Docstoc

6 Social Dancing’s Rules Of Etiquette

Document Sample
6 Social Dancing’s Rules Of Etiquette Powered By Docstoc
					6 Social Dancing’s Rules Of Etiquette 
Salsa dance, the tango, ballroom, latin, swing, etc. –the popular dances for enthusiasts and 
professionals alike. Why? These are the social dances, the ones that face you off with a partner,  challenging not only your own skill and agility but also your ability to be in sync with another  human being.   They allow us to practice not just the expressive aspect of dance, but also the communicative,  where we dance not just for ourselves, but as part of a single entity.   The point of these dances is human contact, to establish a relationship with the body. As such,  they are held together by certain rules of conduct to aid in fostering social interaction between  dancers.  Don’t be alarmed. A lot of these rules are pretty much common‐sense, and all are made to keep  the dance alive and enjoyable. Here are some of these rules:  1. Enjoy! If you’re not having fun, then find something else to do. Besides the great exercise and  the opportunity to express oneself, one of the main reasons people dance is to enjoy  themselves. If you’re going to dance, do it with a passion that will entice you and your partner  to dance better. The more you enjoy it, the better you’ll be at it.  2. Wear deodorant, brush your teeth, take a bath, and wear clean clothes. No you don’t need to  smell like flowers all night; you just have to not stink like a skunk. There’s really nothing more  awkward than ending a dance too early because of body odor or halitosis, not to mention that’s  bound to ruin any chance of a second dance with a good partner.  3. Dress the part. Whether you’re in a formal gala or a dance studio, the proper clothes make  the dancer. If you’re in clothes that you’re comfortable in, the more you’re likely to dance your  best. Rubber shoes can cause injuries as they tend to stick to the floor during certain moves (as  they were designed to do so); wear dancing shoes whatever the occasion. Also, being properly  attired will get you better reactions on and off the dance floor. It is a social activity after all.  4. Tie your hair. Nobody wants to be whacked in the face by their partner’s hair after a perfect  textbook turn. It’s also very unsafe to risk having a dancer’s hair tangle with a   5. partner’s accessories and body parts –it just hampers the dancing. 

6. Thank every person you’ve danced with. Really, it’s simple and easy to do, and your partners  will be very grateful for the gesture.  Etiquette on the dance floor isn’t as hard as you might think and is, as said before, pretty much  common sense. Except for the stricter dances where the rules of etiquette are very specific (like  the tango with its system of approaching the partner, commencing the dance, and leaving the  partner). Etiquette naturally follows as you learn to dance –as long as you remember that it’s  all about passion, contact, and respect. 


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:25
posted:10/12/2009
language:English
pages:2