Heart_of_Boynton_Community_Redevelopment_Plan

Document Sample
Heart_of_Boynton_Community_Redevelopment_Plan Powered By Docstoc
					       HEART OF BOYNTON
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

    Strategic Planning Group, Inc.
     Economics • Planning • Economic Development
        P.O. Box 550590 Jacksonville, FL 32255-0590
        Phone (800) 213- PLAN Fax (904) 731-3006

                     in association with

                     RMPK Group
                    JEG Associates
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS........................................................................................................................................... II

LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................................................IV

INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................................... 1

   THE CITY OF BOYNTON CRA REDEVELOPMENT AREA ............................................................. 1
   METHODOLOGY ............................................................................................................................................... 3
THE STUDY AREA ................................................................................................................................................... 5

   SOCIO ECONOMICS ......................................................................................................................................... 8
   UNEMPLOYMENT STATISTICS ................................................................................................................. 10
   HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOODS .................................................................................................................... 10
   CURRENT LAND USE ................................................................................................................................... 12
   PICTORIAL OF STUDY AREA .................................................................................................................... 14
   CURRENT ZONING ......................................................................................................................................... 16
   NON CONFORMING LOTS .......................................................................................................................... 16
   PARCEL INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................... 16
   CURRENT FUTURE LAND USE ................................................................................................................ 19
REDEVELOPMENT PLANNING PROCESS ...................................................................................................... 21

   STAKEHOLDER PROCESS ........................................................................................................................... 21
       Stakeholder Identification ................................................................................................................................... 21
       Stakeholder Interviews ........................................................................................................................................ 22
       Kickoff Workshop................................................................................................................................................ 25
       Neighborhood Livability Workshop .................................................................................................................... 28
   NEW NEIGHBORHOOD DELINEATION ................................................................................................. 34
       Recommendations for commercial revitalization activities. ............................................................................... 34
       Recommendations for Neighborhoods and Gateways......................................................................................... 36
   OPPORTUNITIES                      TO REDEVELOPMENT .............................................................................................. 42
       History ................................................................................................................................................................ 42
       Location .............................................................................................................................................................. 42
       Schools ................................................................................................................................................................ 44
       Community Development Corporations.............................................................................................................. 44
       Residents ............................................................................................................................................................. 44
       City and CRA Commitments................................................................................................................................ 44
       Churches ............................................................................................................................................................. 45
   CONSTRAINTS           TO REDEVELOPMENT .................................................................................................. 45
       Cherry Hills Public Housing............................................................................................................................... 45
       Boynton Terrace.................................................................................................................................................. 45
       Small Commercial Business Problems................................................................................................................ 45
       Lack of Developable Land .................................................................................................................................. 46

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                                                                                       Page ii
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


   NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPT PLAN ......................................................................................................... 48
   LAND ASSEMBLY .......................................................................................................................................... 50
   PROPOSED FUTURE LAND USE PLAN ................................................................................................. 52
   PROPOSED ZONING ....................................................................................................................................... 52
URBAN DESIGN CONCEPTS ............................................................................................................................... 55
   ATTRIBUTE #1 – METAL ROOFING MATERIALS ........................................................................................................ 57
   ATTRIBUTE #2 – PASTEL COLORS: PINK, WHITE, YELLOW, GREY AND BLUE............................................................ 57
   ATTRIBUTE #3 – STEEP PITCHED GABLED AND HIPED ROOFS ................................................................................... 57
   ATTRIBUTE #4 – DORMER WINDOWS ....................................................................................................................... 57
   ATTRIBUTE #5 – WOOD FRAME CONSTRUCTION ...................................................................................................... 57
   ATTRIBUTE #6– LOW PITCHED PORCH ROOFS .......................................................................................................... 58
   ATTRIBUTE #7– EXPOSED TRUSS WORK .................................................................................................................. 58
   ATTRIBUTE #8 – SIMPLE WOOD RAILINGS ............................................................................................................... 58
   ATTRIBUTE #9 – SIMPLE WOOD TRIM ...................................................................................................................... 58
   FAÇADE COMPOSITION ............................................................................................................................................ 61
   RHYTHM .................................................................................................................................................................. 62
   PROPORTION ............................................................................................................................................................ 62
   SCALE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 62
   STREETSCAPE CONCEPTS .......................................................................................................................... 63
   DESIGN STANDARDS ................................................................................................................................................ 68
ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN......................................................................................................................... 70

IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM ........................................................................................................................ 76

   MASTER PLAN ADOPTION ........................................................................................................................ 76
   MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS ................................................................................... 76
   NEIGHBORHOOD ORGANIZATION PROCESS..................................................................................... 78
   ROLE OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATIONS (CDCS) ........................................ 79
   CHERRY HILLS................................................................................................................................................ 79
   BOYNTON TERRACE..................................................................................................................................... 80
   SEACREST BOULEVARD AND MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. STREETSCAPE ...................... 80
   LAND ASSEMBLAGE .................................................................................................................................... 80
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, IDENTIFICATION OF INCENTIVES FOR ECONOMIC EXPANSION AND
RECRUITMENT OF BUSINESSES....................................................................................................................... 81

   ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ...................................................................................................................... 81
   TRAINING........................................................................................................................................................... 81
   JOB CREATION ................................................................................................................................................ 82
      Micro Enterprise ................................................................................................................................................. 82
      Day Care and other Support ............................................................................................................................... 82
      Service and Office Development ......................................................................................................................... 82
   INCENTIVES ...................................................................................................................................................... 83
      Current Planning Incentives ............................................................................................................................... 84
      Public Financing Techniques.............................................................................................................................. 85
      Other Economic Development Resources Currently Available Within Palm Beach County and the City of Boynton
      Beach ................................................................................................................................................................ 100

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                                                                                     Page iii
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


   AFFORDABLE HOUSING................................................................................................................ 102
   RESIDENTIAL BASED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT...................................................................... 104
APPENDICES ......................................................................................................................................................... 107




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                                                                            Page iv
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




List of Figures
Figure 1. CRA Boundary………………………………………………………………………………………………2
Figure 2. Parcel Map…………………………………………………………………………………………………..6
Figure 3. Aerial Photograph…………………………………………………………………………………………...7
Figure 4. Existing Neighborhoods…………………………………………………………………………...……….11
Figure 5. Existing Land Use………………………………………………………………………………………….13
Figure 6. Current Zoning……………………………………………………………………………………………..17
Figure 7. Parcels By Size……………………………………………………………………………………………..18
Figure 8. Existing Future Land Use…………………………………………………………………………………..20
Figure 9. New Neighborhoods………………………………………………………………………………………..35
Figure 10. Palmetto Park Plan………………………………………………………………………………………...39
Figure 11. Palmetto Park Plan………………………………………………………………………………………...40
Figure 12. Wilson Center Concept Plan………………………………………………………………………………41
Figure 13. Opportunities Diagram …………………………………………………………………………………43
Figure 14. Redevelopment Concept Plan……………………………………………………………………………..49
Figure 15. Proposed Land Assembly ……………………………………………………………………………….51
Figure 16. Proposed Land Use Plan…………………………………………………………………………………..53
Figure 17. Proposed Zoning Map ……………………………………………………………………………………54
Figure 18. Seacrest Boulevard Median Visualization ………………………………………………………………..64
Figure 19. Rehab Apartment Visualization …………………………………………………………………………65
Figure 20. Bus Stop Landscaping Visualization ……………………………………………………………………66
Figure 21. Gateway Signage Visualization …………………………………………………………………………...67
Figure 22. Streetscape MLK, Jr. Boulevard ………………………………………………………………………….69
Figure 23. MLK, Jr. Neighborhood Illustrative Plan ……………………………………………………………….71
Figure 24. Poinciana Neighborhood Illustrative Plan Higher Density ………………………………………………72
Figure 25. Poinciana Neighborhood Illustrative Plan Normal Density ………………………………………………73
Figure 26. CBD Expansion Illustrative Plan………………………………………………………………………….74
Figure 27. Heart of Boynton Community Illustrative Master Plan …………………………………………………..75




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page iv
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




INTRODUCTION

The City of Boynton Beach received an Urban Infill and Redevelopment Grant from the
State of Florida to prepare a Neighborhood Master Plan for what is now referred to as
“the Heart of Boynton”. The Master Plan is the second of five redevelopment plans for
the City’s Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Redevelopment Area. The City
retained the services of Strategic Planning Group, Inc. and its sub consultants JEG
Associates and RMPK Group to prepare the Neighborhood Master Plan.

The City of Boynton CRA Redevelopment Area
The City of Boynton Beach created a Community Redevelopment Agency in 1981 and
created a Community Redevelopment Area originally encompassing 180 acres. The
original boundary consisted of the area bounded by Boynton Canal to the north (C-16),
bounded on the west by the Florida East Coast Railroad (FEC), south to SE 6th Street,
and on the east by the Intercoastal Waterway. Pursuant to a Findings of Necessity, a
redevelopment master plan was prepared for the area in 1983 and was adopted in
1984. The CRA Redevelopment Area was later to include an additional 518 acres
covering an area that expanded the original boundaries to include the area bounded by
the Interstate to the west, the C-16 canal to the north and Ocean Avenue to the South.

In late 1996, the City conducted a city-wide Visions Program that resulted in the
preparation of the Boynton Beach 20/20 Redevelopment Master Plan. That plan called
for the further expansion of the CRA boundaries to extend the original Federal Highway
boundaries to the northern City boundary and to the south to the southern City
Boundary. This expanded the original Federal Highway Corridor (180 acres) to now
include 1,094.98 acres. The new expanded CRA now contains approximately 1,613.74
acres. Figure 1 shows the new expanded CRA boundaries.

The City’s current CRA redevelopment planning is envisioned as a five part effort. The
expanded Federal Highway Corridor Community Master Plan to be adopted in 2001
was the first effort. This study, the Heart of Boynton Neighborhood Master Plan is the
second. The third planning effort is to include the existing Government Center, the
fourth is to include the Boynton Beach Boulevard Corridor and the fifth is to include the
industrial properties lying west of the Interstate.

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 1
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 2
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Methodology
The study effort consists of three main efforts: Planning, Economic Development and
Urban Design.

The entire process is driven by a “bottom up” public participation process or what is
referred to as a “Community/Neighborhood Livability Process”. Strategic Planning
Group, Inc. (SPG) staff and Joe Gray, president of JEG Associates commenced the
public participation process by conducting leadership interviews within the
community/neighborhood. The process included interview community leaders prior to
and immediately after the Kick-off Charrette held on June 18, 2001. Four additional
charrettes were held within the Heart of Boynton on July 21, August 11, August 25, and
September 17th. Over 400 local residents attended the charrette (see the appendix for
attendees).

The public participation concept can be summarized by the following graphic.




                             Bottoms Up
                             CPlanning: Five Tools

                         ! Stakeholder  Outreach
                         ! Livability Surveys
                         ! Livability Workshops
                         ! Strategic Neighborhood Action
                           Plans
                         ! Grassroots Leadership
                           Development




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 3
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




The process can be defined as follows:



                       Strategic
                       Neighborhood                            Stakeholder Outreach
                                                            Identify Key Community Stakeholders

                       Action
                       Plans                                    Community Profiling
                                                             Identify Community Boundaries
                                                     Examine Demographic Data & Past Planning Efforts
                  SEVEN STEPS
                                       Process
                                      Facilitation
                                                                   Livability Survey
                                                            Compile Anectdotal Data Regarding
                                                              Current Livability Conditions




                                                                Livability Workshop
                                                                Determine Livability Standards
                                                     Identify Livability Gaps & Develop Action Strategies

                                      Technical
                                       Support

                                                             Design Workshops
                                                     Citizens Present Action Plan to technical/design team
                                                        Technical/Design Team Develops Action Plans




                                                                Review and Approval
                                                         Approval of Action Plan by Governing Body




                                                                      Action Plan
                                                                Finalize Strategic Action Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                       Page 4
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




The planning process is designed as a long term program effort that links the findings of
this Master Planning effort with other efforts being conducted within the City and Palm
Beach County.

           Strategic Planning Framework
                 Creates a critical link between Neighborhood Action initiatives &
                 Strategic Plans & Budgets


                                                                            Other Public
              Neighborhood
               Neighborhood                                                  Agencies
                 Action
                  Action
                                              Citizen Capacity
                                              Citizen Capacity
                                                   Building
                                                   Building


                                                   Strategic
                                                    Strategic
             Neighborhood                  Planning Framework               Agency         Strategic
             Neighborhood                   Planning Framework              Plans &        Plans &
               Planning
                Planning
                                          • Land Use Plan
                                           • Land Use Plan
                                          • Urban Design Recommendations
               Initiative                  • Urban Design Recommendations
                                          • Neighborhood Target Area        Budgets        Budgets
                Initiative                 • Neighborhood Target Area
                                            Investment Strategy
                                             Investment Strategy



                                           Implementation Plan
                                            Implementation Plan
               Community                  . .Projects
                                              Projects
               Community                  . Budgets
              Development
              Development
                                            . Budgets
                                          . Funding Strategies               Private
                                            . Funding Strategies
               Initiatives
                Initiatives                                                 Partners


                Strategic Planning Group, Inc/JEG Associates




THE STUDY AREA

At the start of the planning process, the study area was referred to as the Martin Luther
King, Jr. Boulevard Neighborhood Planning Study. During the Kickoff meeting it
became apparent that within the local community, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard
Neighborhood meant a sub-neighborhood primarily concentrated on 10th Avenue
(Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.) from Seacrest Blvd. to Federal Highway.            It was
suggested that the study area be renamed to better reflect the geography of the area
and be more inclusive with respect to the historic neighborhoods that make up the study
the area. The community came up the name “The Heart of Boynton”. Figure 2 (the
study area parcel map) and Figure 3 (an aerial of the study area) delineate the study
area.


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                         Page 5
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 6
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 7
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Socio Economics
According to the 2000 Census of Population, the study area contained 3,193 permanent
residents as of April 2000. As shown below the area is predominately African American
and Caribbean composition.



                                               2000 Census




                            0%    1%
                                       6%      4%

                                                              White
                                                              Black
                                                              American Indian
                                                              Other race
                                                              2 or more races

                                             89%




The study area has shown a continued loss of population since 1980 as shown below:

               Table 1: 2000 Census of Population

                   Year      Population
                  1980         3,497
                  1990         3,433
                  2000         3,193
               Source: 2000 United States Census Population
                      Strategic Planning Group, Inc. 2001

To determine current population and household information, Strategic Planning Group,
Inc. commissioned a special computer run from Claritas. Current and future population
projects show a continued downward trend in both population and households. The


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 8
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


following table assumes no major changes in the area; therefore, it would not include
the impacts of the implementation of a new redevelopment program for the area.


               Table 2: Population and Household Projections

                   Year       Population        Households
                  1990          3,433             1,050
                  2001          3,166              949
                  2006          3,093              927
               Source: Claritas and Strategic Planning Group, Inc. 2001



Available housing stock has been declining in spite of concerted efforts by the local
Community Development Corporations (CDC) and Habitat For Humanity.

               Table 3: Housing Projections

                   Year        Housing Units
                  1990            1,204
                  2001               1,081
                  2006               1,054
               Source: Claritas and Strategic Planning Group, Inc. 2001

The area is relatively impoverished with an estimated median household income of only
$27,134 in 2001.

               Table 4: Median Household Income

                       Year              Household
                                          Income
                     1989                 $16,815
                     2001                 $27,134
                   % Change
                     89-01                   61.4%
               Source: Claritas and Strategic Planning Group, Inc. 2001




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                Page 9
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Unemployment Statistics
Strategic Planning Group, Inc. commissioned the Florida Agency for Workforce
Innovation to estimate the unemployment within the Heart of Boynton. The lowest
geographic level that can be utilized is census tract. The study area does not fully
comprise census tract 61, which also includes the area east of the railroad to the
intercoastal and extending south to Boynton Beach Boulevard. However, the study
area represents the majority of the census tract’s unemployment. As shown below, the
study area’s unemployment rate is almost double both the City’s and County’s rate.

               Table 5 : 2000 Annual Average Employment Figures

                Category              Census              City of      Palm Beach
                                      Tract 61           Boynton         County
                                                          Beach
           Labor Force                  2,769             26,215        517,893
           Employment                   2,541             25,035        495,095
           Unemployment                  228              1,180         22,798
           Unemployment                 8.2%               4.5%          4.4%
           rate

               Source: Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation
                       United States Bureau of Labor Statistics 2001
                       Strategic Planning Group, Inc. 2001


Historic Neighborhoods
Utilizing input from City staff, plat maps and community input the study area’s historic
neighborhoods were defined as shown in Figure 4. The Heart of Boynton historically
contained 15 separate neighborhoods:

           1. Cherry Hills
           2. Cherry Hills South
           3. Galaxy Elementary
           4. Ridgewood Hills
           5. Boynton Hills
           6. Sara Sims Park
           7. Poincianna Elementary
           8. Wilson Center and Pool
           9. North MLK Neighborhood (Happy Homes)
           10. MLK Neighborhood Area
           11. City Complex and Head Start


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                      Page 10
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 11
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


           12. St. John’s Neighborhood
           13. Boynton Terrace
           14. Shepard Addition
           15. Arden Park

Current Land Use
The study area is almost totally a residential area comprised mainly of single family and
multifamily housing on both sides of Seacrest Boulevard as shown in Figure 5. The
area has a large concentration of duplex units within the Cherry Hills neighborhood,
which is largely a Public Housing Development run by Palm Beach County. The
County’s Public Housing Authority controls approximately 46 units within Cherry Hills.

The second most significant land use is Boynton Terrace, a 90 unit multifamily housing
project located on both sides of Seacrest Boulevard near the center of the study area.
Boynton Terrace was constructed in 1983 as a mix of 6 single family and ten (10) multi-
family buildings containing 84 units. The western section contains six single family units
and 36 multi-family units.

 Small pockets of commercial uses can be found spread through the area but most are
found in Cherry Hills and along 10th Avenue near Seacrest and Federal Highway and
along Seacrest Blvd.

Arden Park is comprised of a mix of uses from manufacturing to small warehousing and
retail/wholesale operations.

The area contains numerous parks ranging from Sara Sims, Palmetto Park, and Barton
Park to smaller urban gardens.

Public uses include the Wilson Center (a community center, ball-field and pool), two
schools (Poinciana - a magnet math elementary school and Galaxy Elementary), and a
Head Start Center.

One of the most prominent features of the study area is the large amount of vacant
parcels. A total of 234 vacant parcels exist within the study area. Ninety-two (92)
vacant parcels are located west of Seacrest Boulevard primarily north of 9th Avenue.
One hundred and fifteen (115) vacant parcels exist north of 9th Avenue, east of Seacrest
Boulevard while the area south of 9th Avenue contains 27 vacant parcels.


As shown by the following pictures, the building stock within the study area ranges from
deteriorated structures to new housing. Most of the buildings date prior to 1970 and
feature block construction.


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 12
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 13
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Pictorial of Study Area




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 14
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 15
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Current Zoning
The primary zoning for the Heart of Boynton is residential. With the exception of Cherry
Hills (R2-duplex) and Boynton Terrace (R3-multifamily), the area west of Seacrest
Boulevard RIA. East of Seacrest Boulevard, the area is also predominately residential
but at a higher density. Most of the eastern part of the study area is R2 with the
exception of Boynton Terrace (R3).

Commercial Zoning (C2) is found along the west side of Seacrest Boulevard, and two
commercial nodes on either end of Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard (10th Avenue) –
one at the intersection of 10th and Seacrest and the other at 10th and Federal Highway.
The area adjacent to the FEC railroad tracks is zoned C4.

The public works and headstart building, found south of 9th Avenue, is zoned PU as are
the area’s two elementary schools. The area contains a number of recreational parks
but according to Figure 6 on three areas are zoned REC.


Non Conforming Lots
The redevelopment of the Heart of Boynton has historically been hampered by the
adoption of the City’s zoning code, which promoted suburban, larger lot developments.
Most of the area east of the Interstate was developed prior to the 1970s and within the
Heart of Boynton a significant number of smaller (less than 10,000 square feet) lots
exist and do not conform to the City’s existing Land Use Regulations (LDRs). As shown
in Figure 7, it is estimated that approximately 53 residential lots are “non-conforming”
meaning that they are extremely difficult (or impossible) to develop. The same non-
conforming issue also applies to some of the non-residential parcels.

To address the residential non-conforming issue. the City is in the process of adopting
new regulations, which will in effect grandfather the existing small parcel configuration,
allowing for an easier effort in obtaining the necessary permits for residential
development.

Parcel Information
The study area consists of 1,151 individual land parcels according to data obtained from
Palm Beach County. The largest landholder in terms of both acreage and land parcels
is the County School Board which has title to 51 parcels. The City of Boynton Beach
has the second largest ownership at 45 parcels. There are 889 parcel owners within the
study area with 100 people owning more than 1 parcel.



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 16
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 17
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 18
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


One major redevelopment problem within the Heart of Boynton is parcel size. Other than
government own parcels, only 3 parcels are greater than one (1) acre the largest being St.
John’s church (4 acres).

A majority of the parcels are locally owned (739 parcels) and 414 parcels are owner
occupied.

The majority of the improved property dates back to the 1950-60s and varies greatly as
to its both its condition and assessed value as determined by the County Appraiser’s
Office. As shown below, 84% of the parcels have an assessed taxable value of less
than $50,000.

               Table 6: 2000 Annual Average Employment Figures

                       Value           Number          Cumulative
                    $0                171             171
                    <$10,000          236             407
                    <$20,000          210             617 (54%)
                    <$30,000          130             747
                    <$40,000          104             851
                    <$50,000          114             965 (84%)
                    <$60,000          72              1,037
                    <$70,000          33              1,070
                    >$70,000          81              1,151
                    >$150,000         19              NA

                      Source:    Strategic Planning Group, Inc. 2001




Current Future Land Use
The City’s Growth Management Plan (Figure 8) largely mirrors both the existing land
use and zoning for the area. The majority of the residential lands on both sides of
Seacrest Boulevard are defined as Low Density Residential (LDR). Only Boynton
Terrace maintains a High Density Residential classification. Palmetto Park, Wilson
Center, Sara Sims Park, Barton Park and Galaxy Recreational areas are classified as
Recreational (REC).

Galaxy and Poinciana Elementary schools and the St. Johns/Public Works have been
classified Public and Private Governmental/Institutional (PPGI).     Local Retail
Commercial (LRC) have been delineated on either end of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Boulevard between Seacrest Boulevard and Federal Highway. General Commercial as


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 19
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 20
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan



been designed for the area west of 4th street and east of 2nd street, while the area east
of 4th street to the FEC railroad tracks has been designated Industrial.




REDEVELOPMENT PLANNING PROCESS



Stakeholder Process

Community stakeholders provided input regarding their current impressions of the study
area. During the Community Kick Off, community stakeholders identified community
problems and factors that contributed to neighborhood deterioration. During the
Neighborhood Livability Workshop the stakeholders reached consensus on a broad
range of neighborhood livability indicators that would serve as benchmarks for
assessing the current state of community well being. Stakeholders analyzed the study
area base upon each of the established livability standards and assessed a grade for
the areas' performance relative to each standard. The stakeholders then identified the
specific deficiencies that needed to be addressed to improve neighborhood livability and
identified community priorities relative to existing resource deployment and
public/private investment strategies.

During the two planning workshops the consulting team presented educational
information designed to increase the community stakeholders understanding of the
community planning and development process. The stakeholders were then asked to
make specific recommendations regarding physical improvements, development
strategies, design standards, and implementation phasing. Two design charrettes were
conducted to allow community stakeholders review conceptual plans and maps
proposed to guide future development in "The Heart of Boynton."

Stakeholder Identification

The consulting team obtained an initial list of key community stakeholders from City
staff for the purpose of identifying potential participants for stakeholder interviews. The
following groups were interviewed at the start of the planning/economic development
process:

Stakeholder Groups Interviewed:

                  "   Residents
                  "   Property Owners/Landlords

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 21
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


                  "   Service Providers
                  "   Faith Leaders
                  "   CDC Representatives
                  "   CRA Representatives
                  "   Public Housing Agency Representatives
                  "   City Department Representatives
                  "   Law Enforcement Representatives


Stakeholders were asked to identify additional key stakeholders (i.e., civic activists,
business and property owners, faith leaders, etc.) during the interview process.
Meeting notices were mailed to all residents and property owners in the study area, and
the meetings were publicized in the local print media.


Stakeholder Interviews

The stakeholder interviews were designed to elicit specific information about
stakeholder perceptions of current community livability conditions. The data obtained
provided a foundation of relevant base-line information related to key community
livability indicators. Interviews were conducted with key community stakeholders to
obtain background information related to cultural, economic, social, and political factors
that might impact current planning and future development efforts

The consultant team conducted several windshield and walking tours of the study area.
Residents and business owners were interviewed during the tours. The tours
encompassed the entire study area and included informal interviews with community
stakeholders, and inventories and assessments of economic, physical, and social
conditions within the study area.

The following charts provide information gathered by Interviewer group.


Stakeholder Interviews


                      Residents & Other Community Stakeholders
                                  Comments / Responses


           •   There is a strong sense of community in the Heart of Boynton
           •   Long-term residents create a sense of stability
           •   The MLK area has a rich history as a thriving commercial center


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 22
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


           •    Address image and by improving the physical appearance of the
                community
           •    Intensify law enforcement and code enforcement efforts
           •    Reduce or eliminate loitering in front of local businesses
           •    Work to minimize involuntary displacement of current residents during
                redevelopment process
           •    Increase quality and affordability of housing
           •    Address nuisance businesses
           •    Unemployment is a major community problem
           •    There is a need for additional neighborhood serving businesses
           •    Redevelopment plans should maximize area location advantages
           •    Residential areas should be pedestrian oriented
           •    There is a need for additional recreation facilities and activities for
                children


Community Stakeholder Interviews

Consultants interviewed key community stakeholders to obtain input regarding:

            "   Neighborhood Boundaries
            "   Community Leadership and Key Stakeholder Identification
            "   Community Outreach Strategies
            "   Community Strengths, Concerns, and Expectations


                   Major Property Owners & Potential Development Partners
                                   Comments / Responses


         St. Johns CDC:
          • Church Annex construction to be completed by late summer.
          • CDC focus is on support services for MLK residents. Annex can serve
              as service center (approximately half of 32 offices to be utilized for child
              care operation)

         Boynton Beach Faith Based CDC:
          • Would like to develop additional affordable housing in area



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                      Page 23
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


         Boynton Terrace:
          • Substantial renovation of structures is warranted
          • Roof repairs and general maintenance are currently ongoing.
          • The property is a “project-based” HUD facility (HUD subsidized rents not
             transferable)
          • Priority needs include entryway signs, a community center facility and
             improved landscaping.

         Cherry Hills - Housing Authority:
          • Substantial renovation of housing stock warranted
          • Housing Authority willing to explore public/private redevelopment options
             for property

         Business Owners/Investors:
          • Parcel assembly will be critical factor
          • Would like to develop small scale neighborhood serving, mixed use
             commercial corridors on Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard


City Staff Stakeholder Interviews

The consultant team interviewed City staff to obtain input regarding:

                   "   Existing Projects & Plans
                   "   City-Wide Development Goals and Strategies
                   "   Service Delivery Systems
                   "   Specific Challenges in the MLK study area
                   "   Previous Community Planning and Development Strategies
                   "   Resources, Concerns, and Expectations


                                         City Staff
                                    Comments / Responses

         Current Redevelopment Policy and Plans:
          • Predominant character should remain neighborhood residential with
             commercial activity confined to nodes at Seacrest and Federal Highway.
          • Would prefer to integrate additional moderate/ high-end multi-family
             residential units with minimal neighborhood serving mixed-use activity in
             residential areas
          • Plans should be linked with city-wide plans and development goals,
             such as existing plans for a 10 acre park and dock to enhance waterfront
             access, City Centre revitalization , and continued development of
             Federal Highway corridor.


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 24
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


           •   Strong partnerships with CDCs and private development partners are
               critical.
           •   The establishment of clear neighborhood boundaries would facilitate
               community building efforts.

         Crime & Safety:
         • “Real and perceived” crime problems in the MLK District will have to be
            addressed.
         • Loitering around the EZ Mart and Robert’s Diner contribute to negative
            image and actual criminal activity.
         • Bullet resistant street light shields have had a positive impact in Cherry
            Hills.
         • Public Housing units and apartment building are where most criminal
            activity appears to be concentrated.
         • Boynton Terrace is also a major problem from a law enforcement
            perspective.

         Zoning & Land Uses:
         • Zoning overlays may provide a more practical solution in the MLK area
           than rezoning.
         • Existing land use documentation is currently not available.
         • A windshield tour was conducted to evaluate current land uses.

         Code Enforcement:
         • Current policy is complaint driven response, but department is open to
           reviewing other enforcement options
         • Staffing is an issue, relative to enforcement activity
         • Trash on vacant lots and illegal dumping is a major problem
         • Civil citations issued to offenders are used to curtail dumping and offer
           immediate enforcement options, other than liens
         • Lot size limitations and permitting constraints limit infill development
           opportunities.


Kickoff Workshop

A Community Kickoff Meeting was held to announce the planning initiative, review the
planning process, and obtain community input regarding community issues and
concerns. Stakeholders were asked to describe their current impressions of the
neighborhood (i.e., what they valued and, what they would like to change).

This step allowed community stakeholders an opportunity to introduce themselves, and
become acquainted with other workshop participants. More importantly, this exercise
provided an up-front opportunity for community stakeholders to vent their feelings,

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 25
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


regarding the issues, concerns or complaints that were foremost on their mind while
also directing their attention to the things that are good about their neighborhood.

The outcome of the Kickoff session was a list of things that community stakeholders
valued about the neighborhood and a list of issues of concern.

The following page highlights the findings of the Kickoff Workshop held at St. John’s
Church.

                           TOP STRENGTHS OF STUDY AREA:
                       {Order listed does not reflect priory of concern}


       •   Location                            • Wilson Center
       •   Community cohesion                  • Affordable housing
       •   Size                                • Canal
       •   Diversity                           • Potential for development
       •   Community loyalty                   • Schools
       •   Short blocks                        • Home owners
       •   Developable property                • Market potential
       •   Infrastructure in place             • Sense of “home”
       •   Residents care about children       • Rich history
       •   Pedestrian oriented                 • Places of worship
       •   Long-term residents                 • Boynton Blvd., US 1, and Ocean Ave.
       •   Sense of community                     improvements
       •   Close knit families                 • Political voting block
       •   Community gardens



                       MAJOR PROBLEMS IN STUDY AREA:
                  {Order of list does not reflect priory of concerns}


       •   appearance (reinforces image of     •   traffic on Seacrest Blvd.
           unsafe place)                       •   poor access to services
       •   lax code enforcement                •   neglected regarding public resources
       •   crime (drugs, gambling)             •   deteriorating housing stock
       •   loitering (quick shops)             •   inflated property values (speculation)
       •   “hood perception”                   •   fragmentation (lack of community cohesion)
       •   lack of commercial activity         •   negative attitudes
       •   poorly maintained properties        •   absentee landlords
       •   lack of affordable housing          •   poor landscaping
       •   poor access to health services      •   Cherry Hills (physical conditions/crime)
       •   lack of community responsibility    •   Boynton Terrace (physical conditions/crime)
           (civic participation)               •   EZ Mart, Johnsons, Cherry Hills store
       •   lax law enforcement                     (loitering/drug dealing)
       •   insufficient parking


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                           Page 26
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                      DESIRED OUTCOMES:
                       {Order of list does not reflect priory of concerns}



           •   Physical improvements in              •   a unified vision
               Boynton Terrace                       •   pedestrian oriented neighborhoods with
           •   additional sidewalks                      mixed-use development
           •   improved                              •   diversification of incomes
               landscaping/streetscaping             •   additional neighborhood serving businesses
           •   additional/improved recreation        •   grocery store
               facilities                            •   eliminate nuisance properties
           •   accessible health care                •   farmers market
           •   affordable housing (single/multi-     •   expand Head Start facilities
               family)                               •   economic growth
           •   reduced crime                         •   additional job opportunities
           •   mixed use development                 •   improved appearance
           •   public land acquisition to            •   redevelop vacant properties
               facilitate redevelopment              •   improved services
           •   follow through on
               plans/recommendations




                             TOP STRENGTHS OF STUDY AREA:
                         {Order listed does not reflect priority of asset}


           •   diversity                             •   beach access
           •   location                              •   culture
           •   law enforcement                       •   community spirit
           •   home (“sense of place”)               •   individual opportunities
           •   lot of life-long residents (deep      •   small town atmosphere
               roots)                                •   family ties
           •   residents love the area               •   committed City leaders/staff
           •   potential for redevelopment           •   sense of community
           •   decent people                         •   good people
           •   faith institutions                    •   rich heritage
           •   schools                               •   parks and facilities
           •   community forum




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                            Page 27
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                 MAJOR AREAS OF CONCERN:
                      {Order listed does not reflect priority of concern}


           •   insufficient parking                •   lack of civic involvement
           •   inadequate sidewalks                •   inadequate recreation facilities and
           •   inadequate street lights                activities
           •   drugs and related crimes            •   poor property maintenance
           •   lack of neighborhood serving        •   poor landscaping
               businesses                          •   neglected relative to public resources
           •   loitering                           •   inadequate health and social services
           •   illegal dumping                     •   not enough safe places for kids to go
           •   noise/profanity                     •   extensive vacant lots
           •   litter                              •   unclear neighborhood boundaries
           •   traffic on Seacrest Blvd.           •   inadequate signs and gateways
           •   negative image                      •   lost history (pictures/structures
           •   appearance                          •   absentee landlords
           •   need for curfews                    •   distrust of law enforcement
           •   lax law enforcement


Neighborhood Livability Workshop

The Team conducted a Livability Workshop with community stakeholders designed to: 1)
develop community consensus on livability standards; 2) assess how well the community is
currently performing, relative to those standards; and, 3) set clear community priorities and
focus stakeholder input on issues that are critical to enhancing community livability. This
workshop engaged neighborhood stakeholders in a series of exercises and dialogue
sessions designed to develop a collective "community vision" and to identify the essential
ingredients needed to strengthen and preserve their neighborhood as a healthy, livable
community consistent with the collective vision. The workshop was intended to quickly set
clear community priorities and focus citizen input on those issues and concerns that they
identified as being critical to the improved livability of their community. Those community
priorities became the foundation for the community redevelopment plan.

Neighborhood Livability Standards:
The facilitator reviewed a list of Livable Neighborhoods indicators with stakeholders and
obtained consensus within the group to utilize the indicators as guiding standards for
assessing neighborhood livability.

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                          Page 28
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Assessing Current Neighborhood Performance:

This step was intended to identify and confirm what participants saw as the critical
ingredients of a truly healthy and livable neighborhood – what social, economic and
physical elements were critical to ensuring that their neighborhood is one where residents
and visitors can safely and productively enjoy everyday life. Residents graded the study
area according to how well they thought it was performing according to each of the priority
essential ingredients; the scores helped to identify significant “livability gaps” in the
community that can be focal points for future action planning and resource mobilization.

Setting Priorities:
This step provided an opportunity for community stakeholders to offer ideas and solutions
to address neighborhood livability gaps (i.e., to raise the grades on each of the standards to
an acceptable level). It was utilized to define and prioritize essential ingredients for
neighborhood improvement; this provided the framework for developing action plan
recommendations in the next phase of the planning process.

The following summarizes the Livability Workshop (Charrette) Findings:



       Neighborhood essential ingredient deficiencies identified by community
                                   stakeholders


       Public Safety
       Neighbors watch out for each other & enjoy a sense of security within their homes & neighborhood.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Increased Law Enforcement
           a. Illegal Drug Trafficking & Use
           b. Loitering
           c. Speeding/Traffic Violations
       2. Code Enforcement
           a. Illegal Dumping
           b. Vacant Buildings
       3. Increased Community Involvement
           a. Neighborhood Watch


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                               Page 29
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


       4. Infrastructure Improvements
           a. Street Lights
           b. Traffic Calming Devices
           c. Traffic Signal at Seacrest/M.L.K. Intersection
       5. Improved Sanitation Services
           a. Garbage Collection
           b. Removal of debris from vacant lots


       Neighborhood-Serving Businesses
       Nearby businesses offer local jobs along with products & services for everyday life.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Medical Care Facility
       2. Grocery Store
       3. Professional Offices
       4. Gas Station
       5. Restaurants, Pharmacy, Dry Cleaners, Discount Shop


       Pride Of Place & Property
       Residents & property owners invest time & money towards maintaining & enhancing their homes &
       neighborhood.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Increased Code Enforcement
           a. Community Appearance Code
       2. Improved maintenance of rental properties
       3. Increased home ownership
       4. Neighborhood Association
       5. Gateways & Landscaping

       Parks & Open Space
       Ample parks & open space are accessible to residents for recreation & celebration.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. After School Programs
       2. Park Improvements
           a. Pavilions
           b. Restrooms

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                Page 30
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


           c.   Playgrounds
       3. Year Round Pool Access
       4. Improved Security
           a. Curfews/Patrols/Lighting
       5. Organized Sports Programs

       Neighborhood-Oriented Schools
       Quality public schools are physically & socially connected to the neighborhood & nearby civic
       facilities.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Use facilities for other programs
       2. Consider Charter School

       Pedestrian & Bicycle Connections
       A network of walkways & bicycle routes provides residents with safe alternatives to auto travel.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Additional Sidewalks
       2. Increased Law Enforcement
       3. Street Lights
       4. Shade Trees
       5. Bike Paths

       Accommodations for Automobiles
       Public & private parking facilities ensure a place for cars & cars in their place.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Improved Parking
                       th    th
           a. N.E. 12 , 13 Streets
                       th
           b. N.W. 6 Avenue
           c.   Wilson Center
       2. Traffic/Speeding
           a. Seacrest
       3. Eliminate abandoned cars




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                  Page 31
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


       Civic & Spiritual Institutions
       Nearby civic facilities & spiritual centers offer residents community services & worship opportunities.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Increase faith community involvement
       2. Improve existing facilities
           a. Wilson Center Complex
       3. Develop civic meeting/gathering space
       4. Provide additional academic programs

       Infill Development Activity
       Infill development & redevelopment offers new commerce & housing options that enhance
       neighborhood character.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Review & update zoning ordinances
       2. Develop vacant lots
       3. Rehabilitate or eliminate vacant structures

       Mass Transit
       Nearby transit services provide residents with alternative travel options & reduce automobile traffic.

       ESSENTIAL INGREDIENTS:

       1. Bus Shelters
       2. Increased awareness of available services


Major Actions needed include:

                    Law Enforcement (74 votes)                   Community Center (33 votes)
                    Code Enforcement (57 votes)                  Park Improvements (32 votes)
                    Medical Clinic (43 votes)                    Housing Improvements (28 votes)
                    Increase Community Involvement               Infill Development (21 votes)
                     (39 votes)
                    Zoning Changes (36 votes)                    School Involvement (15 votes)
                    Need for job creation and training.


An important part of the Livability Workshop is to get the Stakeholders to rank the relative
condition of their community. A survey was given to the participants and later analyzed by
the Consultant Team. The findings of this self assessment are show on the following page.



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                    Page 32
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan



                         Neighborhood Livability Workshop
                                               REPORT CARD

 LIVABILITY STANDARD                                             GRADE

                                                                 D-
 Public Safety
 Neighbors watch out for each other & enjoy a sense of
 security within their homes & neighborhood.
                                                                                GRADE SCALE
                                                                         The essential ingredients for this
 Neighborhood-Serving Business Districts
 Nearby businesses offer local jobs along with products &
                                                                 D-             standard are:
 services for everyday life.
                                                                         A=      exceptionally high
                                                                                 presence & quality in
 Pride Of Place & Property                                                       neighborhood
 Residents & property owners invest time & money towards
 maintaining & enhancing their homes & neighborhood.
                                                                 D+      B=      strong presence &
                                                                                 quality, although
 Parks & Open Space                                                              specific areas may need
 Ample parks & open space are accessible to residents for        C-              some attention
 recreation & celebration.
                                                                         C=      moderate presence &
 Neighborhood- Oriented Schools
 Quality public schools are physically & socially connected to
                                                                 C               quality but there is a
                                                                                 need for improvement
 the neighborhood & nearby civic facilities.
                                                                         D=      minimal presence &
 Pedestrian & Bicycle Connections                                                quality and there is a
                                                                                 need for substantial
                                                                 D+
 A network of walkways & bicycle routes provides residents
 with safe alternatives to auto travel.                                          improvement

 Accommodations For The Automobile                                       F=      virtually no presence or
 Public & private parking facilities ensure a place for cars &
 cars in their place.
                                                                 D+              quality in neighborhood


 Civic & Spiritual Institutions
 Nearby civic facilities & spiritual centers offer residents     D+
 community services & worship opportunities.

 Infill Development Activity
 Infill development & redevelopment offers new commerce &        D-
 housing options that enhance neighborhood character.

 Mass Transit
 Nearby transit services provide residents with alternative
                                                                 C-
 travel options & reduce automobile




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                Page 33
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


New Neighborhood Delineation
During the charrette (extensive public participation) process, the residents were asked to
delineate the current neighborhoods within “The Heart of Boynton”. Out of this process
seven functional neighborhoods were identified. The neighborhoods with the study area
are delineated in Figure 9.

As previously mentioned, a major factor in the redevelopment area is the elimination of the
Cherry Hills Public Housing and redeveloping the Northwest Quadrant as a new
Neighborhood – “Poinciana Heights”. The two remaining neighborhoods in the western
part of Heart of Boynton maintain their historic continuity as Ridgewood and Boynton Hills.

The eastern half of the study area consolidated the Northeastern Quadrant as the new
expanded Martin Luther King, Jr. Neighborhood. The existing neighborhoods were
retained but participants felt that because not enough representation from the other
neighborhoods no major planning effort could be done with respect to naming etc.

The findings of the Planning Charrette follow:


                                  Recommendations for commercial revitalization
                                  activities.

Last 2 charrettes pointed to the desire/need for a host of neighborhood/community services
including:

       $   Medical Facilities
       $   Grocery Store
       $   Professional Offices
       $   Gas Station
       $   Restaurants
       $   Pharmacy
       $   Dry Cleaners
       $   Discount Shops

The group agreed that the only potential for community and neighborhood levels of service
was on Martin Luther King, Blvd. and the only place for mixed-use development was the
Southeast Quadrant.

Problem for these types of development is that no land parcels of sufficient size are
available for any amount of developable space. Commercial developments require parking
(usually 4 per 1,000 ft. with restaurants requiring more).

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 34
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 35
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                   Recommendations for Neighborhoods and Gateways

The group reviewed the 15+ neighborhoods and recommended 7 neighborhoods, 3 west of
Seacrest Boulevard and four east of Seacrest (as noted above, the stakeholders did not
feel that enough local participation from the three southern neighborhoods to warrant
strong planning positions regarding these neighborhoods).

Recommendations

Western Neighborhoods:

       $ Poinciana Heights
       $ Boynton Hills
       $ Ridgewood

This western portion of the study area was seen as a predominately single family
residential area (R-1) with only a small area of commercial allowed (south of 10th at
Seacrest). Stakeholders suggested closure of the road bordering the northside of EZ Mart
and redeveloping area into a neighborhood commercial use.

Poinciana Heights was a major change from the existing neighborhood structure.
Stakeholders called for the redevelopment of the old Cherry Hills Public Housing and
surrounding developments and to capitalize on the Poinciana School and new Wilson
Center image to reinvigorate this newly expanded neighborhood.

The neighborhoods of Boynton Hills and Ridgewood called for the stabilization of each
area. The moving of Boynton Terrace Apartments from Boynton Hills was recommended
(moved to east of Seacrest).

The stakeholders strongly endorsed development of linear park along C-16 and south
along I-95 to Galaxy Elementary.

Gateways (2 each) were recommended for each neighborhood and traffic calming features
were identified (sidewalks, parking at Barton Park and several stop signs).

Eastern Neighborhoods

       $ Martin Luther King, Jr.
       $ Boynton Terrace
       $ Shepard Addition
Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                               Page 36
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


       $ Industrial (1st/FEC)

The group did not feel comfortable with naming the neighborhoods. Martin Luther King
Neighborhood was seen as mostly residential with commercial at each end node of MLK
Boulevard (Seacrest and FEC/Federal). This was in conflict with the group at large and
past study efforts which define MLK as more of a neighborhood/commercial linear center
with restaurants, shops etc.

Shepard Addition was another area of conflict between the earlier finding of the group at
large (and summary findings at close) for the need to assemble parcels for commercial
mixed uses.

Commercial Developments discussed included:

       $   Restaurants
       $   Professional Offices
       $   Medical Facilities
       $   Grocery Store
       $   Vocational Training
       $   Home Based Businesses
       $   Gym
       $   Shops and Beauty/Barber
       $   (Remove EZ mart)

Gateways and traffic calming features were identified.

Recommendations to improve traffic flow, parking, and pedestrian routes.

Eastside issues:

       $   Congestion @ 9th/Seacrest
       $   Limit City Vehicles to East @ NE 9th Street
       $   Slow traffic @ MLK, 13th
       $   Parking on MLK (street)
       $   Make parking ordinance more flexible
       $   Centralize parking 10th/11th
       $   Add Signs “ Slow Children”
       $   Stop Sign 6th/1st E/W
       $   Limit Parking to 1 side on 13th, 12th and 11th.
       $   Setback changes
       $   Maintain alleys (encourage rear parking)


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                Page 37
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Westside issues:

   $ Sidewalks on 3rd and 4th (Ridgewood)
   $ Stop signs in Poinciana Heights
   $ Close road north of EZ Mart

Recommendations for Parks/Green Spaces & Civic Centers

   $   Continue Canal Park to I-95 then south to Galaxy School
   $   Parking at Barton Park
   $   Improve Wilson Center
   $   Add benches to parks
   $   Plant shade trees
   $   Add water fountains
   $   Add Garden @4th/1st and 6th/1st.

As part of past redevelopment planning efforts, the City constructed a park (Palmetto Park)
on the C-16 Canal from the FEC railroad tracts to Seacrest Boulevard. As part of its
ongoing planning efforts, the Recreational Department has developed conceptual plans to
extend the park west of Seacrest. The stakeholders overwhelming endorsed the concept
as well as its continuation south to Galaxy School.

Figures 10 and 11 show the conceptual plans for the western extension.

The redevelopment of Wilson Center and its ball field and pool is a critical part of the
overall redevelopment of the Heart of Boynton. The city has committed to the conceptual
planning of this Center and the planning contract is expected to be approved before the
end of 2001. A conceptual diagram of one alternative is shown in Figure 12.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 38
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 39
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 40
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 41
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan



Recommendations for Land Use & Zoning

   $ Approved of new proposed zoning ordinance to grandfather smaller/older lot
     configuration east of the Interstate
   $ Approved of Floribbean Architectural Design Standard
   $ Approved of Continuing Ocean Avenue Streetscape concept into Heart of Boynton


Recommendations for Streetscapes

The stakeholders felt that major streetscape work on Seacrest Boulevard is needed and to
a lesser extent on Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard, east of Seacrest Boulevard.
Illustrations for the Streetscape of Seacrest can be found in Figures 18 through 21 found
later in this report.


Opportunities to Redevelopment
The Heart of Boynton has numerous inherent opportunities that should assist in its
redevelopment and shown in Figure 13: (1) History, (2) Location, (3) Schools, (4) CDCs,
(5) Residents, (6) CRA and City commitment, and (7) a large number of churches.

                                         History

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard corridor (10th Avenue) has a long history as a
regional African American entertainment and commercial corridor (due in large part to
segregation prior to the 1960’s). Furthermore, the study area also includes the historic
Boynton Hills development with its unique use of “round abouts”, a feature that has just
started to be reinvented by communities throughout the country.

                                         Location

Geographic location is one of Heart of Boynton’s biggest advantages. Its favorable location
with respect to I-95, Federal Highway, Seacrest Boulevard (access to Gateway), proximity
to the inter-coastal waterway and the ocean and the City’s emerging CBD are all critical
locations that give this area a competitive edge. Boynton Beach Boulevard serves as one
of two access points to the interstate for this portion of the City as well as Ocean Ridge.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 42
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 43
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                         Schools

The Heart of Boynton is home to two (2) excellent elementary schools: Poinciana and
Galaxy. Poinciana the newer of the two is a magnet school specializing in math and
technology. The study area also has a Head Start Center catering to the areas children.

                                         Community Development Corporations

Another major advantage to the redevelopment of Heart of Boynton are its two (2)
Community Development Corporations (CDCs): (1) Boynton Beach Faith Based
Community Development Corporation and (2) R.M. Lee Community Development Center,
Inc.

The Boynton Beach Faith Based CDC has been extremely active in the community in
providing both leadership and assisting in supplying housing in the study area. It also
serves as the community’s only Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO).

R.E. Lee CDC was originally involved in assisting in the creation of housing but has
changed its focus to be more service oriented. The R.E. Lee CDC has constructed a multi-
use two building, two floor facility including large multi-use room, and 30 classrooms. The
facility is expected to house a much needed day care facility and serve as the possible
location for a Health Clinic.

                                         Residents

The study area contains a large and active resident population that has actively participated
in the planning efforts to reinvigorate this historic community. As stated earlier in this
report, over 400 people gave of their time in participating in the charrettes/workshops for
this planning effort alone.

                                         City and CRA Commitments

The City has made a commitment to improve the entire CRA area and in particular the
Heart of Boynton. The city has torn down several dilapidated buildings, created small
urban gardens, improved water and sewer lines and built Palmetto Park (these represent
only a part of the City’s past and ongoing efforts).




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 44
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                         Churches

Heart of Boynton contains 18 churches covering a wide range of denominations. The
location of these churches in the study area has both positive and negative impacts.
Churches represent an important source of leadership if church leaders can form an active
Ministerial Alliance (which has yet to develop). On the negative side, there are probably
too many churches located in such a small area. The churches do not contribute
advalorem or TIF moneys to the CRA and several churches are in violation of parking
requirements and other LDRs and several are in need of major façade improvements.

Constraints to Redevelopment
Constraints are largely confined to a limited number of issues: (1) Cherry Hills Public
Housing (and its image to the entire area), (2) Boynton Terrace, (3) Small commercial
businesses catering to these two developments (EZ Mart, etc.), lack of developable
acreage, and (5) upkeep of vacant parcels and general code enforcement.

                                         Cherry Hills Public Housing

Cherry Hills is the single largest impediment to the redevelopment of Heart of Boynton.
The area is a major center of crime, the aesthetics are bad, and the general image is that of
a “hood” which permeates the entire area. Conversations are been held with the Palm
Beach Public Housing Authority to enable the City to take over the Project. Under that
plan, residents would be given Section 8 vouchers to obtain housing elsewhere, and the
City would demolish the projects buildings and according to this redevelopment plan replat
the area to accommodate a large parcel size. As discussed earlier and again in the next
section, with the removal of Cherry Hills, a new neighborhood will be developed -
“Poinciana Heights” using both the magnet Poinciana Elementary school and a
redeveloped Wilson Center as its center-piece.

                                         Boynton Terrace

Boynton Terrace is a project based Section 8 Housing Project located on either side of
Seacrest Boulevard. As mentioned earlier, the western complex does not fit into the single
family neighborhood of the historic Boynton Hills development. The complex is under
pressure by HUD to improve its facilities and overall management.

                                         Small Commercial Business Problems

Several small commercial businesses (including EZ Mart, Cherry Hill Store, etc.) primarily
serve Cherry Hills and Boynton Terrace and serve as major loitering areas and centers for

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 45
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


criminal activity. Most of the sites located west of Seacrest would not be compatible with
the new low-density residential character of “Poinciana Heights”.

                                           Lack of Developable Land

While the area has a significant amount of vacant parcels most are 5,000 – 10,000 square
feet in size with no existing parcel exceed 2 acres. Therefore without assemblage no large
scale redevelopment is possible.

The following is representative of the land requirements for several types of development:




                                 Retail Opportunities
                     • Neighborhood Center (provide goods for
                       day to day living and personal services)
                       include grocery, laundry, dry-cleaning, hair-
                       styling, shoe repair - used to include
                       pharmacy
                         –   Average Size -- 30,000 - 100,000 leaseable
                         –   Average Acreage -- 3 to 10 acres
                         –   Rule of thumb - 10,000 sq. ft per acre
                         –   Trade area 11/2 mile circle, 5-10 minutes drive




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 46
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                 Retail Opportunities
                     • Community Center usually anchored by
                       discount store
                         – Average Size -- 100,000 - 300,000 leaseable
                         – Average Acreage -- 10 to 30 acres
                         – Trade area 3-5 mile circle, 10-20 minutes drive




                                           OFFICE
                     • Small office users
                         –   16,000 - 20,000 square feet
                         –   Bldg usually 100 ft wide, 200 ft long
                         –   Parking 4 spaces per 1,000 sq.ft.
                         –   Medical require 6-7 spaces per 1,000 sq.ft.
                         –   Typical parking space - 300-350 sq.ft.
                         –   10,000 sq.ft office -- 1 acre




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                               Page 47
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                 APARTMENTS
                     •   Average size -- 150-200 units
                     •   Average acreage -- 8-12 acres
                     •   Townhouse, 1 story apartment -- 10-15 acre
                     •   Two-story garden apartments -- 20-30 acre
                     •   Three-story -- up to 40 units per acre




Neighborhood Concept Plan
The Heart of Boynton Concept Plan is based on the creation and stabilization of seven
neighborhoods. The western portion of the redevelopment area will contain three single
family neighborhoods (the new Poinciana Heights, Boynton Hills and Ridgewood). The
western half of Heart of Boynton will be centered on a revitalized Boynton Hills, a new
Poinciana Heights neighborhood, a redesigned Wilson Center and an expansion of
Palmetto Park linking the area from Galaxy School to the existing Palmetto Park located
east of Seacrest Boulevard.

As shown in Figure 14, each neighborhood would have two (2) entrance gateways with
new signage to identify the neighborhood. Several traffic calming elements (sidewalk and
stop signs) have been identified.

The eastern portion of the Heart of Boynton becomes a mixed use development
incorporating a range of multi-family developments on either side of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Boulevard, and single family homes on 13th and 12th Avenues. While the neighborhood
plans currently include Boynton Terrace and Shepard Addition as established
neighborhoods with gateways and traffic calming, the redevelopment Master Plan calls for

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 48
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 49
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




this area to develop into an expansion of a new CBD based on redeveloping the
Government Center to the south.

Land Assembly

The redevelopment plan is based on major redevelopment of three major areas within the
Study Area. To accomplish the redevelopment, land assembly will be required. Cherry
Hills area will have to be assembled to allow for replatting and redevelopment as a
traditional single family neighborhood similar in concept to Ridgewood.

The second major assembly action will be within the Martin Luther King, Jr. Corridor. This
will be required to redevelop the area as a multi-family neighborhood allowing for increased
housing and population to support possible neighborhood services. This includes the
redevelopment of the City’s Public Works parcel allowing for more depth in the
redevelopment of this neighborhood.

The last section is the southeast quadrant which appears to have competitive advantage as
an area for the expansion and creation of a new CBD for the City of Boynton Beach. As
alluded to earlier in this report, a major negative feature of the current structure of Heart of
Boynton is lack of developable parcels (10+acres). Because of the area’s strategic
location, the southeast quadrant has creditable mixed use potential assuming the
redevelopment of the Government Center as part of a new CBD.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                      Page 50
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 51
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Proposed Future Land Use Plan

The following graphic (Figure 16) depicts the future land use of the Heart of Boynton and
as such represents the Redevelopment Master Plan for the Study Area. As discussed
above, this Future Land Use Plan is the result of incorporating the Land Use changes
requested by the stakeholders of Heart of Boynton. It is this Plan (map) that will be
adopted by the CRA and City and that the City will use to amend its Growth Management
Plan.


Proposed Zoning

Figure 17 translates the Future Land Use into a new Zoning Map for the Heart of Boynton.
The City, once the Future Land Use Plan has been adopted, will amend its zoning map to
incorporate (implement) the zoning changes recommended in this Report.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                Page 52
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 53
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 54
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




URBAN DESIGN CONCEPTS

The Urban Design concept adopted by the stakeholders evolved through numerous
planning efforts in the area over the last 15+ years. The history of the area, particularly
Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard (10th Avenue), and the recent growth of Caribbean
residents into the area was a strong rationale for the adoption of an “Old Florida” and
“Caribbean” influence. This new design concept labeled “ Floribbean” was overwhelming
approved as the preferred choice for design standards.

The following section provides an overview of the new Floribbean Design Concepts.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 55
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                  Floribbean Architectural Guidelines




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                          Page 56
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan



Attribute #1 – Metal roofing materials




Attribute #2 – Pastel colors: pink, white, yellow, grey and blue

Attribute #3 – Steep pitched gabled and hiped roofs




Attribute #4 – Dormer windows




Attribute #5 – Wood frame construction




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                     Page 57
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Attribute #6– Low pitched porch roofs




Attribute #7– Exposed truss work




Attribute #8 – Simple wood railings




Attribute #9 – Simple wood trim




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 58
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


    Floribbean Design Style – Traditional:




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 59
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




       Floribbean Design Style – Contemporary Interpretation:




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                  Page 60
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Façade Composition

Building facades play a basic role in the visual
makeup of the business district. Storefronts, signs,
window displays, and color are all integral elements
of the design. Collectively improved, these elements
create visual order. The façade should be
intentionally designed to integrate storefront, sign
and window display space into the overall fabric of
the building exterior. As individual buildings stand
side by side, visual harmony is created by the similar
structural components of buildings of various styles,
age and appearance. Over the years, isolated changes
on facades, storefronts, and signs have altered their
visual relationships and have led – in part – to the
physical and visual disorder common on today’s
commercial business district.

With proper design attention, a building’s
appearance from the street can be improved.
Attractive individual commercial structures and
signs, both old and new, are the basic building blocks
of visual order. Improving building facades and signs
will go a long way towards bringing visual harmony
to the business district.

It serves the business community’s own best interests
to see that independent improvements are compatible
in design with the overall goals of an improved
business district. Improving the business district
today will require care, planning, and a cooperative
effort if additional changes are to indeed make any          Storefront:
measurable difference.                                   A. Building Cornice
                                                         B. Storefront Cornice Frieze
                                                         C. Transom
                                                         D. Pilasters
                                                         E. Kick Panels
                                                         F. Lintel
                                                         G. Sill




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                          Page 61
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Rhythm




Rhythm – A building’s rhythm is created by an ordered recurrent alteration of strong and weak architectural elements.

Proportion




Proportion – A building’s proportions are created by the relationships between the neight and width of the building and
its architectural elements.

Scale




Scale – A building’s scale is created by the size of the units of construction and architectural details in relationship to the
size of humans.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                                 Page 62
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Streetscape Concepts
An important part of the redevelopment of the study area is to improve the Seacrest
corridor by providing major streetscape improvements including a planted median and
extensive lighting and signage.

The following graphics incorporate the existing Ocean Avenue theme (street lighting and
banners) into a new proposed streetscape for both Seacrest Boulevard and MLK, Jr. Blvd.
(10th avenue).




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                              Page 63
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 64
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 65
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 66
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 67
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Design Standards




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 68
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 69
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




ILLUSTRATIVE MASTER PLAN




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 70
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 71
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 72
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 73
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 74
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 75
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM


The implementation program addresses the six major elements of this redevelopment
program: (1) Adoption of the Master Plan and Schedule, (2) Neighborhood Formation and
Empowerment, (3) Cherry Hills Redevelopment (4) Seacrest Boulevard and Martin Luther
King, Jr. Boulevard Streetscape Improvements, and (5) Land Assembly.

Master Plan Adoption
The adoption of the Master Plan will necessitate several immediate actions.

                          Action                           Responsibility     Timeframe
          Adoption of Master Plan                      City Staff             End 2001
                                                       CRA
                                                       City Commission
          Amend City’s Future Land Use Plan            City Staff             Mid 2002
                                                       City Commission
          Approve Design Standards                     City Commission/CRA    End 2001
          Amend City’s Zoning Map                      City Staff             2002
                                                       City Commission


Master Plan Implementation Actions

                           Action                         Responsibility      Timeframe
          Cherry Hills Redevelopment                  County Public           2002
            Agreement for City to take over Cherry    Housing Director
            Hills Public Housing                      City Manager
                                                      City Commission
              Secure Section 8 Vouchers for residents County Public
                                                      Housing
              Begin Planning Study/Replat Study       City Staff/Consultant   2002
              Financial/Cost Study                    City Staff/Consultant   2003
                                                                              early 2002



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                Page 76
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                          Action                          Responsibility        Timeframe
          Neighborhood Formation
            Continue Leadership Form                   City Staff/Consultant   2001
            Form Neighborhood Associations             City/Residents/CDCs     2002
            Elect Neighborhood Leadership              Neighborhoods           2002
            Gateway signage                            Neighborhoods/City
                                                       staff                   2002
             Façade Grants                             CDC/City Staff          2002+
             Neighborhood Grants                       CDC/City                2002+
            Traffic Calming                            City staff              2002+
             Homeownership Program                     CDC/City/County         immediate
          Wilson Center Redevelopment                  City staff/Consultant   2002
            Select Consultant                                                  immediate
             Prepare Plan
             Select Developer/Construction                                     late 2002
          Palmetto Park Expansion
             Seacrest to Interstate 95 Plans           City staff              2002 (started)
             C-16 to Galaxy Plans                      City staff              2002
             Construction (Seacrest/I95)                                       2003
             Construction (to Galaxy)                                          2003+
          Seacrest Boulevard Conceptual Plans          County/City             2002+
            Secure agreement to begin study
          MLK, Jr. Streetscape Plans                   City Staff/consultant   2002
          Land Assembly                                CRA/City staff
            Old Cherry Hill Neighborhood (Tax Liens)                           2002
             MLK (tax Liens)                                                   2002
             Shepard Addition (tax Liens)                                      2002
             Public Works (start relocation study)                             2002
             Plan for assemblage of old Cherry Hills                           2002
              Including Relocation study
             Plan for assemblage of MLK                                        early 2002
             Plan for assemblage of Shepard                                    in conjunction
             Addition                                                          with CBD
                                                                               planning
             Cherry Hill Assemblage                                            2003+
             MLK assemblage                                                    2002+
             Shepard Addition assemblage                                       2003+
          The two existing Community Development City staff                    immediate
          Corporations (Boynton Beach Faith Based
          CDC and R.E. Lee CDC) currently play

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 77
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


          critical roles in the redevelopment of the
          area and under this redevelopment plan will
          continue to be critical partners in the
          Redevelopment Process.               Currently,
          Boynton Beach Faith Based CDC is the
          most active of the two. Its primary focus is
          creating new homeownership within the
          area. Given the need for land assemblage,
          it is critical that new housing be constructed
          within the community to house those
          relocated. The primary target area for this
          type of new residential development will be
          in the northern portion of the Martin Luther
          King Neighborhood.

          The R.E. Lee CDC is reestablishing itself
          as a service based CDC initially utilizing the
          building it built behind St. Johns Church.
          This facility could house a Public Health
          Clinic, Day Care and other public service
          uses.

         Finally, as discussed later, CDC’s play an
         important role in accessing federal and
         state grants as well as provide job training
         and employment opportunities.
              Garbage


The City will need to amend its Growth Management Plan to reflect changes to the Future
Land Use Plan. After the City’s Future Land Use amendment has been approved, the City
will need to approve the Zoning changes recommended in this Master Plan.

The adoption of the Heart of Boynton Master Plan will also serve as approval to the new
adopted Design Standards for the area. The following provide a short discussion of the
steps required to implement the Master Plan.

Neighborhood Organization Process
The City has retained the services of a consultant to assist the Heart of Boynton develop
the necessary leadership and empowerment skills to form Neighborhood Associations with
effective leadership.

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                Page 78
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Once Neighborhood Associations have been formed, the City/CRA should assist the
Associations plan and construct signage at the approved gateways. The CRA, CDC, City
staff and the Neighborhood Associations should work together to secure grants for a host
of needs: Homeownership, Housing Improvement, Landscaping, etc. The City already has
effective programs in place as a starting point.

The leadership process should be expanded to include the development of a Ministerial
Alliance of the 18 churches in the area (as well as other nearby churches who share
congregations). These Alliances have proved very effective in other communities by
increasing awareness, providing manpower and leadership, as well as “marketing” a
revitalized neighborhood to their extended congregation.

Role of Community Development Corporations
(CDCs)
The two existing Community Development Corporations (Boynton Beach Faith Based CDC
and R.E. Lee CDC) currently play critical roles in the redevelopment of the area and under
this redevelopment plan will continue to be critical partners in the Redevelopment Process.
Currently, Boynton Beach Faith Based CDC is the most active of the two. Its primary focus
is creating new homeownership within the area. Given the need for land assemblage, it is
critical that new housing be constructed within the community to house those relocated.
The primary target area for this type of new residential development will be in the northern
portion of the Martin Luther King Neighborhood.

The R.E. Lee CDC is reestablishing itself as a service based CDC initially utilizing the
building it built behind St. Johns Church. This facility could house a Public Health Clinic,
Day Care and other public service uses.

Finally, as discussed later, CDC’s play an important role in accessing federal and state
grants as well as provide job training and employment opportunities.

Cherry Hills
Because of the negative impact that the Cherry Hills development has on the entire area, it
is important that timely agreements can be reached for the City to take over the Public
Housing and that the County issue Section 8 vouchers as early as mid 2002. As soon as it
becomes widely known that this area is being cleaned up, the quicker the market can
respond to Ridgewood and Boynton Hills. Lastly, it is important that the name Cherry Hills
be eliminated and replaced with Poinciana Heights (can not be done prior to removal of
Public Housing Project).


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 79
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Boynton Terrace
Like Cherry Hills, Boynton Terrace as currently configured is a negative factor in the overall
image of the Community. Based on interviews, it appears that the Project is in financial
difficulties and the HUD is reviewing its commitment to this Project based Section 8
development. Regardless of its funding outcome, steps need to be taken to either entirely
remove the western complex or move those units to the east (absorbed as part of the
higher density multifamily housing planned for this part of Heart of Boynton.


Seacrest Boulevard and Martin Luther King, Jr.
Streetscape
The importance of a renewed Seacrest Boulevard, with its northern linkage to Gateway can
not be overstated. With major landscaping including a planted median (as shown earlier),
Seacrest Boulevard becomes the dominate feature of the economic renewal of the
community. Equally important is the need for streetscape improvements to MLK, Jr.
Boulevard. The consultant suggests that the streetscape design be part of a whole
redevelopment strategy of the corridor.        As discussed later in this section, the
redevelopment program calls for major land assemblage by the CRA. Using successful
techniques from other communities, it is suggested that the CRA place a Developer RFP or
RFQ to enlist the skills of a proven developer to plan and develop the entire MLK corridor
(as a multifamily community).

Land Assemblage
As repeatedly mentioned throughout this report, lack of available land for development is
major implement to redeveloping the area. The large number of small land parcels makes
it impossible for a private developer to assemble acreage in sufficient size to economically
develop larger scale projects in the community. As already discussed, three major land
assemblage areas are envisioned in the area: Old Cherry Hills, MLK, Jr. Blvd, and Shepard
Addition. These assemblages will require CRA action that might include the use of eminent
domain should traditional assemblage techniques fail.

The redevelopment of MLK, Jr. Boulevard neighborhood will also require CRA/City
assistance in the development of “financial/developer” packages and incentive programs
including Section 108 grants etc. These conceptual incentive packages should be
developed prior to land assemblage and any “developer offerings”.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 80
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, IDENTIFICATION OF INCENTIVES FOR
ECONOMIC EXPANSION AND RECRUITMENT OF BUSINESSES

Economic development is a process and approach used to create jobs, assets, and an
investment climate in distressed neighborhoods and cannot be separated from community
development. Economic development impacts and is impacted by key social and political
factors in a community ranging from access to quality education and social services to the
availability of decent and affordable housing. When economic development is viewed as an
important element of a larger community development strategy, significant progress can
occur.


Economic Development
The public participation process documented the need for increased economic
development opportunities for local residents. The single biggest issue raised during the
charrette/workshop process was for training. While the County does provide training
through its Workforce Development Agency, the closest facility is in Delray Beach. As is
the case in most inter-city neighborhoods, transportation access is the single biggest
impediment to both training and employment.

The economic development strategy for this area will require a multiple task approach:
localized training, access to job opportunities, and localized job development.

The State of Florida’s Agency for Workforce Innovation provides information on labor force,
employment and unemployment at a geographic level as low as a Census Tract. As shown
on page 11, the Heart of Boynton encompasses approximately 60% of the land area of
Census Tract 61, but in terms of population it represents a slightly higher percentage as is
also the case for unemployment. The overall Census Tract had a 2000 annual
unemployment count of 288 and an unemployment rate of 8.2 percent (compared to the
City’s 4.5% unemployment rate). It is safe to assume that most of the 288 unemployed
persons reside within the Heart of Boynton as therefore its unemployment rate is closer to
10%. Furthermore this rate does not include persons unemployed but not considered to be
within the Labor Force which if identified could increase the unemployment count

Training
A major impediment to providing training within the Heart of Boynton is the lack of available
meeting/training space. There currently are three possible solutions to the lack of training
space/facilities: A redeveloped Wilson Center, a community center within Boynton Terrace,
and use of the St. John facilities. The principal of Poinciana Elementary has offered its
services to provide off site tutoring. With proper facilities a number of state and charitable

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 81
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


organization exist (including the CDCs) to assist in providing necessary skill and motivation
training to the area’s unemployed and under-employed.

These same facilities can be used as a job clearinghouse in conjunction with the County’s
Workforce Development Board to schedule job interview, provide skill identification, etc.




Job Creation

The area currently has a limited number of jobs available with in the area, as the
community is largely residential by design with the exception of the industrial area
bordering the FEC tracks.

Job creation within the area can be developed in three major areas: micro enterprises,
creation of service and office developments/jobs, and construction employment.

                                         Micro Enterprise

Micro Enterprises are usually single entrepreneurial efforts that can be housed in existing
residents. Examples of successful micro enterprises in distressed neighborhoods include:
African or Caribbean clothing design, photography, leather crafts, catering, carpentry,
landscaping, and pest control. One of the fastest growing and successful programs
supported by grants was training of inner city minority residents to become Web page
designers.   This later effort could be developed with tutoring help for Poinciana
Elementary.

                                         Day Care and other Support

As pointed out during the charrettes, the area is need of day care and other support
services including a public health clinic. Both of these services, which could be co-located
within the R.E. Lee CDC facilities, can assist residents seeking employment as well as offer
local employment opportunities.

                                         Service and Office Development

Job opportunities are currently limited, as the community is largely residential by design.
The only employment node are the industrial properties along the FEC railroad tracks. The
master plan does allocate a limited amount of service commercial at three nodes (on
Seacrest Blvd south of 10th Avenue and at either end of MLK, Jr. Boulevard (at Seacrest
and at Federal Highway).        These sites have very limited employment generation
Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 82
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


opportunities. The greatest potential for local job growth will be in the expansion of the
CBD into the Shepard Addition neighborhood. The Master Plan calls for the redevelopment
of this 30+ acre area into a light mixed use area. Types of businesses that could locate
within the area include a full range of retail businesses, general office and other typical
small city CBD oriented firms/businesses.


Incentives
The Boynton Beach CRA/City has significant tools to assist the Heart of Boynton in
redevelopment. The following discussion provides an overview of some of the “carrots and
sticks” that City government can utilize and public financing techniques that may be used
depending on the size and scope of potential development and the economic and political
viability of the program.
The city has a number of specific incentives available to businesses that expand or locate
with the general Redevelopment Area. These incentives include; waiver of impact fees,
waiver of building permit fees, and waiver of water and sewer facilities construction and
installation.
The following table provides an overview of other tools government can use to manage
redevelopment.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 83
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


                 Table 24: Public Sector Tools For Managing Redevelopment

          ACQUISITION                            Subdivision
          1. fee simple                          17. conventional subdivision regulations
          2. less than fee simple                      a. exactions (land, fac., money)
          3. compensable regulation              18. planned unit development
          4. land banking
                                                 Environmental
          FACILITIES                             19. hazard zones (floodplain, etc.)
          Provisions                             20. sensitive areas (slopes, shores, etc.)
          5. capital improvements program        21. natural process zones (acquifers, etc.)
          6. connection permit                   22. pollution controls
          7. construction and engineering
             approval (17a) exactions (see
             subdivision)
                                                 Other
          COST RECOVERY                          23. official map
          8. general taxation                    24. transfer of development rights
          9. special assessment                  25. restrictive covenants
          10. user fees                          26. building code
          11. development districts              27. housing code
                                                 28. fire code
          Linking Devices                        29. public nuisance
          12. adequate facilities ordinance      (3) compensable regulation
                                                 30. developments of regional impact
          REGULATION
          Zoning                                 PUBLIC FINANCE
          13. conventional zoning                31. land cost write down
                a. variance                      32. housing subsidies
                b. exception                     33. commercial industrial revenue bonds
                c. special permit                34. tax increment financing
                d. flexible zoning               35. discount tax delinquent prop.
                e. floating zone                 36. equity participation
                f. contract zoning
                g. conditional zoning            TAX SYSTEMS
                h. bonus zoning                  37. property taxation
                i. exclusive non-residential          (8) general taxation
                j. exclusive agricultural             (9) special assessment
                k. exclusion of multi. etc.           (11) development districts
                l. minimum/maximum floor area         a. rural/urban service area
                m. height/bulk/setback                b. preferential taxation
                     restriction
                n. minimum/maximum lot size      38. income taxation
                    (12) adequate facilities           a. deductions for charitable donations
                    ordinance (independent
                    modifiers)
          14. esthetics zoning                        b. capital gains tax
          15. historic districts taxes                c. inheritance and gift tax
          16. impact performance zoning




                                                Current Planning Incentives

The study area already has in place a number of development incentives as a result of the
past redevelopment planning efforts for the business community, CDCs and city staff: new
zoning overlay district and changes to the code, significant public improvements,
designation of the area as a Redevelopment District according to Chapter 163, Part III, and
a host of financial and economic development resources.



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                  Page 84
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Zoning Overlay and Code Changes

The city has adopted a new overlay district within the MLK corridor which encourages a
more neo-traditional development by moving buildings closer to the street to promote more
pedestrian traffic and new zoning language for R 1 allowing for the use of 5,000 square
foot lots (east of the Interstate) which had previously been non-conforming.

Public Improvements

The City has expended significant moneys in improving the area including the development
of Palmetto Park, removal of dilapidated buildings along Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard,
creation of small urban gardens, increased code and police presence and funding of
improvement strategies.

Redevelopment District

The study area has been designated a Redevelopment District according to Chapter 163
F.S. and as such as a range of tools and resources uniquely available to a RDA including
acquisition of property, demolition, removal and clearance of existing structures, relocation
assistance, management of property acquired and construction of public improvements.
The last tool has been utilized along Ocean Avenue to create extensive new streetscape.
See the next section for a discussion of Tax Increment Financing.

                                   Public Financing Techniques

Public financing techniques for redevelopment projects can take the form of indirect and
direct measures to assist public/private ventures. Indirect or non-monetary measures,
while not financially involving local government in a real estate project, can have an equal
or greater impact on project financing than direct public financial participation. Motivated by
a desire to avoid direct financial participation or by a lack of financial resources, these
measures can effectively close financing gaps for a project. The following discussion is
for educational input only. While the City of Boynton Beach currently uses most of the
techniques referenced below; this section does not suggest that any of these techniques or
combination of techniques can be utilized within the Heart of Boynton without close
scrutiny and detailed analysis by the appropriate City Departments. We have provided
examples of the use of various techniques in other areas of the country.

Zoning and Density Bonuses

By using its land use ordinance, the city can create value for a site by upgrading the land
use or density allowed as well as by creating disincentives for developing in competing
areas. It is important to note, however, that increased density might not translate into
increased value if the market cannot support the size of the project. The City has current
Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                     Page 85
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


utilized this approach in two ways: an overlay District on MLK, Jr. Blvd., and zoning
changes allow for the residential development of 5,000 square foot parcels. The proposed
future land use and zoning changes recommended within this report will also achieve
increased densities east of Seacrest Boulevard while decreasing densities west of
Seacrest.

Government Commitments to Rent Space

A public commitment to lease space in a new development makes it considerably easier for
a developer to obtain financing. Even if government commits itself to leasing, only a minor
portion of a proposed project (its favorable credit rating as a lessee) makes it easier for the
developer to obtain other lease commitments. By carefully structuring the terms of rent
escalation and renewal options, a municipality can minimize the cost of space at the same
time it encourages private development. This approach could be utilized in several areas
of Heart of Boynton especially the south east quadrant.

Transfer of Development Rights

Transferring development rights form on site to another, not only encourages development
within a given location, but also relieves development pressures on other sites, notably
where historic structures are located. The transferred development rights can be used to
increase a building's total floor area and to increase its lot coverage beyond what the
zoning ordinance would normally allow. This approach might be used to assist the moving
of the western Boynton Terrace complex and to encourage the redevelopment of the old
Cherry Hills area.

Regulatory Relief from Zoning and Building Codes

Flexible regulations and zoning measures can create market opportunities in depressed
areas. Trading permitted maximum floor area for the provision of improved pedestrian
circulation, greater public open space, better shopping and coordinated development has
been used in cities nationwide. This technique has been used in allowing the development
of non-conforming residential lots and could be used in the southeast quadrant for CBD
expansion.

Facilitating Project Approvals

The City of Boynton can take steps to facilitate permitting, reduce processing time and
champion public approvals in projects they politically support. Reduced approval time can
result in lower interest and overhead costs to a developer thereby putting income-producing
property on the local tax rolls faster. Organizing a one-stop office to receive city approvals
where a developer can coordinate all approvals through one person has been particularly


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                     Page 86
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


effective. It can also be used to remedy problems caused by changes in zoning ordinances
or planning policies before a project's completion.

Quick Take by Eminent Domain

Taking by eminent domain, a mechanism that allows immediate public possession of
private property for public use, has been a major redevelopment tool for cities throughout
Florida and the nation. It facilitates the assembly of parcels of land for development and
reduces the time and cost required to ready a site.

Encouragement of Financing by an Ancillary Party

The public sector can influence the availability of financing for private development projects
by facilitating civic funds, patient capital or soft equity money to be placed in a project. It
can also orchestrate the placement of foundation funds or can direct the placement of
equity through local non- profit organizations to facilitate tax deductions and contributions
for investors.

Local banks might be persuaded to make concessions in return for deposits of government
funds in their institutions. While the moneys might or might not be lent to the project, their
presence can have a positive effect by creating a supply of loan funds that otherwise would
not have existed. The City has a Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) and a
Community Financing Consortium, Inc. (CFC) in place to support this type of approach.

Design Coordination in Public/Private Projects

When public and private uses are linked in the same project, two or more design teams can
be involved: one for the public components and one for the private components. Though
not always the case, this situation can create problems because of the lack of coordination.
Selecting one design team to be coordinator can be a safeguard.

The same point applies to project construction. In some cases, a single construction
manager overseeing the initiation and administration of contracts, bidding and negotiations,
supervision of contractors and subcontractors, scheduling of activities and monitoring of
work in progress can be a more effective approach. Coordinating design and construction
results in lower costs for a project.

An example of coordinated design is the award-winning Old Town Square project in Fort
Collins, Colorado. In a public/private partnership, a mixed-use office and retail project
within a downtown historic district was completed in 1985 that includes a large pedestrian
plaza, bisecting the development and a publicly-built parking ramp located across the
street. Both the private project elements (office and retail space) and the amenities were


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                     Page 87
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


designed by the same architect, which ensured a cohesive design between the two
elements.

Outdoor seating for the restaurants and second and third-story terraces all face toward and
overlook the plaza's staging area, where performances have attracted crowds of over
10,000 people.

This approach could be used by the City of Boynton Beach throughout the CRA including
the southeast quadrant of the Heart of Boynton.

Preservation Easements

Building owners might agree that a building's exterior physical features will not be changed
to preserve its historical or architectural importance. Cities might convey buildings to
developers under an agreement that the developer donate the exterior to the community
while renovating the interior for income-producing uses. The effect is a reduction in front-
end costs through the tax savings generated by the charitable contribution. Cities also
covenant with developers to make no changes to any part of a building, interior or exterior,
with this loss in value representing a charitable contribution that can qualify as a tax
deduction for the acquiring developer.

This approach is probably not needed within the Heart of Boynton has few if any buildings
of this type are present.

Local Tax Incentives

Cities can legislate local historic districts or establish enterprise and foreign trade zones,
covering parts of a redevelopment area. These mechanisms permit developers and/or their
tenants to generate additional tax savings.

When the city of Athens, Georgia wanted to develop a mixed-use project linking the
downtown and the University of Georgia, it engaged a multidisciplinary team to formulate a
strategy for development and implementation. The identified project included a civic
center, retail space, parking hotel and a condominium development. The project was
funded in part by $20 million from local-option sales tax revenues.

The tax was approved by a vast majority of area residents based upon the documentation
of a significant portion of sales tax receipts generated by university students and the
surrounding rural counties. Additional funding was provided by federal grants, local
matching funds and private debt and equity. The civic center is now undergoing financial
design and development.



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 88
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Other Indirect Measures

Other measures can save costs in public/private ventures, including the public sectors
assuming some or all of the responsibility for preparing environmental impact statements or
reports, arbitrating or otherwise settling disputes involving equal opportunity, minority
contract and affirmative action, instituting a crime prevention program in a declining area
targeted for revitalization, providing cheaper energy by integrating community energy
systems into its redevelopment plan, acting as a liaison and information source for local
neighborhood groups, surrounding property owners, merchants' associations, and others
who have opinions regarding aspects of the proposed project and selling the
redevelopment area through a regular and carefully directed public affairs program. Many
of these items should already be part of the CRA’s redevelop planning process.

Direct Measures

Direct financial involvement in public/private ventures can come from many sources and
can take many forms. Sources include federal and local funds described below.

Federal Sources

Though federal funding for redevelopment has been cut and though it still comes with
complicated wage requirements, federal moneys do still exist. The cortisone of dilapidated
downtowns, HUD's Urban Development Action Grant has been eliminated, but repayments
of UDAGs can be used. Community Development Block Grants, as well as money from the
Economic Development Administration (EDA), The Farmers Home Administration (FHmA)
and the Small Business Administration (SBA) are still available, in some instances wide
open for feasible projects.

EDA Grants and Loan Guarantees. Most EDA grants are used in conjunction with other
local, state or federal moneys for rehabilitating or constructing infrastructure and public
works facilities as part of industrial or commercial development. EDA's two categories of
grants include public works grants (for example, water, sewer and road improvements),
which typically cover 50 percent of a project's costs, and economic adjustment grants for
areas experiencing long-term or sudden, severe loss of jobs. Economic adjustment grants
can cover up to 75 percent of a project's costs and can be used to fund, for example,
incubator facilities or low-income housing projects. EDA funding is targeted to "highly
distressed" locations and in about 65 to 75 percent of the cases, to rural areas.

Reuse of UDAG Loan Repayments. Communities fortunate enough to have received the
now terminated UDAGs are using the repayments from the earlier investments.
Discounting or capitalizing the income stream form development loans financed with
UDAGs is an excellent way to generate current cash, which may be reinvested in a second
wave of redevelopment.

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 89
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Philadelphia, for example, has created a mini-UDAG program with paybacks. Los Angeles
has used $5 million in repayments as security to leverage a $40 million revolving loan fund
for small businesses. According to a 1990 HUD study of UDAG projects, $443 million in
repayments are projected through 1995, with over $2 billion total in repayments due.

Community Development Block Grants. CDBG funds can be used for direct or
secondary loans to developers; to fund loan guarantees; collateral; insurance costs on
notes, bonds and loan fees; and for planning and administrative costs related to a city's
development program.

The objectives that must be met to receive CDBGs have become increasingly difficult to
meet, however. CDBG-funded activities must meet one or more of three objectives: 1)
benefit low and moderate-income people (60 percent of the people benefiting from the
funded activities must be low or moderate income); 2) eliminate slums and blight; and 3)
fill urgent community needs. Furthermore, union wage requirements imposed by federal
legislation discourage use of the funds.

Nevertheless, CDBG funds, administered by HUD, are still being used successfully in many
redevelopment projects, including the City of Boynton Beach. In the Buffalo Theatre
District redevelopment project, for example, CDBG funds were used to purchase two
deteriorated office buildings, to renovate theaters and to acquire property for new
construction. Another $29 million in CDBG’s was used as a short-term loan, allowing the
developers to receive no-interest loans during construction and to issue taxable revenue
bonds.

CDBG Floats: Under this concept, a Community Development (CD) entitlement grantee
may take advantage of the unexpended moneys available in its CDBG line of credit for
short-term financing needs for activities which are eligible for CDBG funding. Under this
arrangement, the city would request the use of funds which have not been expended and
will not be expended during the time-frame for which the CD float funds are needed. These
funds are not dependent upon federal funding cycles and may be approved at any time
during the year if sufficient unexpended moneys exist. This type of approach works well
with construction financing for residential and commercial development projects. The CD
moneys can be provided at below-market rates and thus making a project feasible. The
construction period also represents the highest risk and thus most difficult portion of a
project to finance.

Section 108 Guaranteed Loans:           Section 108 of the Housing and Community
Development Act allows communities entitled to CDBG moneys to borrow against future
grants to finance major projects. Communities can borrow up to three times their annual
CDBG and repay the loan over a period up to six years by pledging the future CDBG funds
as security. Section 108 loans, administered by HUD, can be used for almost any CDBG-

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 90
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


eligible rehabilitation or economic development project and because of the collateral, loan
rates are low. The application process is short as well -- six to eight weeks. Section 108
loans are not affected by the caps on volume and other restrictions of the Tax Reform Act
of 1986, nor are they limited by any local debt ceilings.

The amount of funds available is up to three times the annual entitlement amount. The
funds borrowed are repaid over a six-year period from the city’s entitlement. The
repayments can be made from the cash flow of the development either for the full amount
or portion. These repayments by the developer can also be secured with lines of credit,
property, personal net worth, etc. The repayment of these moneys could come in whole or
part from the developer so as not to limit the city’s use of CDBG funds in the future.

The restrictions on CDBG moneys involve benefit to very low, low- and moderate persons.

FHmA Business/Industrial Development Program. Targeted to communities with fewer
than 25,000 population (though loans have been made in communities with populations up
to 50,000), the Business/Industrial Development (BID) program is administered by the
Department of Agriculture and is designed to stimulate job growth and to bring new
technology to rural areas. Grants, direct loans and guaranteed loans can be used to buy
land or property and/or to rehabilitate buildings.

SBA Section 504 Loans. The SBA 504 program provides financing for acquisition of fixed
assets and real property to individual businesses, usually through a local SBA-certified
development corporation. Typically, the development corporations, through a private
intermediary, sell SBA-guaranteed (up to 40 percent) debentures. A 10 percent injection of
equity is required, but other public financing can be used to satisfy that requirement.

State Funds

Several programs are available for either local governments or for profit or nonprofit
residential developers.

SAIL Program: This program is for multi-family rental development. The project may be
either new construction or rehabilitation of existing units. The state’s funds are in the form
of a below-market rate loan which is repaid over a period of 20 years. As a condition of this
assistance, 20 percent of the units must be set aside for up to 15 years for persons of very
low income (50 percent or below median adjusted for family size).

Unlike the federal assistance programs, there is no assistance to the tenant as a part of the
program. A tenant with a housing voucher may chose to live in the development, but this is
not an assisted project.



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 91
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Housing Predevelopment Loan Fund: This program makes available up to $500,000 of
moneys to assist in the costs associated with predevelopment activities of residential
development. These developments can be either rental or for sale. The funds are
provided as a three-percent, three year loan.

Local Sources

To be acceptable to private investors, the public's share of the return in most cases comes
after private investors have earned a return sufficient to attract their investment in the first
place. This objective for profit sharing has led to a shift from outright grants to private
developers to loans with the repayment schedules and interest rates depending on the
project's performance, similar to those used by conventional mortgage lenders. Thus,
direct public financial assistance is now focused on the particular problems frustrating
private investment and development, reflecting the more business-like and sensitive
approach public entities are taking to spur greater interest from private investors and
developers.

Subsidized Loan Interest: This subsidy is normally implemented through loan pools
established wit local or federal funds matched to other than public assistance.

Loan Guarantees: Local government can shift some of the lender’s risks by guaranteeing
a loan, a portion of a loan, or a portion of the debt service payments made to retire loans,
thus increasing the likelihood that developers can obtain private funds. Similarly, if the
local government agrees to lease or purchase the project at a percentage of projected
market value in the event the projected return does not materialize, the project becomes
more attractive to equity and mortgage investors.

In Asheville, North Carolina, the city agreed to guarantee partial repayment of the private
financing for Park Plaza, a downtown project, consisting of 11 adjacent historic buildings
dating from the late 19th century, a new office/commercial building and a new 320-car
parking structure. City financing was necessary to justify restoration of these structures
and to interconnect the three blocks of buildings so that marketable floor plates and
efficient elevator cores could be offered.

In the event the project did not generate net operating income sufficient to cover the first
mortgage payment to a consortium of local private lenders during the first five years of the
project, the city pledged that it would make available a $200,000 line of credit to the
developer. If $200,000 were not needed in any one year to cover the payment, the funds
paid by the city would be only the amount necessary to cover the mortgage payment. The
partnership agreement called for any funds paid by the city to the developer under the line
of credit to be repaid by the developer with interest upon sale or refinancing of the project
or no later than 10 years after initial project occupancy.


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                      Page 92
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Public Grants: Grants of surplus or unused public moneys to fund the public portion of a
public/private venture can be made. Typical sources of local revenues include surplus
water and sewer funds and leftover urban renewal funds.

Direct Loans: In a highly competitive capital market, direct loans from the public sector at
below-market interest rates can fill a gap created when no private funds or insufficient
funds are available for a particular portion of a project's financing. In addition to the benefit
of encouraging new development, local governments also get the benefit of exercising a
level of control that it would not have otherwise. If its interests are at stake. the city might
wish to offer a below-market direct loan, even if a project does not require it financially.
Many states have resolved the prohibitions against the use of public funds for direct loans
by passing enabling legislation allowing the creation of economic development corporations
or other special vehicles that serve as a conduit for city grants, loans and contracts to
private entities.

Jacksonville Landing in Jacksonville, Florida, is one example of a city's taking direct
financial interest in a project. In recognizing the potential for public benefit from
development of a major festival marketplace in its core downtown, the city of Jacksonville
solicited interest from the Rouse Company of Columbia, Maryland, to develop the facility.
The resulting $43.5 million project, which includes 187,000 square feet of specialty retail
and entertainment space and four integrated pavilions around a central court, was financed
in large part with city funds -- over $36 million lent to the developer to generate the project's
development. The public funding involved an innovative tapestry of sources, including
revenue bonds, the subordinated loan of CDBG funds, CDBG float loans to offset the need
for some private construction financing and tax increment financing. The developer
contributed approximately $7 million in conventional debt and equity for the project.

Public Funding of Predevelopment: Involving a private developer early in the project
could hinge on the public sector's willingness to underwrite some or all of the front-end
expenses. This technique has successfully attracted developers to assess the potential for
a project by removing one of the major obstacles to urban development, the difficulty of
convincing developers to invest time and money in an assessment of a project's feasibility
in weak or uncertain markets. Most developers view the probability of a reward from front-
end investments under these conditions as very low and therefore choose not to make the
effort. The willingness of the local government to undertake some such development costs
creates an atmosphere conducive to further negotiations and possible involvement.

In New Bern, North Carolina, for example, the city, through a nonprofit development
corporation, funded studies by consultants for market, financial and design feasibility
assessments in an effort to attract developers to dormant, unused urban renewal property
along the waterfront adjacent to the downtown area. The property, located at the
confluence of two rivers, had been cleared 14 years earlier, but had remained
unproductive. The city's underwriting initial expenses attracted a developer to the project,

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                       Page 93
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


and construction of the $22 million development, which includes a 100-room hotel, a 400-
seating meeting center, 10,000 square feet of retail space, a 100-slip marina and 40
residential condominiums.

Support of Other Public Objectives: Cities desiring high-quality amenities that the
market might not be able to support, public art, for example, can offer to pay for the
increment of cost necessary to create the amenity.

Tax Increment Financing. Tax increment financing (TIF) is a mechanism that allows city
redevelopment agencies to fund downtown revitalization by capturing the increased
property taxes that result from revitalization. This annual increment of revenues, which
otherwise would be split with local taxing entities, is then used to pay for the public
improvements directly or to secure the repayment of bonds used to finance public
improvements. Bond issues based on tax increment revenue are not direct obligations of
the city, therefore, they do not require voters' approval once approved by the city council.




A city implements TIF by designating a district to be redeveloped that is blighted or
declining in value. The tax base for the area is then established and frozen for a specific
period of time. A redevelopment plan must be approved and followed, future taxes over the
amount of the frozen assessment are then used to implement the plan. In most states, the
standards for establishing blighted areas are liberal, powers over the use of Monies are
broad and the administration of the process is relatively easy -- so much so that TIF is
sometimes considered a downtown redevelopment director's dream.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 94
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Controversy over TIF, however, centers around a concern that the development being
financed could occur without public financing and that, as a result, local taxing entities like
school districts and counties are unnecessarily deprived of revenues. Thus, to ensure
passage of enabling legislation for TIF, any proposal must persuasively set forth the long-
term economic return to the community from the funded activities.

Improvement or Business Development Districts. An improvement district combines
the financing vehicle of assessment district, in which all properties in a defined area are
levied against for all or part of the cost of certain improvements, with additional
administrative powers, such as planning, maintenance and promotion of improvements or
downtown activities.

Typically, the city levies a charge on the property in a specified single or multi-purpose
district (a downtown area, a commercial strip or a historic preservation area) and the funds
collected are used to retire bonds issued by the city (or the district itself) to pay for the
improvements and services in the district. The bonds are repaid directly from the tax
revenues collected or from the city' general fund, which is later reimbursed by the special
tax revenues.

General Obligation Bonds. Backed by the city's full faith and credit, these bonds are
used to finance general public improvements. Ad valorem tax revenues are used to retire
the bond debt. The city's current financial status must be evaluated to identify its capacity
to issue general obligation bonds and the interest rates the bondholders charge the city
reflect the municipality's bond rating. General referenda could be required to issue general
obligation bonds and sufficient debt capacity must remain for the city to enter the bond
market.

Revenue Bonds. Revenue bonds are retired directly with the revenues generated from a
specific facility. Parking fees from garages, hotel or bed taxes, and sales taxes, for
example, have been used to pay debt tied to parking facilities, visitor facilities, group
meeting space and other similar ventures.

Industrial Development Bonds.           Issued by a public agency or authority, IDBs are
revenue bonds for private projects with a public purpose. The Tax Reform Act of 1986
limits the amount of the bonds to $50 per capita or $150 million per state, whichever is
higher, and their use to multifamily housing, mass transit, airports, docks, wharves, utilities
(electricity or gas), hazardous waste disposal, sewage and water facilities. The following
types of projects cannot be financed with IDBs: sports, hydroelectric, air/water pollution,
parking facilities, convention/trade show complexes and commercial activities.

Shared Grants and Funding options: Most developments today take use of a multitude of
financial and other grants/incentives by combining the best funding/incentives:


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                     Page 95
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Tax Concessions. Through tax concessions, a city encourages privately financed
improvements in specified areas by not collecting the real estate taxes on those
improvements for a number of years, or by freezing the assessment at the predevelopment
level.

In Phoenix, Arizona, for example, the city abated taxes for eight years for the 1 million-
square -foot mixed-use Arizona Center. The abatement was part of a comprehensive
public financing package, including vacated public right-of-way in exchange for equity in the
project, access to tax-exempt municipal bonds and ownership of public space.

In Trenton, New Jersey, the developer of Trenton Commons pays 15 percent of rents
received annually in lieu of property taxes for 15 years, an effective abatement of 50
percent. Other variations of tax concessions have included exempting the increased value
of redeveloped property from property taxes and gradually decreasing abatements.
Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 96
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Site Assembly. In a built up area like the Heart of Boynton, where most of the land has
already been subdivided and developed, the acquisition of a suitable site can be a major
problem. Because most of the land has been divided into relatively small parcels owned by
separate parties, the problem of acquisition increases with the size of the site required.

The public sector can alleviate these problems by purchasing property, removing clouded
titles from privately purchased property and/or instituting land banking. Land banking
allows a city agency or local development corporation to acquire and assemble land
suitable for development and to hold the land until a suitable user is identified.

Land Writedowns and Deferred Land Payments. Traditional redevelopment projects
used land write-downs to attract developers to renewal sites and the incentive is still
popular. After an analysis of the residual value of the land (calculated by capitalizing the
net income to arrive at the value of a project and matching it with the capital cost of
producing or replacing it), the write-down, or reduction of price to a level the proposed
development can support can be established.

Alternatively, rather than a one-time payment for the land, the public entity holding the land
could agree to receive installment payments from the developer. This practice reduces the
requirement for front-end cash and allows the developer to stage the payments to better
match cash flow from the project.

Relocation Assistance.. Even though a public agency might not directly aid site
acquisition, it can help a private developer assemble a site by helping to relocate space
users in property slated for development. Relocation assistance can take the form of loans
and grants to pay moving expenses or aid in finding or developing a new site for those who
must move. Both parties can benefit. The relocated activity has a chance to leave
obsolete facilities and an inadequate location and the community gains economic benefits
from new businesses. Because a majority of property identified for assemblage is
residential and the likelihood that Federal moneys will be utilized, relocation assistance will
have to be provided to all those dislocated.

Insuring Condemnation or Acquisition Costs. The unusual, but effective practice of
securing an insurance policy to cover local government's risk of excessive court-negotiated
acquisition costs during eminent domain proceedings can mean the difference in whether a
project is feasible or not. Local government units can pay for or share in the costs of a one-
time premium payment made to an insurance company that assumes the risk that total
acquisition costs will not exceed an agreed upon level. This practice makes it possible to
avert stalemates in negotiations that occur when cities are reluctant to use eminent domain
unless they are certain of the maximum acquisition cost. Similarly, developers who agree
to pay for city-assembled land avoid surprises or excessive payments resulting from court
proceedings subsequent to their negotiated transactions with public entities.


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                     Page 97
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


Site Clearance and Demolition. Once sites have been assembled and the existing
residences and business relocated, government funds can be used to demolish and clear
the site and prepare it for new development.

Provision of Infrastructure and Public Facilities. To attract private investment, local
governments can provide a range improvements adjacent to or on the project site, including
major capital improvements (transit systems, highway and street alignment, transit stops,
storm and sanitary sewers, utilities), major public facilities (schools, parking a civic center,
government office buildings, hospitals, neighborhood centers), or public amenities (outdoor
recreational plazas, open spaces, landscaping or pedestrian bridges). A city's investment
in public facilities can generate demand for specific kinds of private investment tied directly
to those facilities, such as hotels, office buildings or residential projects.

Sharing Space. Shared use of space allows the developer of a mixed-use project to avoid
duplicating facilities and to minimize the requirements of open space that cannot be
amortized by privately incurred debt. An impressive foyer, lobby, entry or parking garage
can be shared by city and private users to amortize or set aside those aspects of the
public/private development that cannot be amortized. Kitchen and registration areas can
be shared in hotels and convention centers, for example.

Shared Expenses for Maintenance. In a large, complex project, combining public and
private space agreements are usually fashioned to define responsibilities for public and
private sectors' maintenance and management of those facilities. The general trend is to
consolidate most management and maintenance under one entity, with other participants
paying for their share of services.

Off-Budget Debt Financing. Agencies have entered into securitized lease/purchase and
other installment capital deals in which the use of tax-exempt financing (often through
certificates of participation or COPs) results in lower-than normal annual costs for public
buildings. Voters' approval is usually not required, as when certificates are used. Non-
appropriation carries significant penalties, however, and can result in a strong negative
mark on a city's credit rating.

Defaults rarely occur with this type of financial transaction as tax-exempt lease/purchase
agreements are usually made for unpopular, but essential facilities. COPs are an
expanding and widely used alternative to general obligation bonds and have been used to
build schools, jails, public administration buildings and other projects. Typically, COPs are
slightly more expensive than issuing general obligation bonds, but investors' confidence
has grown and their yield is now within a narrow range of general obligation debt.

As installment purchase contracts for a capital project, COPs allow developers to build
public facilities for a fee. The public entity agrees to lease the facility for a stated time
period. At the end of the lease, the public entity purchases the building for a nominal fee

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                      Page 98
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


(usually $1). Such arrangements also lower total costs, as the public and the developer
can avoid government procurement processes and can negotiate fast-track, turnkey
construction services, materials and equipment for the public facilities.

Ground Leases. While ground leases are not new, local governments have not employed
them to a large degree outside of several western states, including California. Public
entities, using vacant public lands, enter into long-term, unsubordinated, participating
ground leases with developers to create additional cash flow to supplement tax revenues.
In some instances, the public sector negotiates lower lease payments in exchange for
developers' providing limited building space.

Long-term leases are increasingly used in publicly assisted development because they are
so flexible. The lease can provide for a minimum base payment, plus a percentage of
income generated by the project or by some other graduated arrangement. Thus, if the
project does well, the city shares in the income and can recover some or all of its costs.
Ground leases, moreover, can be subordinated if necessary, that is, the city can execute a
mortgage of its land as security for the development loan made to the lessee.

For the developer, such long-term leases can greatly improve the net return on investment
through improved financing terms, reductions in the equity required and tax advantages.
With a subordination clause in the lease, the advantages are event greater. The
disadvantage is that cash flows to the public entity are reduced when the land is leased
rather than purchased.

In San Diego, the city's redevelopment agency leased land for a new apartment building in
the downtown's marina redevelopment project adjacent to the south end of Horton Plaza.
In return for leasing the land at a nominal rate, the San Diego Redevelopment Agency
participates in substantial cash flow after a preferred return on the developer's equity. The
agency was also able to win agreement from the developer that 20 percent of all units
would be set-aside for low and moderate-income households.

Privatization. Local governments can enter into contracts where the private sector
acquires, owns and operates facilities traditionally built by government. In some instances,
public entities lease the facilities. Many types of public facilities have been built under this
arrangement, among them parking garages and jails. Privatization usually works best
when market conditions allow private developers to generate sufficient yields from other
components of the project to justify building public facilities with private moneys.

Transfer of Assets. Land and/or building swaps can be used to accomplish a variety of
goals. Land swaps, for example, are used when the city and/or developer holds only
pieces of the land it needs. The land is appraised, and parcels of equal value are traded to
assemble usable sites for both parties. This technique was successfully used when a
private landowner held several key parcels needed for the development of the Dallas Arts

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                      Page 99
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


District. The landowner participated in a three-way exchange of property involving the city
and the nonprofit Central Dallas Association to obtain land in another area more suitable for
his business.

Local governments can also swap properties in their inventories for private construction of
much-needed public space or facilities. If the market is sufficiently strong and land values
high, cities often can directly swap land for space that might be difficult to finance or be
approved by voters. Usually employed when a city is legally barred from offering any direct
incentives to the private sector and when a city does not have traditional urban renewal
powers, exchanges or swaps can also provide a city with increased control over the
project's design and construction.


                                         Other Economic Development Resources
                                         Currently Available Within Palm Beach County
                                         and the City of Boynton Beach

Most of the following Economic Development Resources are available to qualified
companies locating or expanding in the City of Boynton Beach:

   %   Qualified Target Industry (QTI) Tax Refund
   %   Urban Job Tax Credit
   %   Quick Response Training (QRT) Program
   %   Economic Development Transportation Fund

The Palm Beach County Black Business Investment Corporation (BBIC) is a non-profit
organization formed in accordance with the Florida Small and Minority Business Act of
1985. The corporation was organized by the financial and business community of Palm
Beach County for the purpose of providing business loans, bonding, equity capital and
business services, and for developing job opportunities and other services to business
enterprises owned by eligible black citizens. Ownership means 51 percent or more of any
equity interests. Businesses applying for loan guarantees, bonding and/or equity
investments are closely analyzed to assure viability and to ascertain that financing cannot
be obtained through other sources.

The Business Loan Fund of the Palm Beaches, Inc. is a non-profit financial intermediary
whose chartered purpose is to loan moneys to small businesses and community
development agencies in Palm Beach County. The fund will receive and borrow capital
from public and private investors to establish a countywide revolving loan fund that will
provide below-market interest rate loans for small businesses, as well as community
projects benefiting low- and moderate-income individuals and neighborhoods.

The Business Loan Fund of the Palm Beaches, Inc. will be able to offer loans to

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                  Page 100
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


entrepreneurs and community agencies who have not been able to access necessary
financial resources in the traditional lending market. The fund will work with applicants to
prepare loan applications, polish business plans and ensure that prospective clients have
adequate business training through such resources as local incubators. The fund will also
offer smaller loan amounts which cannot be secured in the banking system. The following
loan amounts will be offered:

   % Mini-micro - Youth Entrepreneurial ($250 - 1,000)
   % Micro - ($500 - 5,000)
   % Small - ($5,001 - 50,000)
   % Commercial Real Estate ($50,000 - 500,000)

Other resources available include:

   %   Enterprise Development Corporation (EDC)
   %   Palm Beach County’s Economic Development Department
   %   Palm Beach County Business Incubators
   %   Small Business Development Center at Florida Atlantic University
   %   Minority Business Development Center South Florida Manufacturing Technology
       Center


                                         Job Training

The Palm Beach County Workforce Development Board, Inc. prime responsibility is to
organize and coordinate a workforce development system to meet the current and future
needs of employers. The organization focuses on four specific areas: School-to Work, High
Skill/High Wage, Welfare-to-Work and One-Stop. Through the direct involvement and
participation of local business partners, the Workforce Development Board directs service
providers to upgrade their curricula and then measure the skill sets by having employers
evaluate their trainees. Workforce Development Board will also be responsible for
overseeing the distribution of money to companies seeking training assistance

The Florida Division of Jobs and Benefits is the largest single source of job seekers in the
state. Within the County, the two closest offices are in West Palm and Delray Beach.
Companies can post job openings on a computerized job bank called the Job Information
System. This allows companies to access job seekers statewide and through America's Job
Bank on the Internet. The following additional services are also available:

Staffing assistance at the local Jobs and Benefits office or at the employer's business
location for new and expanding businesses.

Access to data on employment levels by industry sector, unemployment rates, wage rates,

Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                 Page 101
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


and occupational and industry projections broken down by state, county and other sub-
state areas.

Fidelity bonding, affirmative action assistance for federal contracts, immigration and alien
certification and membership to the Florida Employer Advisory Council. Access to basic
Unemployment Insurance and the Short Time Compensation Program (STC). The STC
Program is a voluntary employer participation program designed to enable employers to
retain employees during a temporary slowdown until business conditions improve. Under
the program, an employer may choose to reduce the hours of some or all of the employees
in lieu of laying off a segment of the work force. In so doing, a larger group of workers work
shorter work weeks and are compensated for their lost work time with partial
Unemployment Compensation Benefits


AFFORDABLE HOUSING
Affordable housing is a major issue within the Heart of Boynton for several reasons. First
and foremost, the redevelopment program will necessitate some relocation within the three
(3) assemblage areas. It is prudent to develop affordable housing in the community prior to
relocation so that those who face relocation can elect to stay in their own community.
Second, due to the area’s historic African-American and Caribbean roots, the area is a
prime location for affordable housing.

The following information illustrates the difficulty in finding affordable housing within Palm
Beach County. Within the County, it takes a minimum salary of approximately $15.38 for
a two bedroom apartment or a minimum annual salary of $30,000. For a three bedroom
apartment the annual income necessary to rent a market grade apartment is $$42,480 or
approximately $20.42.

As shown in the following tables, rental housing within Palm Beach County is significantly
higher than the State as a whole.

                                 Number of Renter Households
      Location                                                     Percent Change,
                                      1990          2000
                                                                      1990-2000
   Florida                             1,681,847     1,896,130                   12.74%
   Palm Beach County *                   102,664       120,149                   17.03%




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                   Page 102
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




                                            2001 Family Income
                      2001 Estimated Median Family      Maximum Affordable Monthly Housing Cost by
  Location            Income (HUD)                      % of Family AMI
                      Annual           Monthly          30%         50%       80%         100%
  Florida                     $50,700          $4,225        $380       $634      $1,014      $1,268
  Palm Beach
                             $61,800             $5,150         $464           $772         $1,236       $1,545
  County *

  2001 Fair Market Rents by Number of Bedrooms
  Location                             Zero                One         Two            Three          Four
  Florida                                 $482               $566        $694            $930         $1,087
  Palm Beach County *                     $554               $646        $800          $1,062         $1,315

Income Needed to Afford FMR
                                 Amount                              Percent of Family AMI
Location         Zero One       Two     Three   Four     Zero     One      Two        Three    Four
               Bedrooms Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom Bedroom
Florida          $19,277 $22,646 $27,774 $37,194 $43,487      38%     45%        55%       73%      86%
Palm Beach
                 $22,160    $25,840    $32,000   $42,480    $52,600      36%          42%       52%        69%    85%
County *

                                                     Housing Wage
                     Hourly Wage Needed to Afford       Percent        As % of Minimum Wage
                             (@ 40 hrs./wk.)            Change              ( FL=$5.15 )
    Location       Zero One Two Three Four              in 2BR     Zero One Two Three Four
                   Bedro Bedro Bedro Bedro Bedro        Housing   Bedro Bedro Bedro Bedro Bedr
                    om     om     om      om    om       Wage       om    om     om      om oom
                   FMR FMR FMR FMR FMR (2000-2001) FMR FMR FMR FMR FMR
Florida             $9.27 $10.89 $13.35 $17.88 $20.91        9.45% 180% 211% 259% 347% 406%
Palm Beach
                   $10.65 $12.42 $15.38 $20.42 $25.29               9.44% 207% 241% 299% 397% 491%
County *



                                                       Work Hours/Week
                                                      Necessary at Minimum
             Location
                                                         Wage to Afford
                                                           ( FL=$5.15 )
                                         Zero      One         Two       Three      Four
                                       Bedroom   Bedroom     Bedroom    Bedroom   Bedroom
                                        FMR       FMR          FMR       FMR       FMR
Florida                                       72        85          104       139        162
Palm Beach County *                           83        96          119       159        196



Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                                       Page 103
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




Because a major element in the redevelopment of the Heart of Boynton includes major
residential infill and residential rehabilitation, the following grants are available singularly or in
conjunction with each other. The combined use of grants is particularly valuable in addressing
affordable housing. A list of some of the grants follows:


   %   HOME
   %   SHIP
   %   Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC)
   %   CDBG
   %   City Rehabilitation Loans
   %   County’s Commission on Affordable Housing Program


Residential Based Economic Development

Residential based economic development is a site-specific, self-sufficiency strategy designed
to help nonprofit developers (including CDC’s) create jobs and other income-generating
opportunities for residents of their properties. Whether working as employees or contractors,
residents find employment this way in such diverse areas as landscaping, vacant unit
rehabilitation, and data processing. Activities such as the lease or sale of vacant units and
land and profit sharing with commercial tenants can also create income-generating
opportunities.

Unlike the neighborhood community revitalization efforts of some CDCs and similar
organizations, the residential based economic development approach exclusively targets
residents of individual housing developments. Nonprofit owners create these opportunities
using resources they already control, such as the rent stream (or residents' monthly payments
to help cover operating expenses), funds for rehab or construction, and physical space within
properties.

This economic development strategy is founded on four objectives:

   •   Decrease Cash Outflows from Housing Developments. Whenever possible,
       nonprofit owners should purchase goods and services from sources within their
       housing developments, instead of "importing" them from other communities. This calls
       for nonprofits to hire residents of their properties as on-site employees; to sponsor
       activities that help create nonprofit- or resident-sponsored businesses that can contract
       with management and other residents to provide goods and services; and to utilize
       firms that agree to hire and train a certain number of property residents in return for the
       nonprofit owners' business.


Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                       Page 104
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan


   •   Better Use of Space. Affordable housing developers should use available space to
       sponsor the delivery of much needed services or facilities, such as child care, GED
       classes, or a convenience store. This space can also be used to develop nonprofit- or
       resident-sponsored businesses.

   •   Increase Cash Inflows. Nonprofit developers should also use available space to
       increase income to the property and residents by leasing space to paying commercial
       tenants, by entering into profit-sharing ventures with commercial tenants, or by
       providing services and products to outsiders. For example, if a developer uses an in-
       house painting crew, he can later "export" these services to other multifamily housing
       complexes. At Edgewood Terrace in Washington, D.C., an on-site computer learning
       center trained residents to use sophisticated mapping software - a skill residents have
       used to earn income from outside organizations.

   •   Build Contracting Capacity. The ability to increase cash inflows is directly related to
       the ability of nonprofit- or resident-sponsored businesses to compete for work outside
       of the nonprofit-owned housing developments. By controlling the awarding of contracts,
       the nonprofit can "incubate businesses" by awarding work to residents over a period of
       time until they can develop the work and contract management experience to, among
       other things, secure bonding necessary to compete for larger contracts. The Rocky
       Mountain Mutual Housing Association, based in Denver, Colorado, is working to
       incubate painting, landscaping, and vacant unit rehabilitation business driven by its
       residents.

A successful housing-led economic development strategy results in on-site job vacancies filled
by property residents; contracts for goods and services awarded to nonprofit- or resident-
sponsored businesses or outside firms that agree to hire property residents; and more social
and retail services desired by residents of the targeted properties.
The expanded opportunities that result from housing-led economic development not only help
stabilize families by increasing their incomes, but also can stabilize the overall economic
condition of housing developments. Providing more income for families results in more timely
and complete payments to property owners. Timely payments allow nonprofit organizations to
more adequately meet their financial obligations, fund much needed operating and
replacement reserves, and spend less time and money collecting unpaid rents.

Despite the great potential of residential based economic development, nonprofits seldom
venture into this area. This may be the result of the perceived complexity of economic
development work or simply the fact that nonprofits have their hands full with development
and day-to-day operation of properties. Of course, housing-led economic development is not a
cure-all for the complex problems facing nonprofit multifamily housing developers. But by
understanding residents, their needs and skills, and through effective management of
resources within the developers' control or reach, some people's lives will be changed for the
better.
Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                Page 105
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan



Creating A Residential Based Economic Development Plan

   •   Gather, summarize, and analyze information about residents at targeted properties,
       through resident surveys, for example.

   •   Identify assets available for economic development; such as rents, rehab/construction
       funds, and physical space and the economic development opportunities created
       therefrom.

   •   Match resident skills, interests, and needs to available economic development
       opportunities.

   •   Evaluate the feasibility of sponsoring micro-enterprise and child care activities that help
       the economic development plan have its full impact.

The CRA, working with both the R.E. Lee CDC and Boynton Beach Faith Based CDC, should
explore creating a residential based economic development program in conjunction with
developers of all three land assemblage areas each of which is either entirely residential or
that that residential is a major component.




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                                                    Page 106
1 (800) 213-PLAN
The Heart of Boynton Redevelopment Master Plan




APPENDICES




Strategic Planning Group, Inc.                   Page 107
1 (800) 213-PLAN

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:8
posted:9/23/2012
language:Latin
pages:112