Emergency Management and Homeland Security by leader6

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            Emergency Management and Homeland Security
                     Articles of Interest 2-16-07

                   "One Plan, One Team, Many Hazards!"
                       Florida State Emergency Response Team’s Motto

                                      News Reports
Emergency Management and Homeland Security
County Unveils Alert System for Severe Weather (Orange County, FL)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/wesh/20070213/lo_wesh/10989958

http://news.yahoo.com/s/wkmg/20070212/lo_wkmg/10989696

http://news.yahoo.com/s/wesh/20070212/lo_wesh/10989958

http://www.cfnews13.com/News/Local/2007/2/12/weather_warnings.html

http://www.local6.com/news/10989696/detail.html?rss=orlpn&psp=news

Freedom Tower could be sold to investors
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070212/us_nm/newyork_freedomtower_dc

Former Head of New York's Emergency Services Dies (9-11 NY State EM Director)
http://www.wten.com/Global/story.asp?S=6073556

http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070212/NEWS01/70212020

http://www.capitalnews9.com/content/headlines/?ArID=204823&SecID=33

Planning for emergencies (Seattle, WA)
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2003567842_here12m.html?syndication=rss

Dolphins may protect the nation, one fin at a time
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/02/12/dolphins.sealions.ap/index.html

FEMA on hiring binge to fill out staff
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36112&dcn=todaysnews

DHS to test comms strategy in TopOff 4
http://www.fcw.com/article97613-02-08-07-Web

GAO faults SBA disaster planning
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070214/ap_on_go_ot/hurricanes_relief_delays;_ylt=AgA8.kahcW3
qMGwsrKmDRb4PLBIF

Senate 9/11 bill faces objections in House
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36130&dcn=todaysnews

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work      1
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/

Task force recommends measures to improve DHS culture (This report is included in the Report’s
Section)
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36119&dcn=todaysnews

Disasters Unlimited (Provided by King County, WA OEM)
http://www.governing.com/articles/2insure.htm

Proposed Grant Program Changes Prompt Worry among Emergency Managers (Provided by
King County, WA OEM)
http://www.metrokc.gov/prepare/docs/Eric_Corner/eric_cornerCQarticle02-12-07.aspx

Weather Radios save Lives
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=34146

Calif. fire center communications system in one hub
http://www.firerescue1.com/communications-interoperability/articles/278390/

Survey says Texas police unprepared for Katrina fallout
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/politics/16689247.htm

Portland emergency management chief resigns (Oregon)
http://www.portlandtribune.com/news/story.php?story_id=117133457091088100

Mayor appoints new director of emergency office (Portland, Oregon)
http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/stories/2007/02/12/daily19.html?from_rss=1

Firm takes over as Emergency Services Coordinator (Virginia)
http://www.blandcountynews.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=BCM/MGArticle/BCM_BasicArticle
&c=MGArticle&cid=1149192932852&path=

Nightmare in a Nightclub (Rhode Island)
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/02/13/usnews/whispers/main2469253.shtml

Democrats pile on president's Homeland Security priorities
http://www.thedailyjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070212/NEWS01/70212012

Expansion of local intelligence-sharing centers sparks controversy
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36121&sid=28

Senators unveil homeland security grant plan at odds with House
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36127&sid=28

Emergency Management Training Available (California)
http://www.emergencymgmt.com/story.php?id=103903

FEMA starts search to create civilian advisory panel (More information on applications is included
under the Additional Information section)
http://www.fcw.com/article97681-02-15-07-Web&RSS=yes

DHS official defends effort to promote radio interoperability
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36151&sid=28


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work       2
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/


Federal Protective Service may cut hundreds of police jobs
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36134&sid=28

Arlington OEM Deputizes Ham Radio Group to Assist with Emergency Communications (Virginia)
http://www.emergencymgmt.com/story.php?id=103955

Lawmakers accuse Bush administration of homeland security 'on the cheap'
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2007-02-09-chertoff-congress_x.htm?csp=34

Lawmakers keep eye on communications grant program
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=36107&sid=28

Budgets squeeze emergency managers (Texas)
http://www.thevictoriaadvocate.com/428/story/24834.html

White House looks for faster top-secret clearances
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2007-02-14-top-secret-clearances_x.htm



Feeney asks FEMA director about 'lack of coordination' (Florida)
Gary Taylor
Sentinel Staff Writer

February 12, 2007, 11:35 AM EST

U.S. Representative Tom Feeney today asked the director of the Federal Emergency
Management Agency to justify the "lack of coordination" in not using employees at its Florida
Long Term Recovery Office in Lake Mary to help victims of the recent tornadoes that hit Central
Florida.

The Orlando Sentinel reported last week that the Lake Mary office, with more than 400 workers,
was not being used in the recovery process following the Feb. 2 tornadoes that hit in Lake,
Volusia and Sumter counties. Instead, about 150 other workers are being used, many of who are
staying in hotels.

Feeney, R-Oviedo, noted he had been made aware of the facility and the size of its staff, "yet
there has been no mention of using this facility to aid in the response…"

Feeney went on to ask, in a letter dated today to R. David Paulison, why it was necessary to set
up a field office in east Orange County "despite the existence of the considerable Lake Mary
facility close to the areas affected by the tornado."

While the congressman praised FEMA's Florida operation, he expressed concern "that their
resources are not being coordinated by FEMA to maximize the use of these assets. In providing
assistance to those affected by the disaster, an efficient allocation of resources is critical to
helping the maximum number of those who are truly in need receive help."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work          3
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/




Public-safety sector leery of tax cuts (Florida)

Police and firefighters back Crist's plan, but fear job losses. The governor says cities can trim fat
elsewhere.

John Kennedy
Tallahassee Bureau Chief

February 11, 2007

TALLAHASSEE -- Gov. Charlie Crist's push to slash property taxes is putting some of his biggest
supporters on the chopping block, with police and firefighters already threatened with possible job
cuts by cities and counties fearing belt-tightening.

Law enforcement especially provided Crist with a powerful base of campaign volunteers during
his victory last fall over Democrat Jim Davis. But local governments say the new governor's
sweeping proposal will force budget cuts almost certain to target public safety, even as Orlando,
Jacksonville and other cities face alarmingly-high murder rates.

Police and fire services statewide consume about a quarter of city budgets, according to a survey
conducted by the Florida League of Cities.

"The possibility of public-safety cuts are real, because that's where you spend the money," said
John Wayne Smith, a league lobbyist.

Crist dismisses such talk, saying free-spending local governments are defending themselves
through what he called a "Washington Monument" strategy: When the National Park Service
faces budget cuts, shutting down its most visible tourist attraction is a tactic that can spark public
demand that funding be restored.

"What the people would like local government to do, instead of talk about firefighters or police or
schools, is to reduce government waste," Crist said. "The people are smart. They understand
what's going on. Number one, we need to reduce their property taxes. They're just too high."

While some public-safety organizations are wary, so far they are siding with Crist. They say they
are confident the new governor's plan will not lead to layoffs.

"The police and fire were there before the run-up in taxes, and the police and fire will be there
after the recession of taxes," said David Murrell, executive director of the Florida Police
Benevolent Association, many of whose 32,000 members campaigned for Crist.

During last fall's campaign, Crist was endorsed early by the PBA and the state's Fraternal Order
of Police, and later drew backing from firefighters statewide after securing the Republican
nomination.

'Two choices'
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Steve Clelland, an Orlando firefighter and president of the city chapter of the Florida Professional
Firefighters' Association, said nothing is certain under the plan, however.

"Cities and counties would have two choices: Cut services or raise taxes," Clelland said. "But I'd
like to think police and fire would be one of the last items to go after."

Crist wants the Legislature to call a special election this fall so voters can decide whether to
double the state's $25,000 homestead exemption and expand the Save Our Homes property-tax
cap to include businesses, second homes and houses owned by out-of-state residents.

The governor also would allow homeowners to carry those tax-cap savings with them when they
move to new homes.

Cities and counties throughout the state say the package would slash billions of dollars from their
tax rolls, forcing cuts in police, fire, park programs and other public services.

Crist so far has avoided a backlash from school boards, saying his proposal to double the
homestead exemption would not apply to the portion of local property taxes that go to schools
and special districts.

Crist's drive to slash property taxes follows an election in which he made the issue a central plank
of his campaign.

It also comes after a brisk real-estate market helped fuel skyrocketing property values, allowing
statewide property-tax collections to swell to $25.7 billion -- more than double what they were in
1994.

Still, Orange County officials alone estimate some of the proposed cuts would cost as much as
$776 million during the next five years, a level they say is likely to grow by as much as 40 percent
if all the provisions are included.

Orlando officials said if Crist's plan were in effect today, it would slice at least $27.2 million from
the city budget, about 8 percent of spending.

Mayor Buddy Dyer, who last year outlined a $75 million public-safety initiative to add more police
and firefighters to the payroll over three years, already has said the city's tax rate would have to
climb to offset the reduction in the property rolls.

But some state lawmakers also have talked about imposing spending caps on cities and counties
-- to block any attempt to maintain current budgets through tax hikes.

Many lawmakers also scoff at claims that public safety would be among the early cuts made by
local governments.

"If you tell me you're going to cut police and fire first, that'd be the equivalent of a family saying
that we're going to cut our food budget and mortgage first but keep our spending habits like going
out to dinner, buying the trendy clothes, and having a lengthy vacation," said Sen. Mike
Haridopolos, R-Melbourne, chairman of the Finance and Tax Committee, which is conducting
public hearings on the property-tax issue.

"I agree that public safety is a good portion of the budget for local governments," he added. "But it
is not proportional to the dramatic increase in revenues they've had in recent years."
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work 5
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                            document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/


Counting on local roots

At least 28 of the 120 House members and several in the 40-person Senate formerly served in
city governments. Florida cities and the Florida Association of Counties, among other critics of the
plan, are hoping these lawmakers -- given their local ties -- will help soften the tax-cutting plan in
coming weeks.

Many local government organizations are also expected to beef up their lobbying corps in
advance of the two-month legislative session.

The session, which begins March 6, will likely be dominated by the tax-cutting proposals, with
variations of Crist's plan already being floated by governments and lawmakers who acknowledge
some effort at property-tax relief is certain to emerge this spring.

"Right now, there are a lot of moving parts," Haridopolos said. "It's hard to say what the ideas will
look like when they stop moving."




February 9, 2007
New York to Test Ways to Prevent Nuclear Terror
By ERIC LIPTON

WASHINGTON, Feb. 8 — New York City is about to become a laboratory to test ways of
strengthening the nation’s defenses against a terror attack by a nuclear device or a radioactive
“dirty bomb.”


Starting this spring, the Bush administration will assess new detection machines at a Staten
Island port terminal that are designed to screen cargo and automatically distinguish between
naturally occurring radiation and critical bomb-building ingredients.


And later this year, the federal government plans to begin setting up an elaborate network of
radiation alarms at some bridges, tunnels, roadways and waterways into New York, creating a
50-mile circle around the city.


The effort, which could be expanded to other cities if proven successful, is a major shift of focus
for the Department of Homeland Security. As it finishes installing the first generation of radiation
scanners at the nation’s ports and land border crossings, the department is trying to find ways to
stop a plot that would use a weapon built within the United States.


“How do you create deterrence against terrorism?” said Vayl S. Oxford, director of the Domestic
Nuclear Detection Office, the Homeland Security agency coordinating the work. “You complicate
the ability for the terrorist to do what they want.”

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work             6
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                    http://www.iaem.com/

But even as the new campaign begins, some members of Congress and antiterrorism experts are
raising concerns that the initiative, like previous Homeland Security programs, could prove
extraordinarily costly and provide few security gains.

“This is just total baloney,” said Tara O’Toole, a former assistant secretary at the Department of
Energy during the Clinton administration, where she oversaw nuclear weapons safety efforts.
“They are forgetting that no matter what type of engineering solution they try in good faith to come
up with, this is a thinking enemy and they will look for a way around it.”

While Homeland Security officials repeatedly declined to estimate the costs of a nationwide
detection system, agency documents show they might spend more than a billion dollars on the
cargo-screening equipment alone.

Local officials in New York are sparring with Homeland Security over a plan to immediately
transfer to local and state authorities the burden of maintaining and operating the network of
detection machines when it is completed within several years.


“We are concerned they will put money forward for a piece of hardware and then move to another
project,” said Raymond W. Kelly, New York City’s police commissioner. He added that while the
city supports the plan, he is not convinced that the proposed detection network makes sense.
“Whether or not it works, whether or not it causes too many false alarms, which causes a whole
other set of problems, all of these things are still to be determined,” he said.

Mr. Oxford said he is aware of the concerns about costs, which is still the subject of negotiations,
and the performance of the new detection machines. But with a threat like a nuclear attack, the
country cannot afford to wait until all the details are worked out, he said.

“Our philosophy is not to wait for perfection, because perfection never comes,” he said.


The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, among the newest agencies at Homeland Security, was
established in April 2005, in response to criticism that efforts to combat nuclear terrorism were too
disorganized.


The office focuses on blocking two types of plots: a nuclear weapon or a dirty bomb. A nuclear
attack by terrorists is considered unlikely, because of the difficulty of obtaining the required
radioactive materials, such as highly enriched uranium.


The detonation of a dirty bomb is considered much more feasible. It only requires dynamite or
another conventional explosive to detonate a widely available radioactive source — like the
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           7
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                    http://www.iaem.com/

cesium or cobalt in certain medical devices. The blast might cause injuries or deaths, but the
radioactive residue would cover a two- to three-block area and not pose an immediate health
threat. Possible panic and economic disruption could be among the most serious consequences,
experts say.

The Securing the Cities detection network, as the New York experiment is called, is intended to
stop a nuclear or radiological threat as far away from a city as possible. “Detecting it in the core of
Manhattan is too late,” Mr. Oxford said.

The network would most likely include truck inspection stations along highways approaching New
York, which would be equipped with radiation detection devices, agency budget documents say.
Devices might also be installed at highway tollbooths and at spots where rail, boat and subway
traffic could be monitored.

The detection equipment, some of which would be mobile, would be electronically connected and
monitored so if a suspicious vehicle passed one spot without being stopped, it might be
intercepted after passing another detector.

Some New York agencies already have a limited supply of radiation detection equipment, but the
new system would be much more extensive and go much further outside the city.


Mr. Kelly said that the city would, at least initially, use any new detection equipment to screen
vehicles heading into Lower Manhattan. The project would complement a city program to install
cameras, license plate readers and devices that can block vehicle traffic, creating a “ring of steel”
around the financial district.


The actual design of the Homeland Security system and the protocols for how responses to
alarms will be handled, are still being negotiated by federal officials and authorities in New York
City, New Jersey, Connecticut and New York state.


Benn H. Tannenbaum, a physicist and nuclear terrorism expert at the American Association for
the Advancement of Science in Washington, said the system would never create anything close
to an impenetrable barrier, particularly for a nuclear bomb, since the required ingredients have
low levels of radioactivity and can easily be shielded. But the project still might be worthwhile, he
said. “If nothing else, it makes the terrorist think twice before they do something like this,” he said.


Ms. O’Toole, the former Department of Energy official, pointed to Homeland Security’s BioWatch
program, set up in about 30 cities in 2003 to monitor the air for a possible biological attack.


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work              8
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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The equipment was installed quickly, but there was no detailed plan in place for how to respond
to positive alarms, which meant three weeks of confusion among Houston authorities in October
2003, after tularemia, a naturally occurring pathogen, was discovered. “There is this disconnect
between these grand schemes for technology and reality,” Ms. O’Toole said.

Laura S. H. Holgate, vice president at the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a Washington-based research
group, said the government should put far more energy into a global effort to prevent nuclear
materials from getting into the hands of terrorists.

The testing planned on Staten Island at the New York Container Terminal is intended to police
concerns about false alarms.


Three sets of new types of detection machines have been installed there. For the first time, such
machines sound an alarm when something radioactive passes through, and simultaneously
identify the radioactive isotope. That allows officials to distinguish between innocuous items that
can emit low levels of radiation, such as granite or kitty litter, and real threats.


Officials at the Government Accountability Office and some members of Congress are concerned
that Homeland Security is moving too quickly to buy the new machines. Initial tests have shown
them to be not much more effective than existing machines that are a fraction of the cost.


“We know this system is going to be expensive,” said Senator Joseph I. Lieberman, an
independent from Connecticut and chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee. “We
need to be sure it will perform as promised.”




State requests help with disaster fund (Florida)

Frustration prompts Florida officials to ask other states to join forces.


Mark Hollis
Tallahassee Bureau


February 14, 2007


TALLAHASSEE -- Frustrated by inaction in Washington, Florida officials this week are asking
other states to join them in setting up an insurance catastrophe fund.
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work            9
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                            document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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If established, a multistate fund would bail out regions hit by cataclysmic disasters such as
hurricanes, earthquakes, flooding and even terrorism.


But unlike a national fund -- which Congress has balked at setting up -- it wouldn't rely on the
financial backing of the federal government. Only interested states would participate.


"We hear so much about the hurricanes in Florida, but we know there's potential for a $400 billion
loss in California due to an earthquake, and a $250 billion massacre if an earthquake strikes
along the New Madrid Fault [in the Midwest]," Florida Insurance Commissioner Kevin McCarty
said Tuesday.


McCarty and Florida Chief Financial Officer Alex Sinkwill head to Atlanta later this week for a
summit on multistate catastrophe funds that they are hosting during a National Association of
Insurance Commissioners' conference. Sink said she likes the possibility of creating a regional
catastrophe fund linking coastal states.


"Hurricanes will not wait for the federal government to get a national catastrophe fund up and
running," Sink said. "It's up to the coastal states to work together to ensure citizens have access
to affordable hurricane insurance."


Aides to McCarty say the effort to start multistate funds is not an indication of giving up on the
idea of a national catastrophe fund. They say both are desirable.


"If another state gets hit with a Katrina-like hurricane, there's a limit to what the [insurance]
industry can pay, a limit to what any state can handle, and [federal] taxpayers are going to pay
the rest," said Bob Lotane, a spokesman for McCarty's office. "We believe pre-funding for a storm
is going to be cheaper for everyone."


The discussion comes as Gov. Charlie Crist and legislative leaders also work to lobby Congress
and other governors for a federal solution to the catastrophe risk facing states.


Crist plans to lobby his peers from around the country on a national catastrophe fund at the
National Governors Association meeting in Washington later this month.


House Speaker Marco Rubio and Senate President Ken Pruitt are organizing a federal/state
summit that will have the catastrophe-fund issues at the top of the agenda.


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           10
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
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Senate Democratic Leader Steve Geller, one of the Legislature's experts on insurance, is urging
Florida officials to pressure presidential candidates, as they seek early support in Florida, to
commit to backing a national catastrophe fund. Geller is skeptical that states can agree on details
to put multistate catastrophe funds into action.


"I don't object to what [McCarty] is trying," Geller said. "It's noble but unattainable. I just think
there's a little desperation in that we can't get this [national catastrophe fund], so let's get that [a
multistate compact] instead."




Neo-Nazi rally was organized by FBI informant (Florida)
Henry Pierson Curtis
Sentinel Staff Writer

February 15, 2007

A paid FBI informant was the man behind a neo-Nazi march through the streets of Parramore that
stirred up anxiety in Orlando's black community and fears of racial unrest that triggered a major
police mobilization.

That revelation came Wednesday in an unrelated federal court hearing and has prompted
outrage from black leaders, some of whom demanded an investigation into whether the February
2006 march was, itself, an event staged by law-enforcement agencies.

The FBI would not comment on what it knew about the involvement of its informant, 39-year-old
David Gletty of Orlando, in the neo-Nazi event. In court Wednesday, an FBI agent said the
bureau has paid its informant at least $20,000 during the past two years.

"Wow," Gletty said when reached by phone late Wednesday. "It is what it is. You were there in
court. I can't really go into any detail now."

Orlando City Councilwoman Daisy Lynum, whose district includes the march route west of
Interstate 4, said she wants to know who was behind the march, the neo-Nazis or the FBI and
other law-enforcement agencies.

"If it was staged, I would feel very uncomfortable and would ask for a full-scale investigation,"
Lynum said. "To come into a predominantly black community which could have resulted in great
harm to the black community? I would hate to be part of a game. It's a mockery to the community
for someone else to be playing a game with the community."

Others applauded the FBI's infiltration of the neo-Nazis.

"It's one of the largest extremist groups in the country, and Gletty was one of the most visible
individuals in the National Socialist Movement," said Andy Rosenkranz, state regional director for
the Anti-Defamation League. "Generally, the FBI and the JTTF (Joint Terrorism Task Force) in
Florida does an excellent job."

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work              11
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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Rally puts city in spotlight

Orlando drew national attention when the city granted a permit to Gletty so a minimum of 100
white supremacists and National Socialist Movement members could march Feb. 25 through the
historically black Parramore neighborhood.

Wearing swastikas and holding signs declaring "White Pride," the 22 neo-Nazis who turned out
were protected from 500 counterprotesters by about 300 police officers.

Gletty's secret life became public Wednesday in a federal court hearing resulting from the arrest
last week of two suspected white supremacists on charges of conspiracy to distribute crack
cocaine.

Last Thursday, the FBI arrested Tom Martin, 23, and John Rock, 35, after Gletty wore a wire to a
meeting and agreed to help them rob a drug dealer in Casselberry, according to testimony.

Rock told Gletty in a tape-recorded conversation that he and Martin had robbed seven drug
dealers by posing as law-enforcement officers, according to testimony. Martin and Rock remain
held without bail in the Seminole County Jail.

Slip-up lets name out of bag

Throughout most of the hearing, Gletty was referred to as "Mr. X" or "CW" (cooperating witness).
His identity was revealed when Assistant Federal Public Defender Peter W. Kenny repeatedly
slipped up and mentioned Gletty's full name.

FBI agent Kevin Farrington and a federal prosecutor were clearly uncomfortable with the
disclosure of the informant's name in open court.

Questioned about Gletty's role in the march, Farrington testified that "he participated in it. He did
not organize it. . . . [That's] pretty good firsthand information, sir."

The city parade permit, however, lists Gletty as the "on scene event manager."

And pictures of Gletty addressing marchers sporting swastika armbands for the Orlando rally
appear on a neo-Nazi Web site. Captions from other photos on the site mock the
counterdemonstrators and the police presence.

On another Web site, Gletty details his role in organizing the Orlando event and hosting a victory
party afterward.

"On 1/17/06 I got the permits and started the ball rolling," he writes. "On 2/25/06 at 3 pm on
saturday [sic] in downtown Orlando My crew and I got it done."

In another part of the posting, he writes: "Since I was the permit holder I was the person to deal
with the police and had over-all authority of the event."

No word from FBI

FBI officials did not return calls asking for specifics about the agency's relationship with Gletty. A
tree-trimmer in Orlando, he withdrew from the National Socialist Movement last fall to pursue
other projects, Farrington testified.
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Orlando police Deputy Chief Pete Gauntlett, who supervised the march preparations, would not
say what the FBI told police about Gletty and other marchers.

"We let them express their free speech and let them do what they're allowed to do, but we wanted
to have control," Gauntlett said.

Bill White, a former spokesman for the National Socialist Movement who participated in the rally
and now runs another neo-Nazi group, said he was surprised to hear of Gletty's involvement with
the FBI. He said Gletty did a lot for the cause.

A neo-Nazi offers his take

"If he was being sponsored by the FBI, then American National Socialism has a lot to thank the
FBI for," White said in an e-mail.

Lynum said that if the FBI was behind the march, she would like the agency to reimburse the city
for the tens of thousands it spent to send officers -- including SWAT-team and mounted-unit
members -- to police the march.

Adora Obi Nweze, president of the State Conference NAACP in Miami, said she was disturbed an
informant set up the march and was working for the FBI.

"That's very troubling that somebody like that would be an informant for the FBI," she said. "You
never know what they are capable of. No question, it bothers me."

But Alzo Reddick, a former state legislator who grew up in segregated Orlando, lived through
KKK marches and later taught black history, said he was proud of the way the police and the
community responded. He was a member of the "Be Cool" movement organized to calm the
community before the march.

"I think law enforcement has to walk in some murky places to be where the bad guys are,"
Reddick said. "Was the FBI informant an activist or a participant? Was he the agent provocateur
from the get-go? Sure, that would be part of what I'd like to know."




February 14, 2007
Coast Guard Chief Announces Plans to Overhaul the Service
By ERIC LIPTON


WASHINGTON, Feb. 13 — Acknowledging that the Coast Guard has failed to keep up with
changing times, its commandant, Adm. Thad Allen, unveiled a plan Tuesday to restructure its
management radically and expand its surveillance efforts along the nation’s coasts.


The overhaul is intended to address mounting criticism of a $24 billion equipment program known
as Deepwater, which is replacing or rebuilding most of the service’s large ships, planes and
helicopters.
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But it is much broader, including revamping the way the Coast Guard manages its response to
natural disasters and terrorist attacks, supervises its Atlantic and Pacific fleets, maintains its
aircraft and ships and handles its payroll and financial systems.

Some of Admiral Allen’s proposals could be felt by boat owners. He is advocating the mandatory
use of devices like the automated identification beacons that are on large ships on smaller
commercial fishing vessels and at least some pleasure boats.

The plan reflects changes that have already taken place at the service since 2001 when it
assumed a broader antiterrorism mission and has had its budget grow by 50 percent, to $8.6
billion this year.


“We have been running some parts of the Coast Guard like a small business when we are a
Fortune 500 company,” Admiral Allen said in a speech on Tuesday to several hundred Coast
Guard officials. “We need to evolve with changing times.”


Instead of operating separate Pacific and Atlantic fleets, Admiral Allen said, all 35,000 active duty
Coast Guard personnel on the service’s nearly 250 large ships, 1,700 smaller boats, 200 aircraft
and 750 shore-side units will now report to a single commander.


A hundred-person operations group will coordinate how specially trained Coast Guard units
respond to terror attacks, natural disasters, chemical or oil spills and its war-time assignments
with the Department of Defense.


A new deputy commandant for mission support will oversee the design, acquisition and
construction of new ships and aircraft and the maintenance of the fleet once they are built,
functions that are now managed separately.


That will allow the Coast Guard to avoid giving so much authority for design and construction
choices to contractors, like Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman, which renovated the first
eight trouble-plagued ships in the Deepwater program.


The speech by Admiral Allen was in advance of the release of another scathing report by the
Department of Homeland Security’s inspector general on the Coast Guard’s management of its
ship procurement program.


The newest report, a copy of which was obtained by The New York Times, confirmed safety
complaints that had been filed by a former Lockheed employee, who was so frustrated that his
observations had gone unheeded that he posted a Web video to detail them.
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The report says that as the former employee, Michael DeKort, had asserted, Coast Guard
contractors installed hundreds of cables on 123-foot patrol boats that could cause toxic smoke if
they caught fire. The ships are now out of service because of hull breaches. The contractors also
installed electronics equipment that was prone to failure in open-sea conditions.

Since 2001, the Coast Guard has become much more of an extension of the military, instead of a
service that primarily focuses on safety, with law enforcement playing a secondary role.

“This is not my father’s Coast Guard,” Admiral Allen said. “And my father is in the room.” Admiral
Allen’s father, Clyde Allen, served in the Coast Guard and was in the hotel ballroom to hear his
son’s speech.


It will be several years before all the changes are made, officials said, but the plan won early
praise Tuesday. James L. Hested, the former commanding officer of the Coast Guard yard, said
the service needed to go on a bureaucrat diet.

“You will have fewer fiefdoms,” Mr. Hested said.


Representative Elijah E. Cummings, Democrat of Maryland and chairman of the House panel that
oversees Coast Guard operations, said he hoped that Admiral Allen had time to complete the
work before his four-year tour of duty ended in 2010.


“He has laid out for himself a very tall order,” said Mr. Cummings, who attended the speech. “But
I think he can do it.”




February 16, 2007
In Setback for New Orleans, Fed-Up Residents Give Up
By SHAILA DEWAN


NEW ORLEANS, Feb. 15 — After nearly a decade in the city of their dreams, Kasandra Larsen
and her fiancé, Dylan Langlois, climbed into a rented moving truck on Marais Street last Sunday,
pointed it toward New Hampshire, and said goodbye.


Not because of some great betrayal — they had, after all, come back after losing everything in
Hurricane Katrina — but a series of escalating indignities: the attempted carjacking of a pregnant
friend; the announced move to Nashville by Ms. Larsen’s employer; the human feces deposited

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on their roof by, they suspect, the contractors next door; the two burglaries in the space of a
week; and, not least, the overnight wait for the police to respond.


A year ago, Ms. Larsen, 36, and Mr. Langlois, 37, were hopeful New Orleanians eager to rebuild
and improve the city they adored. But now they have joined hundreds of the city’s best and
brightest who, as if finally acknowledging a lover’s destructive impulses, have made the
wrenching decision to leave at a time when the population is supposed to be rebounding.


Their reasons include high crime, high rents, soaring insurance premiums and what many call a
lack of leadership, competence, money and progress. In other words: yes, it is still bad down
here. But more damning is what many of them describe as a dissipating sense of possibility, a
dwindling chance at redemption for a great city that, even before the storm, cried out for great
improvement.


“The window of opportunity is closing,” Ms. Larsen said, “before more people like us give up and
say it’s too little, too late.”


Mr. Langlois, who has repeatedly called the health and sanitation departments, the police and
City Hall, said he despaired of receiving any response. In November, the couple bought their first
house, and in December, they bought their first handgun.


“My friends here are just the greatest, hard-working, tax-paying people,” Mr. Langlois said, “and I
think a lot of us are feeling under siege.”


The couple are unlikely to make any money on the sale of their house.


For every household that, like this one, has given up, there is another on the verge. Tyrone
Wilson, a successful real estate agent and consultant, said he and his wife, Trina, a lawyer, had
given post-storm life a fair chance. But, Mr. Wilson said, at the end of the school year they are
likely to take their three children back to Dallas, where they took refuge after the storm.


“We came back, we tried,” he said. “It’s really draining, and at a certain point you sit down and
you say, ‘We don’t have to go through this.’ ”




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As a city in flux, New Orleans remains statistically murky, but demographers generally agree that
the population replenishment after the storm, as measured by things like the amount of mail sent
and employment in main economic sectors, has leveled off. While many poorer residents have
moved back to the city, the “brain drain” of professionals that the city was experiencing before the
storm appears to have accelerated.


Some say the overall effect is negligible. Greg Rigamer, a demographer who has done work for
the city, said that the lack of housing had constrained the recovery, but that many residents
remained fully committed to the city.


“The pattern in is certainly stronger than the pattern out,” Mr. Rigamer said.


But in December, the number of houses on the market peaked at a high not seen since the late
1980s, while the number of sales has trended downward since last June, according to data
tracked by the Brookings Institution in Washington. Statistics kept by commercial moving
companies show a net loss to New Orleans. Employers say they have raised salaries for skilled
workers.


One oft-cited survey by the University of New Orleans found that a third of residents, especially
those with graduate degrees, were thinking of leaving within two years.


Susan E. Howell, who conducted the survey, cautioned that the sample was small and that the
poor were underrepresented. There are indications that low-income New Orleanians — those
who will need the most help from a cash-strapped city —are making their way back, despite a
lack of affordable housing, piling into relatives’ homes and trailers.


U-Haul, the rental company that is more affordable than commercial movers, has had more
inbound trucks than outbound, according to the company’s records, and the number of public
school children and new applications for food stamps in Orleans Parish are rising. In Houston, a
task force that helps Hurricane Katrina residents resettle has paid more than $1 million in moving
expenses for 350 families returning to New Orleans.


“This is a serious problem for the city, because one of the things we had pre-Katrina was the lack
of an educated population,” Dr. Howell said. “We had too many people at the low end and not
enough at the high end, and Katrina sort of fast-forwarded that trend.”
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Because many poorer people have taken longer to return, they have not dealt with as many
months of frustration as families with higher income and more mobility, so their staying power has
yet to be determined.


Reganer Stewart, 30, a hotel maid, said she had been living with her cousin and her cousin’s
mother and four children since November. In January, Ms. Stewart’s 12-year-old daughter,
Brandi, joined them, but was put on a waiting list for school and could not enroll until earlier this
month.


Houston, which Ms. Stewart had not liked when she evacuated there, was growing more
attractive as her search for an apartment here grew longer. “Most likely, we going to leave,” she
said.


In battered but proud New Orleans, abandonment is a highly emotional subject, in part because
many have made sacrifices to stay and rebuild. To some, leaving now is tantamount to treason.
When a report appeared a year ago that Emeril Lagasse, the famed chef, had said the city would
“never come back,” reservations at his restaurants were canceled and strangers berated him. He
insisted he had been misquoted.


And in response to an article in The Times-Picayune of New Orleans about a woman who had
decided to move on, Poppy Z. Brite, a New Orleans novelist, wrote: “This isn’t an easy place to
be right now, and the decision to stay or go is deeply personal. But why must some people use
the media to take a parting shot at the city?”


On another occasion, Ms. Brite said, “If a place takes you in and you take it into yourself, you
don’t desert it just because it can kill you. There are some things more valuable than life.”


Such fierce sentiments help explain why a dozen people who were planning to move or had
already done so declined to speak on the record for this article or allow their name to be used.
One man, a chef, said he wanted to remain anonymous because he was likely to return someday.
A university professor said she did not want to compromise her employer’s ability to recruit.


“If I was going to be really politically savvy,” she said, “I would say that I was going to do a job
search about this time anyway.”


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The decision to leave is especially difficult for natives, said Elliott Stonecipher, a demographic
analyst in Shreveport, La., even if they are going no farther than the north shore of Lake
Pontchartrain.


“They just won’t talk about it; they do not want to talk about it,” Mr. Stonecipher said, adding that
the reluctance shows just how unusual the city is. “It’s remarkable that they just don’t want
anybody to know that they gave in.”


Others have unimpeachable reasons: Paul Gailiunas, a doctor whose wife, Helen Hill, was
murdered in their home last month, left immediately for South Carolina.


As for Ms. Larsen and Mr. Langlois, they have taken in all the fury at those who are leaving, in
newspapers, neighborhood forums on the Internet and even in the bars and cafes of their
neighborhood, the Ninth Ward. But while many of their own friends had expressed
disappointment, none had blamed them.


“Not only do they understand why we’re leaving,” Ms. Larsen said, “but they say, ‘You know what,
I’m thinking about getting out of here, too.’ It’s like they’re waiting for that one more bad thing to
happen.”




Senators Would Elevate Top Manager at Homeland Security

By Stephen Barr
Tuesday, February 13, 2007; D04

Many members of Congress are frustrated by the Department of Homeland Security's
performance as it nears the fourth anniversary of its launch. The department's woes include
contracting and budget problems, a sluggish response to Hurricane Katrina, turnover in senior
ranks and a workforce that gives low scores to its senior leadership in attitude surveys.

In a bid to improve all that, key senators would elevate the department's top management job and
enhance its stability.

The department operates with an undersecretary for management, but a bill introduced yesterday
would replace the job with a higher rank, deputy secretary for management, who would be
designated the No. 3 official at Homeland Security.




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The person holding the job would serve for at least five years, according to a draft of the bill. That
would about double the time that the average political appointee stays in office. The fixed term
would allow an appointee to outlast a secretary or a change in administrations.

Sen. George V. Voinovich (R-Ohio), the bill's chief sponsor, said he thinks the existing
undersecretary position "lacks sufficient authority to direct the type of sustained leadership and
overarching management integration and transformation strategy that is needed department-
wide."

The undersecretary for management is Paul A. Schneider, who was confirmed by the Senate in
December. He is the department's second management chief, succeeding Janet Hale, who
resigned in May. A Homeland Security spokesman said the department does not comment on
pending legislation.

Voinovich introduced a similar bill in September 2005, but it never got traction. This version has
more co-sponsors, including Sen. Daniel K. Akaka (D-Hawaii). Akaka chairs the Senate's federal
workforce subcommittee, and Voinovich is the panel's ranking member. Sens. Carl M. Levin (D-
Mich.) and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) also have joined as co-sponsors, Voinovich said in a
statement.

The proposal appears to follow recommendations offered for the past two years by David M.
Walker, head of the Government Accountability Office, Congress's watchdog agency. He has
championed the idea of a full-time "chief management official" for large departments that are
vulnerable to waste, fraud and mismanagement.

But the Bush administration has seemed cool to the idea of setting up management czars. For
example, Pentagon officials have said creating a chief management official for the Defense
Department would create more bureaucracy and slow down the flow of information to the defense
secretary. Other officials have warned that creating a management post would likely raise the ire
of deputy secretaries, who see themselves as the chief operating officers in Cabinet departments.

Voinovich said his plan would ensure that the deputy secretary at Homeland Security, the No. 2
official, would continue to be the secretary's "first assistant on all policy matters," while the newly
created deputy secretary for management would be the secretary's chief adviser on "the
development of sustained, long-term management strategies."

Under Voinovich's bill, the deputy secretary for management would be required to have
"extensive executive level leadership and management experience in the public or private sector"
and "a demonstrated ability to manage large and complex organizations."

The merger of 22 agencies that created the department was one of the largest reorganizations
ever attempted by the government and involved about 180,000 employees. The Bush
administration and Congress hoped the merger would strengthen border security and foster rapid
response to terrorist threats after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

But the department has not jelled as expected. Voinovich pointed out that the GAO has placed
the department on its "high risk" list because an "array of management and programmatic
challenges" limit homeland security strategies and operations.



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Voinovich also noted that the department's inspector general and the Homeland Security
Advisory Council, an outside group set up to help department officials, have expressed concerns
about the department's management and organizational problems.

The Ohio senator, who has served as a mayor and governor in his home state, said he
understands that Homeland Security "is also busy putting out fires." He added, "But the
connection between good management practices and operational success should not be lost."




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Global Warming and Hazards Research
2 N.C. Hospitals Warn of Virus Outbreak
http://www.breitbart.com/news/2007/02/09/D8N6BIMO0.html

Most bird flu victims under 40, WHO analysis finds
http://in.today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=worldNews&storyID=2007-02-
12T071042Z_01_NOOTR_RTRJONC_0_India-287257-1.xml

Passengers trapped on runway for 8 hours
http://www.cnn.com/2007/TRAVEL/02/15/passengers.stranded/index.html

Gunman kills 5 at Utah mall, police say
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/02/13/salt.lake.shooting.ap/index.html

Cop who saved shoppers from shooter: I am not a hero
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/02/13/officer.utah/index.html

Utah mall gunman was Srebrenica survivor, cousin says
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/02/14/utah.mall.gunman.reut/index.html

New Orleans tornado injures three
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/02/13/new.orleans.tornado.ap/index.html

NYC: 9/11 Health Costs $393M Per Year
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/02/13/ap/national/mainD8N94JC00.shtml

New Orleans Mardi Gras spirit undampened by tornado
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070213/lf_afp/usstormkatrina_070213194245;_ylt=ApbF9YQNV4
MWhgWqb82zFkXPOrgF

Study suggests possible bird flu immunity
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070213/sc_nm/birdflu_immunity_dc;_ylt=ArqtP3aF0zyy2VsVlV2U
ud0hANEA

Don't spread panic about bird flu, WHO urges media
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa003&articleID=2EF6B53BEBD1A794AA0FE7749ED
72393

Time to "Adapt" To Climate Change?
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/02/13/tech/main2468909.shtml

Warmer Future Could Bring Droughts
http://physorg.com/news90515559.html

Flying the cleanly skies?
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0212/p13s02-litr.html

USGS Announces Spanish and Asian-Language Versions of San Francisco Bay Area
Earthquake Preparedness Handbook
http://www.emergencymgmt.com/story.php?id=103913


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U.S. wild-bird survey finds no evidence of H5N1
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa003&articleID=70C96C4EF725A5FD488815D60A1
EC206

Antarctic Temperatures Disagree with Predictions
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/842862/antarctic_temperatures_disagree_with_predictions
/index.html

Global leaders reach climate deal
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6364663.stm

Gore Announces Climate Change Concerts
http://www.livescience.com/environment/070215_gore_concerts.html

Troops aid motorists stranded by winter storm
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/02/16/cold.weather.ap/index.html


February 6, 2007
ESSAY
On the Climate Change Beat, Doubt Gives Way to Certainty (Provided by Wayne Blanchard)
By WILLIAM K. STEVENS


In the decade when I was the lead reporter on climate change for this newspaper, nearly every
blizzard or cold wave that hit the Northeast would bring the same conversation at work.

Somebody in the newsroom would eye me and say something like, “So much for global warming.”
This would often, but not always, be accompanied by teasing or malicious expressions, and
depending on my mood the person would get either a joking or snappish or explanatory
response. Such an exchange might still happen, but now it seems quaint. It would be out of date
in light of a potentially historic sea change that appears to have taken place in the state and the
status of the global warming issue since I retired from The New York Times in 2000.


Back then I wrote that one day, if mainstream scientists were right about what was going on with
the earth’s climate, it would become so obvious that human activity was responsible for a
continuing rise in average global temperature that no other explanation would be plausible.

That day may have arrived.


Similarly, it was said in the 1990s that while the available evidence of a serious human impact on
the earth’s climate might be preponderant enough to meet the legal test for liability in a civil suit, it
fell short of the more stringent “beyond a reasonable doubt” test of guilt in a criminal case.




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Now it seems that the steadily strengthening body of evidence about the human connection with
global warming is at least approaching the higher standard and may already have satisfied it.


The second element of the sea change, if such it is, consists of a demonstrably heightened
awareness and concern among Americans about global warming. The awakening has been
energized largely by dramatic reports on the melting Arctic and by fear — generated by the
spectacular horror of Hurricane Katrina — that a warmer ocean is making hurricanes more
intense.

Politicians are weighing in on the subject as never before, especially with the advent of a
Democratic-led Congress. It appears likely, if not certain, that whoever is elected president in
2008 will treat the issue seriously and act accordingly, thereby bringing the United States into
concert with most of the rest of the world. Just last week, Senator John McCain of Arizona, a
presidential aspirant and the co-author of a bill mandating stronger action, asserted that the
argument about global warming “is over.” Back in the day, such words from a conservative
Republican would have been unimaginable, even if he were something of a maverick.


I’ve been avidly watching from the sideline as the strengthening evidence of climate change has
accumulated, not least the discovery that the Greenland ice cap is melting faster than had been
thought. The implications of that are enormous, though the speed with which the melting may
catastrophically raise sea levels is uncertain — as are many aspects of what a still hazily
discerned climatic future may hold.


Last week, in its first major report since 2001, the world’s most authoritative group of climate
scientists issued its strongest statement yet on the relationship between global warming and
human activity. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said the likelihood was 90
percent to 99 percent that emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide,
spewed from tailpipes and smokestacks, were the dominant cause of the observed warming of
the last 50 years. In the panel’s parlance, this level of certainty is labeled “very likely.”


Only rarely does scientific odds-making provide a more definite answer than that, at least in this
branch of science, and it describes the endpoint, so far, of a progression:


¶In 1990, in its first report, the panel found evidence of global warming but said its cause could be
natural as easily as human.


¶In a landmark 1995 report, the panel altered its judgment, saying that “the balance of evidence
suggests a discernible human influence on global climate.”


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¶In 2001, it placed the probability that human activity caused most of the warming of the previous
half century at 66 percent to 90 percent — a “likely” rating.


And now it has supplied an even higher, more compelling seal of numerical certainty , which is
also one measure of global warming’s risk to humanity.


To say that reasonable doubt is vanishing does not mean there is no doubt at all. Many gaps
remain in knowledge about the climate system. Scientists do make mistakes, and in any case
science continually evolves and changes. That is why the panel’s findings, synthesized from a
vast body of scientific studies, are generally couched in terms of probabilities and sometimes
substantial margins of error. So in the recesses of the mind, there remains a little worm of caution
that says all may not be as it seems, or that the situation may somehow miraculously turn around
— or, for that matter, that it may turn out worse than projected.

In several respects, the panel’s conclusions have gotten progressively stronger in one direction
over almost two decades, even as many of its hundreds of key members have left the group and
new ones have joined. Many if not most of the major objections of contrarians have evaporated
as science works its will, although the contrarians still make themselves heard.


The panel said last week that the fact of global warming itself could now be considered
“unequivocal,” and certified that 11 of the last 12 years were among the 12 warmest on record
worldwide. (The fact of the warming is one thing contrarians no longer deny.)

But perhaps the most striking aspect of the 2007 report is the sheer number and variety of directly
observed ways in which global warming is already having a “likely” or “very likely” impact on the
earth.


In temperate zones, the frequency of cold days, cold nights and frosts has diminished, while the
frequency of hot days, hot nights and heat waves has increased. Droughts in some parts of the
world have become longer and more intense. Precipitation has decreased over the subtropics
and most of the tropics, but increased elsewhere in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.


There have been widespread increases in the frequency of “heavy precipitation events,” even in
areas where overall precipitation has gone down. What this means is that in many places, it rains
and snows less often but harder — well-documented characteristics of a warming atmosphere.
Remember this in the future, when the news media report heavy, sometimes catastrophic one-
day rainfalls — four, six, eight inches — as has often happened in the United States in recent
years. Each one is a data point in an trend toward more extreme downpours and the floods that
result.
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All of these trends are rated 90 percent to 99 percent likely to continue.


The list goes on.


And for the first time, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the panel reported evidence of a trend
toward more intense hurricanes since 1970, and said it was likely that this trend, too, would
continue.


Some of the panel’s main conclusions have remained fairly stable over the years. One is that if
greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, they will most likely warm the earth by about 3 to
7 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of this century, with a wider range of about 2 to 12 degrees
possible. The warming over the Northern Hemisphere is projected to be higher than the global
average, as is the case for the modest one-degree warming observed in the last century.


The projected warming is about the same as what the panel estimates would be produced by a
doubling of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, compared with the immediate
preindustrial age. It would also be almost as much warming as has occurred since the depths of
the last ice age, 20,000 years ago.


Some experts believe that no matter what humans do to try to rein in greenhouse gas emissions,
a doubling is all but inevitable by 2100. In this view, the urgent task ahead is to keep them from
rising even higher.


If the concentrations were to triple, and even if they just double, there is no telling at this point
what the world will really be like as a result, except to speculate that on balance, most of its
inhabitants probably won’t like it much. If James E. Hansen, one of the bolder climate scientists of
the last two decades, is right, they will be living on a different planet.


It has been pointed out many times, including by me, that we are engaged in a titanic global
experiment. The further it proceeds, the clearer the picture should become. At age 71, I’m unlikely
to be around when it resolves to everyone’s satisfaction — or dissatisfaction. Many of you may
be, and a lot of your descendants undoubtedly will be.


Good luck to you and to them.




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February 15, 2007
Scientists Warn That Bird-Flu Virus Remains a Threat
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

Last winter, as the deadly bird-flu virus marched out of Asia, across Europe and down into Africa,
public health experts warned of the potential for a catastrophic pandemic like the Spanish flu of
1918.

This year, by contrast, bird flu seems all but forgotten, mentioned occasionally when it claims
another life or when it causes a major outbreak in, say, a British turkey farm. With flu season
reaching its peak, the question for many Americans now is whether the threat they are facing is
not Spanish flu but swine flu — another widely advertised menace that never materialized.

But that is premature, scientists say, cautioning that the virus is as dangerous and unpredictable
as ever. It killed more people in 2006 than it did in 2005 or 2004, they point out, and its fatality
rate is rising — 61 percent now, up from 43 percent in 2005.


More worrisome, they say, is that the disease is out of control in birds in more places than ever,
including the Nile delta in Egypt and Nigeria, where public health mechanisms are weak.


“I’ve gotten at least 10 media calls in the last few months asking me to deliver the death sentence
for avian flu,” said Dr. Michael T. Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease
Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “But at any conference, if you get a group of
virologists at the bar, after the fourth beer, they let their hair down and admit it — they don’t know
what is happening. They’ve been incredibly humbled by this virus.”


Since viruses with very high fatality rates, like Ebola, tend to burn themselves out by killing
victims faster than those who are infected can pass it on, the increasing fatality rate — still
unexplained — may be a silver lining. But the virus has plenty of mutational wiggle room — the
1918 virus had a 2 percent fatality rate and yet still killed 50 million to 100 million because it was
so transmissible.


That is why health experts remain cautious, warning that the pandemic could begin at any time
and noting that February is a particularly risky month. The Year of the Pig begins on Feb. 18, and
New Year’s celebrations in China and Vietnam have become associated with flu outbreaks
because so much poultry for family feasts is on the move.



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Dr. Robert G. Webster, an internationally renowned virologist at St. Jude Children’s Research
Hospital in Memphis, ended a recent talk with a slide of three animals in a reference to Asia.
“We’ve survived the Year of the Chicken and the Year of the Dog,” he said. “Will we survive the
Year of the Pig?”

“My take-home message,” Dr. Webster added, “is don’t become complacent. Don’t trust this one.”


Recent flu outbreaks among poultry in Britain and Hungary are not particularly worrying, the
United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization said, because those countries are proficient at
eliminating veterinary diseases.


The British are very proficient at eliminating veterinary diseases by killing and incinerating
animals, officials said, noting that more than 160,000 birds were swiftly killed to contain the British
outbreak. The Hungarians are believed capable of the same sort of response.


But the virus is out of control in poultry in three countries — Indonesia, Nigeria and Egypt — with
combined populations of 447 million people. A year ago, it was out of control only in Indonesia,
and Thailand and Vietnam had stifled outbreaks, though the virus returned later. China remains a
mystery; despite official denials, there is evidence that it is circulating there, too.


Most alarming to the experts, though it got relatively less attention, was the death in January of a
22-year-old Nigerian woman, an accountant who lived in the crowded financial capital, Lagos.
Officially, only one death of the H5N1 strain was confirmed, but Nigerian newspapers said the
woman’s mother died with similar symptoms two weeks earlier, and a female relative was sick but
recovered.


If true, that suggests a cluster of cases with possible human-to-human transmission. Tests on
them were negative, but human H5N1 tests are best done on fresh samples from deep in the
lungs, which are hard to obtain, and false negatives are common.


In Nigeria, despite the culling of 700,000 birds, avian flu has been found in birds in 19 of the
country’s 36 states, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization. Dr. Oyedele Oyediji,
president of the Animal Science Association of Nigeria, told local papers that bans on poultry
movement and culling orders were simply not being enforced.


“If you go to the markets in Lagos now,” he said, “you would notice that poultry products like
guinea fowl, ducks, turkey and chicken from the northern part of the country are still available.”



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Nigerian farmers have complained that government cullers pay them only $2 for chickens that
cost them $5 to $7 to raise. But payments, supported by the World Bank, seem to be made fairly
promptly through local police stations.

Indonesia, by contrast, provides farmers with $1 vouchers that may not be cashed for three or
four months, said Dr. Tri Satya Putri Naipospos, the country’s director of animal health. “It’s our
weakest implementation,” she admitted at a recent flu conference. “It should be treated as an
emergency, but we still follow routine budget mechanisms.”

Eighty percent of all Indonesian households keep poultry, and the flu is in 30 of the country’s 33
provinces and still, she said, few take the threat seriously enough.


“Farmers say dying chickens are normal in life,” she said. “And you must realize that 62 dead
people in one and a half years? That’s not very much in Indonesia. Three hundred thousand die
from TB, from dengue. People in the villages don’t grab what is a pandemic.”


The picture is not entirely bleak, however. Dr. Joseph Domenech, the F.A.O.’s chief veterinarian,
said he thought the prospects for controlling the spread in birds were “a lot better than three years
ago or even one year ago.”


For unknown reasons — possibly weather patterns and better poultry vaccination in northern
China — not as many migrating swans and geese carried the virus across Western Europe and
down into Africa as did last winter. The main culprit now in spreading the virus seems to be trade
in poultry, health officials say.


Also, Dr. Domenech said, more poor countries have become alert to outbreaks. For example, he
said, the virus was found last year in spots from the Ivory Coast to Cameroon, a 1,000-mile
stretch of West Africa, in countries with “very weak animal health prevention.” Despite nominal
customs bans, Nigeria exports poultry throughout the region, he said.

“But we did not have any explosive outbreak,” he said.


Also, African nations rarely follow the dangerous Asian practice of herding huge flocks of
domestic ducks with clipped wings into paddies after harvests to eat leftover rice and snails. Their
droppings can pass the infection among themselves and on to wild ducks. Vietnam tried to ban
the practice, “but it was a mistake,” Dr. Domenech said. “It cannot be enforced. So now they will
vaccinate ducks instead.”



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The virus has also been found in cats. That is not new; one of the most startling outbreaks killed
103 tigers in a Thai zoo in 2004. But a recent sampling of 500 stray cats collected near bird
markets in Jakarta, the Indonesian capital, found that 20 percent of them were infected. However,
no human is known to have been infected by a cat.

World Health Organization reports almost always link human cases to poultry, but Dr. Naipospos,
the Indonesian animal health official, released data at a flu conference in early February calling
that into question. In the 82 human cases studied, she said, only 45 percent of victims were
directly exposed to sick poultry. Thirty-five percent had “indirect” exposure, which meant sick
birds in the neighborhood, and 20 percent were “inconclusive.”


Virologists say they believe that what must be avoided is a situation in which humans with
seasonal flu catch H5N1, too, because the viruses could mix.

Indonesia’s best prevention against that, Dr. Naipospos said, is the “Tamiflu blanket.”


“We learned that in Garut,” she said, referring to a cluster of cases last August in West Java.
More than 20 people died or suffered serious symptoms. The government quickly gave the
antiviral drug Tamiflu to more than 2,000 people. Ultimately, only three cases in the cluster were
confirmed, but scientists say they suspect that some were missed.




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International Affairs
Japan Launches Satellite-Based Alert System (Provided by Nena Wiley)
http://www.redorbit.com/news/technology/836068/japan_launches_satellitebased_alert_system/in
dex.html?source=

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17107491/

Iran: Nuclear announcement coming in April
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/meast/02/11/iran.nuclear/index.html

India, China, Russia call for fairer world order
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070214/india_nm/india287599;_ylt=AiY6s625LUAoETfCaBgk_gw
PLBIF

Red Cross Agencies Share Lessons from Terrorist Attacks
http://www.voanews.com/english/2007-02-12-voa23.cfm

Sea level rise could hit poor countries hard: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070213/sc_nm/globalwarming_searise_dc;_ylt=AjS2xjaSyWEbuJ
_nI28c6OMhANEA

Ireland examines tsunami early warning system
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070213/sc_afp/irelandeutsunami_070213203949;_ylt=AkhCPlPZ
HrmwiNJjBYpKbA_POrgF

U.N. watchdog unveils new symbol for radiation risk
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070215/sc_nm/nuclear_symbol_dc;_ylt=Al_8JjKUNxTjzu6bdR6A7
i8hANEA

Time for Europe to tackle looming water crisis: environment agency
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070214/sc_afp/climateeuropewater_070214191955;_ylt=AtHqxUV
NZ26TnXmM5aqp0HLPOrgF

London to get bombing victims memorial
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070215/ap_on_re_eu/britain_london_bombings

Second Madrid bomb suspect denies role in al Qaeda
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070216/wl_nm/spain_trial_dc




German Red Army Faction Member Paroled

By DAVID RISING
The Associated Press
Monday, February 12, 2007; 10:27 AM

BERLIN -- A German court on Monday approved parole for one of the last jailed members of the
Red Army Faction in a case that has revived painful memories of the left-wing terrorist group's
1970s heyday.
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Brigitte Mohnhaupt, 57, will be released March 27 after serving 24 years of a life sentence for
multiple murders, the Stuttgart state court ruled.

Conservative politicians and police questioned the decision.

"The RAF terrorists murdered 10 police officers," said Konrad Freiberg, the head of Germany's
police union. "Although the ruling follows the rule of the law and the opinion of the judges needs
to be accepted, we will not forget these murders. A feeling of bitterness remains."

Mohnhaupt was convicted in 1985 of involvement in nine murders, including those of West
German chief federal prosecutor Siegfried Buback and of Hanns-Martin Schleyer, the head of the
country's industry federation.

She was given five life sentences on the murder charges and convictions on other counts. Those
included attempted murder for her part in a 1981 rocket-propelled grenade attack on the car of
U.S. Gen. Frederick Kroesen _ then the commander of U.S. forces in Europe _ which injured both
the general and his wife.

Mohnhaupt, who will be on five years' probation, was a leader in the Red Army Faction, once
known as the Baader-Meinhof gang, which sought to combat what it saw as capitalist oppression
of workers and U.S. imperialism.

Active from 1970 _ when it grew out of student anti-Vietnam war protests _ until 1992, when it
abandoned violence, the Red Army Faction formally disbanded in 1998. During that time, the
group carried out kidnappings, bank robberies and attacks on prominent government and
business figures.

U.S. military facilities and personnel in Germany were also targeted, and the group had ties to
Palestinian radicals and to communist East Germany's secret police, the Stasi.

Over the decades, Red Army Faction members killed 34 people and injured hundreds. Victims
included bystanders, police officers and chauffeurs.

The court decided Mohnhaupt fulfilled the conditions of her sentence and no longer posed a
threat to society, court spokeswoman Josefine Koeblitz said.

The decision was made "according to legal conditions and was not an act of clemency," Koeblitz
said.

Mohnhaupt was captured early in her involvement with the Red Army Faction in Berlin in 1972
and jailed for several years. Released in 1977, she immediately went back to the group and
played a key role in the trail of death it left later that year, which became known as the "German
Autumn."

She was arrested again in then-communist Yugoslavia in 1978, but allowed to go six months
later.

She was finally captured by West German authorities on Nov. 11, 1982, as she went to an arms
cache in woods near Frankfurt, which had been staked out by police for two weeks after they
received a tip from locals who had stumbled upon it.
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Mohnhaupt had petitioned for her release in a bid for parole that was supported by prosecutors in
a closed hearing in January.

The ruling coincides with as a separate petition for clemency from Germany's president by
another convicted Red Army Faction member, Christian Klar. Klar still has two years to serve
before qualifying for parole.

While some say Mohnhaupt and Klar, like other convicted murderers, have a right to parole under
German law, others want to see expressions of remorse and clarification of questions over who
pulled the trigger in the murders of Buback, Schleyer and others.

Bavaria's conservative interior minister, Guenther Beckstein, said the ruling left him concerned
that "such a serious criminal can be set free without ever repenting her acts."

But the opposition Left Party said the ruling was "long overdue."

"Now the other three former RAF activists who are still incarcerated ... need to be set free," said
Ulla Jelpke, the party's spokeswoman on domestic issues.




British Panel Urges Police to Apologize To Muslims for Raid

By Mary Jordan
Washington Post Foreign Service
Wednesday, February 14, 2007; A15

LONDON, Feb. 13 -- London police should publicly apologize to two Muslim families caught up in
a mistaken anti-terrorist raid in which a man was shot, an independent oversight panel said
Tuesday.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission was investigating the dramatic dawn raid of two
homes in East London last June by about 250 officers, some in chemical protective suits. Police
officials later said they believed that "a highly dangerous explosive device that could be set off
remotely" was being made there.

Two men, Mohammed Abdul Kahar, 23, and his brother Abul Koyair, 20, were arrested, and
Abdul Kahar was accidentally shot in the shoulder during the scuffle. A week later, after an
extensive search of the houses, both men were released without charge.

Nine family members, including children and elderly, were also hauled into the police station,
where DNA samples and fingerprints where taken, actions the panel called "insensitive and
unnecessary."

Although it admonished the police for some of their procedures, the panel did not recommend
disciplinary action in connection with the raid, which soured relations between police and many
Muslims.



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Alf Hitchcock, a deputy assistant police commissioner, told reporters that police had already
apologized three times for the raid and would do so again.

The so-called Forest Gate raid, named for the neighborhood where it occurred, is frequently cited
by Muslim leaders, who say that many of the nearly 2 million Muslims in Britain feel under siege
and presumed guilty by police.

Between Sept. 11, 2001, and the end of last September, police arrested 1,140 people for alleged
terror-related offenses and released 631 without charge, according to Home Office statistics. Only
38 have been convicted of terrorism offenses, and 98 are currently on trial, according to the
government.

Police say they have been under extraordinary pressure to stop attacks that could kill large
numbers of people, especially after suicide bombers killed themselves and 52 other passengers
on London trains and a bus in July 2005.

Last August, police arrested 25 people in an alleged plot to blow up transatlantic jets; eight were
later released without charge. Last month, nine Muslim men were arrested in an alleged plot to
kidnap and behead a Muslim serving in the British army; three have been released without
charge.

Muslim leaders are increasingly calling police intelligence faulty and say officers are routinely
picking up the wrong people. Also, they say, the whole Muslim community is tarred when police
swoop in with massive force rather than quietly pulling people in for questioning.

Massoud Shadjareh, chairman of the London-based Islamic Human Rights Commission, said in
an interview that the huge numbers of arrests of Muslims that result in no charges "are
devastating individuals" and making many Muslims "extremely angry."

He said cases such as the Forest Gate raid are becoming typical, citing the lasting damage done
to the Muslim community by publicity about Abdul Kahar and Koyair making a chemical bomb,
even though they turned out to be innocent.

Shadjareh called Tuesday's official finding that police should apologize to the families "too little,
too late."

Abdul Kahar told the BBC he was disappointed by the commission's findings. He said nothing
justified the way police officers handled members of his family, including his 60-year-old father.
"He was half naked, and they were beating him on the floor," Abdul Kahar said.

In all, the two families filed more than 150 complaints against the police. Deborah Glass, the
panel's commissioner, dismissed nearly all of them but agreed that police should have handled
the family members and the two men's accommodation in detention better.

"I've concluded that the police were right to take no chances with public safety," Glass said. But
she added, "They must also plan more realistically for the possibility that their intelligence is
wrong."




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Other
Sixty Deals in Disaster (Book Review-Fiction)
http://www.scifi.com/scifiwire/index.php?category=0&id=40031


February 8, 2007
Gaping Reminders of Aging and Crumbling Pipes (Provided by Wayne Blanchard)
By WILLIAM YARDLEY


PORTLAND, Ore. — After a sinkhole swallowed a sewer-repair truck here on the day after
Christmas, the truck’s crew crawled to safety, muddy and mystified.


Last summer in Irving, Tex., a 2-year-old boy disappeared near a sinkhole. One theory was that
he was kidnapped. Another was that he was lost in the sewer system that had broken open and
caused the collapse.


In December, firefighters in Brooklyn rescued a grandmother carrying groceries who fell into a
hole that opened beneath her on a sidewalk. And in Hershey, Pa., a damaged storm drain caused
a six-foot-deep sinkhole in Chocolate Town Park, nearly sinking the town’s New Year’s Eve
celebration.

Local and state officials across the country say thousands of miles of century-old underground
water and sewer lines are springing leaks, eroding and — in extreme cases — causing the
ground above them to collapse. Though there is no master tally of sinkholes, there is consensus
among civil engineers and water experts that things are getting worse.

The Environmental Protection Agency has projected that unless cities invest more to repair and
replace their water and sewer systems, nearly half of the water system pipes in the United States
will be in poor, very poor or “life elapsed” status by 2020.

“I’m not exaggerating,” said Stephen P. Allbee, a project director in the agency’s water division
who helped make the projections. “It’s a really, really big public issue, and it’s going to be with us
for a long time.”


Local geology or underground hazards are blamed for many sinkholes: weak limestone in Florida,
old mineshafts in Pennsylvania. But increasingly, the authorities say, as America’s cities grow
older and basic repairs are put off, when the ground gives way the problem is bad pipes.




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In its 2005 “Report Card for America’s Infrastructure,” the American Society of Civil Engineers
gave water and wastewater infrastructure across the country a D-minus and suggested it would
take an investment of $390 billion to bring wastewater infrastructure alone up to par.

Estimates vary on what the costs could be, but nervous water utilities and environmental groups
have been campaigning to educate the public and local elected officials to get more money for
repairs. But they face an uphill battle, persuading people to pay higher water and sewer rates,
and politicians to approve those rates instead of building new schools, parks, libraries and roads.

“You can’t easily go to a ribbon-cutting or have your picture taken in front of a new sewer line,”
said Dean Marriott, director of the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, which oversees
sewer maintenance in the city. “Everyone simply counts on them working. Most people don’t
know how they work or even where the system is.”

Still, Mr. Allbee, the E.P.A. official, said age and neglect could prove as fatal to a system as a
catastrophic natural event or a terrorist attack.


“You can lose that system all at once because of terrorism,” Mr. Allbee said, “but you can lose it
over time by just not taking care of it.”


The American Water Works Association, whose members include more than 4,700 utilities, has
begun an advertising campaign “to raise this conversation about buried water infrastructure
above ground,” said Greg Kail, a spokesman for the association.


One advertisement, placed in spots from bus shelters in Miami to newspapers in Anchorage,
features a picture of a faucet with the words, “Do you know how often you turn me on?” Another
ad in the works will focus directly on problems with water mains, and include the phrase, “Don’t
let me break down in front of you.”


“The concept is to personify the infrastructure,” Mr. Kail said. “We’re not trying to scare people.
We’re trying to make them aware that this is a real concern that deserves our attention to keep it
from being a crisis in the future.”


The bulk of the water and sewer lines beneath American streets were installed in three phases: at
the end of the 19th century, in the 1920s, and just after World War II, echoing periods of
population growth in cities and expansion into suburbs.


A burst of environmentalism in the 1970s, including passage of the Clean Water Act, led to
improvements in water and sewage treatment facilities and increased federal scrutiny of the water
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supply. But the condition of underground water and sewage pipes, many of which were built to
last only 50 to 75 years, has not always received the same attention. At the same time, demand
has increased.

“The pipes age, and the population increases,” said James W. Rush, editor of Underground
Infrastructure Management, a trade magazine for public utility administrators. “Those are the two
factors that are always at work.”

Portland has had a boom in downtown development, adding demand to its water and sewer
systems.


The city is in the 16th year of a 20-year, $1.4 billion, federally mandated project to reduce sewage
overflows into the Willamette River from about 100 days a year to 4 days or less. Signs in the city
promote two enormous sewer and storm water lines being dug as part of the project, one on the
west bank of the Willamette that is 14 feet in diameter and another on the east side that is 22 feet
in diameter.


“I’ve walked them,” said Mr. Marriott, the Portland official. “You could roll a marble from one
length to the next — beautiful, beautiful work. What goes in them is stuff that used to go in the
river.”


Overflows are a problem in many cities, and fixing them is not cheap; Portland has some of the
highest water and sewer rates in the country. Mr. Marriott said the average residential sewer bill
in Portland has risen to about $45 a month from about $14 in the early 1990s, when the city
began the mandated improvements.


Once the project is completed, he said, rates will probably stay high so that the city can fix other
problems, like the sewer pipe decay that officials believe most likely helped cause the sinkhole in
December, the one that swallowed the sewer truck.


Mack McEachern was there on that chilly morning. First the water in his apartment on Southeast
Oak Street stopped running. Then the boiler in the basement began to fade. Water-utility workers
came to check an exterior main. The city inspected a clogged sewer line. Something was wrong
with the system, but what?


Mr. McEachern recalled how he stood outside and watched the big sewer truck start to pull away,
supposedly without having pinpointed the problem.

Then, he said, “The ground shook.”
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work          37
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/

                                          Reports
HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY COUNCIL REPORT OF THE CULTURE TASK FORCE
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/hsac-culture-010107.pdf

HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY COUNCIL REPORT OF THE FUTURE OF TERRORISM
TASK FORCE
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/hsac-future-terrorism-010107.pdf

Earthquakes: Risk, Monitoring, Notification, and Research, CRS Report for Congress
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL33861.pdf

FY 2008 Appropriations for State and Local Homeland Security, CRS Report for Congress
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/RS22596.pdf

The Department of Homeland Security's Risk Assessment Methodology: Evolution, Issues, and
Options for Congress, CRS Report for Congress
http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/80208.pdf

Homeland Security Grants: Observations on Process DHS Used to Allocate Funds to Selected
Urban Areas
http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-07-381R

GAO−07−484T: Small Business Administration: Response to the Gulf Coast Hurricanes
Highlights Need for Enhanced Disaster Preparedness (Testimony)
http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d07484thigh.pdf




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work      38
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/

                               Additional Information

First National Comment Period on Upgraded National Incident Management System (For IAEM
members send your comments to Daryl Spiewak-reference the e-mail sent to all US IAEM
Members on Feb. 1st)
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/nims-upgrade-revision-v1.pdf

OSHA Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for an Influenza Pandemic (Provided by Wayne
Blanchard)
http://www.osha.gov/Publications/influenza_pandemic.html

2007 Summit Coverage: Notable Quotes from Business Summit on Pandemic Issues (Provided
by Wayne Blanchard)
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/biz-plan/news/feb0807quotes.html

Identifying People's Needs in Major Emergencies and Best Practice in Humanitarian Response:
Literature and Best Practice Review and Assessment (Provided by Wayne Blanchard)
http://www.ukresilience.info/publications/ha_literature_review.pdf

SHELDUS (Spatial Hazard Events and Losses Database for the United States) (Provided by
Wayne Blanchard)
http://www.cas.sc.edu/geog/hrl/SHELDUS.html

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION -- DISASTER PLANNING AND PREPAREDNESS FOR
SCHOOLS (Provided by Wayne Blanchard)

Steps for Developing a School Emergency Management Plan
http://www.ercm.org/views/documents/Steps4DevelopingSchoolEmergencyMgmtPlans.pdf

Components of Comprehensive School and School District Emergency Management Plans
http://www.ercm.org/views/documents/ComponentsOfComprensiveSchoolDistrictEmergencyMgm
tPlans.pdf

Updating and Maintaining School Emergency Plans
http://www.ercm.org/views/documents/Updating_MaintainingPlans.pdf

Lessons Learned From School Crises and Emergencies," Vol. 2, Issue 1 -- focus on "After-Action
Reports: Capturing Lessons Learned and Identifying Areas for Improvement
http://www.ercm.org/views/documents/After_ActionReports.pdf


Yale New Haven Health, Office of Emergency Preparedness Reports
http://www.yalenewhavenhealth.com/emergency/commu/archives.html

IAEMs Position Paper on Emergency Management Performance Grants
http://www.iaem.com/committees/GovernmentAffairs/documents/IAEMPolicyPositiononEMPG021
207.pdf

ICMA Networked Approach to Improvements in Emergency Management transcript
http://www.emforum.org/vforum/lc070214.htm


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work      39
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/

Social behaviors during disasters (Podcast courtesy of King County, WA OEM)
http://www.metrokc.gov/prepare/emergencyinfo/podcasts.aspx

Connect for Safety Campaign (Provided by King County, WA OEM)
http://www.qwest.com/connectforsafety/index.html

Communicating during a Pandemic Flu (Provided by King County, WA OEM)
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/coca/ppt/cerc_%20pandemic_coca_01_07.ppt

KING COUNTY, WA REGION POTENTIAL SHELTER TYPING (DRAFT) (Provided by King
County, WA OEM)
http://www.metrokc.gov/prepare/docs/Eric_Corner/07-14-02_Shelter_Draft.pdf

Cold War Civil Defense Museum (Provided by King County, WA OEM)
http://www.civildefensemuseum.com/artgal/stuphomeprep.html

National Interoperability Press Releases (Provided by King County, WA OEM)
http://www.nationalinterop.com/press_releases.html

Washington State Emergency Management Division Hiring Announcement (Provided by King
County, WA OEM)
"After conducting a national search and a thorough interview process, I am pleased to announce
that Mr. Clint Goldenstein has been selected as the new Homeland Security Section Manager in
the Emergency Management Division. Clint is currently a Regional Homeland Security
Coordinator for the State of Colorado. He has experience at the State, local and first responder
levels and brings with him an excellent background in working with the Homeland Security Grant
Programs. Clint will assume his new duties as the Homeland Security Section Manager on
March 1st. Roger D. Hieb"

Response to a Ricin Incident: Guidelines for Federal, State, and Local Public Health and Medical
Officials
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/ricin/pdf/ricin_protocol.pdf

Public Entity Risk Institute, Presidential Disaster Declarations from 1953 to 2006 (Provided by
Wayne Blanchard)
http://peripresdecusa.org

Infectious Diseases Society of America, Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Principles for U.S.
Action (Provided by Wayne Blanchard)
http://www.idsociety.org/Content/NavigationMenu/News_Room1/Pandemic_and_Seasonal_Influe
nza/Pandemic_and_Seasonal_Influenza_Principles_for_U_S_Action1.htm

President Bush's FY 2008 Budget: Ignores the Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina,
Disregards the 9/11 Commission Recommendations, and Further Exposes the Nation's
Vulnerability (Provided by Wayne Blanchard)
http://homeland.house.gov/SiteDocuments/20070209140026-38910.pdf

Baldwin County, Ala. EOC Analysis
http://www.emergencymgmt.com/story.php?id=103890&utm_source=emergency_070213&utm_
medium=enews&utm_content=story



Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        40
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.
  This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If your interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website at:
                                    http://www.iaem.com/

Remarks by Secretary Michael Chertoff at the National Emergency Management Association
Mid-Year Conference
http://www.dhs.gov/xnews/speeches/sp_1171376113152.shtm

NATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL -- APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR RESURRECTED
ADVISORY GROUP:

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA) is seeking applicants who wish to be considered by the FEMA
Administrator to sit on the National Advisory Council.

The Council is being created as an advisory role to the FEMA Administrator to help ensure
effective and ongoing coordination of the federal preparedness, protection, response, recovery
and mitigation for natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and other man-made disasters.
Specifically, the Council will focus attention on the development and revision of the national
preparedness goal, the national preparedness system, the National Incident Management
System, the National Response Plan, and other related plans and strategies.

Individuals seeking to be considered for an appointment on the Council should submit a resume
detailing their experience in the arena of emergency management and related fields. Resumes
must be received by FEMA by March 9, 2007, and could be sent via e-mail to:
john.sharetts-sullivan@dhs.gov

Or via Mail to:

FEMA
Attention: John Sharetts-Sullivan
500 C Street, SW
Room 316
Washington, DC 20472




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work       41
    they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts this
                                         document.

								
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