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Human_Trafficking

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					HUMAN TRAFFICKING
                 Story
• An 11-year old girl was recruited to work
  as a waitress at a restaurant in the U.S.
  so she could send money back to her
  desperately poor family in Mexico.
• Sadly, the promised job never
  materialized. She instead found herself
  imprisoned in a trailer serving as a
  portable brothel. This is human
  trafficking—literally modern day slavery
         600,000-800,000
• Victims trafficked annually across
  international borders worldwide
• After drug dealing, human trafficking is
  tied with illegal arms industry as the 2nd
  most lucrative criminal enterprise in the
  world today
• Fastest growing enterprise
     U.S. State Department
           Statistics
• 14,500-17,500 victims trafficked to this
  country each year
• Exploited for labor or commercial sex
• From Southeast Asia, Latin America,
  Eastern Europe, & Africa
• No American community is immune
  from having such victims
          Victims forced to:
•   Prostitution; pornography
•   Migrant farm labor
•   Domestic servitude as nannies & maids
•   Hotel & restaurant work
•   Factory sweatshops
•   Etc.
           For example:
• One girl was forced to work long hours
  in the tomato fields during the day &
  then at night raped by her captor at
  night
               Victims:
• Physical & emotional torture
• Beaten, raped, threatened, denied food,
  human contact, health care
• Often experience PTSD & traumatic
  bonding syndrome which holds them in
  place
• Half of all victims are children
    Ways of luring victims to U.S.
•   Told: will be united with family
•   Work at a legitimate job
•   Attend school
•   Get adopted
•   Get married
• Some victims are brought here illegally,
  others legally; the latter can be held
  “captive” through “debt bondage”
• Other victims are born in the U.S.,
  example, runaways
           The Criminals
• Can be sophisticated, organized
  criminals both national & international
  networks
• Can be organized crime syndicates
• Can be small groups, amateurs
                  Can Be:
•   Neighbors
•   Friends
•   “boyfriends”
•   Family members
•   Village chiefs
•   Former victims/returnees
•   Women who have same ethnicity as victims
       Behaviors of Captors
• Keep victims hidden from public eye
• Threaten to harm victims’ families
• Threaten victims with deportation
• Instill fear in victims of law enforcement
• Victims who do not speak English,
  further isolated
• Victims moved a lot; don’t know where
  they are
  Consequences for Children
• Children malnourished; may not grow to
  normal height
• Have mental & physical health issues
• Have untreated broken bones, hearing
  loss, etc.
• May develop chronic back, visual, &
  respiratory problems
• May have sexually transmitted diseases
  inlcuding AIDS
• Untreated urinary tract infections
• Kidney problems
• Future problems with reproduction
• Mental health issues: PTSD, sleeping &
  eating disorders, phobias, panic attacks,
  depression
• Substance abuse problems: sometimes
  hooked on drugs by captor for power &
  control purposes
• May experience trauma bonding:
  Stockholm Syndrome
• Get children to accept captors as family:
  children accept abuse in exchange for
  familiar bonding
     HELP FOR CHILDREN
• Trafficking Victims Protection Act
  (TVPA) October 2000
  – Increases prosecution of traffickers
  – Protects victims
  – Provides benefits & services to victims
  – Allows for T Visa to remain in U.S.
• Through U.S. Department of Health &
  Human Services (HHS) unaccompanied
  trafficked children eligible for
  Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM)
  program
  – Placed in foster care or independent living
    situations
  – May receive intensive case management
• Assists in family reunification
• Assists in repatriation services
 HHS’s Rescue & Restore
Victims of Human Trafficking
Public Awareness Campaign
• Focuses on educating individuals who
  may encounter victims such as CPS
  workers, teachers, medical personnel,
  law enforcement, etc.
• Any minor involved in commercial sex is
  a trafficking victim
• Must be identified to receive needed
  services
• HHS has created a program to help
  local governments identify victims
• There are posters, training videos, etc.
  to educate individuals to spot & identify
  victims
• Go to: www.acf.hhs.gov/trafficking
     CLUES TO IDENTIFY
         VICTIMS
• Attends school sporadically, not at all;
  or significant gap in schooling
• Often hungry or malnourished
• Wearing the same clothing day after
  day; clothes are dirty & torn
• Poor hygiene
• Bruises or other signs of physical abuse
• Living with multiple people in a cramped
  space
• Lives & works in the same place or with
  employer
• Depression, fear, overly submissive
• No passport or other forms of
  identification

				
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posted:9/23/2012
language:English
pages:25