
             two earning a B, two earning a C, and one earning a D.
         o Unit two - the average score was 93 percent, with five students earning an A and
             two students earning a high B.

This was a particularly strong group! One reason students did so exceedingly well on the second
exam might be that the test was given on Wednesday of the last week of school, with the final
exam period designated for oral presentations. Possibly students had more time to devote to
studying the material at this earlier date, rather than during exam week.

Based on students’ own perception survey of their knowledge of this material, given at the
beginning and at the end of the semester, the students feel that their overall understanding of
French grammar and culture, oral proficiency, reading, listening, and writing skills have
improved.

Student evaluations of the course are not yet available, but will later serve to gauge students’
overall satisfaction with the course.

FLF 31200 - French Conversation and Composition II

Methods of Assessment

         Pre-test given at the beginning of each semester containing items imbedded in the unit
          exams
         Analysis of scores on unit exams
         Student perception survey
         End-of-semester evaluations of the course

Results

Assessment was based on eight students who took both the pre- and post-tests.
    On the pre-test, only three students scored 60 percent or higher
    On the two post-tests
         o Unit one - six of the eight students scored above 70 percent, an average of 73
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           o Unit two - seven of the eight students scored above 70 percent an average of 84
             percent

Based on students’ own perception survey of their knowledge of this material, given at the
beginning and at the end of the semester, the students feel that their overall understanding of
French grammar and culture, oral proficiency, reading, listening, and writing skills have
improved.

Lesson Learned - FLF 31100-31200 Sequence

The department continues to be pleased with the reintroduction of FLF 31200 to the French
curriculum. Students greatly benefit from the additional course and the slower pace resulting
from covering the material in Bonne continuation over two semesters, rather than one.
Reading comprehension is monitored through chapter and cultural readings, chapter exams,
and homework assignments. Other reading work is still being considered: having each student
follow a daily newspaper of a different Francophone country to be reported upon in a journal
and orally to the class at regular intervals.

Writing skills are tested with each test and through compositions and presentations. Also,
dictées were introduced for the first time to this course. How to better use and evaluate dictées
will be further developed by the department chair this summer.

Listening comprehension is measured at regular intervals with each chapter test and is
monitored in a less structured way through class participation. Students are also required to do
listening exercises at regular intervals using the text’s CD-ROM. The students in this course
continue to express that they prefer these listening exercises to those used in the 20000-level
course. The instructor and students found them more interesting and useful than those usually
accompanying the texts.

Oral proficiency is monitored through class participation and through the evaluation of oral
presentations made during the semester. Students are evaluated on fluency, use of appropriate
grammatical structures, proper vocabulary, and pronunciation. Suggestions are given to
students who have trouble progressing orally. Oral proficiency is also measured through the
Conversation Partner Program. The program worked very well this semester, due to the
reliability and attitude of the native French speakers employed. Students’ feedback about this
element of the course is extremely positive. All felt they made great progress in being able to
express themselves with ease in French in this natural setting.

This year, the second oral presentation topic had to do with collective heritage. Students were
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asked to present their family’s cultural heritage. Allowing students to talk about themselves,           English (United States)
their families, and the region or country from which they come proved to be very rewarding.
Students spoke much more naturally than when presenting an artist or country or other topic
researched. This assignment will definitely be used again in the future.

Students’ overall satisfaction with the course was mixed, based on the end-of-semester
evaluations. The main complaint this year was again that the instructor did not base the
semester grade on the criteria set out in the syllabus. The instructor was asked to rectify this
situation based on the same issue having been noted the previous year, but did not. A new
instructor will be teaching the course in future.

Beginning in spring 2012, each Monday students will be expected to report on their activities of
the weekend. This will begin each class and serve to break the ice and get students talking
about themselves and their lives.

Also, beginning in spring 2012, students will be required to watch French television
programming online and possibly to subscribe to a French podcast. During the summer
months, the professor will develop a way to incorporate these into the FLF 31100-31200
curriculum.

FLF 33700: History of French Civilization

Methods of Assessment

         Perception survey given at the beginning and end of the semester
         Course grades
         End-of-semester evaluations of the course

Results

Results are based on 11 students taking a perception survey at the start and finish of the
semester. While the level of interest in the general history of French civilization was high to
start, the level increased from 4.6 to 4.8 on a scale of five. Levels of familiarity increased
strikingly in all areas as seen below.

Category                                                  Pre-test score    Post-test score
interest in history of French civilization                       3.9               4.3
familiarity with the French Middle Ages                          2.1               3.9
familiarity with the French Renaissance                          1.9               3.7
familiarity with the French Enlightenment                        1.8               4.2
familiarity with the French Revolution                           2.0               4.2
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Category                                                          Pre-test score    Post-test score              English (United States)
familiarity with the Napoleonic period                                   2.1               3.9
familiarity with France’s role in WWI                                    2.4               3.1
familiarity with France’s role in WWII                                   2.4               3.3
                                      th
familiarity with the politics of the 5 Republic                          1.2               3.9
familiarity with the French educational system                           2.1               4.1
familiarity with contemporary French society                             2.1               4.0
familiarity with the mindset of the average French citizen               2.5               4.4
0=no familiarity and 5=very familiar

The department considers the results very satisfactory.

Pre-test scores are higher than in past years due to the presence of three French students in
the class. They had more knowledge, especially of contemporary French culture, than the
others. There were also several students in the class who had spent the semester abroad in
Caen. These students also had more familiarity with French culture than those who had not
studied abroad yet.

The students’ grades were based on participation (10 percent), writing assignments (25
percent), quizzes (10 percent), an oral report (five percent), and three exams (totaling 50
percent). Six students earned an A, three earned a B, one a C, and one an F. Overall, it was a
strong group.

This year, for the second time, French students came to explain the French educational system
to the class. The first time we did this, the French students were invited in from the outside. In
2010, they were enrolled in the class. Both times it was a very successful experience and will be
continued.

Based on end-of-semester evaluations, students’ overall satisfaction with the course was very
high. This is an improvement over the experiment of the previous year, with a new instructor
and new textbook, both oriented toward the high-school level.

FLF 35000 - Masterpieces of French Literature up to 1800

Methods of Assessment

         Perception survey given at the beginning and end of the semester
         Analysis of scores on midterm and final exams
         End-of-semester evaluations of the course

Results
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Results are based on 14 students taking a perception survey at the start and finish of the
semester. At the beginning of the semester students were asked to indicate their familiarity
with various movements in French literature from the middle ages to the end of the 18th
century. When asked to list authors/works from the various periods, one student named two
medieval texts, and two listed an 18th-century text, but nothing else in any other category,
which was surprising, as there were two native speakers in the class. By the end of the
semester, all students were familiar with many works and authors from each period.

Period                                                                      Pre-test score    post-test score
Medieval French literature and literary history                                  1.9                4.0
Renaissance French literature and literary history                               2.1                4.0
  th
17 -century French literature and literary history                               2.2                4.0
  th
18 -century French literature and literary history                               2.1                4.3
Perceived interest in French literature and literary history                     3.8                4.3
1=no knowledge and 5=very familiar

The class spent more time on medieval and 17th-century literature than on the other periods
and the least time on the 18th century. End-of-semester perceptions might be based more on
how recently the period in question was studied than on time spent studying it.

Midterm and final essay exams demonstrated a varying mastery of material, though most did
better than average. There were two native speakers in the class, and among the non-native
speakers, one was very weak. Midterm exam grades broke down as follows:

        two scoring above 90 percent
        eight scoring above 80 percent
        three scoring above 70 percent
        one scoring above 60 percent

On the final exam, results were even better:
    six scored above 90 percent
    six scored above 80 percent
    one scored above 70 percent
    one very weak student failed

Reading comprehension and writing skills are assessed through the reading journals and exams.

Oral proficiency and listening comprehension are assessed through class participation and
through the presentation of oral explications de texte. All but one student scored above 80
percent on this assignment, which is quite demanding (and the one who got a D was a native
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speaker). Learning to do an explication de texte is considered to be an important tool for                  English (United States)
literary analysis, and this course will continue to dedicate a couple weeks to this component.

Students’ overall satisfaction with the course was very high, based on the end-of-semester
evaluations.

FLF 35100 - Masterpieces of French Literature since 1800

Methods of Assessment

         Perception survey given at the beginning and end of the semester
         Analysis of scores on midterm and final exams
         End-of-semester evaluations of the course

Results

At the beginning of the semester eight students were asked to indicate their familiarity with
various movements in French literature from the 19th and 20th centuries. When asked to list
authors/works from the various periods, one student named one 19th-century and one 20th-
century author. By the end of the semester all students were familiar with many works and
authors from each period. The following table indicates the increase in overall familiarity with
each period of French literature from these two centuries that were to be studied over the
course of the semester:

Period                     Pre-test Score      Post-test Score
Romanticism                     2.0                  4.2
Realism                         1.8                  4.1
Naturalism                      1.9                  3.9
  th
20 -century poetry              2.0                  3.0
Existentialism                  1.7                  4.3
New Novel                       1.2                  4.2
Scale 1=no knowledge and 5=very familiar

When students were asked to indicate their level of interest in the literature of the 19th and 20th
centuries, the average was 3.4 at the beginning of the course and 4.3 at the end. Six of the
eight students demonstrated satisfactory mastery of all of the material on the midterm; two
cheated on the midterm and received zeros. All of the students demonstrated a satisfactory
mastery of material on the final essay exam. The exams yielded the following results:


                                   th                                  th
                        Midterm (19 century)             Final Exam (20 century)
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90 or above                         2                                      2                                       English (United States)
80 or above                         3                                      4
70 or above                         1                                      1
60 or above                         0                                      1
Below 60                    2 (both cheated)                               0
Overall average       83% (without the 2 zeros)          79%


The use of reading journals was introduced for the first time this year, and the process was
found produce very favorable results. For almost every class, almost every student prepared all
readings and was ready for informed class discussion. This practice will be continued in all
literature courses in the future.

Reading comprehension and writing skills are assessed through the reading journals and exams.

Oral proficiency and listening comprehension are assessed through class participation.
Student evaluations of the course are not yet available.


FLF 40000 - Francophone Literature

Methods of Assessment

         Perception survey given at the beginning and end of the semester
         Analysis of scores on midterm and final exams
         End-of-semester evaluations of the course

Results

Results are based on four students taking a perception survey at the start and finish of the
semester. They were asked to rate their level of familiarity with various areas of the material to
be studied in the course. Levels of familiarity increased strikingly in all areas as seen below:

Category                                                              Pre-test Score    Post-test Score
interest in reading Francophone literature and learning about              4.5                4.7
Francophone cultures
familiarity with Francophone literature in general                         1.2                4.1
familiarity with French colonial history                                   2.2                4.1
familiarity with the history and culture of Martinique                     1.5                3.9
familiarity with the history and culture of Senegal                        1.5                4.1
familiarity with the history and culture of Algeria                        2.1                4.5
proficiency in using the MLA style for writing research papers             2.0                4.4
proficiency at using the library to obtain the resources needed to         2.0                4.6
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write a research paper in French                                                                           English (United States)
0=no familiarity and 5=very familiar

Research papers were submitted by the students at the end of the semester and showed
satisfactory literary research and a mostly acceptable mastery of MLA style.

This was the second time this course was offered, and it was very successful. Students’ overall
satisfaction with the course was very high, based on the end-of-semester evaluations.

FLF 36000 - Speaking of Art: The Pulitzer Project

As a January Term 2011 course, three students participated in a project wherein they learned to
give a guided tour in French of an exhibit at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, Dreamscapes.
The students made many trips to the Pulitzer throughout the January Term, familiarizing
themselves with the exhibit, practicing. However, the course continued through the semester,
as the students gave the tour to a group from Lindenwood, then to several groups of high
school students. It was a very enriching experience for our students. The class also served the
purpose of helping to form relationships with area students and teachers of French.

The assessment tool developed for this project asked students to rate their perceived levels of
interest or proficiency in the following areas. The following results show a satisfactory increase
in perceived competencies:

Category                                                   Pre-test Score      Post-test Score
Interest in art history                                         3.5                  4.5
Familiarity with the Surrealist movement                        1.8                  4.2
                     th
Familiarity with 19 -century European art                       1.5                  4.2
                     th
Familiarity with 20 -century European art                       1.7                  4.1
Proficiency at speaking about art in French                     2.3                  4.5
Proficiency at performing research in art history               1.4                  4.5
Proficiency at using the library to obtain resources            3.0                  4.7
0= poor and 5=excellent

Student evaluations of the course demonstrate that this was again a very enriching experience
for our students, who expanded their knowledge base into new areas and increased their
vocabulary substantially. For some who plan to teach at the secondary level in the future, it
was particularly rewarding to work with high school students and their teachers.

Study Abroad at the Université de Caen

Students are generally very pleased with the program, with the coursework, and with their host
family experience.
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       The students who participate in the program return with a very notable improvement in
        oral proficiency. They showed great improvement in the other skills (reading, writing,
        listening) as well. Needless-to-say, their cultural literacy is also improved and students
        tend to be more self-confident and mature upon returning.
       There have been no further complaints about host families. More attention is being paid
        to evaluations of the families and their locations so that LU students are now
        consistently placed with welcoming families living close to the university or to easy
        access to public transportation.

The assessment tool developed for this project asked students who participated in the fall
semester to rate their perceived levels of interest or proficiency in the following areas (spring
students have not yet finished their semester in Caen). The following results show a satisfactory
increase in perceived competencies:

Fall 2010
Category                                                              Pre-test Score    Post-test Score
Level of oral proficiency                                                    3.1                3.2
Level of listening comprehension                                             2.0                3.2
Level of reading proficiency                                                 3.5                3.1
Level of writing proficiency                                                 2.9                3.6
familiarity with contemporary French society                                 1.2                4.6
familiarity with the politics of contemporary France                         1.2                4.0
familiarity with the mindset of the average French citizen                   1.3                4.1
familiarity with French cuisine                                              2.0                4.6
familiarity with the history of French civilization                          1.7                3.2
familiarity with the geography of France                                     2.8                4.2
overall level of French cultural literacy                                    1.5                4.7
0= poor and 5=excellent

Of the four students in the group, one had had no previous instruction in French, one was
intermediate, and two were more advanced. The beginner’s end results were still rather low,
pulling the exit perceptions down.

One student took the DELF A2 exam and had the following results (Note: the DELF and DALF
exams are similar to the TOEFL exam in English):

Skill tested                        Student average
Oral comprehension                  72%
Reading comprehension               86%
Writing proficiency                 36%
Oral proficiency                    54%
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Two students took the DELF B1 and had the following average results:

Skill tested                   Student average
Oral comprehension             62%
Reading comprehension          76%
Writing proficiency            66%
Oral proficiency               60%

One student took the DELF B2 exam with the following results:

Skill tested                   Student average
Oral comprehension             78%
Reading comprehension          94%
Writing proficiency            70%
Oral proficiency               84%

It is to be noted that while these DELF and DALF scores appear low by American standards, the
scores they are based on (i.e., 19/25=71 percent) are seen as much better by French standards.
They need only a minimum of 5/25 on each part and an overall average of 50/100 to get
certified at each level. The department has asked that we be given some kind of midterm
progress report for all levels and more feedback about student work throughout the semester
but has never been granted this request.

As spring 2011 students have not yet finished their semester in France, their assessment results
could not be included in this report.

Assessment of Majors
All essay exams and research papers created by French majors have been stored in portfolios
since fall 2001. These document skills in writing and in literary criticism and are referred to in
particular when professors are asked to write letters of recommendation for students applying
to graduate school.

General Comments Pertaining to Assessment in French
Assessment tools have been developed for every course in the French curriculum. These
measuring tools will continue to evolve and improve as they are used and their effectiveness is
evaluated by the instructors.
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Spanish                                                                                                  English (United States)



FLS 31100 and 31200 - Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition


Methods of Assessment

Each course has its own pre-test and final test covering items having to do with advanced
vocabulary, grammar and culture studied during each semester. Both FLS 31100 and FLS 31200
were offered twice this year, one section each in the fall and one each in the spring. Of all total
34 FLS 31100 students, 36 have taken both the pre- and post-test, and of all 30 FLS 31200
students, 17 have taken both the pre- and post-test.

Results

FLS 31100 - Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I

N=36            > 60%      Average Score
Pre test           0            26
Post test         27           77.5

Scores on the final for all students broke down in the following fashion according to percentiles:
    90 or above: five
    80 or above: 14
    70 or above: 21
    60 or above: 25
    below 60: 27

FLS 31200 - Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II

N=17            > 60%      Average Score
Pre test           0            31
Post test         15            76

Scores on the final for all students broke down in the following fashion according to percentiles:
    90 or above: two
    80 or above: eight
    70 or above: 13
    60 or above: 15
    below 60: two
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Lessons Learned 30000 Level

Student’s overall satisfaction with this 30000-level course was high. Based on the students’ own
perception survey of their knowledge of this material (given at the beginning and at the end of
the semester), the students feel that their overall understanding of Spanish grammar,
vocabulary, culture, and oral proficiency have greatly improved thanks particularly to the
Spanish-only environment, small in-class group discussions, and the weekly meetings with their
Spanish conversation partners, who are all Spanish native speakers participating in our
Conversation Partner Program. Most students enjoyed researching and writing about different
cultural topics, for both their oral presentations as well as movie reports, which go along the
themes explored in the different movies we actively watch during the semester. In addition, the
end-of-semester course evaluations for both FLS 31100 and FLS 31200 offered positive
comments on the course overall, the performance of the instructor, the textbook, and the
constructive instructor’s oral and written feedback on the different assignments, despite the
challenging course workload. Media use is on the rise in these classes, both by the professor
and the students during their oral presentations. Finally, the instructor will keep the portfolio of
newspaper articles project for honors students in the FLS 31200 course, which was very popular
with the students who participated in and learned from it in class.

Listening comprehension continues to be measured at regular intervals with each chapter test
and is monitored in a less structured way through class participation (interaction with
instructor), with pairs during oral presentations, as well as during movie sessions.

Oral proficiency is measured through oral examinations, oral presentations, and the
Conversation Partner Program (required for both FLS 31100 and FLS 31200). Oral proficiency is
also monitored through class participation. Students are evaluated on fluency, use of
appropriate grammatical structures, proper vocabulary, and pronunciation. Suggestions are
given to students who have trouble progressing orally.

Reading comprehension is monitored through chapter and cultural readings, chapter exams,
and homework assignments.

Writing skills are tested with each test and through compositions and presentations.
As a consequence of the findings above, the instructor will continue focusing the FLS 31100 and
31200 courses series on conversation, cultural awareness, and advanced grammar. Specifically,
the instructor will continue developing more activities with vocabulary, more materials to
accompany the textbook to emphasis even more on advanced conversation, grammar
(adjective position, preterit/imperfect, subjunctive tenses, relative pronouns), and vocabulary
subtleties — all of which are now being posted on PC Common for students’ easy access. In
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addition, to reinforce the listening and oral skills of the students, the conversation partner for       English (United States)
FLS 31100 and FLS 31200 students will continue to be mandatory, and grammar review
handouts will be provided to the partners to give them material to work with, if the students
request it. The instructor will adjust the assessment tools to help measure the response of
students to these changes.

Culture and Civilization Courses: FLS 33500 - Peninsular Spanish Culture and Civilization, FLS
33600 - Latin American Culture and Civilization

Methods of Assessment

At the beginning of the semester in both courses, students were given a questionnaire on their
goals/expectations for the course and on various aspects of the culture (readings on the topic,
knowledge of geography and people, of historical or contemporary events or individuals, of
major cultural, social, or political movements in Spain/Latin America), as well as their level of
interest in the subject matter and their perceived levels of proficiency in the three aspects of
linguistic competence in Spanish needed for the course (reading, speaking, writing). It is
important to note that the presence of native speakers in all courses, while advantageous in
many respects, can skew the results of the language-proficiency part of the questionnaire and
makes it less useful as a statistical statement.

In general, the questionnaires showed a very limited knowledge of the material at the
beginning, even among the native speakers, including the usual confusion as to the origins of
many of the famous Spanish-language writers and historical figures they had already heard of,
failing to differentiate between peninsular Spanish writers and those from the various Spanish-
American countries. In answer to similar questions at the end of each course, students all
responded with greater detail and accuracy, but added comments such as “and much more” or
“too many to list.” The final questionnaires also included an opportunity to restate the initial
goals/expectations, asking whether the course had helped them in that endeavor. All most all
of the students felt that it had.

Results

FLS 33500 - Peninsular Spanish Culture and Civilization

Of the 15 students originally in the class, nine completed the course. Several of those who
dropped out felt that their command of Spanish was not yet adequate to the content level of
the course. At the end of the course, the participants expressed their satisfaction at having
delved so deeply into the prehistory and history of the Peninsula and their surprise at the many
ethnic currents that have contributed to Spanish culture and civilization. Their grades in the
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course of the semester also indicate that they achieved a fair to excellent grasp of the material.         English (United States)


FLS 33600 - Latin American Culture and Civilization

There were 10 students in the course. Two of them were native speakers of Spanish (U.S.
Hispanics); Portuguese (Brazilian) was the native language of another. All of the participants
expressed beginning and continued high interest in the subject matter and great satisfaction
with the course. Their responses to the content questions confirm an increase in specific
knowledge of the subject, compared to the vagueness and inaccuracy of the answers on the
initial questionnaire. With regard to their perceived levels of proficiency in reading, writing,
and speaking Spanish, some were quite proficient to begin with and remained so; some who
judged their initial level at three or four felt that they had improved by at least one level,
although writing remained the weakest category, as might be expected. Notable was the
improvement in reading proficiency in particular, indicated by several. This is significant, since
the FLS 33500/33600 culture courses are usually the first courses in which the language is used
as a learning tool, rather than the object of study. Most commented on having gained a greater
appreciation of the wide variety of historical and cultural aspects of the 19 Spanish-speaking
countries of Latin America and of the differences in attitudes and customs among the countries,
which they had initially assumed to be all the same.

Literary Masterpieces Courses: FLS 35000 - Masterpieces of Spanish Literature, FLS 35100:
Masterpieces of Latin American Literature

FLS 35000 - Masterpieces of Spanish Literature

At the beginning of the semester, students were asked to indicate their familiarity with various
periods in Spanish literary history. Nineteen students took the class; of those three were native
speakers of Spanish. Three students were able to identify the Poem of Mio Cid, and another
three identified Cervantes or Don Quixote, although one of them did not include it in the right
period. Another student recognized Becquer, and two of them named Garcia Lorca. At the
end, two students missed class the day the assessment was done. However, most of the
students who took the survey listed between two or three authors and/or works per period,
with an average of eight to 10 writers and/or works mentioned for the whole class. The
following shows the changes in overall perceived familiarity with each period.

Familiarity Levels                  1      1     2     2        3      3       4      4       5       5
                                   Pre   Post   Pre   Post    Pre     Post    Pre    Post    Pre    Post
Medieval / Renaissance             68%    6%    16%   12%     11%     59%     0%     18%     5%      6%
Enlightenment / Generation of 98   74%    0%    21%   12%      5%     53%     0%     29%     0%      6%
Civil War / Franco era             63%   6%     21%    6%     11%     29%     5%     53%     0%      6%
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1975 (Franco’s death) to Present     68%      6%     26%        6%        5%     35%     0%     41%     0%     12%   English (United States)
1 (no knowledge) to 5 (very familiar)

Most students expressed that they were interested in learning about Spanish culture and
literature but mostly expected to improve their Spanish language skills. Improving their
speaking skills was one of their top priorities. At the end of the semester, students were able to
write essays and give information about the different periods and writers in Spanish literature.
They mentioned being more confident in their oral skills. Their goal of learning about Spanish
literature and improving their speaking seemed to have been reached by the end of the
semester.

FLS 35100 - Masterpieces of Latin American Literature

There were six students in the class. All students were asked at the beginning of the semester
to indicate their familiarity with various periods in Spanish-American literary history, and only
one student could name one author. At the end, most students listed between four or six
authors and/or works per category, with an average of 10 to 12 per student. The following
shows the changes in overall perceived familiarity with each period as represented by the scale
already given above:

                                     1      1       2       2         3          3      4      4       5      5
                                    Pre    Post    Pre     Post      Pre       Post    Pre    Post    Pre    Post
Pre-colonial to Independence       100%    33%     0%      33%       0%         0%     0%     17%     0%     16%
Independence to
                                   83%     17%     17%     33%       0%        33%     0%     17%     0%     0%
“Posmodernismo”
“Boom”                             100%    17%     0%      0%        0%        33%     0%     33%     0%     16%
Present                            83%     17%     0%      0%        17%       0%      0%     33%     0%     50%


All the students expressed the goal of increasing their knowledge of Spanish-American history
and cultures as well as the general outlines of its different literary movements. Some also
expressed their desire to improve their Spanish language abilities in comprehension, reading,
and speaking. Several expressed that they felt the workload to be very hard at the beginning of
the semester, but as they improved in their writing and reading skills it become more
manageable. Many expressed that they enjoyed the readings although the homework was hard
and challenging. As in the previous semester, they liked the study guides that were provided
before the test.

Literary Seminars: FLS 40000 - Spanish Romanticism, FLS 42100 - The Spanish-American
Regional Novel
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FLS 40000 - Spanish Romanticism

There were originally six students in the course; one disappeared without explanation during
the second week, and another withdrew because she had enrolled in too many courses, not
having realized the amount of time required for literary study. The initial assessment
questionnaires for the remaining four stated their goals for the course as including learning
more about Spanish literature and the Spanish society of the era through the eyes of the
authors, learning to interpret Spanish literary works more deeply, and improving their reading
and speaking skills in Spanish, all of which were accomplished to varying degrees by the end of
the course.

The responses to the prior knowledge questions in the initial questionnaire indicated a very
vague idea of the romantic movement and showed the usual confusion between peninsular
Spanish and Spanish-American authors. By the end of the course, all of them exhibited a much
stronger grasp of the essentials of the movement, how it differed from other 19th-century
literary movements, the concerns of the individual authors, and the characteristics of the
genres involved.

The level of interest in the subject matter generally grew from average to very high, correlating
fairly clearly with the amount and intensity of individual engagement with the material (the
greater the personal involvement, the higher the interest level indicated). Films of the dramas
contributed to students’ interest in and understanding of the dramatic works, and their
analytical abilities grew as they improved their journal-keeping techniques.

There were three questions concerning the students’ background and proficiency in researching
and writing papers. The perceived proficiency levels varied, but showed a general tendency
toward improvement by the end of the semester. More certainly needs to be done in this area.

FLS 42100: The Spanish-American Regional Novel

There were four students in the class, one of which was a native speaker of Spanish and
another who was a native speaker of Portuguese (Brazilian). In the initial assessment, the
students expressed the desire to learn more about Spanish-American literature, to improve
vocabulary, and to gain greater skill in reading and fluency in speaking. At the end of the
course, all of the students felt that they had accomplished their initial goals and additional,
unexpected ones.

In response to the three prior-knowledge questions at the beginning of the semester, all
showed very limited knowledge, frequently naming peninsular Spanish authors and works
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rather than Spanish-American and confusing centuries. By the end of the course, they were               English (United States)
able to go into much greater detail, both naming at least the authors and works studied, with
additional information in some cases. The study of the history and politics of the early
twentieth century, as it concerned the search for national identity and the question of
civilization versus barbarism, was heavily involved here. That their knowledge had increased
notably in depth was confirmed by the term papers and the level of each student’s
contributions during the final colloquium.

Interest in the material was high to begin with, but generally rose in the course of the semester.
Research competence generally improved, as well, but still leaves ample room for
improvement.

Study Abroad: Costa Rica

Spring 2011 was the third time that the Spanish department organized the spring semester
study abroad in Costa Rica. All 12 students who started the 15-week program (all 12 at the
advanced level) completed it and filled out a thorough program evaluation.

According to these evaluations, it can be stated that all participants believe that our semester
abroad program continues to be a great success.

      Most students mentioned that they felt prepared both culturally and linguistically for
       the program and coursework thanks to the language requirements we have as a pre-
       requisite to their participation (FLS 31100/FLS 31200 and one upper-level culture or
       literature course), as well as the J-Term course (taught in the fall). The two students who
       wrote that they were not fully prepared linguistically for the program had completed
       the language requirements, but with weaker grades than other participants.
      Regarding the local school, the instructors and staff at Intercultural, every student
       highlighted how professional and organized they all were, how welcomed they felt, and
       how approachable everyone was. Whenever there were doubts or someone needed a
       review on grammar, students mentioned that the local instructors always complied. It
       appears that everyone enjoyed the intensive 4-hours-day of class format, as it was
       conducive to the full-immersion goal of this program.
      In the sections of the program evaluation in which students were asked to provide some
       constructive criticism, some suggested adding at least one more week of
       grammar/composition to the advanced writing workshop (currently a two-week course).
       Others suggested modifying the plays selection and the types/frequency of assignments
       in the theater course, especially being the last course and having to present in a play as
       part of the final project for this course.
      Finally, most students expressed that this experience of living and studying abroad was
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       a life-changing one. As in the past years, most mentioned it was the best four months of        English (United States)
       their lives. Thanks to their experience in Costa Rica, many students feel that they have a
       better appreciation of the many differences between their home country and Costa
       Rica. They also felt that their stay there helped them develop a deeper sense of curiosity
       for Latin America, Spain, and the world. Several students added that they would love to
       return to Costa Rica soon and perhaps live and study again in a foreign country in the
       near future.

Program Assessment
As can be seen from the above discussions of the French and Spanish 30000- and 40000-level
courses, we have a growing number of students doing upper-division work. As an example, a
survey of students in the Spanish program in fall 2010 resulted in 26 majors and 38 minors. The
last six academic years have seen an expansion of the French program to include a semester of
intensive work in France, which is attracting additional majors. The Spanish program has also
been expanded to require a semester of study in Costa Rica for majors; this is an option for
minors, as well, although the possibility of completing the minor on the Lindenwood campus
remains. Our upper-division students are frequently double-majors or minors, combining such
subjects as education, international business, or social work with their studies in the foreign
language, culture, and literature. Some students shy away from upper-division studies in this
field as soon as they recognize the time-consuming nature of such studies, as can already be
surmised from the remarks concerning workloads in the language-oriented courses. In view of
this continued apparent disinclination to invest the large quantities of time and effort required
by the field, the imposition of additional requirements over and above those of the individual
upper-division courses themselves still seems inadvisable. The assessment tools for individual
tasks within the courses can serve as evidence of overall achievement, as, for example, part of a
portfolio. As described above, beginning- and end-of-semester questionnaires are being used
in the 30000- and 40000-level culture and literature courses to gain some insight into the pre-
course and final levels of knowledge of the material. In many of the culture and literature
courses, an additional opportunity for specific insights into student evaluation of their
achievements is provided by the inclusion of an opinion question on the final: They are asked to
describe at least three ways in which they feel the course has benefitted them personally and
to explain why they consider these important. These benefits often involve not only increased
knowledge, but a change in attitudes toward personalities or events.

Reading Assessment

As one of the four basic skills of foreign-language learning, reading comprehension is something
that must be assessed throughout every course, frequently on a daily basis, in the course of
every exercise, whether the focus is on some point of grammar or on the skill of reading itself.
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As can be seen from the above descriptions of the Spanish and French finals at all levels,             English (United States)
reading assessment is already part of our procedures. It becomes especially pertinent at the
end of the first advanced conversation and composition courses (FLF 31100 / FLS 31100). These
courses are, respectively, the prerequisite for all upper-division literature courses, which
require reading comprehension as a starting point from which to advance toward other goals,
including text-analysis and interpretation.

The PRAXIS Exam

This year three of our majors in French and two in Spanish took and passed the PRAXIS exam.

Other “Outside” Feedback

In order to enhance our means of evaluating the effectiveness of our teacher preparation, we
have been participating in a program for the School of Humanities, the Survey of Cooperating
Teachers, began in fall 2007, to receive input from the supervising teachers at the schools
where our majors are doing their practice teaching. In addition to general questions about the
class/grade levels at which the student teacher is teaching and how well the student seems to
know the relevant material, etc., for foreign languages, we ask about student performance
regarding pronunciation of the target language, command of the grammar, ability to explain
the grammar clearly, cultural knowledge, ability to communicate that knowledge, and ability to
get the students to speak the foreign language in class. Additionally, there are questions
concerning breadth of knowledge and asking about areas of skill or knowledge that seem
particularly strong or particularly lacking. So far the responses have been extremely positive
throughout, with no mention of areas of skill/knowledge lacking, except occasionally in the field
of classroom management, which falls under the School of Education’s purview. We will
continue to follow up on our student teachers in this way as frequently as possible. It has,
however, become more difficult to do so, since a number of our students have found their own
positions as contract teachers and thus have no supervisor to whom we can direct our
questions.

Lessons Learned
Most of the specific efforts for the coming year have already been indicated above, including
the intensification of the experiential aspect of the French and Spanish programs through the
semester in France or Costa Rica, as well as the semester program being offered for study at
the university in Bochum, Germany. The department has also received approval for a semester
in Spain beginning with the 2012-13 academic year. The J-Term travel programs will continue
again this year, with trips to France, Germany, and Mexico. We also continue to encourage
individual students to take advantage of study opportunities in Spanish-speaking or other
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countries, as some have done in the past. To that end, we maintain the large bulletin board in         English (United States)
the department hallway with announcements of opportunities for study abroad, as well as for
graduate work in the fields of language and literature.

Roemer 304 continues to be designated for primary usage by foreign-language classes so that
the wall maps can be permanently exhibited and available for reference in class. The room is
also equipped for VCR, DVD, and PowerPoint presentations. The large, many-shelved closet
attached to R304 provides storage space for the wall maps not currently in use, the
French/Spanish library, and any instruction-related art books, DVDs, CDs, and other
supplemental material.

For students who would like to add depth to various aspects of their language, literature, and
cultural studies, many of our courses are being offered for honors credit. With the reactivation
of Lindenwood’s chapter of the national collegiate Spanish honor society in spring 2006, the
department now has active national honor society chapters in both French and Spanish, giving
added incentive and encouragement to our majors and minors to excel in their studies.

At the other end of the spectrum and impossible to measure, but very much in evidence
(especially at the elementary level), is the unwillingness of too many students to practice
intensively on a daily basis, something absolutely essential to establishing the reliable
foundation that is the goal of the course requirements at both the elementary and
intermediate levels, without which there can be very little linguistic self-assurance and
therefore no fun. Encouraging students to take this work seriously and to strive for linguistic
accuracy is an ongoing pedagogical challenge with no pat answers. Nevertheless, one tool that
can be used to attract many students is the opportunity to work with technology and to
practice with native speakers in a lab setting.

Recognizing this, we continue to strengthen this part of our program, requiring regular
laboratory practice as an essential component of the semester grade in the elementary and
intermediate courses, as well as the conversation partners program for specific courses beyond
the elementary level. Efforts to encourage and help arrange individual tutoring will continue, as
well, in connection with the language lab as a center and by other means (i.e., peer volunteers).
Internet access and installation of foreign-language software for use at the more advanced
levels have improved the computer section of the lab, which is now being well used.
Appropriate review software for the earlier stages is still elusive; however, there are a number
of useful websites that can be accessed for practice at this level. The collection of foreign-
language magazines has grown, as well, making it possible for students to use this resource for
a variety of assignments at different levels of language learning.
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History and Geography
Geography
As the University does not currently offer a major or minor in geography those classes assessed
are listed in the GE assessment report.

History

Objectives
Upon completing the history program, a graduate will be able to demonstrate

      factual knowledge appropriate to United States, European, and world history, including
       chronology and important persons, processes, and ideas,
      knowledge of the basic geography of major world civilizations and the ability to identify
       significant features,
      recognition that there are varying interpretations of the events of history,
      understanding the concept of multiple causation in history,
      knowledge of the various types of historical works, e.g., political, diplomatic,
       intellectual, economic, and social history,
      the ability to write well-organized essays on set historical topics,
      the ability to write well-crafted papers on assigned topics using proper documentation
       and prose appropriate for history.

History Program Assessment

       Assessment of student academic achievement in the History program is accomplished in
       four ways:

       1. Syllabus Examination and Analysis

           o The syllabi of the various courses offered in each academic year will be collected
             and matched to specific sections of the class and to the final examinations given
             in these courses. The syllabi are matched to the program goals and objectives to
             ensure that all courses relate to them and that all goals and objectives are
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              covered. The examinations will then be tallied to measure the extent to which            English (United States)
              the program goals and objectives, translated into course goals and objectives,
              were achieved and measured in the examination process.

       2. Course-Related Assessment Examinations

           o All 10000-level courses (HIS 10000, HIS 10500, HIS 10600, and HIS 15500) have
             pre- and post-test assessment tools. The purpose of these tests is to determine
             the level of improvement in knowledge of the students at the end of the
             semester. This information is reviewed by the history faculty to determine if
             areas of focus should be adjusted. These tests are currently under review in
             order to revise the tool to match the department’s current goals. The process of
             creating an assessment tool for HIS 20000 Contemporary World, is complete and
             has been revised multiple times in the last three years. Determining and
             creating the appropriate assessment tools/methods for 30000-level courses is
             ongoing.

       3. Comprehensive Examination

           o All graduating history majors sit for a three-part comprehensive examination
             that focuses on the major concepts listed in the program goals and objectives,
             such as multiple causation, varying interpretations of historical events, and
             historical literacy. The comprehensive examination enables the History faculty
             to assess the success the program has had in conveying these priorities to
             students.

       4. Final Research Project

           o All graduating history majors are required to complete a final major research
             project which includes a public presentation. The goal is to assess the student’s
             research, writing, and communication skills, and it enables the history faculty to
             assess the success the program has had in conveying these priorities to students.

HIS 20000 - History of the Contemporary World

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of History 20000 the student will

          know the basic geography of major world civilizations and be able to identify
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              significant features on a blank map,                                                           English (United States)
             demonstrate the impact of events, people, and civilizations from WWI to WWII on
              the world since 1945,
             be able to place significant persons and developments since 1945 in time. (This is
              not so much a matter of memorizing exact dates as of being able to place events in
              chronological order and context with an appropriate degree of accuracy),
             be able to identify, from lists provided, important persons, places, processes, and
              events from the human past: To be, in other words, literate in history,
             demonstrate an understanding of the chief characteristics of the major world
              civilizations, cultures, and religions, and of their interaction with one another since
              1945,
             demonstrate an understanding of the of some of the factors influencing the
              development of the world since 1945,
             demonstrate an understanding of the economic, political, and cultural interactions
              between western culture and other cultures since the end of World War II.

Methods of Assessment Used

This class uses a pre- and post-test system of assessment. The test is made up of 35 multiple-
choice questions. The spring 2011 assessment added a world map with 20 countries to be
identified.

Results

During spring 2011, of the 27 students who took both tests, the average number of correct
answers for the pre-test was 18/35 (51 percent); the average for the post-test was 24/35 (69
percent). The table below compares results with the spring semester 2010.

The questions were divided into eight topics; some questions covered more than one topic.

Topic (questions)                Pre-test   Post-test   Difference   Pre-test    Post-test    Difference
                                   S 10       S 10                     S 11        S 11
Cold War (4)                       67%        85%         +19%         63%         76%          +13%
U.S International policies (8)     56%        65%          +9%         60%         72%          +12%
International economy (3)         57%         73%         +16%         51%         73%          +22%
Communist World (9)               37%         60%         +23%         39%         58%          +19%
Decolonization (3)                43%         57%          +6%         41%         58%          +17%
Developing World (8)              51%         67%         +18%         50%         69%          +19%
Islam and the world (7)           44%         60%         +16%         60%         72%          +12%
Persons and movements (4)         43%         69%         +16%         52%         65%          +13%
Average improvement                                       +15%                                  +16%
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Map                               Pre-test, S 11        Post-test, S 11      Difference
Africa (6 countries)                   17%                   57%                +40%
Americas (5 countries)                 42%                   70%                +28%
Asia (5 countries)                     29%                   48%                +19%
Europe (1 country)                     15%                   34%                +19%
Middle East (3 countries)              59%                   93%                +34%
Average improvement                                                             +28%

Lessons Learned

All areas showed some improvement. The average grade on examinations (75 percent) was
markedly higher than the average on the post-test; this was also the case in spring 2010.

Action Plan

The test questions will be rewritten for greater precision and lectures will be revised,
particularly those concerning Islam and the World. The relatively strong results for the map
may be due to map testing during the term. This will be continued in 2011-12, and results
compared to spring 2011.


History 20300 - Historical Methods

        This class examines tools and techniques of historical writing and interpretation of
        history and acts as an introduction to historical methods, source problems,
        bibliographical aids, source criticism, and use of related techniques.

Course Objectives

        Students successfully completing this course will be much better prepared for 30000-
        level courses and for the capstone, HIS 40000. Hopefully, less time will be spent in the
        higher-level courses on these skills after students have had this introductory course.

        For research skills, students will be able to

                    acquire a basic understanding of historical methodology,
                    conduct historical research and be able to evaluate sources,
                    show knowledge of how to find and use library, archival, oral, and other
                     source materials,
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                   better identify and interpret primary sources.                                            English (United States)


         For scholarly skills, students will be able to

                   understand the range of computer usage for the historian,
                   manage material information and writing appropriate for the standards of
                    historical scholarship,
                   show knowledge of historical journals and databases,
                   correctly footnote and annotate historical writing,
                   improve skills in reading, writing, discussing, and assimilating material,
                   organize thoughts and communicate them clearly and concisely in a written
                    form,
                   become familiar with professional opportunities for graduates in history.

         For interpretation skills, students will be able to

                   frame questions in order to more clearly clarify a problem, topic, or issue,
                   differentiate between facts, opinions, and inferences,
                   expand knowledge to build abilities to comprehend, synthesize, and analyze
                    information,
                   manage information which involves sorting data, ranking data for
                    significance, and synthesizing facts, concepts, and principals,
                   identify a thesis and understand how historical data is used to support a
                    historical argument,
                   understand and use organizing principles of key concepts to evaluate data,
                   expand knowledge of historiography.

Method of Assessment

         Students were asked to respond to the class in a paper at the end of the class. Their
         comments indicated that they understood the purpose of the course and that they
         benefited from it in specific ways:

                   By using the workbook to develop writing and organizational skills.
                   By working in the Lindenwood University Archives.
                   Through the use of primary source documents.
                   Through interaction with other history majors.
                   By working on rewriting assignments.

Action
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          Continue to use Gordon-Reed and the workbook.
          Add in-class exercises on the use of footnotes.
          Add group work on Gordon-Reed’s book.
          Add more work on electronic data bases.
          Survey students in HIS 40000 (the history capstone class) regarding the usefulness of
           HIS 20300. (2010-11 was the first year that all students in HIS 40000 will have been
           required to take HIS 20300).

History 40000 - Comprehensive Exam

Goals and Objectives for Class

This course serves as a capstone for history majors wherein students are expected to
demonstrate competence in areas of study as well as research and writing. This course
provides assessment of both student and program performance.

Methods of Assessment

The course has evolved into a two-part class with the first part being a series of essay exams
each student must take over the areas of

          United States history
          World history
          Modern European history

These exams are designed to evaluate student

              command of the sweep of world, European, and United States history,
              ability to communicate understanding and interpretations in a well-written and
               organized fashion,
              ability to accumulate, recall, and interpret historical information in a fashion
               consistent with current historical thinking and scholarship,
              capacity to use historical facts to support larger arguments and interpretations,
              ability to conduct historical research and to analyze, interpret, and write your
               ideas and findings effectively.

Competence is demonstrated with a passing score on each of the three exams. Exams are given
every two weeks beginning with week two or three of the semester. There are two readers
from the history faculty for each exam and the readers do not know the identity of the tested
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students. Results below are averages.                                                                      English (United States)


The second part of the course involves the research and writing process in which students are
required to produce a substantial research paper and then make a 10 minute PowerPoint
presentation on their results. These projects are designed and graded by the instructor.
Starting in fall 2010, student presentations were evaluated by a faculty committee.

The research paper is designed to evaluate student

         ability to use varied scholarly research sources,
         capacity to understand the interpretive changes and nuances of the writing of history
          over time,
         understanding of the role of historian as interpreter, not merely dispenser of
          information,
         ability to communicate ideas in clear and correct English,
         use of proper scholarly apparatus such as footnotes, bibliographic citations, etc.

The oral presentation is designed to evaluate student

         ability to summarize, organize, and clearly explain information,
         ability to use images to advance the argument.

Methods of Assessment Used

Subjective (instructor evaluation of essay and oral work) and analysis of results constitutes
assessment of program.

Results

                       US Avg.   World Avg.   Europe Avg.   Overall Avg.   Papers Avg.    Oral Avg.
2008-09 Fall Avg.       77%        85%           82%           81%            78%           N/A
2008-09 Spring Avg.     72%        75%           73%           73%            76%           N/A
2009-10 Fall Avg.       78%        77%           85%           80%            80%           71%
2009-10 Spring Avg.     77%        78%           77%           77%            88%           88%
2010-11 Fall Avg.       82%        76%           82%           80%            78%           82%
2010-11 Spring Avg.     77%        74%           80%           78%            85%           87%

Examination scores (%) compared to grades (GPA) in classes taken in areas tested and overall
GPA. Fall, 2010
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Student   World   World   US      US    Europe   Europe    Exam     Oral    Paper    Course   Overall
          GPA     Exam    GPA    Exam    GPA      Exam    Average   Pres.     %      Grade     GPA
                    %              %                %        %       %
   1.      3.5     90     3.7     88      3.8      93       90       86       88       A        3.4
   2.      4.0     93     4.0     83      4.0      93       90       96       98       A       3.96
   3.      3.0     66     2.3     84      2.0      85       78       86       88       B        2.9
   4.      2.0     68     2.0     72      2.5      80       73       84       75       C        2.4
   5.      2.0     76     3.0     82      2.5      71       76       66       78       C        2.7
   6.      2.5     74     2.5     68      2.0      62       68       76       80       C        2.9
   7.      3.0     82     1.7     76      2.8      93       84       92       60       B        2.4
   8.      4.0     71     4.0     90      3.8      82       81       94       80       B        3.9
   9.      2.5     69     2.3     75      2.3      77       74       72       63       C        3.0
  10.      4.0     71     3.0     69      3.5      89       76       56       50       D        3.3
  11.      3.0     72     3.0     76      2.5      70       73       80       73       C        3.2
  12.      3.5     83     4.0     95      4.0      83       87       96       93       A        3.8
  13.      4.0     77     3.5     80      3.5      92       83       86       88       B        3.7

Examination scores (%) compared to grades (GPA) in classes taken in areas tested and overall
GPA. Spring, 2011

                  World           US             Europe    Exam     Oral
          World           US            Europe                              Paper    Course   Overall
Student           Exam           Exam             Exam    Average   Pres.
          GPA             GPA            GPA                                  %      Grade     GPA
                    %              %                %        %       %
   1.      3.0     88      3.0    62      3.7      71       74       88       88       B       3.5
   2.      3.5     80      3.7    78      3.0      94       84       85       88       B       3.4
   3.      3.5     82      3.7    73      3.0      77       77       83       83       B       3.3
   4.      3.0     60      2.0    72                        66                         F       2.7
   5.      3.0     83      3.5    92     2.25      76       84       83       89       B       3.3
   6.      2.5     61      2.5    69     1.6       70       67       82       75       C       2.8
   7.      3.0     72      3.3    81     2.7       86       80       87       86       B       3.5
   8.      4.0     79      3.7    97     3.3       87       88       85       84       B       3.7
   9.      3.5     66      3.3    77     3.0       80       74       97       83       B       3.4
  10.      3.5     71      3.3    72     3.0       81       75       88       88       B       3.5

Of the 13 students in fall 2010, all completed the exams and paper and, except for one D,
passed with a C or better; the overall average was 79 percent. Of the 10 students in the spring,
one completed only two examinations and did not complete the paper and thus failed the
course; the others passed with a C or better. Of the passing students, the overall average was
81 percent.

The difference in grades on papers reflected the approaches of the two instructors and did not
materially affect the average outcomes. Oral presentations were graded by all the faculty
attending.
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Lessons Learned

When compared to their performance in topical classes, students’ scores on examinations
varied in some cases. But the overall results indicate that these classes did prepare students.

Most students benefitted from the new-to-this-year policy of both instructors to have students
submit their papers in sections for instructor evaluation and suggestion before submission of
the final paper.

Prior experience giving oral presentations in class benefitted students in HIS 40000.

Impacts and Changes on Classes

We will add a survey asking students to evaluate various aspects of their experience as a history
major at the University.

Action Plan

The department is satisfied that HIS 400 indicates that our program is doing what we want it to
do.


International Studies


Program Goals and Objectives
Goals for the Graduates in the Major

The Bachelor of Arts in International Studies was specifically designed for those who wish to
increase their understanding of global issues in order to pursue future graduate study, to
prepare for international/government employment, or to work in the fields of consulting,
business, banking, teaching, or international journalism. Therefore, the curriculum is
multidisciplinary and utilizes material from the fields of political science, international relations,
anthropology, religion, history, geography, economics, sociology, law, and management. To
facilitate this, the Bachelor of Arts in International Studies has three separate emphasis areas.

              International Studies, International Relations
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              International Studies, Cross Cultural Asian Studies                                       English (United States)
              International Studies, Cross Cultural European Studies

These are specifically offered in order to provide students an avenue into the most developed
and emerging knowledge spheres, markets, and systems throughout the world.

Objectives for Graduates in the Major

The objectives for the majors are to develop the necessary critical thinking, writing, and
research skills so they can successfully move on to graduate school and/or their professional
field.

Classes to be Assessed
The only course that is exclusively an international studies course is IS 40000 Senior Tutorial.

Methods of Assessment Used
The method of assessment is based on the individual meetings with students (to identify a
baseline for their talents/knowledge), their class presentations (can they articulate their work),
the written thesis itself (is it clearly written and effectively communicated), and the formal
defense with their faculty panel (how completely have they synthesized the material and then
professionally presented it).

Results
An empirical comparison is not possible this year. For the future, a new grading rubric for this
course will be created, based on the four methods of assessment above, to quantify the relative
impact of the course more so than the final grades. Given this course is available every term,
comparative data will be available after the next academic year.

Lessons Learned
As a department, we have learned that students have become increasingly global in their
thinking. However, students consistently show strong connections to their local background
and experiences. It is imperative that instead of thinking about society from their own context,
they develop an understanding of the volume of contextual realities and interpretations
throughout the world. This perspective will enable them to identify themselves outside their
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personal environments and instead place themselves squarely in the middle of an increasingly            English (United States)
shrinking world.

Secondly, we noticed our students have sound critical thinking and analytical skills. However,
there is ample room for improvement (hence the one-on-one and small-group nature of the
thesis course). Critical thinking involves classifying, assessing, interpreting, and evaluating
information in the form of hypotheses and theories into higher order thought processes.
Abstracting and evaluating competing theories and hypotheses by relying on critical abilities in
assessing data is extremely important.

Action Plan for Next
As a department, we are very satisfied with our IS Senior Tutorial course. We feel it clearly
reflects students’ talents, knowledge, and academic ability. However, as stated above, we plan
to develop a more nuanced and measurable means to relatively assess students’ learning in the
classroom. At this time, we foresee a Likert scale that measures clarity of writing, effective use
of citations, interdisciplinary use of material, understanding of key concepts and paradigms,
ability to publicly present the material, and overall synthesis of knowledge.

Impacts and Changes on Classes for the Following Year
The format and course content (methodological and thesis writing approaches) will not change.
However, the means of assessment will. Subjectively, we already know the course content
reflects the needs of the students that this particular stage of their academic career. However,
what we will be searching for are ways to help them better assimilate the knowledge, interpret
it, retain it, and then present it.


Philosophy


Mission Statement
The philosophy program at Lindenwood University is designed to introduce students to the field
of philosophy by introducing the major works and authors in the philosophical tradition and by
exploring the central philosophical questions in their historical context as well as their
relevance in matters of perennial interest. This is to be done with the interests and needs of
the general student body in mind but especially to prepare and train philosophy majors for
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greater goals of the University by providing courses of instruction that lead to the development
of the whole person — an educated, responsible citizen of a global community by promoting
ethical lifestyles, the development of adaptive thinking and problem-solving skills, which
further life-long learning. We use as a guide and goal the words of Bertrand Russell, who said:
“Philosophy should be studied … above all because, through the greatness of the universe
which philosophy contemplates, the mind also is rendered great, and becomes capable of that
union with the universe that constitutes its highest good.”

Departmental Goals and Objectives
The goals of the Philosophy Department are

          to provide adequate courses and training for students seeking to pursue philosophy
           at the graduate and post-graduate level, with special emphasis on the history of
           philosophy,
          to develop students’ abilities to carefully read and critically analyze material from
           different perspectives and to form and express cogent judgments concerning
           philosophical questions and issues,
          to develop an understanding of the philosophical questions and issues that underlies
           much discussion of contemporary problems facing the world today,
           for students to develop their own world-views and understanding of philosophical
           questions, to cogently argue for their views, and to understand perspectives and
           views different from their own,
          to further the University’s commitment to values-centered programs leading to the
           development of the whole person–an educated, responsible citizen of a global
           community.

Classes Assessed
In keeping with the departmental goals, and in changing the senior seminar, we will assess
performance in the core classes. These classes, as core classes, represent the core of the field
of philosophy and are thereby a good indicator of the success of the program.

       PHL 21400 – Ethics, PHL 21500/21600 - Traditional/Symbolic Logic, PHL 31100 - Ancient
       Philosophy, PHL 31200 - Medieval Philosophy, PHL 31300 - Modern Philosophy, PHL
       34500 – Metaphysics, PHL 35500 – Epistemology

Methods of Assessment Used
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Students this year were assessed under the old action plan.

Results
This year we only had two students taking the senior seminar (one for December and one for
May). The student taking the seminar for May graduation turned in his work late and
assessment was not done in time for this report (assessment based on using both classes). The
action plan from last year remains in force.

Lessons Learned
The original goal of the senior seminar course was to have students synthesize their previous
learning in addressing a single question: What is Philosophy? This goal was not being met by
even our brightest students. The seminar became just another research project. Also, the
faculty did not have sufficient free time to meet individually with each student to assist them
with their work (since each student would be expected to work with all of the department’s
full-time faculty).

Action Plan
Given that students have plenty of opportunity to do research papers, or independent studies
on topics of their choosing, the addition of a senior seminar was too much extra work for
faculty and students. (Revising the readings in light of last year’s assessment did nothing to
change the situation.) A proposal will be made to drop the requirement but maintain the 36-
hour requirement.

Based on this year and previous years, a substitution in the required texts for the course was
made. We are discussing making other changes in the readings, possibly allowing students
some choice. But this will be taken up in our fall 2010 departmental meetings.

PHL 49300 Senior Seminar was informally assessed for the first time in spring 2008. The senior
seminar was restructured to provide a program assessment. The topic (“What is Philosophy?”)
and the books were selected to make standardization of data possible. The students were
assessed on the following criteria (selected based on the departmental goals and objectives
above): (1) Understanding of ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary philosophy; (2)
Understanding of arguments; (3) Construction of arguments. Roughly, (1) focuses on content,
(2) on analysis and critical reading, and (3) on synthesis and argumentative writing. Last year
(2007-08) the results were encouraging, while this year’s results were disappointing. Changes
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to the readings and requirements (especially making the latter more explicit) are being made          English (United States)
for 2009-10 and are being discussed over the summer. Plans are to repeat this assessment, or a
slightly modified one, in 2009-10. Assessment will be discussed at regular department
meetings.

This year students had an informal exit exam and we recorded the scores from their graduate
exams and places that accepted them. Placement was better for the 2008 graduates than in
previous years, and the exit exams largely confirmed our expectations.

Based on the concerns mentioned in the American Philosophical Association’s Outcomes
Assessment, the Philosophy Department will adopt the following for the 2010-2011 school year
and beyond:
        DGO 1 will be met by continuing to require philosophy majors to take core courses
          in the history of philosophy, ethics, logic, and metaphysics/epistemology. Student
          work in those classes will be assessed to ensure adequate learning.
        DGO 2 will be met with the logic requirement for majors and by having students take
          (1) other courses in logic, such as traditional logic, game theory, and
          intermediate/advanced Logic and by (2) having all courses address critical reading
          and writing in various ways (short section on logic, essays, classroom discussion,
          etc.). The department is working on a writing like Aquinas guideline for developing
          critical skills in most lower-level classes.
        DGO 3 will be met in required and elective courses in topics like contemporary moral
          theory, metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of law, political philosophy, game
          theory, God and suffering, continental philosophy, etc.
        DGO 4 will be met by students doing research papers in upper-level courses and,
          lower-level courses, by having students form and defend judgments about various
          topics.
        DGO 5 will be met by all of the above and especially by courses in ethics, such as
          moral life, ethics, bioethics, contemporary moral theory, metaethics, etc., and by
          courses in political philosophy, philosophy of law, etc.
        These goals will be met by (1) monitoring class enrollments, (2) maintaining a strong
          core with an emphasis on the history of philosophy and use of primary texts, (3)
          regular department meetings, (4) monitoring majors and assessing their strengths
          and weaknesses, (5) constant monitoring of classes and instructors, and (6)
          maintaining records on graduate placements and scores on graduate exams.

Attention will continue to be given to the concerns addressed by the American Philosophical
Association in its statement on outcomes assessment.
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Political Science


Mission
The department sees itself as preparing students for graduate school and law school. Thus,
good writing focused on critical reasoning, analytical thinking, and clear writing are essential.

Program Goals and Objectives
          Goals for the graduates in the major:
                  o The goals for political science majors are that they are prepared to
                       handle graduate school and law school. The department spends a great
                       deal of time pushing students in this direction.

          Objectives for graduates in the major:
                  o The objectives for political science majors are to achieve the critical
                      thinking and writing skills and research skills (spelled out in the syllabus)
                      so they can handle graduate school and law school.

Classes Assessed
The department plans to add one PS 30000-level course on top of the PS 15600 American
Government: The States course. The instructor is interested in whether students in the 30000-
level course start off with more scores of three (out of three) on their first-round book notes
than is the case with the PS 15600 courses. Many of the students in the 30000-level courses
have taken a course from this professor before, so the department can get a sense of if
students are carrying forward their learning from one level to another.

Through PS 31500 Policy Analysis Statistics and PS 475000 Governmental and Economic
Research, students learn how to do online research. Basically, in political science and public
administration, all research is online research.

Methods of Assessment Used
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The method of assessment will be the use of book notes and the grading method. The                     English (United States)
professor plans to use the same system in the case of a 30000-level course that is used in the
IPS 15600 course.

Results
The department is not sure how much comparison will be possible next year, since the idea will
be to change how the students will approach the writing each of their book-note rounds by
giving them specific issues to address for each of those round of book notes.

Lessons learned
The department is surprised at what students across levels of academic skill levels know and
don’t know regarding spelling and grammar. The department is also surprised by what it is
assumed they know as a basic starting point regarding political knowledge. Book notes helped
the professor to realize that he needs to stop making assumptions regarding basic educational
skills and basic political knowledge.

Students learn best when a complex issue is broken into smaller more digestible chunks. The
professor may take time in several lectures to address Piaget. Essentially, Piaget spent his life
looking at his children and how they learned. The basic idea take from his writing is that you
learn by breaking things down into parts, and the parts into parts. So, the professor wants to
develop a sense of consciousness in students about how they learn, but that they may not
realize what they are doing already. Take learning a word-processing program: In reality, none
of us learns the entire manual before we start using a word processing program; we pick and
choose what we need, and we add new features along the way. So we learned word processing
by not learning the whole but parts of the whole.


Action Plan
The professor has pointed out in several places above what will be done differently for the
2011-12 academic year is to give precise issues that students need to address in their book
notes for each round. A 300-page book will be broken down in thirds with students to reading
100 pages per round.


Religion
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Objectives of the Religion Major and Courses
          Develop the student’s ability to do rational, critical thinking and analysis in studying
           diverse religions.
          Encourage students to respect, preserve, and perpetuate all that is good in each
           tradition.
          Develop an appreciation of diverse world views, moral systems, and religious beliefs.
          Develop a sense of openness to and acceptance of other cultures and traditions
           different from one’s own.
          Bring students to an understanding of the difference between an academic study of
           religion and religious beliefs and a theological study of a person’s own individual
           faith.
          Expose students to original literature and historic faith texts from cultures and
           civilizations.
          Encourage students to develop their own beliefs in light of the various traditions and
           theories, be able to make practical and theoretical judgments based on those
           beliefs, and understand the strengths and weaknesses of those beliefs.

Methods of Assessment Used
Three forms of assessment will be used to evaluate whether or not this approach leads to
higher forms of critical thinking and learning; short evaluative essays, critical thinking short
answer and essay questions on exams, and faculty evaluation of classroom discussions.

Lesson Learned
REL 20100 – History of Christianity

After being taught as a special topics course for the past three years, this course was added to
the catalog as a regular offering this winter. Since a majority of the students who attend
Lindenwood University come out of a culture that claims to be predominantly Christian, it was
felt that it was important to give those students some understanding of the history, influence,
and effect of this tradition on their society and their lives.

The last two times this course was offered, rather than lecturing on the controversies that had
occurred in the two-thousand-year history of Christianity, students were asked to study the text
and produce charts of the major issues, opposing ideas, and individuals involved in the debates
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over orthodoxy and faith that occurred in the fourth century, during the Reformation, and in            English (United States)
the past two hundred years. Putting this task on the students resulted in a better understanding
of the many controversies that have been a part of the growth and development of Christianity
throughout its history. It was also possible, with these charts, to bring students to a better
understanding of the effect and importance of these debates. Essay questions on exams
showed that students were able to understand and articulate the implications of these
theological debates on society and their own lives. In the fall, deeper and more probing
questions will be developed on exams and in classroom discussions to see if this way of
teaching can lead to better understanding and critical thinking.

REL 30000 – Religion, Science and Faith and REL 30500 – Psychology of Religion

These are two courses that seem to work very well as they are. Based on classroom discussion
and critical essays, students in these courses are able to begin to think critically, to approach
ideas and concepts that are unfamiliar without being intimidated or threatened, and to discuss
them with fellow students in an open and unthreatening way. Both of these courses will be
taught in the same way in the coming academic year.

REL 31000 – Religious Foundations of Western Civilization

This class has been changed in the catalogue to Islam and the West due to three main
weaknesses: the class was based on a textbook rather than on original source materials, the
textbook on which it was based was poor, and the class was too broad in its scope.

The Religious Foundations of Western Civilization class was based on a textbook of the same
name. The Religion Department has begun to move away from textbooks as the main written
resources for classes in favor of original source materials. The move is not necessarily
comprehensive, for some classes may continue to use textbooks, perhaps in conjunction with
original sources. The move is, nevertheless, important to the department’s increasing self-
awareness as a vital link in the great western tradition of liberal learning. In part for that
reason, the textbook will no longer be used for REL 31000.

The textbook itself is problematic for a number of reasons, the main one being that although its
contents range from basic to advanced, the writing is fairly consistently advanced, making it
very difficult to use effectively. I found that I was unable to rely on the text as a source of
information for the students, with the result that class time consisted mainly of lectures. That is
not a preferred teaching method, and this is the other reason that this textbook will no longer
be used for REL 31000.

Finally, the class content is unduly broad. The textbook seeks to explore the religions of
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Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, their historic interactions, their political histories and           English (United States)
approaches, and how they might be shaped in the future. That is simply too broad for adequate
treatment of the subjects. Islam and the West, therefore, will focus on Islam, with only brief
looks at Judaism (especially Zionism) and the Western segregation of religion from governance,
each for the sake of developing the context for the examination of Islam. The class will examine
Islam through the Qur’an, the Hadith literature, and the writings of a number of Muslim
intellectuals from various religio-political perspectives.

REL 32000 – Christian Doctrine

This class used a textbook (A. McGrath’s Christian Theology: An Introduction) and a reader
(McGrath’s companion, Christian Theology Reader), a collection of excerpts on various topics
from various theologians across the centuries. Although, as noted above, the department is
moving away from textbooks, it is doubtful that this class, which is part of the department’s
core, is susceptible to a primary-source-only approach. The number of different perspectives on
any given topic would make such an approach prohibitive. Furthermore, in this case the
textbook worked out quite well because it is well-written and generally addresses the conflicts
over doctrine very effectively. The result was a class that emphasized outside reading and in-
class discussions, with some lectures as needed. The department was very pleased with the
outcome pedagogically, as students engaged with challenging ideas and discussed them with
some sophistication. Nevertheless, the chair thinks in-class discussions could have been
improved by requiring students to take notes on the readings and turn in the notes for credit.

The reader was rather a disappointment, as most excerpts are too brief to be of much use. It
would be preferable to develop a supplemental set of fewer source materials of greater length
and depth on important topics by key authors such as Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, and Wesley.

REL 32000 more than met the department’s goal that students in 30000-level classes produce
at least 10 pages of written work. The syllabus included a formal paper of more than eight
pages, plus three exams consisting entirely of essay questions. The professor’s approach to the
paper was not ideal, however, as different due dates were assigned for different paper topics,
and students were allowed to choose their topic and associated due date. Most students simply
chose the last due date, and the professor ended up with one paper on one topic, one paper on
another, two papers on a third topic, and the rest on the fourth topic. The lack of comparability
made grading more difficult. In the future the professor will give one due date and one or two
paper titles. The professor will also spend more time walking the students through expectations
for the paper, discussing how to use source materials and secondary literature, clarifying what
constitutes good academic writing, and setting due dates for bibliographies and outlines in
advance of the due date for the final paper.
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                        School of Humanities Analysis

English
      The department’s senior assessment is a positive effort to look at the final product of
      students before they graduate. The department is considering methods to compare that
      work to writings from earlier efforts by the majors. The program should expand the
      number of 30000-level classes that are being assessed, including all those classes in the
      program core. Is there any effort at assessing the creative writing classes? Would
      making ENG 30200 a prerequisite for 30000 English classes force them to take it earlier
      in their education and thus improve writing in later classes? Who was the anonymous
      part of the review process for papers (the reviews or the students)?

EPP
      The program is working on assessment for all of the classes offered to better define the
      program goals and objectives to be better able to define success. It would be useful to
      know how they are doing in ENG 17000, especially compared to those non-native
      speakers who went straight to ENG 17000. EPP 11000 and EPP 15000 will require
      greater analysis. Be careful of phrases such as “good indicator of student need,” as it is
      unclear what is meant. It is also worth noting if there is any significant change in the
      placement numbers for each level.

Foreign Languages
      The foreign language programs have one of the most extensive and thought-through
      assessment systems at Lindenwood and works hard to assess the vast majority of the
      classes in the program. But including more specific information in the report would be
      useful. For example, what were the results of pre- and post-tests? What were the
      results on the survey of skill for the 30000-level classes? When discussing percentages
      on unit exams, are we discussing percentages from areas assessed on the pre-test or
      total on the exam? When using students’ perceptions of a skill, how does that compare
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     to their actual ability? The department needs to avoid being too general in statements;         English (United States)
     words such as “many” can have a wide variety of meanings. Keeping the portfolio can be
     useful, but does it assess student progress?



History
     The History Department has made a major effort to assess its GE classes and its
     capstone and to do analysis appropriate to both. The program does have areas to work
     on; it needs to extend assessment into some of the core 30000-level classes. The faculty
     members need to consider how they might make assessment at the 20000- and 30000-
     level classes professor proof (appropriate for anyone who might teach the class by
     covering the goals and objectives every section should meet). They should create a
     system for comparing a paper from HIS 20300 and HIS 40000.

International Studies
     International studies is a new program and is just in the process of putting assessment
     into place. A clearer, more definite mission statement will help the department to
     determine its goals. The department also needs to create more measurable program-
     based student learning objectives that will allow for the creation of a system of
     assessment that is less vague than the one currently discussed. The department also
     needs to make sure that their lessons learned are driven by some type of assessment.

Philosophy
     The department began to assess the senior seminar, which is the capstone course
     during the 2010-11 academic year. They are working on expanding their ideas of, and
     tools for, assessing the success of the program. An area in need of expansion is in the
     creation of student learning objectives for the program. The program needs to create
     objectives that are more measurable, in virtually any form, than those that are currently
     listed. Addressing objectives might entail more than offering a class and might be a
     concern that needs to be measured over multiple classes. It is worth asking if the
     change in the senior seminar affects the objectives of the program. It would also be
     good to see the data from the graduate exams that confirm the program success.

Political Science
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    The Political Science Department, for much of its history, worked within the business            English (United States)
    school’s assessment system, and it is still creating a system that is completely its own.
    For this, a number of areas will need to be addressed. Assessment systems need to be
    more formally created for PS 15500, and the assessment for PS 15600 needs to be
    finalized and implemented. The programs need to develop student learning outcomes,
    which will make the development of an assessment system more manageable.
    Assessment also needs to be developed for other core classes in the program. The
    central questions that need to be the focus are what are they learning in the program
    and is the learning meeting the department goals and objectives? The assessment needs
    to include more data as to the specific results and ensure results are playing a role in the
    both developing and changing the program.

Religion
    The Religion Department is making an effort to do some form of assessment in each of
    the classes it offers on a regular basis. But there are some areas for strengthening
    assessment. The program needs to define student learning objectives that can be
    measured by the assessment program. There is a dearth of data; most of this
    assessment is made up of department changes, but what lead to them being made? Are
    you assessing core knowledge gained by students in your classes and programs? What
    has assessment told you about the program’s strengths or weaknesses, and what are
    you doing to deal with them?
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                              School of Sciences

The School of Sciences has six departments — biology, chemistry, computer science,
mathematics, psychology, and sociology/anthropology — that offer 13 bachelor of science and
bachelor of arts degrees as well as eight minors. The school also has a number of non-degree
and pre-professional programs. For students interested in teaching at the secondary level, the
school also offers certification programs in biology, chemistry, unified sciences, and math.

The Schools of Sciences offers the following degrees
       Bachelor of Arts in
                Biology
                Environmental Biology
                Chemistry
                Computer Science
                Mathematics
                Psychology
                Sociology
                Sociology with Anthropology

       Bachelor of Sciences in
              Biology
              Chemistry
              Computer Science
              Computer Information Systems
              Mathematics

       Minors in
                  Anthropology                                       Engineering Physics
                  Biology                                            Mathematics
                  Chemistry                                          Psychology
                  Computer Science                                   Sociology

       Pre-professional Programs
               Pre-Chiropractic                                      Health Sciences
               Pre-Dentistry                                         Pre-Medicine
               Pre-Engineering                                       Pre-Optometry
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   Pre-Medicine                                                         English (United States)
   Pre-Veterinary
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Anthropology/Sociology
Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology (contract degree) and Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Goals and Objectives
Goals

Students will

            develop as more complete human beings, who think and act freely as individuals
             and as members of the community,
            acquire the intellectual tools and the range of perspectives needed to
             understand human cultures, as they are, as they have been, and as they might
             be,
            reason analytically about both qualitative and quantitative evidence,
            develop personal guidelines for making informed, independent, socially-
             responsible decisions that are respectful of other people and of the
             environment,
            recognize and identify the fundamental concepts, principles, and professional
             vocabulary of several specific social science disciplines, and demonstrate an
             awareness of how such concepts and principles influence behavior and values at
             the individual, social, and cultural levels.

Objectives

These are the measurable aspects of the assessment of the students in the sociology and
anthropology program. These objectives coincide with the various competencies of the
Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning model.

Basic Concepts

Students should

       develop a good understanding of the historical development of sociology and how it
        emerged in relationship to the industrial and political revolutions in the West,
       demonstrate knowledge of how sociologists attempt to explain human behavior and
        institutions,
       be able to distinguish a sociological generalization from common sense
        understandings of society,
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      demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of culture and society as used by                English (United States)
       social scientists,
      understand the distinctions among the concepts of material culture, symbols,
       norms, values, subcultures, ethnocentrism, and cultural relativism,
      understand the differences among hunting-gathering, tribal horticultural and
       pastoralist, agrarian, and industrial societies,
      demonstrate a knowledge of the concept of socialization as it relates to the
       nurture-nature controversy in the social sciences,
      understand the relationship of family, peers, school, and the mass media and
       socialization processes,
      understand the concepts of status and role as used by social scientists,
      understand the difference between primary and secondary groups and the research
       conducted by sociologists on these groups,
      understand the different types of sociological explanations for deviant behavior,
      understand the differences between closed, caste-based societies and open, class
       societies, and the implications these societies have for social mobility,
      understand the various sociological explanations for social stratification and poverty
       in their own society,
      demonstrate knowledge of the differences between race and ethnicity, sex and
       gender, and other distinctions between biological and sociological categories,
      demonstrate knowledge of the major racial, ethnic, economic and cultural groups
       that make up the contemporary United States, as well as some of the changes
       among and between these groups,
      understand basic worldwide demographic trends and the consequences for
       urbanization.

Social Theory
                                                                                                    Formatted: Font: 5 pt
Students should
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      have a good understanding of the differences between structural-functional,
       conflict, and symbolic interaction theories in sociology,
      have an understanding of the differences between unilineal evolutionary theory and
       diffusionism as early explanations of societal change,
      have knowledge of the major classical theorists in both sociology and anthropology
       such as Comte, Spencer, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Parsons, Boas, Margaret Mead,
       George H. Mead, Benedict, and White,
      have an understanding of the contemporary views of societal change:
       modernization, dependency, and world systems theory.
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Research Methods                                                                                     English (United States)


Students should

      have knowledge of what constitutes independent and dependent variables,
       correlations with and without causal linkage, and causation,
      understand objectivity and the limitations of objective research in the social
       sciences,
      understand the different research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, in
       sociology, anthropology, and social work including social experiments, survey
       research, participant observation, and secondary analysis,
      understand the basic steps of formulating a research project from defining the topic
       to specifying hypotheses to data collection to interpreting results including statistical
       procedures and finally drawing conclusions.

Institutional Understanding

Students should

      have a cross-cultural understanding of the different forms of family structure and
       marriage, educational institutions, the major religious belief systems and
       institutions, and economic and political systems that exist throughout the world,
      have an understanding of social conditions and social problems that affect social
       work practice. This should be demonstrated by social work majors; a demonstration
       of the need to make social institutions more humane and responsive to human
       needs, especially for at-risk populations will be evident.

Results
This academic year 2010-11 the department had six students graduating in our sociology
and anthropology programs. Three students were anthropology majors (contract majors),
and they were all outstanding students who graduated with top grades. One student had
an archaeology emphasis and was accepted into the graduate archaeology program at
Illinois State University, Normal. She had also received a good offer for a scholarship at
Missouri State University, Springfield. However, UIS offered her a better award, and they
have better facilities for the type of archaeology she is interested in for her M.A. work.
Another anthropology student was a top student who is interested in applying for graduate
school at the University of Missouri, Columbia, with an emphasis in evolutionary
psychology. He wanted to work for a semester and take the GRE before applying to the
program. He will try to get accepted in spring 2012. If not, he plans to try again next year.
The third anthropology student will graduate later this summer. To complete her degree,
she took our study abroad to China course. She wants to teach English in Japan before
moving on to become a graduate student in anthropology. She was an exchange student in
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Japan during her high school years and has retained a love and fascination with Japanese            English (United States)
culture. All of these students took courses that involved doing an extensive research paper
that was evaluated within a portfolio of papers we keep on file.

We had three sociology students that graduated this year. One was a top student who
received our Jessie Bernard Sociology Award for our outstanding student in the academic
year of 2010-11 as well as the top Easton Award for female students at Lindenwood. She
plans to work on her M.A. in International Studies at Lindenwood this next year. Ultimately
she wants to work in some humanitarian capacity in different regions of the world. She
wrote an extensive research paper on Anthony Giddens for the social thought and theory
course. She is an elegant writer who has excellent analytical and research talents. We
expect her to do very well in our international studies program. The other two students who
graduated with a sociology degree may pursue graduate work in the future, one in sociology
and the other in physical education. All six of the students did major research and analytical
papers for our SOC 320 Social Thought and Theory course, which is currently the major
capstone course in our area. We retained and evaluated their research papers that they
completed for the course. We found that all three of them really developed their critical
writing skills with the research papers. In addition, all of them had to do a major oral
presentation for the class based on their research. All of them did very well with their oral
presentations. The department believes that all of these students benefitted from our
sociology and anthropology major.

For our next academic year in 2011-12, the department will have a fully developed
anthropology major. We have hired a full-time archaeologist, and we expect a lot of growth
in this program. Currently, the job market for students trained in archaeology with a B.A.
degree is outstanding. We expect our program to grow gradually within the next five years.
We intend to develop a major overhaul of our assessment program for this new
anthropology major in our program.

Action Plan
The department needs to continue to perfect our collection of papers for incorporation into
the portfolios. We have improved our collection of research papers for the portfolios of our
students. The faculty will still need to remind students of how important these portfolios
are and the students need to be more aware of how these portfolios will be assessed. One
way in which we will do this is to inform them that these portfolios will be used as a means
of writing recommendation letters for them for their future careers.

Challenges in Our Assessment Program for Sociology and Anthropology

The department expects a considerable increase in the number of majors in anthropology
and possible sociology in the next couple of years, especially as we develop a formal
anthropology major for this next academic year. In respect to those developments, the
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faculty is going to try to develop a more effective instrument for assessing the student             English (United States)
portfolios for those majoring in sociology or anthropology. At this time, since we have a
small number of majors graduating, it is difficult to get statistically meaningful assessment
information. We did develop a Likert scale for assessing their essays in their portfolios;
however, we are still evaluating whether this is a significant measure of our students’
intellectual and critical thinking abilities. Therefore, we will re-evaluate our methods this
next year to determine whether we can improve our assessment for our majors.

This year the department did have a final exit interview with the students to discuss their
plans and how they relate to our program. We experimented with this informally in the
past. And next year we will continue to interview our graduating students in a more
formalized manner with their portfolios in hand. Next year, we will have a new capstone
course for our anthropology majors where we guide them in their career paths.

Beyond our introductory courses in sociology and anthropology, we use essay exams, short
papers, and more extensive research papers to assess our students’ progress throughout
our curriculum. We also have students do presentations on their research papers by
utilizing PowerPoint slides. We have noticed an improvement in oral communication
presentation skills since we introduced this into our program. We have not developed any
formal means of assessing these materials to demonstrate student proficiencies in any
statistical meaningful way. However, we do believe that we are engaged in both the
process and culture of assessment throughout our program.


Biology
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Mission
The mission of the Department of Biology is to prepare students for a variety of scientific
career options, including graduate study in biology, medical, and other professional schools,
secondary education, laboratory work in industrial and clinical settings, as well as
environmental field work.

Program Goals and Objectives
Goals

Biology majors will demonstrate

           thorough understanding of the major areas of biology, especially cell structure
            and function, genetics, evolution, and ecology,
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            facility in practicing the scientific method, including observation and perception       English (United States)
             of patterns in nature, induction and deduction, investigation, data collection,
             analysis, synthesis, and scientific writing and communication,
            a level of preparation enabling them to succeed in graduate and professional
             schools, or to obtain and succeed in careers in applied areas of biology, such as
             environmental science, industrial or academic research and development, and
             process / quality analysis,
            awareness of the important historical developments that underlay contemporary
             discoveries in biology.

Objectives

Students will

            be provided with facts and concepts in areas of biology such as ecology,
             evolution, cell and molecular biology, anatomy, physiology, and genetics
             through a variety of lecture, laboratory, and field study approaches,
            initiate and complete laboratory experiments using scientific methodologies,
            do historical reviews and complementary searches of biological journals,
            learn to present results and conclusions of research, experimentation, and
             scientific thinking in a variety of formats, including visual, oral, and written
             modes,
            pursue some topic(s) in greater depth than is presented in most courses,
            be introduced to ethical issues generated by advances in genetics,
             biotechnology, environmental science, and other areas of biological research.

Classes Assessed
BIO 25100 - General Biology I, BIO 25200 - General Biology II, BIO 22700 - Human Anatomy
and Physiology I, BIO 22800 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II, BIO 49100 - Senior
Synthesis

Methods of Assessment Used
      BIO 25100 and 25200 utilized objective pre- and post-testing.
      BIO 22700 and 22800 utilized both objective pre- and post-testing and subjective
       assessments such as oral and written in-class questions, end-of-class “most muddy
       point,” and review sessions.
      BIO 49100 utilized an objective exit exam as well as a subjective student response
       assessment that seeks to gather information on student attitudes toward the
       Lindenwood biology program and post-graduation career plans.
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         Instructors of each course read and discuss the University-administered subjective              English (United States)
          student course evaluations and incorporate student suggestions where possible.

Results
BIO 25100 and BIO 25200

Pre- and post-tests have been developed for both BIO 25100 and BIO 25200. The following
competencies are assessed using these tests:
            Development of factual knowledge base in five areas of biology: cell structure and
                function; genetics; evolution; structure and function; acquisition and interpretation
                of scientific information.
            Ability to expand basic knowledge toward understanding of key biological concepts.
            Ability to apply conceptual understanding of course material to analysis of specific
                biological examples.
            Understanding of the experimental, analytical, and communication processes
                utilized by modern biologists.

The BIO 25100 and BIO 25200 pre-tests are administered during the first class meetings of the
semester and the post-tests are administered as part of the final exams. The post-test questions add
extra credit to the students point totals, while the pre-tests have no effect on student grades. Each
test consists of 25 multiple-choice items selected primarily from the test bank for Biology, 5th – 8th
edition, Campbell, Reece and Mitchell, the textbook used for both courses.

BIO 25100 - General Biology I
Year             Pre-test       Post-test    Change      Improvement
2005-06            7.43          10.10        2.67           36%
2006-07            7.47          10.13        2.66           36%
2007-08            7.48          11.54        4.06           54%
2008-09            7.91          10.90        2.95           37%
2009-10            7.96          12.52        4.56           57%
2010-11            6.90          11.40        4.50           65%
Grand Avg.         7.64          11.31        3.66           48%

BIO 25200 - General Biology II
                Pre-test mean        Post-test mean     Change        % Improvement
2009-10              8.32                 18.83          10.51            126%
2010-11              7.69                 16.38          8.69             113%
To Date              8.13                 17.83           9.7             119%


Other assessments of student progress included exams for lecture and lab, mini-quizzes in
lecture, lab quizzes and reports, assignments in lecture and lab, and class discussion.
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BIO 22700 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I                                                          English (United States)


This is the first course of human anatomy and physiology sequence, and it also fulfills the
general education requirement for a laboratory based natural science course (biology).

GE goals and objectives met by this course

Students will

      refine and apply the basic skills needed for productive study and communication of
       ideas,
      develop and use the higher levels of thinking, including analysis, synthesis,
       evaluation, and integration,
      reason analytically about qualitative and quantitative evidence,
      develop personal guidelines for making informed, independent, socially-responsible
       decisions,
      demonstrate a grasp of the scientific method and the fundamental concepts and
       principles of biological science and identify how these concepts and principles relate
       to the interrelationship between human society and the natural world.

Course goals and objectives met by this course

Students will

      learn the organization, form, and function of the human body, including an
       introduction to anatomy and physiology, cells, tissues, and the following systems:
       integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, special senses, and endocrine,
      integrate and use this material in advanced courses,
      use the knowledge gained to make informed choices about anatomy and physiology
       related social and personal issues,
      use the knowledge gained to understand, interpret, and critique the popular media.

The test assesses the following competencies:

          Development of factual knowledge of human biological systems (25/25).                    Comment [u12]: these could be explained

          Ability to expand this knowledge to understand scientific processes and
           fundamental biological concepts (9/25).
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Year              N      Pre-test     Post-test    Change       %Change
2009-10           77       7.44        16.20        8.76         118%
2010-11          124       9.40        16.02        6.62          70%


BIO 22800 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the second course of the two-semester human anatomy and physiology sequence, but is not
designated as a general education course. It meets the same course goals and objectives as BIO
22700 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, except that it covers the following human systems:
cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproduction, and also covers selected
topics in water and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, nutrition, and human development.

The test assesses the following competencies:

             Development of factual knowledge of human biological systems (25/25).
             Ability to expand this knowledge to understand scientific processes and fundamental
              biological concepts (7/25).
             Ability to apply conceptual understanding of course material to analysis of specific
              biological examples (3/25 items).


Results
Year             N       Pre-test    Post-test     Change       %Change
2009-10          75        6.50       15.00         8.50         131%
2010-11          94        7.36       15.74         8.38         114%

BIO 49100 - Senior Synthesis (Program Assessment) - Assessment of Graduating Seniors

         Each May, an exit exam is administered to all graduating seniors. The exam contains
          many of the questions from the BIO 25100 General Biology I and BIO 25200 General
          Biology II pre- and post-tests, along with questions from plant biology and the
          ecology/environmental biology area. The exit exam questions cover the key areas
          that our students have studied in the biology program at Lindenwood University.
         The exit interview of graduating students includes questions in which students are
          asked about the features of the biology program that they feel were most beneficial
          and which areas could be improved.
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Exit Exam
Grad Year        N        Part 1     Part 2     Total
   2002          12       12.42      12.50      50%
   2003          16       12.81      14.88      55%
   2004          16       14.13      16.20      61%
   2005          12       13.08      13.00      52%
   2006          18       15.00      17.11      64%
   2007          23       13.00      16.26      59%
   2008          17       15.24      16.00      62%
   2009          19       11.32      16.63      56%
   2010          10       14.55      15.91      61%
   2011          20       15.21      17.74      66%
Cumulative      163       13.58      16.65      60%

The subject matter in which our graduating students are weakest includes biochemistry and
metabolism, gene regulation, and the more quantitative aspects of evolution.

Exit Interviews

The features of the biology program that students most often complement are the small
class sizes, easy availability of instructors and advisors, and breadth of coverage of areas of
biology represented by the current faculty.

The feature they reported to be most in need of improvement is the diversity of biology
elective course offerings. Also frequently mentioned is the need to encourage students to
become involved in research early in their careers at Lindenwood.

Lessons Learned
BIO 25100 - General Biology I

General Biology I students still struggle most with the biochemistry, cellular metabolism, and gene
regulation portions of the course content. Gene regulation comes at the end of the course and is
often rushed, so it is not surprising that students do not understand this material well. In previous
years instructors have added online homework as a course requirement hoping to improve student
performance in the cell structure and function units. However, the effect on student performance
has been limited. Despite this, students feel that they learn better from the online exercises, so the
homework requirement will be retained in future semesters.

BIO 25200 - General Biology II

Examination of the post-test questions that were most often missed shows that they represented
different topics and do not indicate a particular problem area in the course content. A comparison
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to last year’s data shows one question that was consistently missed both years and should be           English (United States)
considered for revision. Other questions did not show a pattern.

BIO 22700 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

The decrease in percent change from the 2009-10 academic year to the 2010-11 academic
year is due to the increase in pre-test scores of the students (post-test scores were nearly
identical). This increase in pre-test scores is likely due to better enforcement of course
prerequisites.

Further we assessed student performance in BIO 22700 course prerequisites (introductory
biology and chemistry courses) to see if there was a significant effect on student
performance in the BIO 227 course during fall 2009. There was a marginally significant
relationship between the average grade received in the two prerequisite courses and BIO
22700 (r2 = 0.341; see figure below).

Of the 24 students who earned either a D or F in BIO 22700 during fall 2009, 17 of these
students (70.8 percent) received a D in at least one of the two prerequisite courses or had
not completed one of the courses.




BIO 22800 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Comparison of results from the past two years offers some interesting details. Although the
percent change decreased from 2009-10 to 2010-11, the post-test scores were nearly
identical. The higher pre-test score for entering students in the 2010-11 academic year may
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have been due to better enforcement of the prerequisites. The department is still in the           English (United States)
process of establishing a baseline for this course.

BIO 49100 - Senior Synthesis (Program Assessment)

Exit exam results indicate continuing student weakness in a few key areas, particularly
biochemistry and metabolism and gene regulation. This subject matter is important for
students going on to graduate and professional schools, so this deficiency should be
addressed.

Graduating students value the small classes, hands-on laboratories, and accessibility of the
biology faculty members. These are features of the program that should not be changed.
However, students do want some of the features of a larger program such as a wider variety
of elective courses and research options.

Action Plan for next year
BIO 25100 - General Biology I

The department will continue its efforts to improve student understanding of biochemistry
and cellular metabolism.

BIO 25200 - General Biology II

No activity is planned.

BIO 22700 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIO 22800 - Human Anatomy and
Physiology II

The department will continue its investigation of student performance in introductory
biology and chemistry courses. If it appears to significantly impact performance in the
human anatomy and physiology sequence, we will discuss changing the minimum grade
accepted for the prerequisites. In 2011-12, we will begin collecting data to determine the
effect of the new requirement for a minimum grade of C in BIO 22700 in order to continue
into BIO 22800.

BIO 49100 - Senior Synthesis (Program Assessment)

The department will continue to improve the variety of biology elective course offerings.
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Impacts and changes on classes
BIO 25100 - General Biology I

In 2011-12, the department will pilot a new set of lab exercises for the course. We selected
labs that focus more on providing practical applications of the biochemistry and metabolism
topics presented in the course.

BIO 25200-General Biology II

No changes planned.

BIO 22800 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Beginning with fall 2011, students will be required to have earned a C or higher in BIO
22700 to continue on into BIO 22800. We plan to compare student performance in BIO
22800 before and after this change.

BIO 49100 - Senior Synthesis (Program Evaluation)

In fall 2011, parasitology, a 30000-level BIO elective that has not been offered in a number
of years, will be offered. Some faculty have received course release for research in spring
2012, so if we are to offer more BIO elective courses that semester, we may have to rely on
qualified adjunct instructors to cover some of the lower-level courses.


Chemistry


Goals
The Chemistry Department’s goals are to prepare and train graduates for
    professional work in chemistry,
    continuation to graduate studies in either chemistry or related professions,
    teaching at the middle school and/or the secondary school level.

Objectives
Students will
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      acquire core competencies in major divisions of the chemistry field such as                   English (United States)
       analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry,
      acquire practical experience in the subject areas of the courses through both the
       design and implementation of laboratory experiments using a team approach as well
       as individualized practice,
      adequately collect, record, and analyze data in a laboratory setting,
      recognize and implement safe and appropriate laboratory techniques,
      research, repeat, and present senior‐level experiments in at least one major field of
       chemistry that will be evaluated based upon a grade rubric that is generated by the
       chemistry faculty.

Course Assessments
CHM 23100 – General Chemistry 2

Methods of Assessment

This course was assessed with pre- and post-test as well as exam assessments.

Students took a post-test assessment after the midterm exams. The questions on the
assessment were geared towards getting the students to think about their study habits and
what they need to do to improve for their next exam as well as the fairness of the exam. On
the assessment, the students were asked how much time they spent studying for an exam
and what they would do differently next time: Did they see the professor or tutors or get
help from fellow students? Over the course of the semester, students reported getting
more assistance from the professor or others and their exam scores showed an
improvement. Another section of the assessment was how long was spent studying for the
exam. As shown in the data above, the more the students studied, the better they did on
the exam. There was also a place on the assessment where students wrote about the topics
that they had the most difficulty with and the professor will incorporate their suggestions
into the course when I teach the topic again.

The department will continue to use pre- and post-tests in the future; however the
professor will look at the particular questions within the exam, rather than just the overall
scores. A similar exam assessment will also be used to motivate the students as well as
addressing issues pertaining to the current course.

Results
Final grade correlated to percent increase on pre-test to post-test and missed lectures.

      If the student received an A in the course, there was a 21.6 percent average increase
       in his/her pre-test to post-test scores and on average missed 2.2 days of lecture.
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      If the student received a B in the course, there was a 13.7 percent average increase        English (United States)
       in his/her pre-test to post-test scores and on average missed 2.8 days of lecture.
      If the student received a C in the course, there was a 5.6 percent average increase in
       his/her pre-test to post-test scores and on average missed 5.1 lectures.
      If the student received a D or F in the course, there was a 2.3 percent average
       increase in his/her pre-test to post-test scores and on average missed 12.5 days of
       lecture.
      Overall there was a 12.7 percent average increase from pre-test to post-test scores,
       and 4.6 days were missed on average.

The above data indicates that student performance is directly correlated to class
attendance.




Correlation of Hours Studied Compared to Exam Scores

Students took a post-test assessment after the midterm exams. The questions on the
assessment were geared towards getting the students to think about their study habits and
what they need to do to improve for their next exam as well as the fairness of the exam. On
the assessment, the students were asked how much time they spent studying for an exam
and what they would do differently next time, did they see the professor or tutors or get
help from fellow students. Over the course of the semester, students reported getting more
assistance from the professor or others, and their exam scores showed an improvement.
Another section of the assessment was how long was spent studying for the exam. As
shown in the data below, the more the students studied, the better they did on the exam.
There was also a place on the assessment where students wrote about the topics that they
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had the most difficulty with, and the professor will incorporate their suggestions into the          English (United States)
course when I teach the topic again.

         In preparation for exam one, students reported studied an average of two to three
          hours for their exam. The average score on exam one was 68 percent.
         In preparation for exam two, students reported studying an average of four to six
          hours for their exam. The average score on exam two was 80 percent.
         In preparation for exam three, students reported studying an average of three to
          four hours for their exam. The average score on exam three was 62 percent.
         In preparation for exam four, students reported studying an average of four to six
          hours for their exam. The average score on exam four was 67 percent.
         The average score on the final exam was 76 percent.

The department will continue to use a similar assessment in the future, updating the
information for the current course and topics being covered.

CHM 23200 ‐ General Chemistry 3

This course was taught for the first time spring 2010 with limited enrollment. For fall 2010,
the students in this course were the first students who were completing the new sequence
of CHM 23000, CHM 23100, and CHM 23200. The fall 2010 courses were in large part on-
sequence freshmen who began the 23000 sequence in fall of their freshman year,
continued to CHM 23100 and CHM 24100 in spring of their freshman year, and finally
completed the sequence in fall of their sophomore year. The 38 students in the course were
assessed with a pre- and post-test 25 question multiple-choice assessment test that
included questions on solutions, equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, acids, and bases.

Results

The average improvement for the students between the pre- and post-test was 34 percent.
In addition, the students were given CATs on multiple topics and lecture was modified
based upon the success of the students. Similar testing was performed for the 33 students
that were enrolled in spring 2011, with an average improvement of 32 percent between the
pre- and post-test. As the final course in the general chemistry sequence, CHM 23200 faces
unique challenges and benefits vs. CHM 23100 and CHM 23000.

Lesson Learned

The students that are enrolled in CHM 23200 have successfully completed two chemistry
courses prior to entering and, in general, have completed more math courses as well. While
the enrollment in the course is less than the final course, CHM 25200, in the previous
sequence with 38 students enrolled in fall 2010 (on sequence course) and 33 enrolled in
spring 2011 (off-sequence course) compared to an average of 60-65 students on sequence
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in CHM 25200 and 30-35 off sequence in CHM 25200, the percentage of students that are               English (United States)
successfully completing the course is higher.

For CHM 25200, on average 28 percent of the students received an A, 26 percent received
a B, and 26 percent a C with the remainder of the students receiving a D or below and not
fulfilling the C or better requirement to continue onto future chemistry courses. For CHM
23200, 31 percent of the students received an A, 44 percent received a B, and 8 percent
received a C with the remaining students receiving a D or below. The largest jump by far
was in the number of Bs that were earned in the course with the same instructor for all
courses, including the CHM 25200 courses. As the instructor, it was clear that the students
were not only more prepared in the background chemistry material, but also in the
mathematical concepts that are necessary for CHM 23200 including advanced algebra,
logarithms, quantitative relationships, and reasoning. While the number of students
entering the course has decreased, those students that are completing the course appear to
retain more information and have a more solid foundation in chemistry.

CHM 36100 and CHM 36200 ‐ Organic Chemistry

In the previous academic year, the department began to look seriously at the changes
necessary for the chemistry program to achieve ACS approval. One of those changes was
the introduction of a chemical literature course. This course would focus heavily on the use
of journals and an increase in the students learning to evaluate resources in writing in the
field of chemistry. Part of the course would benefit chemistry majors as they learn how to
write lab reports.

The general chemistry sequence represents the beginning level of coursework for the
majors and is where they are introduced to the idea of report writing. In these courses, the
students are first exposed to the idea that lab reports are not just a simple tabulation of
what went on in the laboratory but that they are evaluating their efforts and are looking to
gain an understanding of the methodology in science and some level of context by learning
about the back ground or history of the techniques. In the mid-level courses like analytical
chemistry and organic chemistry the students are not just looking to gain a greater
understanding of the techniques being used, but are also looking to develop necessary skills
like using flowcharts for procedures, understanding of the need to describe experimental
apparatus, and in interpretation of their results.

At the highest level of coursework, the department wants the students to display a mastery
of these skills that we find is currently lacking. The faculty has definitely seen improvement
in student reporting skills over the last few years as our program began looking at the
improvements for these skills as a priority for our various courses.

Methods of Assessment
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In the last year the department began tracking the lab report grading using a spreadsheet                                                                                                                                        English (United States)
that showed the individual grades for various sections within the lab report. The professor
broke the report down into six sections that were individually important.

   1. The title page, which includes the basic information identifying the report, the
      author, the lab partner(s), the date, and the course/section. While it may seem that
      this information just makes sense in the format of the lab report, students often
      leave out these components.
   2. The introduction to the lab was the next section, which included a paragraph of the
      purpose for performing the lab, the background or historical context, and the theory
      of the lab. Students often gloss over this information, because they lack the
      understanding that we do not perform these labs just to make them go through the
      motions of science, but rather that they are learning the techniques and principles of
      the scientific method in a very practical form.
   3. The next section is the experimental method, which includes the hazards/warnings,
      the materials list, the set-up, and the procedure. This is a very important aspect of
      the lab report to the development of the students as science majors as it represents
      the technical writing aspect of the report. The explanation of these topics is crucial
      to their understanding of the needed components, the dangers inherent in the
      process, the design of an experiment, and the methods used in their experiments.
   4. The data section of the report is a space to present the proof of their experiment, as
      well as to demonstrate their knowledge of the calculations and to tabulate the data
      that is gathered. The data sheets represent the factual record of the experiment.
      The tabulations of measurements and the calculations of theoretical and percent
      yields will provide a basis for the information in the final discussion section.
   5. The discussion section is where they are expected to draw a conclusion about the
      success or failure of their experimental procedure, as well as the evaluation or
      analysis of an outcome and is also a portion of the report where they are expected
      to come up with a discussion of error. If there were problems with the experiment,
      what were they and how might they be corrected or avoided? Again these critical
      evaluation skills are of utmost necessity for the functioning science major.
   6. The professor also added a reference section, where the students are supposed to
      list the references for the various comparisons, or resources used in the writing of
      the report. This has traditionally been an area of concern in student work.
                                                                                                                                                                                      Discussion of Error
                                                                                           Hazards/Warnings




                                                                                                                                        Weights/Yields
                                                                                                              Materials List
                                            Class/Section




                                                                                                                                        Data Sheets/


                                                                                                                                                         Calculations

                                                                                                                                                                        Conclusions



                                                                                                                                                                                                            References
                                                                                                                                         Procedure
                                                            Purpose
                           Partner




                                                                      History

                                                                                Theory




                                                                                                                               Set Up
                    Name




                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Total
                                     Date
            Title




  Total
 Possible   1       1      1         1       1              1         1         2            1                 2               1        1         3       2              2              3                    1           25
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By tabulating the data for two full sections of students over the course of two semesters              English (United States)
and comparing to the total possible points, the professor discovered a series of trends that
seem to correlate to anecdotal evidence that was provided by other professors in the
department.




In each of the first semester sections the areas that showed the most inconsistency and required the
most improvement were the sections dealing with

             the introduction section, most specifically the theory portion,
             the experimental method section dealing with set-ups and procedures,
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             the data section,                                                                      English (United States)
             the discussion section.

In the second semester, it was believed that the students would show greater improvement or more
consistency in these areas. The scale for the second semester is different because the labs were
routinely two weeks and therefore were worth more points.




It was disappointing to note that the same areas noted above remained the ones of
greatest inconsistency and a continuing trend to fall short of the total possible points. Our
belief that a continuing attempt to educate the students in the importance of these areas to
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their chosen field and greater emphasis in these areas in both the foundational level              English (United States)
courses and in the newly created chemical literature course will lead to more consistency in
the student reports and improvement in the students’ efforts on these reports.

CHM 40100 - Inorganic Chemistry

This course was assessed by a mid-semester evaluation performed by the professor. At the
time, the students asked for more sample problems during class and more thorough
explanation of topics in lecture. After that point, the professor attempted to incorporate
more examples and provide more detailed explanations of the topics covered in lecture.
Based on the course evaluations at the end of the semester, the students felt that the
professor had incorporated their concerns and had improved the course. In the future, the
professor will be sure to have more examples for the course material and a more thorough
understanding that is conveyed in their explanation of the topic.

BIO/CHM 42200 - Biochemistry Metabolism

This course was assessed with an opinion questionnaire developed by the professor and
filled out by the students at the end of the semester. In the survey, the professor focused
on the topics of the take-home exams and the lab computer activities. All respondents
indicated that they liked the take-home exam format even though they took longer and
questions were more difficult. They liked being able to take their time answering each
question and felt that the take-home exams assessed both their understanding and how to
find information, which is more “what real research is.” The professor feels the take-home
exams worked well, but may do more of a combination of take-home and in-class in the
future. The professor feels in-class encourages students to commit some information to
memory, which can be useful when studying biochemical pathways. However, the professor
mainly want to assess their ability to think through complicated problems that involve
assimilation of large amounts of data for which, it is felt, take-home exams work better.

The computer lab for this course involved three main areas: microarrays, bioinformatics
research projects, and gene annotation. Although all labs worked well, the microarray lab
needs the most revision before this course is taught again. The professor would like to
incorporate more analysis of original microarray data and primary literature. Students
enjoyed the bioinformatics research projects the most so the professor will also plan to
expand that section. Students enjoyed the collaborative nature of the gene annotation
project (combining their work with students at Washington University in St. Louis) and the
chance to contribute to a publication. However, the too much time was left for the gene
annotation lab. The professor can easily cut time from that section and add time to the
other two sections of the lab in the future.

BIO/CHM 49000 - Medicinal Chemistry
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This course was assessed with an opinion questionnaire developed by the department and              English (United States)
filled out by the students at the end of the semester as well as a departmental assessment
given to the students at the middle of the semester. The mid-semester evaluation was
performed by the department. At that time, students responded that they did not like the
text. The text is a graduate-level text, and each chapter is written by a different expert in
the field. The text also has fewer pictures than many textbooks, but the professor
supplements with figures in lectures. The professor chose the text because of its range of
topics and its value to the student as a supplemental resource and felt students might
change their opinion of the text as the course went on. The end-of-semester questionnaire
showed that half of the students changed their minds and appreciated the text. They found
it helpful for the end-of-semester team research project. However, half of the respondents
(11/22) indicated the text was too difficult for the course. Due to the lack of undergraduate-
level texts for this subject, the professor plans to use the same text next year and spend
more time addressing how to best use it in class. Overall, student comments were very
positive about this course, and they enjoyed the content and supplemental activities,
especially the Danforth Center tour.

CHM 47100, CHM 47200 and CHM 47300‐ Physical Chemistry I and II lectures and
laboratory

The physical chemistry sequence, CHM 47100 and CHM47200/47300, has been reorganized
to offer the first semester of the sequence CHM 47100 as a spring semester course with the
second semester and lab as fall/J‐Term courses. The department chose to reorganize the
sequence in order to accommodate the need for Calculus II, which many of the chemistry
majors do not take until the fall semester of their sophomore year.

CHM 47100 Physical Chemistry I

A pre‐test was given to test for overall knowledge from previous courses in areas of gas
laws, thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, and solutions. General competency and
background knowledge of non‐calculus‐based problem solving in these five areas is
expected to be built upon in order for students to have success in this course. With this in
mind, the pre‐test was given on the second day of class with advanced warning to the
students in spring 2011 so that the students could bring calculators, periodic tables, and
other necessary handouts to readily examine the problems on the pre‐test. Based upon the
scores on the pre‐test and subject question analysis, additional review material was
presented during the semester in order to ensure that all students had the necessary
background knowledge to effectively expand upon ideas in this advanced course for
senior‐level majors.

Results
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This group of students lacked competencies in equilibria and kinetics, with 64 percent of the       English (United States)
students failing equilibria and 72 percent failing kinetics. Additional background lectures
were added into the syllabi to accommodate the need for review in these areas.



CHM 47200 – Physical Chemistry II

A pre-test on basic calculus concepts was given to the students prior to the start of the
semester on the first day of the class. The students were tested on basic derivatives and
integrals. Based upon the results, a brief review of derivatives and integrals was given at the
start of the second lecture. No post-test was given in the course. There were seven students
enrolled in the course, with four of the seven students concurrently enrolled in Calculus III
and one of seven having completed Calculus III in a previous semester.

Results

As this course is heavily intensive with advanced Calculus, the students were asked
repeatedly whether concurrent enrollment in Calculus III was helpful to understanding the
concepts that were being taught in the chemistry class, the response was a resounding yes.
The students in this section of the course, relative to previous year’s courses, performed
better with a firmer math foundation on both homework and tests. In addition, the
students were given a mid-semester evaluation that assessed the lecture style, textbook,
study habits, and test material. The students unanimously stated that the lecture style and
textbook were effective, that homework was the key to their success, and that the
concurrent enrollment in Calculus III was critical to their understanding of the quantum
mechanics that was taught in the course. This course arrangement will be continued in
future semesters.

CMH 47300 – Physical Chemistry Lab

CHM 47300 is the laboratory section that accompanies the physical chemistry curriculum
for B.S. in chemistry majors. The labs are extremely long and detailed with the lab reports
and calculations equally as challenging. In order to accommodate the time that is needed
for the labs, the course was offered as a 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. course during J-Term in 2011.

Results

The course was the only one that the students were enrolled in and allowed for the
students’ full commitment to the labs as well as an entire day to complete the labs. This was
a new concept that was tried by the program with a very successful outcome. The students
were all seniors and were advised that they would need to be available during J-Term. All six
enrolled students were timely, successfully completed all labs (some requiring multiple
days), and reports. The students appeared to have gained more insight than previous
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regular semesters in which the course was taught. The students verbalized that they                 English (United States)
believed they learned more and were able to focus on the concepts with more detail and
overall enjoyed the change in format. As the instructor, it was clear that the format was
much more conducive to the students dedicating their time and energy on the laboratory
solely rather than as just another class stacked on during the semester. The program will
strive to continue this format in the future.

CHM 49000 - Senior Seminar

Several issues arose during this past semester’s seminar course. This course provides
students with an opportunity to complete a literature research project on a chemistry-
related topic that interests them, then to organize their research into a seminar
presentation and a written report. The main goal of the course is to provide a supportive
environment for students to give a professional scientific talk where they can be critiqued
by the faculty and their peers. The department sets the expectation for the students that
they reach above the undergraduate level and appear more like experts in their chosen
topic. The hope for this course is that students leave better prepared to give professional-
level scientific talks in graduate school or their future jobs.

Lessons Learned

The issues that arose this semester were as follows:

          Although students were each assigned a faculty mentor, students did not make
           use of their mentor and met with them only the day before their seminar or not
           at all. We feel students would benefit from earlier and more frequent meetings.
          Students often did not treat the seminar as a professional talk and instead
           showed up without practicing and wearing jeans.
          Although many students did a great job reading and interpreting primary
           literature, others mainly did one Google-Scholar search to pick an article then
           used other Web resources like Wikipedia for the main content in their talk. That
           approach does not meet the goals for the course, but there was not a clear way
           to take off points for poor research or poor use of literature.

The course was larger this year, with 24 students instead of the six to eight students in the
past. In the future, the goals listed above need to be more clearly explained to the students
and more clearly tied to the points for the course. Faculty also discussed informing students
that it is possible to fail the course and not graduate if they do not satisfy the course
requirements. These issues will help guide us in the design and assessment of this course
next spring.

Senior Student Assessment
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As a major undertaking for the department, the faculty has started to implement a senior            English (United States)
exit exam for all students in their final year in the department. The challenge to the faculty
is in developing a single test that effectively measures all of the basic competencies of
chemistry major while also taking into consideration the breadth of majors that the
department includes: Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, and
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with a biochemistry emphasis. Each of these majors differs
in junior‐ and senior‐level coursework and breadth of topics. This year’s exam was identical
to the previous year’s, made up of nine multistep problems covering areas in stoichiometry,
gas laws, acid‐base and Ksp equilibria, thermodynamics, kinetics, VSEPR, organic synthesis,
and spectroscopy.

Each of the 21 students in the department’s capstone senior seminar course were given an
exam covering the topics listed above. The students were given two weeks to solve the
problems and turn in the exam. Each question had multiple parts and was worth 10 points
for a total of 90 evenly distributed points on the exam. The exam accounted for 50 percent
of the grade in the capstone course.

Results

Overall results were extremely successful for this format: 16 of 21 of the students scored 60
percent or higher on the exam. The average for all 21 students was a 79.55 percent. This
jump in the overall average from the previous year was significant but may be skewed by
the fact that some students had the same exam. The department is exploring this issue and
modifying the exams in the future. Overall, students had an average on nine out of 10
points in questions based upon stoichiometry, gas laws, VSEPR and organic spectra, eight
out of 10 on questions based upon kinetics and thermodynamics, even out of 10 on Ksp, Ka            Comment [u13]: im guessing this should be a
                                                                                                    number
and Kb questions, and six out of 10 on organic synthesis. This shows improvement from the
struggles in organic spectra and VSEPR that were seen in last year’s exams, but again the
program is uncertain as to the cause of the improvement as each student did not have a
unique exam this year and thus will be addressing this for the upcoming academic year.

Lessons Learned

Overall, the program is happy with the success of the students and will be looking at the
overall program curriculum to ascertain if changes in any upper-level courses need to be
addressed based upon the results of the senior exams.

Department Action Plan
The 2011‐12 academic year will involve a continued restructuring of the chemistry
assessment program in order to improve pre‐ and post‐exams as well as incorporate
mid‐semester evaluations in most courses. Most significantly, the department will focus on
continued evaluation of the CHM 23000, 23100, 23200 sequence and implement evaluation
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of the laboratory sections of this course CHM 24100 and CHM 24200. The department                   English (United States)
continues to choose a group approach to assessment to build a program that is consistent
and uniform for all general courses. As part of this complete overhaul, the department has
set the following goals for the 2010‐11 academic year:

          A pre‐test and post‐test evaluation will again be restructured for all sections of
           CHM 23100 and CHM 23200. This pre‐ and post‐test will be compiled by the
           entire chemistry faculty to include multiple competencies as well as a correlation
           with semester exam questions to evaluate retention of material with post‐test
           questions. This data will then be correlated by instructors in order to standardize
           the curriculum for all instructors.
          Assessment will be modified and evaluated to examine the success of the new
           CHM 23000 sequence. Evaluation of exam scores, pass/fail rate, and retention
           will be completed from the 23000, 23100, and 23200 sequence. This evaluation
           will occur over the next two years so that three complete three‐semester classes
           may be examined.
          Assessment of the laboratory section of the general chemistry sequence will
           begin as rubrics are used for all laboratories in both CHM 24100 and CHM 24200.
           The rubric breakdowns will then be assessed based upon areas of lab purpose
           procedure, data and calculations, and conclusions in order to target areas of
           concern in the laboratory.
          Mid‐semester evaluations will be given in most chemistry courses that evaluate
           textbooks, lecture style, tutoring availability, and out‐of‐class assignments.
          Upper‐level course assessment will continue to evolve to meet the needs of the
           students in each individual upper‐level course. Evaluation of these upper‐level
           courses poses unique challenges for each course and will be addressed by the
           individual instructor to best fit the needs of the course.
          Senior exit exams will be given to all graduating seniors to evaluate strengths
           and weaknesses in the Chemistry Department. The form of the senior
           assessment will remain in take‐home, individual, multi‐question format.

Program Changes
The program focused this year on individual course changes and reorganization of the
syllabi in order to better suit the needs of the students. In addition, the program also
modified the B.S. in chemistry degree to add courses in biochemistry as well as modified the
lab hour requirements in several upper-level courses.

A fifth faculty member was also added this year as well as numerous adjunct faculty. In
order to maintain consistency among all sections of a course, the program has implemented
lead instructors for all courses within the program which are taught by multiple instructors,
both full-time and part-time. The lead instructor is responsible for aligning the syllabi,
lecture and laboratory curriculum in these courses, as well as managing assessment
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between all sections. Finally the lead instructor will serve as a primary contact for all          English (United States)
students that are enrolled in a course, this instructor will always be a full-time faculty
member which has regular office hours weekly. The goal for this process has been to
manage the programs growing number of adjunct faculty, maintain consistency in the
curriculum, and maintain all courses along the guidelines of program needs. Assessment of
these changes will be ongoing for the program.


Computer Science


Mission
The Department of Computer Science offers three majors. They are the Bachelor of Arts in
Computer Science, the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, and the Bachelor of
Science in Computer Information Systems. The mission of all three majors is to produce
knowledgeable, productive, well-informed, and educated citizens who will entertain careers
in the field of computer systems and to prepare students for work in areas ranging from
design and development of commercial software systems to the development of virtual
reality and computer graphic programs. Other areas in which the graduate can have
productive careers are telecommunications, virtual reality training and entertainment, the
internet for commerce and information dissemination, robotics, and exploration.

Program Goals and Objectives
The goals for all of the graduates from the Department of Computer Science are as follows:

                  Provide students with the knowledge to produce high quality computer
                   software.
                  Provide students with a comprehensive understanding of how computers
                   perform the operation of data processing.
                  Give students a well-rounded view of ethical issues concerning the
                   manipulations of computer systems.
                  Convey the interrelationship between computer science and other fields
                   of endeavors.

Objectives for graduates in the major
The objectives for all bachelor of arts and bachelor of science majors in computer science
are listed below. Students will

              be capable of writing clean, clear, and productive computer programs using
               the various programming languages of C++, JAVA, and Visual Basic,
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             be able to identify the various components of computer systems and their            English (United States)
              function/purpose,
             recognize the importance of operating systems and the services they provide
              to the user,
             be able to employ advanced programming techniques and abstract data
              structures to write software to solve real life problems involving computer
              systems,
             understand how various computer networks perform.

The objectives for the bachelor of science majors in computer information systems are
listed below. Students will

             be capable of writing clean, clear, and productive computer programs using
              the various programming languages of C++, JAVA, and Visual Basic,
             recognize the relationship between the business world and computer
              science,
             understand how various computer networks perform,
             comprehend how database systems operate and how to apply them to real
              world problems,
             understand the basic business topics of accounting, economics, business
              management, and organizational behavior.

Classes Assessed
CSC 10000 - Intro to Computer Science, CSC 14400 - Computer Science I, CSC 18400 -
Computer Science II, CSC 25500 - Assembly Language Programming, CSC 30500 - Principles
of Database Systems, CSC 32000 - UNIX Workshop, CSC 34000 - COBOL Programming, CSC
40300 - Computer Architecture, CSC 40500 - Computer Graphics, CSC 36000 - Data
Structures, CSC 38000 - Telecommunication and Networking, CSC 40600 - Operating
Systems, CSC 41000 - JAVA Programming, CSC 42500 - Advanced Database Design

Methods of Assessment Used
The method of assessment for these courses consisted of written examinations, which
included both factual recall of information and problem solving, programming assignments,
individual and team projects, written and oral reports, and a final examination. Not all
courses employed all the methods. Each course did employ a minimum of three of the list
methods. Students demonstrated a positive attitude towards these methods as fair and
appropriate.

Results
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An assessment of the results of our program shows that we are meeting our goals and                 English (United States)
objectives. All majors graduate within the normal four-year time frame. Most majors (72
percent) obtain a position in the field of computer science or a related field before
graduation. Within six months of graduation, the placement rate is over 95 percent. In
addition, retention rates for those students who have succeeded in completing the initial
coursework are well over 90 percent. These results compare very favorably to results from
past years. Placement rates in past years were slightly better due to better economic
conditions. However, retention rates have improved. Past retention rates were in the 70-80
percent range.

In addition, in spring 2010, the computer science faculty undertook a self-study of the
computer science program. Included in the self-study group were Dr. Dominic Soda, Dr.
Wojciech Golik, Dr. Stephen Blythe, Dr. Sajalendu Dey, and Prof. Renee Van Dyke. The main
focus of the study was to assess how well our curriculum served the needs of our students
and to compare our program with those of colleges and universities similar in size and
mission as Lindenwood University.

As a result of the self-study, the CSC faculty has made the following changes to the CSC
curriculum.

          CSC 10000 - Introduction to Computer Science will focus more on program
           development using the Python programming language. This change should
           better prepare student moving on to CSC 14400 to write programs in a concise,
           logical, and efficient manner.
          CSC 14400 - Computer Science I will change programming languages from C++ to
           an introduction to the JAVA and Visual Basic programming languages. This
           change will provide students with an early introduction to these languages while
           continuing to stress the logic of the program development process.
          CSC 18400 - Computer Science II has been upgraded to a 200-hundred level
           course. The new course number is CSC 24400. The course title has not changed.
           The purpose of this change is to emphasize program development using the C++
           programming language. The change combines the C++ topics that were covered
           in CSC 14400 with the topics in CSC 18400.
          CSC 32000 - UNIX Workshop was removed as a required course for majors in
           computer information systems.
          CSC 34000 - COBOL Programming was removed as a required course for majors
           in computer information systems.
          CSC 34400 - GUI Application Design was added as an upper-level required course
           for all majors. This course combines the topics of CSC 40200 - Visual Basic
           Programming, and CSC 41000, JAVA Programming. Both CSC 40200 and CSC
           41000 have been removed as required courses for all majors and will eventually
           be eliminated from the catalog.
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          CSC 42500 - Advanced Database Design has been removed as a required course               English (United States)
           for CIS majors. It will eventually be removed from the catalog. It will be replaced
           by a new course, CSC 43000.
          A new course has been introduced for all majors. The course is CSC 43000 -
           Senior Project. This course will act as a capstone course for all majors.

The faculty believes that these changes will update the CSC curriculum and provide students
with the required knowledge and understanding of their chosen career field.

Lessons Learned
The involvement of students in projects, programs, and reports produced a hands-on
learning experience that has benefitted student in a positive manner. Oral reports provided
students with the opportunity to gain skills and experience as a speaker before an audience
that will benefit them in their future careers. Programming assignments provide students
with the skills necessary to be successful in their chosen field of computer science. Written
exams provided students with the opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge they had
acquired in their respective course.

Action Plan
The CSC faculty will monitor student improvement in the understanding of programming
concepts and acquisition of knowledge of program development and computer systems.
The curriculum changes listed in CSC 34400 - GUI Application Design are design to enhance
student learning in the area of computers and computer science while additionally support
the goals and objectives of the University.

In addition, the course objectives for all CSC courses will need to be revised to reflect
changes in the curriculum. This action will commence with the start of fall 2011 and will be
scheduled for completion by the end of fall 2011.

Impacts and changes on classes
Depending on the results of the curriculum changes in CSC 34400 - GUI Application Design,
additional changes, improvements, and enhancements may be necessary to provide
students with a viable and practical course of study, which will improve student learning
and provide students with a firm foundation in computer science which will enhance their
chances for a successful and productive career in computer science.


Earth Sciences
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                                                                                                   English (United States)
       Lindenwood University does not offer a degree in earth sciences; all of the courses
       by this department are offered as general education classes to fulfill one of the
       science requirements.




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Mathematics


Goals and Objectives
   The main goal of the Lindenwood mathematics program is to prepare and train our
   graduates for one of the three areas:
           teaching of mathematics at the secondary school level,
           graduate study in mathematics or related professions,
           professional work in applied mathematics (actuarial studies).


Mathematics Program Objectives
Students will

      understand the basic concepts (CONC) of each knowledge area,
      understand the basic skills and tools (SKAT) associated with each knowledge area,
      understand the logical foundations (LOGF) of mathematics,
      know the historical development (HISTD) of mathematics,
      understand the applications (APPL) of mathematics to our culture,
      recognize the interrelationships between knowledge areas (INTER) of mathematics,
      read and communicate mathematics independently (SEM).


Methods of Mathematics Program Assessment 2010/2011
Students reach these goals and objectives by taking courses in the following areas of
mathematics: algebra, analysis, discrete mathematics, geometry, numerical methods, and
probability and statistics.

Mathematical Content Areas      Relevant LU Courses
Algebra                         MTH 29000, MTH 31500, MTH 32000
Analysis                        MTH 27100, MTH 27200, MTH 30300, MTH 31100, MTH 36100, MTH
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                                     37000, MTH49000                                                         English (United States)
Discrete Mathematics                 MTH22100, MTH 28000, MTH 29000, MTH 39000
Geometry                             MTH 30300, MTH 31500, MTH 33000
Numerical Methods                    MTH 27100, MTH 27200, MTH 31100, MTH 35100
Probability and Statistics           MTH24100, MTH 34100, MTH 34200

Each section of every mathematics course is assessed by its instructor who submits
electronically to the department chair the following documents:

        A copy of the course syllabus.
        A copy of the final for each course taught.
        An instructor's epilogue, which is a performance record on each course objective
         and a narrative enumerating accomplishments and recommending improvements.
         Between five and eight objectives were written for each of the mathematics
         courses. Starting in fall 2010/spring 2011 assessment cycle for each course objective,
         each instructor was supposed to assign subjectively a letter grade based on the
         totality of the performance of his/her section on that objective during the semester.
         This method over time will allow the identification of those objectives, which are not
         adequately met and the necessary adjustments could be made.

The department thinks that the new method will be more reliable than the previous
method of assigning quantitative percentages based on the student performance on one to
two problems/objectives (the problems varied widely among different sections of the same
course).

Results
Fall 2010 (Fall 2009)

There were seven (eight in the fall 2009) courses taught in nine (ten in the fall 2009)
sections by six full-time instructors. All instructors wrote epilogues for each of their classes.

Grade Distribution Fall 2010 (Fall 2009)
Course                                 # of
                                                  A           B         C        D       F       of ABCs
                                     students
                                                                                                   100%
 MTH 22100 - Discrete Structures       8(9)      1(3)        3(3)      4(3)      0       0
                                                                                                  (100%)
MTH 24100 - Statistics for Science    44(51)      14          18        5       1        6       86% (NA)
MTH 27100 - Calculus I                55(48)    10(12)      16(13)    15(10)   8(7)     6(6)   75% (73%)
MTH 27200 - Calculus II               16(19)     2(5)        3(7)      4(1)    2(2)     5(6)   56% (62%)
MTH 30300 - Calculus III              13(22)     5(4)        6(6)      1(5)    1(4)     0(3)   92% (68%)
MTH 31500 - Linear Algebra            17(21)     8(6)        2(5)      4(6)    0(2)     3(2)    82% (81%)
MTH 32000 - Algebraic Structures       7(6)      1(0)        3(2)      3(1)    0(2)     0(1)   100% (50%)

Objectives
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Course                               OBJ 1   OBJ 2       OBJ 3       OBJ 4       OBJ 5       OBJ 6        OBJ 7       OBJ 8         English (United States)
MTH 22100 - Discrete Structures       C       B           C           B           A           A            A           B
MTH 24100 - Statistics for Science    A       A           C+          C+          C+          C            B           C+
MTH 27100 - Calculus I                C+      B           B           B+          C           B            C+          C-
MTH 27200 - Calculus II               B       C           B           B           C           C            B
MTH 30300 - Calculus III              D+      C+          D+          B            X          C+           F+          F+
MTH 31500 - Linear Algebra            A-      A-          B+          B           C+
MTH 32000 - Algebraic Structures      B       B           C           C           B           B



Spring 2011 (Spring 2010)

There were six (eight) math courses taught in eight (nine) sections by six full-time
instructors. All instructors filled out the epilogues for each of their classes.

Grade Distribution - Spring 2011 (Spring 2010)
Course                                 # of
                                                     A           B           C           D           F        % of ABCs
                                     students
MTH 24100 - Statistics for Science    54(63)      34          13           5          0             2         96% (NA)
MTH 27100 -Calculus I                 39(20)     3(2)        10(5)       16(4)       6(6)          4(3)       74% (55%)
MTH 27200 - Calculus II               45(25)     9(4)        10(6)       12(6)       5(1)          9(8)       69% (64%)
MTH 29000 - Intro to Adv. Math        23(12)     15(6)       4(2)        1(3)        1(0)          2(1)       87% (92%)
MTH 31100 - Differential Equations    12(15)     9(5)        1(8)        1(1)        1(1)          0(0)       92% (93%)
MTH 33000 - Geometry                    5          3           1           0          1             0           80%

OBJECTIVES Spring 2011
Course                               OBJ 1      OBJ 2      OBJ 3       OBJ 4       OBJ 5          OBJ 6      OBJ 7          OBJ 8
MTH 24100 - Statistics for             A          A          B           B           B              B          A              B
Science
MTH 27100 -Calculus I                  C          B          B               A       B               A            A           B
MTH 27200 - Calculus II                C+         C          C+              B       B+              D+           B           X
MTH 29000 - Intro to Adv. Math         B          A          B               A       A               X            A           X
MTH 31100 - Differential               A          X          A               X       B               X            A           A
Equations
MTH 33000 - Geometry                    C         A           B              B           B           A            X           X


Lessons Learned and Actions Taken in 2010/2011
        We have added one new full-time Ph.D. mathematics position for the 2010-11
         academic year. The new faculty member helped us better balance the teaching
         loads between the full-time and part-time faculty.
        The passing ratios (number of ABCs /number of all students who finished the course)
         in the calculus sequence (MTH 27100, MTH 27200) have improved somewhat in the
         last year although the ratios still remain quite low. MTH 27100 and MTH 27200 are
         introductory courses in a difficult major, and some students are not prepared to
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      handle that level of difficulty in the material. In addition, these courses are required     English (United States)
      for chemistry majors who are not as strong in math as the mathematics majors. The
      calculus courses seem to act as filters selecting students likely to succeed in the
      math-intensive majors.
     The passing ratios in the higher-level courses are quite satisfactory. The higher-level
      courses are taken by mathematics (and some computer science) majors who have
      already passed MTH 27100 and MTH 27200.
     Adding MTH 24100 - Statistics for Science Majors to the requirements for the B.A.
      and the B.S. in mathematics was a success (good passing ratios). However, this
      decreased the demand for MTH 34100 - Probability and Statistics, which remained a
      required course only in the B.A. in actuarial studies. This latter degree would benefit
      from higher enrollment. Adding MTH 3200 - Algebraic Structures to the
      requirements for the B.A. and the B.S. in mathematics was also a success – it made
      these degrees stronger.
     Assessing the course objectives by assigning letter grades to each objective seems to
      work quite well. The letter grades are easier to follow and clearly indicate which
      objectives will need more instructor attention in the next course cycle.
     To increase enrollment and promote our math/CS programs, we have hosted (for
      the fifth year in a row) the annual American Mathematics Contest sponsored by the
      Mathematical Association of America and Lindenwood University. Fifty high school
      students participated in it (last year we had 88). The three top contenders were
      awarded substantial Lindenwood scholarships.

Action Plan
     We will continue our letter grade assessment of the course objectives. We will
      evaluate its effectiveness in the next year assessment report.
     As a measure of the quality of our mathematics program, we will design and utilize a
      graduating student exit survey, which will help us find out which program areas
      could be improved.
     Mid‐semester evaluations will be given in many 2xx level mathematics courses to
      evaluate textbooks, lecture style, tutoring availability, and out‐of‐class assignments.
     For the 2011-12 assessment cycle, we have added a new full-time Ph.D. faculty
      member in computer science. Contribution to the computer science program will be
      balanced by the corresponding contribution of the remaining computer science
      faculty to our math program. Thus, the new faculty will help us better balance the
      teaching loads between the full-time and part-time faculty. Currently our
      mathematics/computer science/physics/pre-engineering division has 12 full-time
      faculty members and offers about 80 sections of mathematics/computer
      science/physics/pre-engineering courses per semester.
     We have added MTH 37000 - Advanced Calculus to the requirements for the B.S.
      degree in the next cycle. The advanced calculus course has been offered as a special
      topics in mathematics course MTH 49000 for three consecutive years. Most B.S.
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        mathematics degrees in the United States have that requirement. Our action will                English (United States)
        bring our degree in line with those programs.
       We will continue our efforts to promote the mathematics program and increase its
        enrollment. The main initiatives in this area are
            o the annual high school American Mathematics Contest,
            o promoting of the Actuarial Studies Program.
       We plan to acquire a WWW presence for the MCPE division with individual faculty
        Web pages highlighting the strengths of our program. We consider it a valuable
        recruitment tool.


Physics and Pre-Engineering


Mission: Physics and Pre-Engineering Program
At Lindenwood University, we have a physics program and also a pre-engineering program.
The physics program does not offer a major at this moment. However, it offers physics
courses that are required by students of other majors. The physics program also offers a
minor in engineering physics. The pre-engineering program offers several introductory
engineering courses that will prepare a student to pursue an engineering major degree at
the undergraduate level once the student transfers to an engineering college. In order to
achieve the above mentioned mission, for the physics and the pre-engineering program, the
following courses are offered:

Physics Course Offerings

Our physics program offers the following calculus-based, algebra-based, and concept-based
courses:
Specific Basis       Physics Courses at Lindenwood University
Calculus-based       PHY 30100, PHY 30200, PHY 30300
Algebra-based        PHY 25100, PHY 25200
Concept-based        PHY 11100, PHY 11200


Pre-Engineering Course Offerings

Specific Basis                        Pre-Engineering Courses at Lindenwood University
CAD-based                             EGR 25100
Statics- and Dynamics-based           EGR 33100 , EGR 33200
Electrical Circuit-based              EGR 36100, EGR 36200


Program Goals and Objectives
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The program goals and objectives of physics and pre-engineering program are described                English (United States)
below, for each course, as catalog descriptions and course objectives.




Course Objectives: Physics

PHY 11100 - Concepts of Physics

The student should be able to

      identify the variables involved in Newton’s Laws of Motion and calculate their
       values in various situations for linear motion,
      identify the variables involved in the definitions of work, kinetic energy, and
       potential energy, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving linear momentum and collisions and calculate their
       values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving rotational kinematics, rotational dynamics, rotational
       energy, and static equilibrium and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving gravity, projectile, and satellite motion, and calculate
       their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving atomic nature of matter, and matter in solid, liquid,
       gas, and plasma phases, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving temperature, heat, expansion, heat transfer, change
       of phase, and thermodynamics, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving vibrations, waves, and sound and calculate their
       values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving electrostatics and electric current, and calculate their
       values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving magnetism and electromagnetic induction, and
       calculate their values in various situations.

PHY 25100 - Introductory Physics I

The student should be able to

      identify the variables involved in one dimensional and two-dimensional kinematics
       and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved in Newton’s Laws of Motion and calculate their values
       in various situations,
      identify the variables involved in the definitions of work, kinetic energy, and
       potential energy, and calculate their values in various situations,
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      identify the variables involving linear momentum and collisions and calculate their           English (United States)
       values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving rotational kinematics, rotational dynamics, rotational
       energy, and static equilibrium and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving gravitational force and calculate their values in
       various situations,
      identify the variables involving oscillations about equilibrium, waves, and sound and
       calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving physics of fluids and calculate their values in various
       situations.

PHY 25200 - INTRO PHYSICS II

The student should be able to

      identify the variables involved with our study of temperature scales, thermal
       expansion, specific heats, conduction, convection, radiation, ideal gas properties,
       Kinetic Theory of Gases, latent heats, phase equilibrium, evaporation, and phase
       changes, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of the Zeroth Law of
       Thermodynamics, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics,
       and the Third Law of Thermodynamics, and calculate their values in various
       situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of the electric forces, electric fields,
       electric potential and electric potential energy, and calculate their values in various
       situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of electric currents, direct-current
       circuits, Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s rules, and RC circuits, and calculate their values in
       various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of magnetic field, magnetic force on
       moving charges, magnetic force exerted on a current-carrying wire, magnetic
       torque, Ampere’s law, magnetism in matter, magnetic flux, Faraday’s law of
       induction, Lenz’s law, inductance, RL circuits, and transformers, and calculate their
       values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of alternating-current circuits
       including RC circuits and RLC circuits, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of production and propagation of
       electromagnetic waves, electromagnetic spectrum, polarization, reflection,
       refraction and dispersion of light, and geometrical optics including optical
       instruments, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of physical optics including
       interference and diffraction of light, and calculate their values in various situations.
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PHY 30100 - General Physics I                                                                       English (United States)


The student should be able to

      identify the variables involved in one-, two-, and three-dimensional kinematics and
       calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved in Newton’s Laws of Motion and calculate their values
       in various situations,
      identify the variables involved in the definitions of work, kinetic energy, and
       potential energy, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving linear momentum and collisions and calculate their
       values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving rotational kinematics, rotational dynamics, rotational
       energy, and static equilibrium and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving gravitational force and calculate their values in
       various situations,
      identify the variables involving oscillations about equilibrium, waves, and sound and
       calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving physics of fluids and calculate their values in various
       situations,
      identify the variables involving our study of temperature scales, thermal expansion,
       specific heats, conduction-, convection- and radiation of heat, ideal gas properties,
       Kinetic Theory of Gases, latent heats, phase equilibrium, evaporation, and phase
       changes, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics,
       First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics, and the Third Law of
       Thermodynamics, and calculate their values in various situations.

PHY 30200 - General Physics II

The student should be able to

      identify the variables involved with our study of the electric forces, electric fields,
       electric potential and electric potential energy, and calculate their values in various
       situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of electric currents, direct-current
       circuits, and Ohm’s law, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of Kirchhoff’s laws, and RC circuits, and
       calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of magnetic field, magnetic force on
       moving charges, magnetic force exerted on a current-carrying wire, magnetic
       torque, Ampere’s law, and magnetism in matter, and calculate their values in
       various situations,
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      identify the variables involved with our study of magnetic flux, Faraday’s law of             English (United States)
       induction, Lenz’s law, inductance, RL circuits, and transformers, and calculate their
       values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of alternating-current circuits
       including RC circuits and RLC circuits, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of production and propagation of
       electromagnetic waves, electromagnetic spectrum, polarization, reflection,
       refraction and dispersion of light, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of geometrical optics including optical
       instruments, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of physical optics including
       interference and diffraction of light, and calculate their values in various situations.

PHY 30300 - Modern Physics

      identify the variables involved with our study of Special Theory of Relativity, and
       calculate their values in different situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of Introductory Quantum Mechanics,
       and calculate their values in different situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of Atomic Physics, and calculate their
       values in different situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of Introductory Nuclear Physics, and
       calculate their values in different situations,
      identify the variables involved with our study of Cosmology will be covered, and
       calculate their values in different situations.

Course Objectives: PRE-ENGINEERING

EGR 25100 - Computer Aided Design

The student should be able to

      open an AutoCAD drawing, work with multiple drawings, save an AutoCAD drawing,
       print an AutoCAD drawing,
      draw lines using absolute, relative and polar coordinates, erase an object, trim and
       extend a line, move and copy an object,
      draw regular shaped objects including rectangles, polygons, and chamfers,
      move around an object by using panning, and zoom in and zoom out of an object by
       using the zoom feature of AutoCAD,
      draw curved shapes including circles, arcs, ellipses, and fillets,
      put text on a drawing by using both dynamic text and multiline text features, use a
       template and set a drawing’s parameters,
      use various object snap techniques, and use viewports,
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      use linetypes, layers, and object properties.                                                English (United States)




EGR 33100 - Engineering Mechanics I- Statics


The student should be able to

      identify the methods involved in numerical calculations using international system of
       units, in various situations,
      identify the methods involved in combining vectors in various ways, and perform
       calculations involving them in various situations,
      identify the variables involved in the study of equilibrium of a particle, and calculate
       their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving combining torques in various ways, and perform
       calculations involving them in various situations,
      identify the variables involved in the study of equilibrium of a rigid body, and
       calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving structural analysis of simple trusses and calculate
       their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving structural analysis of frames by identifying internal
       forces, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving the frictional properties of materials and their
       applications in wedges, screws, flat belts, collar bearings, pivot bearings, disks, and
       journal bearings, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involving center of gravity, centroid, moment of inertia, and
       their engineering applications, and calculate their values in various situations,
      identify the variables involved with engineering applications of virtual work, and
       calculate their values in various situations.

EGR 36100 - Circuit Theory I

The student should be able to

      identify the basic elements of a DC electrical circuit and calculate their values,
      use simplification techniques for circuit analysis,
      use Kirchoff’s laws for circuit analysis,
      use Thevenin’s theorem and Norton’s theorem for circuit analysis,
      use and calculate various input and output values/parameters of an operational
       amplifier,
      analyze transient and sinusoidal steady state behavior of an RL circuit,
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        analyze transient and sinusoidal steady state behavior of an RC circuit,                                  English (United States)
        analyze transient and sinusoidal steady state behavior of an RLC circuit.



Classes Assessed
All classes that were offered have been assessed except PHY 11200, which is a one-credit
lab course.

Methods of Assessment Used
Assessment is based on the course grade. The course grade is based on the performance of
the students on quizzes, tests, hands-on activities in the labs as represented in the lab
reports, and also the final exam.

Results
Fall Semester - 2010
Course                          Section    # of A    # of B     # of C       # of D       # of F
                                                                                                         # of Ws
                                   #       grades    grades     grades       grades      grades
PHY 11100-Concepts of Physics                10        14          9            2           0
PHY 11100-Concepts of Physics     22          6         7          3            0           2
PHY 25100-Introductory          21 and
                                             11         5         5            0             0
Physics I                         22
PHY 30100-General Physics I       11         8          9         4            0             2
PHY 30300-Modern Physics                     1          0         0            0             0


Spring Semester - 2011
Course                          Section    # of A    # of B     # of C       # of D       # of F
                                                                                                         # of Ws
                                   #       grades    grades     grades       grades      grades
PHY 11100-Concepts of Physics                11        10          6            2
PHY 11100-Concepts of Physics     11          5         2          4            1
PHY 25200-Intro Physics II        11         10         5          2            0            0
PHY 30100-General Physics I       11         12         9          3            0            1
PHY 30200-General Physics II      21          9         8          1            0            0
PHY 25100- Introductory
                                  11         5          3         0            0             0
Physics I


Summary Statistics: Course Assessment

Summary Statistics: Physics: 2010-2011
Course                          # of A    # of B    # of C    # of D      # of F      # of
                                                                                                 Total       %
                                grades    grades    grades    grades     grades       Ws
PHY 11100-Concepts of Physics     32        33        22         5          2                     94      47.24%
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PHY 25100-Introductory                                                                                                English (United States)
                                     11         5              5            0       0                  21    10.55%
Physics I
PHY 25200-intro physics II            10         5             2            0       0                  17    8.54%
PHY 30100-General Physics I           20        18             7            0       3                  48    24.12%
PHY 30200-General Physics II           9         8             1            0       0                  18    9.05%
PHY 30300-Modern Physics               1                                                                1    0.50%
Total                                 83       69             37         5          5                 199     100%
%                                   41.71%   34.67%         18.59%     2.51%      2.51%              100%


Pre-Engineering: 2010-2011
Course                                     # of A         # of B     # of C     # of D      # of F   # of
                                                                                                             Total
                                          grades         grades      grades     grades     grades    W‘s
EGR 25100–Computer Aided Design              5              3           0          0          0                8
Percentage                                62.50%         37.50%                                              100%


Conclusions from Summary Statistics: 2010-2011

        Conclusion #1: In physics classes, on the average, almost 42 percent of the students
         got A, almost 35 percent of the students got B, 19 percent of the students got C, 3
         percent of the students got D, and 3 percent got F.
        Conclusion #2: In pre-engineering classes, on the average, 63 percent of the
         students got A, 37 percent of students got B, no student got C, D, or F.
        Conclusion #3: In physics, in total, eleven sections of courses were offered during
         the academic year 2010-11, whereas in pre-engineering, only one section of courses
         were offered during this same period.
        Conclusion #4: In physics, on the average, the number of students per section was
         18 during the academic year 2010-11, whereas in pre-engineering, on the average,
         number of students per section was close to eight.

Comparison of Present-Year Data/Information with those of Last Year

    Comparison of Physics Program
            Items Compared                    2009-10                2010-11                   Conclusion
 1.Total number of students                     150                   199                 Increased almost 33%
 2.Total number of sections                         8                  11                 Increased almost 38%
 3.Avg. no. of students per class                   19                 18                 Decreased almost 5%
 4.Percentage of students got grade A           41%                   42%                Grade A: increased 1 %
 5.Percentage of students got grade B           33%                   35%                Grade B: increased 2 %
 6.Percentage of students got grade C           23%                   19%                Grade C: decreased 4 %.
 7.Percentage of students got grade D               0%                 3%                Grade D: increased 3 %
 8.Percentage of students got grade F               3%                 3%          Grade F: remained same at 3 %


Comparison of Pre-Engineering Program
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 Items Compared                                          2009-10    2010-11           Conclusion           English (United States)
 1. Total number of students                               29          8            Decreased 72%
 2. Total number of sections                                3          1            Decreased 67%
 3. Avg. no. of students per class                         10          8            Decreased 20%
 4. Percentage of students who received a grade of A       31%        63%       Grade A: increased 32%
 5. Percentage of students who received a grade of B       34%        37%       Grade B: increased 3%
 6. Percentage of students who received a grade of C       28%        0%        Grade C: decreased 28%
                                                                                Grade D: remained same
 7. Percentage of students who received a grade of D       0%         0%
                                                                                         at 0%
 8. Percentage of students who received a grade of F       7%         0%         Grade F: decreased 7%


Lessons Learned
       The quality of teaching is getting better.
       The number of students and number of sections in physics has increased
        significantly.
       Pre-engineering has seen a decrease in the number of students and course sections.
        The reason(s) will be investigated. If it is any kind of time conflict with any other
        course(s), appropriate actions will be taken to remedy the situation promptly.

Action Plan for the Next Year
The department will

       continue our efforts to include more computational and lab-based activities in both
        the physics program and the pre-engineering program,
       continue our efforts to expand the physics program,
       continue our efforts to expand the pre-engineering program,
       continue reviewing the course objectives as needed,
       continue finding newer methods for conducting program assessments,
       make sure that there is no time conflict between scheduled engineering classes with
        higher-level calculus classes.


Psychology


Mission
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The Lindenwood University psychology program’s mission is to help our majors attain a                  English (United States)
base level of competence in understanding the impact that wide-ranging psychological,
biological, and social influences have on the mind and on behavior.

The psychology program’s mission encompasses a range of knowledge, skills, and values
that are reflective of the University’s broader liberal arts mission, including fostering literacy
in information technology (e.g., computer proficiency), improving communication skills,
enhancing multicultural awareness, encouraging personal development (e.g., enhanced
self-awareness; insight into the behavior of others), and career planning and development.

Program Goals and Objectives
The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology is a general liberal arts degree that prepares graduates
for lifelong learning. Features of the major include exposure to and practice in problem-
solving skills, critical thinking skills, information gathering and synthesis skills, interpersonal
and intrapersonal skills, and skills in research and statistical reasoning consistent with the
undergraduate curriculum guidelines promulgated by the American Psychological
Association (APA Board of Educational Affairs Task Force on Psychology Major
Competencies, 2002) and reflective of the University’s broader liberal arts mission.

Knowledge Base of Psychology
    Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical
      findings, and historical trends in psychology.
          o Explain why psychology is a science.
          o Identify and explain the primary objectives of psychology: describing,
             understanding, predicting, and controlling behavior and mental processes.
          o Compare and contrast the assumptions and methods of psychology with
             those of other disciplines.
          o Describe the contributions of psychology perspectives to interdisciplinary
             collaboration.
    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding representing appropriate breadth and
      depth in selected content areas of psychology:
          o learning and cognition,
          o individual differences, psychometrics, personality, and social processes,
             including those related to socio-cultural and international dimensions,
          o biological bases of behavior and mental processes, including physiology,
             sensation, perception, comparative, motivation, and emotion developmental
             changes in behavior and mental processes across the life span,
          o the history of psychology, including the evolution of methods of psychology,
             its theoretical conflicts, and its socio-cultural contexts,
          o relevant levels of analysis: cellular, individual, group/systems, and culture,
          o overarching themes, persistent questions, or enduring conflicts in
             psychology, such as
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                • the interaction of heredity and environment,                                     English (United States)
                • variability and continuity of behavior and mental processes within
                   and across species,
                • free will versus determinism,
                • subjective versus objective perspective,
                • the interaction of mind and body.
       o relevant ethical issues, including a general understanding of the APA Code of
         Ethics

      Use the concepts, language, and major theories of the discipline to account for
       psychological phenomena.
          o Describe behavior and mental processes empirically, including operational
              definitions.
          o Identify antecedents and consequences of behavior and mental processes.
          o Interpret behavior and mental processes at an appropriate level of
              complexity.
          o Use theories to explain and predict behavior and mental processes.
          o Integrate theoretical perspectives to produce comprehensive and multi-
              faceted explanations.
      Explain major perspectives of psychology (e.g., behavioral, biological, cognitive,
       evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and socio-cultural).
          o Compare and contrast major perspectives
          o Describe advantages and limitations of major theoretical perspectives

Research Methods in Psychology

      Explain different research methods used by psychologists.
          o Describe how various research designs address different types of questions
              and hypotheses.
          o Articulate strengths and limitations of various research designs.
          o Distinguish the nature of designs that permit causal inferences from those
              that do not.
      Evaluate the appropriateness of conclusions derived from psychological research.
          o Interpret basic statistical results.
          o Distinguish between statistical significance and practical significance.
          o Describe effect size and confidence intervals.
          o Evaluate the validity of conclusions presented in research reports.
      Design and conduct basic studies to address psychological questions using
       appropriate research methods.
          o Locate and use relevant databases, research, and theory to plan, conduct,
              and interpret results of research studies.
          o Formulate testable research hypotheses, based on operational definitions of
              variables.
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           o Select and apply appropriate methods to maximize internal and external                English (United States)
               validity and reduce the plausibility of alternative explanations.
           o Collect, analyze, interpret, and report data using appropriate statistical
               strategies to address different types of research questions and hypotheses.
           o Recognize that theoretical and socio-cultural contexts as well as personal
               biases may shape research questions, design, data collection, analysis, and
               interpretation.
      Follow the APA Code of Ethics in the treatment of human and nonhuman
       participants in the design, data collection, interpretation, and reporting of
       psychological research.
      Generalize research conclusions appropriately based on the parameters of particular
       research methods.
           o Exercise caution in predicting behavior based on limitations of single studies.
           o Recognize the limitations of applying normative conclusions to individuals.
           o Acknowledge that research results may have unanticipated societal
               consequences.
           o Recognize that individual differences and socio-cultural contexts may
               influence the applicability of research findings.

Critical Thinking Skills in Psychology

      Use critical thinking effectively.
          o Evaluate the quality of information, including differentiating empirical
               evidence from speculation and the probable from the improbable.
          o Identify and evaluate the source, context, and credibility of information.
          o Recognize and defend against common fallacies in thinking.
          o Avoid being swayed by appeals to emotion or authority.
          o Evaluate popular media reports of psychological research.
          o Demonstrate an attitude of critical thinking that includes persistence, open-
               mindedness, tolerance for ambiguity and intellectual engagement.
          o Make linkages or connections between diverse facts, theories, and
               observations.
      Engage in creative thinking.
          o Intentionally pursue unusual approaches to problems.
          o Recognize and encourage creative thinking and behaviors in others.
          o Evaluate new ideas with an open but critical mind.
      Use reasoning to recognize, develop, defend, and criticize arguments and other
       persuasive appeals.
          o Identify components of arguments (e.g., conclusions, premises/assumptions,
               gaps, counterarguments).
          o Distinguish among assumptions, emotional appeals, speculations, and
               defensible evidence.
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          o Weigh support for conclusions to determine how well reasons support                     English (United States)
             conclusions.
          o Identify weak, contradictory, and inappropriate assertions.
          o Develop sound arguments based on reasoning and evidence.
      Approach problems effectively.
          o Recognize ill-defined and well-defined problems.
          o Articulate problems clearly.
          o Generate multiple possible goals and solutions.
          o Evaluate the quality of solutions and revise as needed.
          o Select and carry out the best solution.

Application of Psychology

      Describe major applied areas of psychology (e.g., clinical, counseling. industrial,
       organizational, school, health).
      Identify appropriate applications of psychology in solving problems, such as
           o the pursuit and effect of healthy lifestyles,
           o origin and treatment of abnormal behavior,
           o psychological tests and measurements,
           o psychology-based interventions in clinical, counseling, educational,
               industrial-organizational, community, and other settings and their empirical
               evaluation.
      Articulate how psychological principles can be used to explain social issues and
       inform public policy.
           o Recognize that socio-cultural contexts may influence the application of
               psychological principles in solving social problems.
           o Describe how applying psychological principles can facilitate change.
      Apply psychological concepts, theories, and research findings as these relate to
       everyday life.
      Recognize that ethically complex situations can develop in the application of
       psychological principles.

Values in Psychology

      Recognize the necessity for ethical behavior in all aspects of the science and practice
       of psychology.
      Demonstrate reasonable skepticism and intellectual curiosity by asking questions
       about causes of behavior.
      Seek and evaluate scientific evidence for psychological claims.
      Tolerate ambiguity and realize that psychological explanations are often complex
       and tentative.
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         Recognize and respect human diversity and understand that psychological                     English (United States)
          explanations may vary across populations and contexts. Assess and justify their
          engagement with respect to civic, social, and global responsibilities.
         Understand the limitations of their psychological knowledge and skills.



Classes Assessed
We continue to improve our methods of assessing teaching and learning within our major.
Once again, we have data from several classes to share. Classes will be presented in
numerical order.

PSY 30400 - Basic Research Methods

Basic Research Methods is a required course for all psychology and sociology majors. The
prerequisite for the course is a letter grade of C or better in MTH 14100-Basic Statistics and
students are required to take concurrently, PSY 30600: Behavioral Science Statistics. PSY
30400 is intended for sophomores and juniors and it is a prerequisite for many of the
courses we offer in our experimental cluster.

Method of Assessment Used

This spring, a new tool was created and used to assess students’ knowledge of four key
topic areas covered in the PSY 30400 course: research methodology, research ethics, APA
style, and statistical knowledge. The tool consisted of 25 questions and was devised by the
course instructor. Students were asked to take the assessment at the beginning of the
semester (pre-test) and again at the end of the semester (post-test).

Results

A total of 35 students completed both the pre-test and post-test. The results of a paired t-
test comparing student performance on the assessment tool revealed a significant
difference, t(34) = 10.97, p < .001, where, as expected, post-test scores (M = 16.87, SD =
3.49) were greater than pre-test scores (M = 9.91,SD =2.92).

A Pearson’s product-moment correlational analysis was conducted to determine how
related students’ assessment scores were to their final course grade. The results revealed a
correlation coefficient of r = .56 (n = 36), which would be considered a moderately strong
relationship. Although one might expect the two to be more strongly associated, the PSY
30400 course grade is based not only on exam scores, which account for 45 percent of the
overall course grade, but also on group project performance (27 percent), short lab
assignments (25 percent), and attendance (three percent). Indeed, when examining only
the relationship between the post-test scores and scores obtained by students from exam
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performance in the course, we see that that two are strongly related, r = .70 (n = 36). For         English (United States)
purposes of comparison, the relationship between the final course grades and pretest
scores was rather modest at r = .26 (n = 35), and the relationship between pre- and posttest
performance was r = .32 (n = 35).

Correlation Coefficients between Assessment Measures
                       Final Course Grade      Total Exam Grade         Pretest Score
                               .56                    .70                    .32
  Post-test Score
                             (n = 36)               (n = 36)              (n = 35)
                               .26                    .55
   Pre-test Score                                                             --
                             (n = 35)               (n = 35)


Lessons Learned
These data taken together suggest that students in PSY 30400 did gain knowledge of the key
issues in the course, and that a student’s initial knowledge of the course material was only
weakly associated with how much knowledge they retained at the end of the semester.
Furthermore, the relationship between overall course grades and the results of the post-
test assessment scores reveals encouraging information when evaluating the utility of the
new assessment tool.

Action Plan for Next Year
The plan for next year is to keep collecting data from PSY 30400 students pre- and post-test,
and once we have gathered data from all students taking PSY 30400 in the academic year of
2011-12, an item analysis will be conducted to determine the strengths and weaknesses of
the students pre- and post-test. Based on these results, appropriate measures will be taken
to improve upon course delivery for the 2012-13 academic year. Meanwhile, students who
elect to take PSY 40400 - Advanced Research Methods will be given the same assessment
tool in order to find out how much information is retained from PSY 30400 to PSY 40400,
keeping in mind that those who elect to take PSY 40400 tend to be students who are more
interested in pursuing post-graduate studies.

Impact on Classes for Next Year
The lack of sufficient data makes it difficult to make any conclusions based on the results of
the assessment that would make a significant impact on the classes for next year. At best,
the data obtained from students who took PSY 30400 in spring 2011 suggest that the
department should continue the same type of instruction and assessment for the upcoming
academic year.

PSY30600 - Behavioral Science Statistics
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This is a required course for all psychology and sociology majors. The prerequisite for the          English (United States)
course is a letter grade of C or better in MTH 14100-Basic Statistics, and students are
required to take concurrently, PSY 30400-Basic Research Methods. The course is intended
for sophomores and juniors.


Method of Assessment Used

The assessment test used in PSY 30600 consists of 50 multiple-choice questions. The first 30
questions are mostly basic knowledge items, and the last 20 are questions pertain to two
short research articles (10 questions for each article).

Results

The data for the pre-tests and post-tests for this academic year were obtained from 29
students enrolled in PSY 30600 in fall 2010 and 33 students in spring 2011. Two different
adjunct professors taught the course this year: one in the fall and one in the spring. The
instructor who taught in the fall had taught the same course previously at Lindenwood,
whereas the instructor who taught in the spring had not taught this course in the past.

The results of a two (semester) x two (test) mixed analysis of variance (anova) revealed
statistically significant main effects of semester, F(1,60) = 4.14, p = .046, test, F(1,60) =
181.13, p < .001, and a significant interaction of semester x test F(1,60) = 27.65, p = .001.
Based on the results of a series of univariate follow-up tests, the only significant difference
between semesters was on the post-test, t(62) = -4.11, p < .001, and not the pre-test
scores, t(62) = .72, p > .05.

Summary Statistics for Pre-test and Post-test Scores by Semester
      Semester         Sample       Pre-test Score (maximum          Post-test Score
                         Size              score is 40)           (maximum score is 40)
      Fall 2010           29           M = 22.48, SD =4.73         M = 27.45, SD = 4.40
     Spring 2011          33          M = 21.58, SD = 5.12         M = 32.91, SD =5.58

As is the case every year, we found that the students enrolled in PSY 30600 did gain
statistical knowledge throughout the semester as assessed by the pre- and post-tests. One
notable finding this year is the fact that there was a significant semester difference in post-
test performance.

There are a number of different explanations for the differences between students’ post-
test scores between the two semesters. The most obvious difference is that the two courses
were taught by different instructors. The instructor who taught in the fall semester has had
previous experience with this course, he has a master’s degree in psychology. The spring
semester instructor may have had a stronger background in statistics. She is currently
working on her dissertation for her Ph.D. in psychology.
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There is also another difference between the two semesters with respect to the extent to
which the instructors for the two co-requisite courses, PSY 30400 and PSY 30600, monitored
each other’s courses throughout the semester. PSY 30600 has been taught by three
different adjunct instructors for the last two academic years. Having so many different and
temporary instructors poses challenges for the consistency of content delivery in any
course. However, given that this is a required course in two majors and that there is a co-
requisite course (PSY 30400), the variability in teaching styles and content among the
different instructors needed to be addressed.

The PSY 30400/30600 Combination

Although the instructors who teach PSY 30400 and PSY 30600 have always agreed on a
particular sequence of topics to be covered in each course, such that they go hand in hand,
the actual content of the coverage had not always been monitored.
     In fall 2010, there were apparent differences in the rate of content delivery which
        resulted in a mismatch of content between the courses.
     Furthermore, the intricate relationship between the two courses was emphasized by
        only one of the course instructors, whereas the other presented the courses as
        independent entities. This resulted in students not understanding the connection
        between research design and statistics, which defeated the purpose of having the
        two courses taken concurrently by our students.

Based on observations made from the fall semester, the two instructors involved in PSY
30400 and PSY 30600 in the spring made a conscious effort to keep monitoring each other’s
progress as well as to stress the relevance of the counterpart course in their current course
throughout the semester. Specific efforts made in spring 2011 were as follows:

      Each instructor had access to each other’s Blackboard environment to keep abreast
       of course progress. Each had access to the other’s course materials, grade book, and
       announcements to students.
      After every exam, the two instructors shared all grades and conducted correlational
       analyses to determine how related the exam grades from the two courses were at
       every point during the semester. Attendance information was also shared.
      Communication between the instructors was emphasized. The two instructors
       involved exchanged 57 conversation topics through email communication during the
       semester, as opposed to only 11 in fall 2010. Each of these conversation topics were
       threaded with multiple exchanges, so the amount of contact between the two
       instructors ensured that each one was familiar with the issues surrounding each
       other’s courses.
      The PSY 30400 instructor made a point to inform the PSY 30600 instructor about the
       kind of group research projects the students were engaged in as they engaged in
       them so that the PSY 30600 instructor could make mention of their projects and
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       designs in her statistics course. Meanwhile, the PSY 30400 instructor not only              English (United States)
       mentioned the relevance of the statistical techniques being covered in PSY30600 in
       the topics covered in PSY 30400, but made a conscious effort to include several
       questions on the exams pertaining to the students’ statistical knowledge.
      The close relationships between the two courses as well as the instructors involved
       were further demonstrated to students in many small ways as well. For instance, the
       PSY 30600 instructor sometimes gave her make-up exams in the PSY 30400
       instructor’s office due to space issues. The PSY 30400 instructor would either come
       into the PSY 30600 classroom or ask the PSY 30600 instructor to pass out graded
       assignments and exams to the students when the PSY 30400 class was not meeting
       that week due to the class periods being used as research days. These habitual
       references to as well as exchanges between the instructors involved in the two
       courses served as reminders to the students that PSY 30400 and PSY 30600 were
       indeed intricately related.
      The PSY 30400 students present the results of their group research projects at the
       end of every semester. In spring 2011, the PSY 30600 instructor came to these
       presentations to observe and provide feedback and support to the students. Past
       instructors of PSY 30600 had also been invited to attend these presentations. Yet, no
       others in the past have attended. The fact that the PSY 30600 instructor in spring
       2011 showed so much interest in the students’ performance in the counterpart
       course also helped to showcase the connection between research design and
       statistics.

The table below shows the degree to which exam scores in PSY 30400 and PSY 30600 were
related to each other throughout the semester based on data gathered from the 34
students who took all exams. The coefficients all indicate a strong positive relationship
between the exam scores from the two courses. Because the content of the courses
matched up, the fact that these coefficients were so high assures that there was a high
degree of consistency in the course content in the two courses.

The Relationship Between Mean Exam Scores in PSY 30400 and PSY 30600
   n = 34       PSY30400 Mean       PSY30600 Mean      Correlation between Exam
                  Exam Scores        Exam Scores                  Scores
  Exam 1           M = 74.94           M = 76.06                 r = 0.66
                  (SD = 15.64)        (SD = 19.44)
  Exam 2           M = 79.14           M = 80.00               r = 0.81
                  (SD = 10.08)        (SD = 14.59)
  Exam 3           M = 69.48           M = 82.85               r = 0.76
                  (SD = 17.07)        (SD = 13.24)
  Exam 4           M = 71.02           M = 80.94               r = 0.78
                  (SD = 11.77)        (SD = 11.77)
   TOTAL           M = 73.65           M = 79.96               r = 0.93
                  (SD = 13.81)        (SD = 13.67)
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Furthermore, correspondence between students’ final course grades in the two courses in             English (United States)
the spring semester was r = 0.91 (n = 34) as opposed to r = 0.66 (n = 29) for fall 2010. These
results suggest that the two courses delivered in spring 2011 were more in sync, due at
least in part to the special efforts made by the two instructors involved in trying to keep
each other in their consciousness as well as the awareness of the students.


Lessons Learned

Based on the results of spring 2011, we are encouraged by the potential benefits of the
instructors for PSY 30400 and PSY 30600 making the effort to keep monitoring each other’s
course progress as well as helping to remind the students of the interrelationship between
the two courses. The overall impression by the PSY 30400 instructor was that the students
in spring 2011 seemed much more comfortable with the statistical concepts covered in the
PSY 30400 course, perhaps because they were aware of the relationship between that
course and what they were learning in PSY 30600.

Action Plan and Impact on Classes

The department hopes to continue with this approach in the two courses in the future in
hopes that such strategies will help, even in the face of frequency with which different
instructors teach PSY30600 for the time being. In fact, precisely because of the increased
potential for divergence when multiple instructors are involved, extra care must be taken to
keep the two courses parallel to each other.

PSY 43200 - Senior Seminar

In previous years, senior seminar was taught by various psychology faculty members on a
rotating basis, which made the process of designing and implementing assessment
procedures difficult. The 2010-11 academic year was the first year that the department has
limited the instructors to two, one for fall and one for spring, and they have collaborated
regarding the content and delivery of the senior seminar class. The course objectives have
been reviewed for consistency, a common set of texts is being assembled, and assessment
procedures continue to be refined. Both instructors utilized a variety of methods to assess
student learning and improve program quality, including the PSY 10000 objective test (for
comparison with those students’ performance), written reflection assignments, quizzes,
discussions, and a formal research paper and presentation.

Course Objectives

Students will be able to

      analyze ethical issues in contemporary psychology,
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         demonstrate knowledge of the field’s history and current challenges; communicate          English (United States)
          clearly verbally and in writing,
         summarize and present research-based information according to APA standards,
         reflect on his or her personal development and educational experience,
         develop strategies for meeting career goals.


Methods of Assessment Used

Objective Test

As the Psychology Department became invested in the development of the pre- and post-
test for PSY 10000, we wondered how our seniors would perform on the same instrument,
so it was administered to the spring semester senior seminar class.

Verbal Feedback

Both spring and fall sections elicited and valued student feedback throughout the semester.
For example, during class discussions early in the spring semester, it became apparent that
many of the students had not had the opportunity to take the “Careers in Psychology” class
offered during J-term, and as a result they had many questions about graduation, job
hunting, and graduate school. The course syllabus was modified to spend two additional
class periods (the class meets once weekly) to address these questions, create and review
resumes, and to bring in Ms. Brandi Goforth from career services for additional guidance.

Final Personal Review Assignment

As part of their course requirements, students in senior seminar must complete a final
personal review, which requires them to audit their own work in terms of compliance with
the course objectives.

Results

Objective test

The senior seminar class was given the PSY 10000 pre- and post-test once, at the beginning
of the spring semester. The mean score for these students (M=29.84, SD=4.01) was                    Comment [u14]: it seems odd that they would
                                                                                                    give both tests at the same time.
significantly higher than the post-test scores from PSY10000 students (M=26.49, SD=5.42),
t(257)=3.00, p = .003.

Verbal feedback
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Feedback from the students in the fall semester resulted in changes in the distribution of          English (United States)
course content and a reconsideration of texts. In the spring semester, students expressed
appreciation for the modification in the course schedule. Some stated that the careers class
should be offered more frequently than just in the J-Term to enable more students to take
it.




Final Personal Review assignment

Students were able to discuss in detail how their class assignments (research paper,
presentation, quizzes, and written reflections) related to the goals of senior seminar. This
assignment could serve as a springboard for a portfolio project in future years.

Lessons Learned and Action Plan for Next Year

The department’s students scored better on the PSY 10000 pre and post-test than did this
semester’s students in PSY 10000. We will likely continue to refine this instrument and
assess senior seminar students with it to illuminate areas for future program improvement.

Psychology students are also meeting the expectations set for them via the course
objectives, but they feel underprepared for life after graduation. Fortunately, the
psychology club is making an effort to improve the distribution of information related to
career and graduate school paths. A portfolio may become a requirement in the class as an
extension of student and program assessment.

Impact on Classes for Next Year

The instructors of the senior seminar class will continue to add structure and focus while
allowing for flexibility of teaching style and adaptation needed for class size variations.

Broader Program Assessment

The Psychology Department is making a concerted effort to engage in meaningful overall
program evaluation, beyond the required curriculum assessment. This year we have
focused on assessing advising satisfaction, and we will continue to look for trends as more
data are collected.

Method of Assessment Used
A student advising satisfaction survey was first created and distributed in spring 2010. At
that time, a total of 102 students, approximately 50 percent of 206 active majors,
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completed the instrument. Overall, student satisfaction with advisor availability, time                      English (United States)
allotted for advising, personal interest in advisees demonstrated by advisors, respect
demonstrated by advisors, information provided, and guidance offered was quite high.
However, only 57 percent of respondents indicated that their advisor was willing to help
with internship planning. This year, the same advising survey was distributed via a
SurveyMonkey link in an email to all psychology advisees.




Current Results
A total of 105 students completed the survey this year. Although the majority of
respondents were juniors and seniors, most indicated they had been psychology majors at
Lindenwood for only one to two years. The vast majority of respondents indicated that their
advisors were frequently meeting the expectations we asked about, though it appears we
could still improve our communication with advisees regarding internship possibilities.

Percentage of Respondents in Each Year of Study
                Number        Percentage
Freshman          11             11%
Sophomore         17             16%
Junior            34             32%
Senior            41             39%
Unknown           2              2%
Total            103


Length of Study at Lindenwood in Semesters
                       Number          Percentage
1-2 semesters            37                35%
3-4 semesters            34                33%
5-6 semesters            18                17%
7-8 semesters            14                13%
Missing                   2                2%
TOTAL                    105


Frequency Ratings of Advisors’ Behavior
                                  Never         Rarely   Sometimes    Often    Always     N/A    Responses
My advisor posts office
hours so I can make an              0%           0%        2.0%       7.8%     90.2%      0%         102
appointment
My advisor keeps
                                    0%           0%         0%        5.9%     93.1%     1.0%        102
scheduled appointments
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                                Never   Rarely   Sometimes    Often    Always     N/A    Responses   English (United States)
My advisor allows time for
                                 0%      0%        3.9%      11.8%     83.3%     1.0%        102
effective advising
My advisor shows an
interest in me and my           1.0%    2.0%       10.9%      6.9%     79.2%      0%         101
concerns
My advisor encourages and
motivates me to succeed in      2.0%    2.0%       10.8%      7.8%     75.5%     2.0%        102
my studies
My advisor respects my
opinion and listens to me       1.0%    2.0%       6.9%      11.8%     76.5%     2.0%        102
when I need to talk
My advisor provides me
with information about
                                3.0%    3.0%       8.9%      12.9%     72.3%      0%         101
courses required for my
major
My advisor directs me to
other sources for               3.9%    6.9%       7.8%      14.7%     61.8%     4.9%        102
assistance as needed
My advisor is willing to help
me plan for
                                4.0%    5.9%       10.9%      5.0%     42.6%     31.7%       101
internship/volunteer
opportunities
My advisor is willing to
provide information on
                                5.9%    5.9%       7.8%       5.9%     52.0%     22.5%       102
graduate school
opportunities


Lessons Learned
This was the department’s first attempt to distribute an assessment instrument via
SurveyMonkey and email. This method of delivery allowed for more efficient revision and
feedback from within the department, and more efficient data analyses. The results were
similar to what we found last year.

Action Plan for Next Year
We will continue to review the advising survey questions to determine the need for revision
and additional data. Efforts have been made to increase opportunities for advisees to
complete service practicum hours by restructuring PSY 45000, which will continue into next
year. An advisor-advisee expectation checklist, consistent with the survey instrument, has
been completed and will be added to the content on our new program website in the fall.

Impact on Classes for Next Year
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                                                                                                    English (United States)
We plan to continue to refine our assessment activities in this area, but these data on
advising are not likely to have a direct impact on classes.




                         School of Sciences Analysis

Anthropology and Sociology
       The program has developed a very extensive list of goals and objectives, but there
       may be far too many to effective assess. Developing an exit interview is a good idea
       for getting student feedback on the program. Generalities and anecdotal stories
       have a value, but what was it that he student got from the program that help them
       be successful and how are you measuring it? What is being done with the portfolios?
       Are they telling the faculty anything about the program’s strengths and weaknesses?
       Don’t get too concerned about statistics, there are other ways to learn about and
       improve the program. The anthropology major is a good development, but be sure
       to create an assessment system during this process as opposed to trying to tack one
       on later.

Biology
       The Biology Department’s assessment has the pieces in place and is making efforts
       to close the loop by making adjustments to the classes and programs based on what
       they are finding. Class assessment is getting stronger, but the department needs to
       take more time in looking at the overall program. What does all of this tell the
       department about strengths and weaknesses of the program? Look to expand
       assessment into more of the core classes in order to better identify where the
       program’s strengths and weaknesses are.

Chemistry
       The chemistry program has made significant efforts to close the loop of assessment
       by using information gained to adjust the program, add a class, and spread out
       content to allow for more time to be spent on various topics. The creation of a
       multi-part exit exam that is adaptable based on a student’s area of study is also a
       good idea. The study of study habits is also very interesting. There are a few areas to
       note: in the report, the department will want to more clearly tie assessment to the
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    program and class objectives. The use of CAT is good and will provide worthwhile             English (United States)
    information, but how are you showing if you are meeting your course or program
    objectives? By giving students time to prepare for the physical chemistry sequence
    pre-test, are you really able to assess what they knew coming in the first day of
    class?



Computer Sciences
    The program is expanding its assessment program, across all of its degree programs.
    The development of program assessment is the next step. The use of the packets for
    assessment provides a useful way to ensure that desired information is
    accumulated. The program is working on creating specific student learning
    objectives and finding ways to measure them. There are a few things to note: More
    explanation of the data that leads to the choices that the department is making
    would be very useful and which schools and programs were used in the
    comparisons.

Earth Sciences
    The Earth Sciences Department does not offer any majors.

Mathematics
    The program has developed an initial placement test to assist in putting students in
    the correct level class to help improve the potential for student success, but it would
    be worth more study to see if this has had the desired results. The department has
    in place a set of objectives for the program and all of its classes and uses those
    regularly to review their success. There are a few things to note: Subjective
    measures created by the professor are of limited value in that there is any number
    of factors that may influence the grade for the class. Might a capstone class,
    possibly combined with the initial assessment, also be useful in determining their
    progress at Lindenwood? A combination of subjective and objective measures could
    be very useful to the Math Department.

Physics and Pre-Engineering
    The program has an extensive list of class objectives but needs to list the program
    objectives. Grades are very limited as a method for showing student learning, and
    another system will need to be developed. The program needs to move beyond
    using grades as the central piece of the assessment process.
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Psychology                                                                                      English (United States)



    The department has been active in doing assessment and works to include
    assessment throughout its program. The department is closing the assessment loop,
    using assessment data to adjust and change program requirements. The inclusion of
    the advising assessment was a good start down that road. There are some areas to
    note. Is there any program-related assessment in the senior seminar (written work
    or objective testing)? Can the senior seminar be tied back to the early classes in the
    program to show student growth? The report needs to use more of the data that
    lead to the conclusions. The creation and use of table for comparison is good, but
    they need to be more readable. When using statistics, be sure to include explanation
    for any abbreviations. Based on this year’s assessment, what are the strengths and
    weaknesses of the program and classes? Are any additional changes necessary?
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                                                LCIE
                                   The LCIE Approach
The Lindenwood College for Individualized Education is dedicated to
    using the Socratic method of teaching,
    providing a sound core in the liberal arts,
    providing a structured, broad-brush approach in majors in business administration,
       communications, health management, human resource management, criminal
       justice, gerontology, information technology, and fine arts in writing,
    preparing students to be competitive in an increasingly global market place,
    developing the student’s analytical and communication skills, with emphasis placed
       on both written and oral communication,
    using a cluster format to serve the adult learner,
    providing mentoring for every student,
    developing an appreciation of the importance of continuing growth and education
       with an emphasis on values-centered thinking.

Assessment
LCIE assesses the accomplishment of this mission at many levels. During the 2010-11
academic year, faculty, students, programs, clusters, and off-campus locations were
evaluated.

Methods of Assessment

Faculty

         Full time and adjunct – End-of-term student evaluations of courses and instructors.
         Full time – annual review with dean of LCIE and IDP process.
         Adjunct
          o Classroom visits
          o Annual performance review

Students

         Faculty assess students (internal).
          o Grades
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          o End of cluster written evaluation of each student                                           English (United States)
              • Quantitative ratings in five areas
              • Narrative comments
         LCIE post-graduation surveys in which students report professional successes related
          to their education (internal).
         ETS Proficiency Profile testing using undergraduate pre-test at beginning of program
          and post-test before graduation (external).
         ETS Major Field Tests where appropriate (external).
         Success in courses aligned with professional norms (blend).
         Portfolios (internal).

Programs

         Achievement of program learning outcomes as measured by program directors.
         LCIE post-graduation survey.

Clusters

         Student evaluations of clusters and instructors.
         Adherence to standardized syllabus as measured by classroom visitations.

Off campus locations

         Dean of LCIE visits and files regular reports on off campus locations.
         Full-time faculty - assigned to an off campus location, visit regularly, advise and get
          feedback from students.
         ETS Proficiency Profile establishes baselines for new undergraduates at the various
          locations.

This document summarizes some of the results of the above processes and lists the actions
that were taken as a result of that information.




Results

Faculty

LCIE piloted a new reporting system, Digital Measures, whereby it could track the
professional accomplishments of its full-time and adjunct faculty and assess the level of
accomplishments of both groups. These results were used in the annual performance
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reviews of adjunct faculty done by the program directors who supervise these adjuncts.               English (United States)
The business programs were working on a specialized accreditation, and so their groups
were examined closely in the 2010-11 year. As a result, the following areas for
improvement were noted:

      Need to hire more adjunct faculty with terminal degrees to teach graduate-level
       clusters.
      Need to encourage some current adjunct faculty to take additional graduate course
       work in the disciplines that they teach.
      Need to publicize significant creative output by all faculty.

The end-of-quarter evaluations of the faculty and clusters by the students resulted in the
following actions:

      Draft proposal to administration to give significant tuition breaks to adjuncts
       teaching at Lindenwood.
      Creation of a rubric now used for classroom visitations.
      Use new LCIE website.
      Creation of annual performance review forms now being used by program directors
       for the adjunct faculty that they supervise.
      Incorporation of more online material into some clusters to provide additional
       instruction outside of the classroom.

Students

Faculty members assess their students when they issue grades. That process was refined in
2010 allowing all instructors academic freedom in determining exactly which tools they
wished to use, but in determining that no matter which section of the same cluster a
student chooses to take, that student’s grade will be determined by similar tools. A
standard syllabus was adopted for every cluster and the core, called the standard
abbreviated syllabus, is the same across all clusters.

CLUSTER OBJECTIVES

      Demonstrate written communication and documentation skills.
      Demonstrate oral communication skills.
      Prepare for and participate in every cluster meeting.
      Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the concepts and practices within
       each course.
      Earn a passing grade in the cluster.

The five cluster objectives listed are common to all LCIE clusters. In objective four, the exact
course content is provided by the program director for each cluster. However, the structure
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is the same. Each quarter the instructors electronically submit an evaluation form for each        English (United States)
student evaluating that student on these five objectives. These forms are stored on the LCIE
folder of the N: drive and are available for program directors and faculty advisors to use.
Summaries are also stored on the N: drive. Of particular interest are the responses to items
four (IV) and five (V), the instructor’s perception of the mastery of content and the grade
that the student earns according to the grading rules set down in the syllabus. This
information is used as one source of determining the validity of the grades. Since classes
are limited to 14 students and instructors use more Socratic methodology than didactic
methodology, there is a basis for using this type of judgment.
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Discipline            BA              Discipline      Health Mgmt.           Discipline            HR
  Level               UG                Level               UG                 Level               UG
Objective        IV         V         Objective       IV           V         Objective       IV           V
WinQtr11                              WinQtr11                               WinQtr11
Sum               1080      1078      Sum                  80           77   Sum              430             434
Students           143          143   Students             18           18   Students             91           90
Ave               4.44       4.28     Ave              4.44         4.30     Ave              4.67         4.79

WinQtr11                              WinQtr11                               WinQtr11
Avg.              4.43       4.24     Avg.             4.53         4.45     Avg.             4.72         4.81
FaQtr10                               FaQtr10                                FaQtr10
Sum                558          539   Sum              121             116   Sum              187             188
Students           123          123   Students             25           25   Students             40           40
Ave               4.57       4.47     Ave              4.69         4.57     Ave              4.67         4.69
FaQtr10                               FaQtr10                                FaQtr10
Avg.              4.48       4.30     Avg.             4.62         4.43     Avg.             4.73         4.70
SuQtr10                               SuQtr10                                SuQtr10
Sum                764          747   Sum                  42           38   Sum              320             328
Students           170          170   Students              9           10   Students             69           69
Ave               4.46       4.33     Ave              4.66            3.8   Ave              4.60         4.75
SuQtr10                               SuQtr10                                SuQtr10
Avg.              4.45       4.27     Avg.             4.70         4.37     Avg.             4.65         4.78
SpQtr10                               SpQtr10                                SpQtr10
Sum               1104      1080      Sum                  95           95   Sum              480             483
Students           250          250   Students             20           20   Students         104             104
Ave               4.65       4.56     Ave              4.77         4.77     Ave              4.72         4.74
SpQtr10                               SpQtr10                                SpQtr10
Avg.          4.449678   4.147348     Avg.         4.869931     4.906621     Avg.         4.656013     4.671853

The information for these four quarters, along with the information collected over the past
six years, indicates that in business administration, students at the undergraduate level
scored lower on tests than their instructors’ perceptions of how well they mastered the
material. In both other business programs, health management and human resource
management, the two measures align very well. Such information prompted several
actions.

Actions

Actions specific to the business administration programs and actions for LCIE in general
follow:

          Examination of the testing process in the clusters:
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         o Standardized testing in the form of the ETS Major Field Tests beginning in 2009.             English (United States)
             Looking at an external measure allowed the business programs to compare the
             scores of their graduates to those of business administration students
             nationwide.
        More prerequisites for the undergraduate clusters (More clusters now require the
         math/stat cluster).
        Increasing the prerequisites for the math/stat cluster (Placement tests and/or a
         basic math course).
        Increasing the prerequisites for the initial communications cluster (Placement tests
         and/or a basic writing course).
        Determining a baseline for the overall proficiency of new LCIE undergraduate
         students as measured by the ETS Proficiency Profile which was implemented in 2010
         (Table of results follows).

ETS® Proficiency Profile Summary of Proficiency Classifications for Three Quarters of
Incoming Undergraduate LCIE Student
                                                    Proficiency Classification

     Skill Dimension       LCIE          National      LCIE        National      LCIE        National


                                  Proficient                 Marginal               Not Proficient
 Reading, Level 1          55%             50%         24%           24%         21%           27%
 Reading, Level 2          14%             24%         32%           16%         54%           60%
 Critical Thinking         1%                  3%       8%           10%         91%           87%
 Writing, Level 1          36%             49%         45%           30%         20%           20%
 Writing, Level 2          4%              12%         30%           30%         66%           58%
 Writing, Level 3          1%                  4%       5%           19%         93%           77%
 Mathematics, Level 1      38%             41%         25%           27%         37%           33%
 Mathematics, Level 2      14%             19%         32%           22%         54%           60%
 Mathematics, Level 3      4%                  4%       7%           11%         89%           85%

An additional measure of the extent to which LCIE fulfills its mission is the success of its
students in their careers. Since most LCIE students are already working in their chosen
careers, the faculty members of LCIE feel that student perception of how the programs are
helping them is valid in assessing the programs. LCIE developed a survey that it administers
to students immediately following their graduation. This survey was first administered in
early 2010 and the results are on the N: drive. It has been refined after each administration.
The narrative comments have been the most effective in the process of assessing programs.
The original survey was constructed around the theme of student satisfaction rather than
student achievement.
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During 2010-11, LCIE program directors participated in webinars and seminars on using                English (United States)
portfolios, developing rubrics, and doing assessment in online programs. The criminal
justice programs are beginning to pilot a portfolio process. The program directors in charge
of general education offerings are looking at the ETS Proficiency Profile Tests. A committee
is working on a standardized rubric for evaluating an oral presentation in any cluster.

Programs

Beginning in July, 2010, every program director worked on refining the student learning
outcomes for their programs and clusters. The results are in the LCIE folder on the N: drive.
Each document includes three columns: learning outcomes, measurable competencies,
and, measures used. These documents are always a work in progress, and they are
discussed at the monthly LCIE assessment meetings that precede the monthly LCIE general
meetings.

In addition, every program submitted an individual assessment plan for the 2011-12
academic year. These are also saved on the N: drive.

Clusters

The standardized cluster syllabi as exemplified in section three above is used to assess the
individual instructors’ syllabi. Program directors examine the syllabi submitted by their
adjunct faculty. They work with those faculty members to help assure that all students
receive adequate coverage of the subject matter and to assure that there are adequate
instruments to assess the students’ mastery of the content. In addition, each program
director visits two classes each quarter for a total of eight classes each year. The director
uses evaluation forms which measure the quality of the cluster that he/she visits.

At the end of the quarter, students evaluate their instructors and their clusters. An
electronic evaluation began to be used in LCIE in the 2010-2011 academic year. There are
fewer students responding to the electronic version, and work needs to be done on
determining how to use the results.

Off-campus locations

In order to assure that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve the learning
outcomes for the programs in which they are enrolled, it is critical that the quality of
delivery at the various locations is monitored. The dean of LCIE leads the effort in visiting
each location unannounced and reporting on it. He also uses the standard syllabus to
assure that the required topics are being covered.

The ETS Proficiency Profile is administered during the first meeting of the communications
cluster. That cluster is the orientation for new LCIE undergraduate students. The
administration of the test captures the section number of the cluster and so is a good
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measure of the new students attending the various locations. LCIE expects this information          English (United States)
to assist in properly assessing the effectiveness of its programs at those locations.

This concludes the summary of the LCIE assessment process for 2010-2011. Additional
details are available as indicated. All forms and reports are stored on the shared LCIE folder
on the N: drive. A CD of that information is stored with the Dean Of Institutional Research.
The individual assessment plans and reports for the major programs are attached.


                                    LCIE Programs

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

   The LCIE Bachelor of Science in Business Administration prepares students to become
   managers of business and nonprofit organizations or enhances their knowledge of
   business topics if already employed in a management capacity. The intent of the
   program is to expand the students’ business skills and to provide students with a strong
   liberal arts and professional business background. All LCIE undergraduate degree
   programs contain core requirements in the liberal arts. This is particularly important to
   the manager because it provides the opportunity to develop cultural, human, and
   theoretical understandings essential for successful business interactions and effective
   community leadership. Throughout their studies, LCIE students gain practice in
   management techniques as they learn to write concise papers, make small group
   presentations, practice effective time management, and communicate with fellow
   student professionals.

Program Goals and Objectives

Graduates

           will demonstrate contemporary business competencies and the aptitude
            required for life-long learning and personal development,
           will acquire the technical, human and conceptual skills that would contribute to
            critical analysis, problem solving, operational recommendations, and continuous
            improvement of dynamic and changing organizations and the ability to
            professionally communicate those recommendations and improvements,
           will demonstrate the entrepreneurial spirit of being enterprising, resourceful and
            productive in their professional lives,
           are able to act and build upon the foundation of their course work for the
            furtherance of their professional careers (Adapted from SB&E One Year Action
            Plan).
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Objectives for graduates in the major – graduates will achieve the following Student                   English (United States)
Learning Outcomes:

          Outcome                            Competency                   Performance Measure
1. Describes the role of each      Demonstrates understanding         Successful completion of
of the functional areas of          of the purpose of each of the        Course requirements
business                            following business areas within         within each cluster,
                                    the core Business                       including examinations,
                                    Administration clusters, with           projects, research
                                    focus on global, legal, and             papers, and exercises.
                                    ethics issues:                       Major Field Test -
                                          Accounting                       Business
                                          Finance
                                          Marketing
                                          Management
                                          Human Resources
                                          Information Systems
                                          Business Operations
2. Understands the major           Explains theories and principles   Successful completion of
theories and principles which       in each of the following             Course requirements
apply to business                   courses:                                within each cluster,
                                          Principles of Financial          including examinations,
                                             Accounting                     projects, research
                                          Principles of                    papers, and exercises.
                                             Managerial Accounting       Major Field Test -
                                          Principles of Finance            Business
                                          Principles of
                                             Microeconomics
                                          Principles of
                                             Macroeconomics
                                          International
                                             Economics
                                          Introduction to
                                             Information Systems
                                          Introduction to
                                             Operations
                                             Management
                                          Microcomputer
                                             Applications in
                                             Business
                                          Principles of
                                             Management
                                          Human Resource
                                             Management
                                          Managerial Ethics
                                          Principles of Marketing
                                          Marketing
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                                            Management                                               English (United States)
                                        International
                                            Marketing
                                        Investments
                                        Consumer Finance
                                        Business Law
                                        Quantitative Methods
                                            for Business
                                        Basic Statistics
                                        Research Design and
                                            Methodology
3. Applies knowledge of           Integrates knowledge gained in   Successful completion of
business to develop business       coursework to evaluate             Case Study Analysis
strategy                           business problems through             Projects
                                   examination of current             Business Administration
                                   business events and case study        Capstone Course
                                   analysis

IBA 49900 – Business Administration Capstone

Methods of Assessment Used

Internal objective assessments include

              Analysis of current business issues,
              Complex case study requiring various methods of evaluation and analysis,
              Comprehensive exam.

External objective assessments include

              ETS Major Field Test - Business

Results

The ETS Major Field Test – Business has been administered quarterly since 2009, enabling
comparison of results obtained by Lindenwood students over time, and comparison of
Lindenwood results with national comparative data.

The charts shown below are for data gathered from ETS Major Field Test results from the
summer 2010, fall 2010 and winter 2011 quarters. The test was administered for the spring
2011 quarter but the results were not available at the time of this report. Legend – “Overall
Mean Scores” are the LCIE overall mean scores.

Chart 1: Summer 10 Quarter Results – Breakdown by Assessment Area
Legend – “Overall Mean Scores” are the LCIE overall mean scores.
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Chart 2: Fall 10 Quarter Results – Breakdown by Assessment Area
Legend – “Overall Mean Scores” are the LCIE overall mean scores.




Chart 3: Winter 11 Quarter Results – Breakdown by Assessment Area
Legend – “Overall Mean Scores” are the LCIE overall mean scores.
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Chart 4: LCIE Overall Results vs. Comparative Data 2010-2011




LCIE Overall Results vs. Comparative Data 2010-2011
                         LCIE Mean Score     Comparative Mean               Variance
  Summer 2010                 138.2                153.1                     -14.9
     Fall 2010                142.1                151.3                      -9.2
   Winter 2011                141.6                151.3                      -9.7

Lessons Learned

Inspection of the results shown in (above) has yielded some interesting observations:

      ETS changed the form for the Major Field Test – Business in time for administration
       of the test in fall 2010 quarter. The overall mean score for LCIE students taking the
       test during their business administration capstone course (IBA49900) improved by
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       3.9 points in fall 2010 and 3.4 points in winter 2011. The variance between the             English (United States)
       comparative mean scores and LCIE mean scores decreased due to the new form
       (Table 1) indicating an overall improvement in LCIE scores. This could simply be the
       effect of the new form or perhaps the questions are now better aligned with our
       Business curriculum. Further analysis of the scores by assessment area provides
       better insight.
      Scores for legal and social environment are consistently higher than the comparative
       scores – this may be due to a change of text book in the consumer finance/business
       law cluster approximately 18 months ago. Feedback from adjuncts teaching this
       cluster indicated that the Ashcroft text was inadequate and prompted the
       evaluation of several business law texts. A much more substantial business law text
       by Henry Cheeseman was selected and implemented across the board.
      Scores for management and marketing are consistently close to the comparative
       scores – LCIE students continue to achieve in these disciplines which rely heavily on
       writing skills.
      Scores for assessment areas requiring quantitative skills are consistently poor when
       compared to the comparative scores – although there may be exemplary students
       who are the exception to the rule, LCIE students continue to be challenged in the
       areas of accounting, finance and economics. This finding indicates that more focus
       needs to be provided in these areas of the business administration curriculum.

Action Plan

Investigate possible changes to the business administration curriculum to provide more
focus on developing quantitative skills.

Evaluate and pilot software which is available from textbook publishers (i.e., Connect – a
web-based assignment and assessment platform) to enhance the student’s learning through
use of tutorials, assessments and other online learning tools.

Implement the chosen solution for quantitative business courses, i.e., accounting/finance,
economics, and business statistics (already implemented as part of the math/statistics
cluster).

Impacts and Changes on Classes

Impacts and changes expected include:

      Increased use of technology, i.e., Blackboard.
      Increased standardization of assignments and assessments.
      Improvements in students’ test scores.
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Health Management Programs

University Goals and Objectives Met by the Program

The undergraduate degree in Healthcare Management will develop professional
competencies in its students that will fulfill the mission and goals of the organizations that
they represent. In addition, students will have a solid ethical foundation. They will obtain
these competencies and ethical foundation through understanding the material presented
and discussed in class, generally related to the management of healthcare organizations.

The goal of the HCM program is the development of students who will be successful in their
chosen HCM fields of emphasis. The HCM program will provide superior instruction and
development within the field for its students from enrollment through every aspect of their
academic experience. The students will learn business models and concepts to assist them
in understanding and managing departments and organizations within the healthcare
industry.

Healthcare management program outcome goals have been developed to reflect the
specific application level work skills and abilities that align with the program and student
learning outcomes.

Program Goals and Objectives

Graduates

      will demonstrate contemporary business competencies and the aptitude required
       for life-long learning and personal development,
      will acquire the technical, human and conceptual skills that would contribute to
       critical analysis, problem solving, operational recommendations, and continuous
       improvement of dynamic and changing organizations and the ability to
       professionally communicate those recommendations and improvements,
      will demonstrate the entrepreneurial spirit of being enterprising, resourceful and
       productive in their professional contributions,
      are able to act and build upon the foundation of their course work for the
       furtherance of their professional careers:
            o What should students be learning and in what ways should they be growing?
            o What are students actually learning and in what ways are they actually
                growing?
            o What should we be doing to facilitate student learning and growth?
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Objectives for graduates in the major – graduates will achieve the following Student                English (United States)
Learning Outcomes:

      Demonstrate an understanding of management principles and concepts with regard
       to health care.
      Understand pertinent ethical issues within health care organizations.
      Understand fundamental concepts and methods of financing and accounting with
       regard to health care organizations.
      Understand health care delivery in the United States.
      Understand fundamental prevalent legal issues in health care and develop a basic
       knowledge of the United States legal system.
      Understand basic concepts of business information systems, operations
       management, and software applications.
      Understand fundamental concepts of supervisory and managerial roles within health
       care organizations and how to conduct basic problem analysis.

Classes/Clusters to be assessed

Foundations of Management

IHM 30100 - Ethical Issues in Healthcare Management, IHM 30200 - Healthcare
Management and IHM 35100 - Healthcare Marketing

Healthcare Finance

IHM 47600 - Essentials of Healthcare Finance, IHM 47700 - Healthcare Finance, and IHM
47800 - Economics of Health and Medical Care

Healthcare Law

IHM 33300 - Legal Issues in Healthcare, IHM 33400 - Government Organization and the
Healthcare Industry and IHM 33500 - Cases in Healthcare Administration

Health Policy

IHM 46000 - Healthcare Delivery in the USA, IHM 46100 - Healthcare Policy and Research
and IHM 46200 - Global Healthcare Reform

Accounting

IBA 21010 - Principles of Financial Accounting, IBA 21011 - Principles of Managerial
Accounting and IBA 32000 - Principles of Finance
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Management Information Systems                                                                     English (United States)


IBA 24000 - Introduction to Information Systems, IBA 33400 - Introduction to Operations
Management and IBA 36500 - Microcomputer Applications in Business

Capstone

IHM 49900 - Health Management Capstone

Methods of Assessment Used

The content of the clusters is kept current through meetings with adjunct faculty members,
who practice in the industry, meetings with the LCIE business advisory board, and alignment
with discipline specific associations (e.g., AUPHA) the outcomes are measured by through
the following:

Faculty assess students’ abilities to
    analyze current business issues,
    evaluate and analyze case studies,
    effectively present information in written and verbal formats,
    understand industry issues and concepts.

Results

The assessment process was recently implemented and is still in its infancy. However, over
the next two years, comparisons and trends will be identified and analyzed and impacted
via a continuous improvement process.

Lessons Learned

At this point, health management is piloting the assessment process.

Action Plan

Next year, we will continue to improve student learning through two means. First, we will
continue to implement our plan, taking into consideration the positive and negative lessons
and issues that colleagues in other programs have encountered. Second, we will pursue a
healthcare specific accreditation for the program which will provide the opportunity for a
third party evaluation of the program as well as additional teaching and assessment
resources.
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Impacts and Changes on Classes                                                                       English (United States)


At this point, it is premature to speculate about the changes on the classes.

                                LCIE School Analysis
LCIE is continuing to increase both is assessment program and assessment reporting. LCIE is
working to close the loop on assessment by making improvements to the programs based
on assessment data but some of the programs are very early in the process. The student
evaluation system is interesting, and if it is capable of comparing their first cluster to their
last, it could provide very useful data. LCIE has already identified the adjunct response rate
as an issue and is working on it. The University may need to consider a separate report for
LCIE, but that is for the future.



                 Program Assessment Overview

Lindenwood University’s program assessment is growing and becoming more
comprehensive each year. All of the schools at Lindenwood annually assess some or all of
their degree programs, with the exception of the school of American studies, which only
came into existence in the last couple of years.



                  Summary of Assessment of Programs

Program assessment - some conclusions:
    A number of our professional departments/schools are going through, or have
      finished, the process of getting outside accreditation, and because of that, they are
      working on changing their assessment programs to meet the standards of the
      professional associations.
           o Athletic training has professional accreditation.
           o Social work has professional accreditation.
           o School of Business and Entrepreneurship received specialized accreditation
              this year.
           o LCIE is also going through the business accreditation process.
           o The School of Communications is reviewing the possibility of specialized
              accreditation.
           o The Music Department is reviewing the possibility of specialized
              accreditation.
    Student improvement has, and continues to be, a constant over the years.
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       o Students have demonstrated value added from the courses and majors.                     English (United States)
   A number of departments have determined that their current assessment tools
    and/or programs no longer provide useful information, and this had led to
       o some departments looking at new assessment techniques and tools,
       o a number of departments are working on creating whole new assessment
            programs in order to better suit the department’s needs.
   The School of Business has been using and LCIE is beginning to use third-party
    sources for assessment tools, such as the Educational Testing Service professional
    exams.
   We still have departments that have problems closing the loop on assessment in a
    formal process but have begun to do so informally (without documentation).
       o This appears in these areas:
                 programs with a lot of physical activity, or very subjective material,
                 new programs that have yet to work out what they need assessment
                   to tell them,
                 programs that had significant turnover in personnel,
                 programs that do not have a history of doing assessment.



                  Program Assessment Action Plan

   The University’s program assessment is constantly in a state of evolution.
        o In 2011-12, a new assessment reporting system will be implemented in
            which ¼ of the programs report each year.
                 Programs will be required to do SLO-based assessment reporting in
                    each year in which they do not do program-level assessment.
        o Assessment oversight has been moved to the school level from the University
            level. Each school has its own assessment committee. Oversight of the
            University program will continue to be in the hands of the Office of
            Institutional Research. This process is still in its early stages of development
            as the school committee gets use to their new and developing
            responsibilities.
   The Dean of Institutional Research will meet with assessment officers for each
    program to discuss the strengths and weakness of their assessment programs.
   Aid will be given to the schools’ assessment committees by the Office of Institutional
    Research as requested or needed in
        o assisting programs in the creation of their assessment plans,
        o examining and recommending methods of assessment,
        o the creation or selection of assessment tools, such as outside, third-party
            tools.
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   The assessment officers for each school/department will be encouraged to create in          English (United States)
    their assessment plan a section on how they will be looking at GE goals in their
    programs.
   The student’s ability to communicate effectively and correctly in written and oral
    English will see greater emphasis.
        o The use of the Writing Proficiency Exam and Writing Proficiency Assessment
            will continue to be expanded to the Belleville Campus and LCIE.
        o Departments will be encouraged to look for ways to assess communications
            in all of their academic majors.
   Departments currently having trouble closing the feedback loop in the assessment
    documentation will be encouraged to include how they are using assessment to
    modify their majors, such as
        o outlining success of current methods,
        o outlining changes in courses or majors brought about through assessment.
   Schools and departments will be encouraged to look to use both objective and
    subjective measures in their analysis and written reports. They will be encouraged to
    increase the use and reporting of more subjective measures including CATs, student
    class assessments, and other non-quantifiable measures.
   Schools and departments will be encouraged to examine the success of graduates,
    such as how many are employed in their fields and how many go to graduate school.
   Faculty members will be encouraged to promote student involvement in assessment
    via the use of CATs, surveys of student attitudes and expectations, student
    participation in program assessment committees, exit interviews, and student
    membership on assessment committees.
   The Office of Institutional Research will assist and encourage departments to
    develop more focused assessment plans that will allow them to concentrate their
    efforts on specific areas of concern. The aim is to lighten the burden of assessment
    (where possible) while focusing efforts on using assessment to improve instruction
    in specific areas and through specific methods.
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