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					Table ID
ALL

ALL
ALL



ALL




ALL




ALL


ALL




B02005




B02006
B02007




B05005

B05006

B07001

B07001PR

B07002

B07002PR

B07003

B07003PR

B07004A

B07004APR

B07004B

B07004BPR

B07004C

B07004CPR

B07004D

B07004DPR

B07004E

B07004EPR

B07004F

B07004FPR

B07004G
B07004GPR

B07004H

B07004HPR

B07004I

B07004IPR

B07007

B07007PR

B07008

B07008PR

B07009

B07009PR

B07010

B07010PR

B07011

B07011PR

B07012

B07012PR

B07013

B07013PR

B07101

B07201

B07201PR

B07202

B07202PR

B07203

B07203PR
B07204

B07204PR

B07401


B07401PR


B07402


B07402PR


B07403


B07403PR


B07404A


B07404APR


B07404B


B07404BPR


B07404C


B07404CPR


B07404D


B07404DPR


B07404E


B07404EPR
B07404F


B07404FPR


B07404G


B07404GPR


B07404H


B07404HPR


B07404I


B07404IPR


B07407


B07407PR


B07408


B07408PR


B07409


B07409PR


B07410


B07410PR


B07411
B07411PR


B07412


B07412PR


B07413


B07413PR


B08006
B08007
B08008
B08009
B08011
B08012
B08013
B08014
B08015
B08016
B08017
B08018
B08101
B08103
B08105A
B08105B
B08105C
B08105D
B08105E
B08105F
B08105G
B08105H
B08105I
B08111
B08113
B08119
B08121
B08122
B08124
B08124
B08126


B08126
B08128
B08130
B08131
B08132
B08133
B08134
B08135
B08136
B08137
B08141
B08201
B08202
B08203
B08301
B08302
B08303
B08406



B08406
B08412



B08412
B08501



B08501
B08503



B08503
B08505A



B08505A
B08505B



B08505B
B08505C



B08505C
B08505D
B08505D
B08505E



B08505E
B08505F



B08505F
B08505G



B08505G
B08505H



B08505H
B08505I



B08505I
B08511



B08511
B08513



B08513
B08519



B08519
B08521



B08521
B08522



B08522
B08524
B08524



B08524
B08526


B08526



B08526
B08528



B08528
B08532



B08532
B08534



B08534
B08536



B08536
B08537



B08537
B08541



B08541
B08601



B08601
B08602
B08602
B08603



B08603
B10055




B10058



B14005



B16002


B16010



B17005



B17016


B18001




B18002




B18007
B18008




B18010




B18015




B18016




B18020




B18020



B18020A




B18020A



B18020B




B18020B



B18020C
B18020C



B18020D




B18020D



B18020E




B18020E



B18020F




B18020F



B18020G




B18020G



B18020H




B18020H
B18020I




B18020I



B18021



B18022



B18023



B18024



B18025




B18025



B18026




B18026



B18030
B18035




B18036




B18040




B18045




B18046




B21005



B21006




B22004




B23001
B23001



B23002A
B23002A



B23002B
B23002B



B23002C
B23002C



B23002D
B23002D



B23002E
B23002E



B23002F
B23002F



B23002G
B23002G



B23002H
B23002H



B23002I
B23002I



B23003



B23004



B23004
B23005




B23005



B23006



B23007



B23008



B23011




B24010
B24010A
B24010B
B24010C
B24010D
B24010E
B24010F
B24010G
B24010H
B24010I
B24011
B24012
B24020
B24021
B24022
B24030


B24031


B24032
B24040


B24041


B24042


B24050


B24050
B24060
B24070


B24081


B24082


B24091


B24092


B26001



B99080
B99081
B99082
B99083
B99084
B99085
B99086



B99086
B99087



B99087
B99088



B99088
B99089



B99089
B99181




B99186




B99187




C02005




C02006




C02007




C05005
C05006

C07001

C07001PR

C07008

C07008PR

C07201

C07201PR

C07202

C07203

C07204

C07204PR

C07401


C07401PR


C07408


C07408PR


C08006
C08007
C08011
C08012
C08014
C08016
C08017
C08018
C08101
C08105A
C08105B
C08105C
C08105D
C08105E
C08105F
C08105G
C08105H
C08105I
C08111
C08113
C08119
C08122
C08124
C08124
C08126


C08126
C08128
C08130
C08132
C08133
C08134
C08136
C08137
C08141
C08201
C08202
C08203
C08301
C08302
C08303
C08406



C08406
C08412



C08412
C08501



C08501
C08505A



C08505A
C08505B



C08505B
C08505C



C08505C
C08505D



C08505D
C08505E



C08505E
C08505F



C08505F
C08505G



C08505G
C08505H



C08505H
C08505I



C08505I
C08511



C08511
C08513



C08513
C08519



C08519
C08522



C08522
C08524
C08524



C08524
C08526


C08526



C08526
C08528



C08528
C08532



C08532
C08534



C08534
C08536



C08536
C08537



C08537
C08541



C08541
C08601



C08601
C08602



C08602
C08603



C08603
C14005



C16010



C17016


C18001




C18002




C18007




C18008




C18020
C18020



C18020A




C18020A



C18020B




C18020B



C18020C




C18020C



C18020D




C18020D



C18020E




C18020E
C18020F




C18020F



C18020G




C18020G



C18020H




C18020H



C18020I




C18020I



C18021



C18022



C18023



C18024
C18025




C18025



C18026




C18026



C18030




C18035




C18036




C21005



C21006




C23001
C23001



C23002A
C23002A
C23002B
C23002B



C23002C
C23002C



C23002D
C23002D



C23002E
C23002E



C23002F
C23002F



C23002G
C23002G



C23002H
C23002H



C23002I
C23002I



C23004



C23004
C23007
C23008



C23011




C24010
C24010A
C24010B
C24010C
C24010D
C24010E
C24010F
C24010G
C24010H
C24010I
C24020
C24030


C24040


C24050


C24050
C24060
C24070


DP02




DP02




DP02

DP02-PR
DP02-PR




DP03



DP03
DP03
DP03


DP04
DP05

R0102
R0105

R0106

R0107

R0502
R0503
R0504
R0505
R2401
R2402
R2403
R2404


R2405


S0101

S0101

S0101

S0102

S0102
S0102




S0102-PR

S0102-PR



S0102-PR




S0103

S0103



S0103-PR

S0103-PR



S0201



S0201
S0201


S0201


S0201-PR



S0201-PR
S0201-PR


S0201-PR


S0501
S0501
S0501


S0502
S0502


S0502-PR
S0502-PR


S0503

S0503
S0503


S0504

S0504
S0504


S0505

S0505
S0505


S0506

S0506
S0506


S0601

S0601

S0601

S0601-PR

S0601-PR

S0601-PR

S0701
S0801
S0801

S0802
S0802
S0802
S0802


S0804
S0804
S0804
S0804


S0901
S0901
S0901


S0901

S1001
S1001


S1001

S1002
S1101
S1101
S1201
S1301
S1602


S1802
S1802


S2101

S2301

S2301



S2302



S2401
S2402
S2403


S2404


S2405
S2405


S2406
S2407


S2503

S2504
Note
For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and definitions, see Survey
Methodology (http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/datanotes/exp_acs2007_1yr.html).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 American Community Survey
Although the American Community Survey (ACS) produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,
it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of
the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns and estimates of housing units for states and
counties (http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/official_estimates_2007.html).
Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability. The degree of uncertainty for an estimate
arising from sampling variability is represented through the use of a margin of error. The value shown here is the
90 percent margin of error. The margin of error can be interpreted roughly as providing a 90 percent probability
that the interval defined by the estimate minus the margin of error and the estimate plus the margin of error (the
lower and upper confidence bounds) contains the true value. In addition to sampling variability, the ACS estimates
are subject to nonsampling error (for a discussion of nonsampling variability, see Accuracy of the Data
(http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/ACS/accuracy2007.pdf)). The effect of nonsampling error is not
represented in these tables.
While the 2007 American Community Survey (ACS) data generally reflect the December 2006 Office of
Management and Budget (OMB) definitions of metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas; in certain instances
the names, codes, and boundaries of the principal cities shown in ACS tables may differ from the OMB definitions
due to differences in the effective dates of the geographic entities. The 2007 Puerto Rico Community Survey
(PRCS) data generally reflect the December 2005 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) definitions of
metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas; in certain instances the names, codes, and boundaries of the
principal cities shown in PRCS tables may differ from the OMB definitions due to differences in the effective dates
Estimates of urban and rural population, housing units, and characteristics reflect boundaries of urban areas
defined based on Census 2000 data. Boundaries for urban areas have not been updated since Census 2000. As
a result, data for urban and rural areas from the ACS do not necessarily reflect the results of ongoing
Explanation of Symbols: 1. An '**' entry in the margin of error column indicates that either no sample
observations or too few sample observations were available to compute a standard error and thus the margin of
error. A statistical test is not appropriate. 2. An '-' entry in the estimate column indicates that either no sample
observations or too few sample observations were available to compute an estimate, or a ratio of medians cannot
be calculated because one or both of the median estimates falls in the lowest interval or upper interval of an open-
ended distribution. 3. An '-' following a median estimate means the median falls in the lowest interval of an open-
ended distribution. 4. An '+' following a median estimate means the median falls in the upper interval of an open-
ended distribution. 5. An '***' entry in the margin of error column indicates that the median falls in the lowest
interval or upper interval of an open-ended distribution. A statistical test is not appropriate. 6. An '*****' entry in
the margin of error column indicates that the estimate is controlled. A statistical test for sampling variability is not
Total includes people who reported one or more tribe or tribal grouping within a specified tribal grouping and no
other tribal grouping and no other race; includes people who checked the American Indian or Alaska Native
response category and did not write-in a specific tribe; includes people who reported one or more American
Indian or Alaska Native tribal grouping not shown separately above or elsewhere classified and no other race, and
people who reported two or more of the specified tribal grouping shown above; and includes people who wrote
generic terms such as "American Indian," "Alaska Native," "Indian" and so forth. All Other American Indian tribe
includes people who reported one or more American Indian tribe or tribal grouping not shown separately above
and no other race; people who reported two or more of the specified tribal groupings shown above; and includes
people who reported one or more of the specified tribal grouping shown above in combination with another tribal
grouping not shown separately above. All Other Alaska Native tribe includes people who reported one or more
Total includes people who reported Asian only, regardless of whether they reported one or more detailed Asian
group. Other Asian includes people who reported one detailed Asian group not shown separately and people who
reported two or more specified Asian groups (and no other race). The Other Asian, not specified includes people
who checked the "Other Asian" only response category on the census questionnaire or wrote in generic terms
such as "Asian," "Oriental," "Asiatic," and so forth.
Total includes people who reported Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander only, regardless of whether they
reported one or more detailed Pacific Islander groups. Other Polynesian includes people who reported one
detailed Polynesian group not shown separately and people who reported more than one specified Polynesian
group only (and no other race). Other Micronesian includes people who reported one detailed Micronesian group
not shown separately and people who reported more than one specified Micronesian group only (and no other
race). Other Melanesian includes people who reported one detailed Melanesian group not shown separately and
people who reported more than one Melanesian group only (and no other race). Other Pacific Islander includes
people who reported two or more specified Pacific Islander groups including such response as Native Hawaiian
and Guamanian; Other Pacific Islander and Samoan; Native Hawaiian, Guamanian, Samoan; and so forth; and
includes people who reported at least one specific Pacific Islander group and a generic response, or who
Data for year of entry of the native population reflect the year of entry into the U.S. by people who were born in
Puerto Rico, U.S. Island Areas or born outside the U.S. to a U.S. citizen parent and who subsequently moved to
Regions, subregions, and country code list
(http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/Foreign_Country_Code_List_31908.pdf).
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
A linguistically isolated household is one in which no member 14 years old and over (1) speaks only English or
(2) speaks a non-English language and speaks English "very well." In other words, all members 14 years old and
over have at least some difficulty with English.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The universe - families - includes those householders and spouses who were 15 years old and over at the time of
the interview. Labor force information was not collected for people under 16 years of age. Therefore, people who
were 15 years old at the time of the interview are treated as "did not work in the past 12 months."
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html.
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
By definition, a person cannot be classified as both "employed" and "did not work in the past 12 months".
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
The Class of Worker status “unpaid family workers” may have earnings. Earnings reflect any earnings during the
12 months prior to the ACS interview. The Class of Worker status reflects the job or business held the week prior
to the ACS interview, or the last job held by the respondent.
The Class of Worker status “unpaid family workers” may have earnings. Earnings reflect any earnings during the
12 months prior to the ACS interview. The Class of Worker status reflects the job or business held the week prior
to the ACS interview, or the last job held by the respondent.
The Class of Worker status “unpaid family workers” may have earnings. Earnings reflect any earnings during the
12 months prior to the ACS interview. The Class of Worker status reflects the job or business held the week prior
to the ACS interview, or the last job held by the respondent.
The Class of Worker status “unpaid family workers” may have earnings. Earnings reflect any earnings during the
12 months prior to the ACS interview. The Class of Worker status reflects the job or business held the week prior
to the ACS interview, or the last job held by the respondent.
American Community Survey (ACS) data are designed to show social, economic, and housing characteristics of
the nation's population. The annual estimates of the resident population in Group Quarters for the United States,
states, and counties, prepared by intercensal Estimates Program, represent the Census Bureau's official
estimates of updated census counts for these areas. These estimates, and more information, can be found at
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Total includes people who reported one or more tribe or tribal grouping within a specified tribal grouping and no
other tribal grouping and no other race; includes people who checked the American Indian or Alaska Native
response category and did not write-in a specific tribe; includes people who reported one or more American
Indian or Alaska Native tribal grouping not shown separately above or elsewhere classified and no other race, and
people who reported two or more of the specified tribal grouping shown above; and includes people who wrote
generic terms such as "American Indian," "Alaska Native," "Indian" and so forth. All Other American Indian tribe
includes people who reported one or more American Indian tribe or tribal grouping not shown separately above
and no other race; people who reported two or more of the specified tribal groupings shown above; and includes
people who reported one or more of the specified tribal grouping shown above in combination with another tribal
grouping not shown separately above. All Other Alaska Native tribe includes people who reported one or more
Total includes people who reported Asian only, regardless of whether they reported one or more detailed Asian
group. Other Asian includes people who reported one detailed Asian group not shown separately and people who
reported two or more specified Asian groups (and no other race). The Other Asian, not specified includes people
who checked the "Other Asian" only response category on the census questionnaire or wrote in generic terms
such as "Asian," "Oriental," "Asiatic," and so forth.
Total includes people who reported Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander only, regardless of whether they
reported one or more detailed Pacific Islander groups. Other Polynesian includes people who reported one
detailed Polynesian group not shown separately and people who reported more than one specified Polynesian
group only (and no other race). Other Micronesian includes people who reported one detailed Micronesian group
not shown separately and people who reported more than one specified Micronesian group only (and no other
race). Other Melanesian includes people who reported one detailed Melanesian group not shown separately and
people who reported more than one Melanesian group only (and no other race). Other Pacific Islander includes
people who reported two or more specified Pacific Islander groups including such response as Native Hawaiian
and Guamanian; Other Pacific Islander and Samoan; Native Hawaiian, Guamanian, Samoan; and so forth; and
includes people who reported at least one specific Pacific Islander group and a generic response, or who
Data for year of entry of the native population reflect the year of entry into the U.S. by people who were born in
Puerto Rico, U.S. Island Areas or born outside the U.S. to a U.S. citizen parent and who subsequently moved to
Regions, subregions, and country code list
(http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/Foreign_Country_Code_List_31908.pdf).
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their residence at the time they were surveyed.
The characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to Puerto Rico, other U.S. Island Areas, or Foreign Countries.
This table provides geographical mobility for persons relative to their previous place of residence. The
characteristics crossed by geographical mobility reflect the current survey year. The estimates do not include
people who moved to other U.S. Island Areas or Foreign Countries.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
These tabulations are produced to provide estimates of workers at the location of their workplace. Estimates of
counts of workers at the workplace may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions,
coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, and estimation procedures. The ACS is a household survey
which provides data that pertains to individuals, families, and households.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The universe - families - includes those householders and spouses who were 15 years old and over at the time of
the interview. Labor force information was not collected for people under 16 years of age. Therefore, people who
were 15 years old at the time of the interview are treated as "did not work in the past 12 months."
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Armed Forces data are not shown for the population 65 years and over.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
By definition, a person cannot be classified as both "employed" and "did not work in the past 12 months".
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire. This
change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and the
recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later with
data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Ancestry listed in this table refers to the total number of people who responded with a particular ancestry; for
example, the estimate given for Russian represents the number of people who listed Russian as either their first
or second ancestry. This table lists only the largest ancestry groups; see the Detailed Tables for more categories.
Race and Hispanic origin groups are not included in this table because official data for those groups come from
the Race and Hispanic origin questions rather than the ancestry question (see Demographic Table).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire.
This change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and
the recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later
with data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Data for year of entry of the native population reflect the year of entry into the U.S. by people who were born in
Puerto Rico, U.S. Island Areas or born outside the U.S. to a U.S. citizen parent and who subsequently moved to
Ancestry listed in this table refers to the total number of people who responded with a particular ancestry; for
example, the estimate given for Russian represents the number of people who listed Russian as either their first
or second ancestry. This table lists only the largest ancestry groups; see the Detailed Tables for more categories.
Race and Hispanic origin groups are not included in this table because official data for those groups come from
the Race and Hispanic origin questions rather than the ancestry question (see Demographic Table).
The Census Bureau introduced a new skip pattern for the disability questions in the 2003 ACS questionnaire.
This change mainly affected two individual items -- go-outside-home disability and employment disability -- and
the recode for disability status, which includes the two items. Accordingly, comparisons of data from 2003 or later
with data from prior years are not recommended for the relevant questions. For more information, see the ACS
Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm) for Disability.
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
The median gross rent excludes no cash renters.
For more information on understanding race and Hispanic origin data, please see the Census 2000 Brief entitled,
Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin (http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-1.pdf), issued March
The sex ratio represents the number of males per 100 females in the population.
The age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the combined under-18 and 65-and-over populations by the 18-to-
64 population and multiplying by 100.
The child dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population under 18 by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
The old-age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population 65 and over by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
U.S. citizens born in Europe are excluded.
U.S. citizens born in Asia are excluded.
U.S. citizens born in Latin America are excluded.
U.S. citizens born in Mexico are excluded.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
The age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the combined under-18 and 65-and-over populations by the 18-to-
64 population and multiplying by 100.
The old-age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population 65 and over by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
The child dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population under 18 by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
The 60 years and over column of data refers to the age of the householder for the estimates of households,
occupied housing units, owner-occupied housing units, and renter-occupied housing units lines.
The age specified on the population 15 years and over, population 25 years and over, population 30 years and
over, civilian population 18 years and over, civilian population 5 years and over, population 1 years and over,
population 5 years and over, and population 16 years and over lines refer to the data shown in the “Total” column
while the second column is limited to the population 60 years and over.
Within the population 60 years and older, different definitions of "with any disability" are used for the subgroup
aged 60 to 64 and the subgroup aged 65 and older. For people aged 60 to 64, "with any disability" is defined as
having at least one of the six different types of disability. For people aged 65 and over, "with any disability" is
defined as having at least one of five different types of disability. Work disability is not incorporated into the
definition of "with any disability" for people aged 65 and over.
The 60 years and over column of data refers to the age of the householder for the estimates of households,
occupied housing units, owner-occupied housing units, and renter-occupied housing units lines.
The age specified on the population 15 years and over, population 25 years and over, population 30 years and
over, civilian population 18 years and over, civilian population 5 years and over, population 1 years and over,
population 5 years and over, and population 16 years and over lines refer to the data shown in the “Total” column
while the second column is limited to the population 60 years and over.
Within the population 60 years and older, different definitions of "with any disability" are used for the subgroup
aged 60 to 64 and the subgroup aged 65 and older. For people aged 60 to 64, "with any disability" is defined as
having at least one of the six different types of disability. For people aged 65 and over, "with any disability" is
defined as having at least one of five different types of disability. Work disability is not incorporated into the
definition of "with any disability" for people aged 65 and over.
The 65 years and over column of data refers to the age of the householder for the estimates of households,
occupied housing units, owner-occupied housing units, and renter-occupied housing units lines.
The age specified on the population 15 years and over, population 25 years and over, population 30 years and
over, civilian population 18 years and over, civilian population 5 years and over, population 1 years and over,
population 5 years and over, and population 16 years and over lines refer to the data shown in the “Total” column
while the second column is limited to the population 65 years and over.
The 65 years and over column of data refers to the age of the householder for the estimates of households,
occupied housing units, owner-occupied housing units, and renter-occupied housing units lines.
The age specified on the population 15 years and over, population 25 years and over, population 30 years and
over, civilian population 18 years and over, civilian population 5 years and over, population 1 years and over,
population 5 years and over, and population 16 years and over lines refer to the data shown in the “Total” column
while the second column is limited to the population 65 years and over.
Data for the households, families, occupied housing units, owner-occupied housing units, and renter-occupied
housing units lines refer to the specified race, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, or ancestry
of the householder shown in the table. Data in the "Total population" column are shown regardless of the race,
Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, or ancestry of the person.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
See the American FactFinder Glossary (http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/epss/glossary_a.html) for more
information on the definition of the following population groups: Arab, Arab/Arabic, European, Subsaharan
African, African, American, and All Other Hispanic or Latino.
Data for the households, families, occupied housing units, owner-occupied housing units, and renter-occupied
housing units lines refer to the specified race, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, or ancestry
of the householder shown in the table. Data in the "Total population" column are shown regardless of the race,
Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, or ancestry of the person.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
See the American FactFinder Glossary (http://factfinder.census.gov/home/en/epss/glossary_a.html) for more
information on the definition of the following population groups: Arab, Arab/Arabic, European, Subsaharan
African, African, American, and All Other Hispanic or Latino.
These data for the occupied housing units lines refer to the native or foreign-born status of the householder.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Regions, subregions, and country code list
(http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/Foreign_Country_Code_List_31908.pdf).
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Regions, subregions, and country code list
(http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/Foreign_Country_Code_List_31908.pdf).
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Regions, subregions, and country code list
(http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/Foreign_Country_Code_List_31908.pdf).
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Regions, subregions, and country code list
(http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/Foreign_Country_Code_List_31908.pdf).
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
The age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the combined under-18 and 65-and-over populations by the 18-to-
64 population and multiplying by 100.
The old-age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population 65 and over by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
The child dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population under 18 by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
The age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the combined under-18 and 65-and-over populations by the 18-to-
64 population and multiplying by 100.
The old-age dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population 65 and over by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
The child dependency ratio is derived by dividing the population under 18 by the 18-to-64 population and
multiplying by 100.
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
The 12 selected states are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New
Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin.
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Workers include members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at work last week.
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Excludes householders, spouses, and unmarried partners.
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
Disability is defined as having at least one of the specified disability conditions including either a long lasting
physical condition (i.e., vision and hearing impairments, difficulty walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting, or
carrying); or difficulty completing tasks (i.e., learning, remembering, concentrating, dressing, bathing, and getting
Public assistance includes receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI), cash public assistance income, or
Food Stamps.
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
Disability is defined as having at least one of the specified disability conditions including either a long lasting
physical condition (i.e., vision and hearing impairments, difficulty walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting, or
carrying); or difficulty completing tasks (i.e., learning, remembering, concentrating, dressing, bathing, and getting
Public assistance includes receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI), cash public assistance income, or
Food Stamps.
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
Housing unit weight is used throughout this table (only exception is the average household and family size cells).
Average family size is derived by dividing the number of related people in households by the number of family
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
Foreign born excludes people born outside the United States to a parent who is a U.S. citizen.
A linguistically isolated household is one in which no member 14 years and over (1) speaks only English or (2)
speaks a non-English language and speaks English “very well.” In other words, all members of the household 14
years and over have at least some difficulty with English.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
The categories under period of service are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Veterans may have served in
more than one period.
The “Employed” and “Unemployment rate” columns refer to the civilian population. For more information, see the
ACS Subject Definitions (http://www.census.gov/acs/www/UseData/Def.htm).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Employment and unemployment estimates may vary from the official labor force data released by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics because of differences in survey design and data collection. For guidance on differences in
employment and unemployment estimates from different sources go to Labor Force Guidance
(http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/laborfor/laborguidance082504.html).
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
Occupation codes are 4-digit codes and are based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000.
Industry codes are 4-digit codes and are based on the North American Industry Classification System 2002.
However, the Industry categories adhere to the guidelines issued in Clarification Memorandum No. 2, "NAICS
Alternate Aggregation Structure for Use By U.S. Statistical Agencies," issued by the Office of Management and
For occupied housing units and renter-occupied housing units, the median monthly housing costs excludes renter-
occupied housing units for which no cash rent is paid.
The percent imputed for units in structure, year structure built, rooms, bedrooms, plumbing facilities, and kitchen
facilities is based on all housing units (both occupied and vacant housing units) instead of occupied housing units

				
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