Department of Kinesiology

					Department of Kinesiology
College of Health Professions


2006-07 Periodic Program Review




                 Primary Authors


             Michael Sitler, EdD, ATC
                Chair, Kinesiology
                    Professor


             Zebulon Kendrick, PhD
         Associate Dean, Graduate School
                    Professor


              Michael Sachs, PhD
        Graduate Coordinator, Kinesiology
                   Professor


              William Oddou, PhD
      Undergraduate Coordinator, Kinesiology
               Assistant Professor


                 October 5, 2006
                                   Table of Contents



Prologue   Department of Kinesiology: A Brief History
           Full- and Part-Time Faculty


Sections
1          Mission and Vision
2          Strategic Direction
3          Faculty
4          Commitment to Diversity
5          Curriculum
6          Assessment Methods
7          Student Qualifications and Performance
8          Identification of Benchmarks
9          Relationship of Size and Resources
10         Overall Functioning of the Unit




                                             2
                                             Appendices


Appendix A    Course and Teacher Evaluation: Sample Copy and Data
Appendix B    Curricula:
              -Bachelor of Science
              -Master of Education
              -Doctor of Philosophy
Appendix C    Systematic Assessment Methods for Determining Student Outcomes for
              Kinesiology Majors
Appendix D    Graduate Enrollment Management
Appendix E    Graduate Student Scholarship
              -Publications
              -Presentations
              -Theses/Projects/Dissertations Titles
Appendix F    Survey Data
              -Undergraduate
              -Graduate
Appendix G    Funded Graduate Students and Sources of Funding
Appendix H    Kinesiology Major Equipment Purchases and Inventory
Appendix I    Department of Kinesiology Standing Committees
Appendix J    Data Form from Temple University Office of Policy Planning & Analysis




The following materials are available on the CD provided with the Department of Kinesiology’s
Periodic Program Review Self-Study
       Faculty Vitas
       Kinesiology Faculty Statements on Their Teaching, Research, and Service
       Doctoral Student Vitas
       Undergraduate and Graduate Program Manuals
       Course Syllabi




                                               3
DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY: A BRIEF HISTORY
       Kinesiology and its predecessors, Physical Education and Physical Culture, have had a
long and prestigious history at Temple University. When Temple was founded in 1884, courses
were offered for both men and women in The Gentlemen and Ladies Department of Physical
Culture. Ten years later the Department evolved into The Philadelphia Normal School for
Physical Training and began to train teachers who taught at many of the Philadelphia Public
Schools. During this era, there were numerous claims that exercise dissipates diseases such as
insomnia, dyspepsia, indigestion, and kindred ailments. Courses in various types of exercise
were offered to help prevent and cure these ailments.

        Many of the early faculty members in the Department of Physical Culture were
associated with the Turners, a quasi gymnastic and social organization, which migrated to this
country with German immigrants. South Hall, the main physical education building on campus,
was a former Turnverein which housed a natatorium (swimming pool), bowling alleys, and
several gymnasia. Courses in a variety of formal exercise programs were offered for students at
Temple. By World War I the Department’s offerings expanded to include courses in social
problems such as feeble mindedness, juvenile delinquency, sex hygiene, public health, and
sanitation. Following this, folk dancing, swimming, and sports began to be included in the
curriculum.

        In the 1940s, the Department of Health and Physical Education expanded to include
health services, hygiene, non-major physical education, intramural sports, and varsity athletics.
One of the largest departments in the Teachers College, baccalaureate, master, and doctoral
degrees were offered. Many of the national leaders in the discipline of physical activity were
Temple alumni. By 1955 the enrollment in the Department was so large that the University
proposed that the west side of Broad Street be developed exclusively for physical education,
athletics, and related facilities. The Pearson-McGonigle complex opened in 1969 with nine
gymnasiums, including a main arena, and two swimming pools and a diving well.

        Full college status was achieved in 1974 when the College of Health, Physical Education,
Recreation, and Dance was founded. The first dean of the College, Dr. Joseph Oxendine,
presided over an ever-expanding curriculum which included athletic training, exercise science,
dance education, sports management, and a master’s of public health in health studies, as well as
the traditional health and physical education teacher education programs and recreation
administration. Dr. Donald Hilsendager replaced Dr. Oxendine as dean of the College. Dr.
Oxendine returned to faculty and later became chancellor at the University of North Carolina at
Pembroke. Under Dr. Hilsendager’s leadership, the number of student majors expanded greatly.

        In the mid to late 1990s, the University conducted an assessment of its college structures.
With this assessment, it was determined that some colleges were organized neither around a
common core of intellectual interests and values nor around common modes of instruction.
Additionally, the size of colleges was so uneven as to make it difficult for many to substantially
be involved either in the intellectual life of or in the governance structure of the University. It
was deemed that by some “modest” reorganization, collegiate structure could be substantially
improved, resulting in grouping disciplines together by common intellectual interests and
common expectations for faculty research and creative activity. Such reorganization was
anticipated to facilitate interdisciplinary initiatives by bringing faculty with kindred interests into
the same college, so that the initiatives, while possibly still being cross-departmental, would not
have to be cross-college. Accordingly, the Temple University Board of Trustees approved the
termination of the College of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance, effective July

                                                   4
1, 1998, with the Department of Physical Education once again becoming a department in the
College of Education (formerly Teachers College).

        In August 1999, the Temple University Board of Trustees approved changing the name of
the Department of Physical Education to the Department of Kinesiology. Changing the name to
Kinesiology was in line with similar actions at many universities across the country (e.g., Indiana
University, The Pennsylvania State University, Purdue University, University of Illinois,
University of Maryland, University of Michigan, University of Pittsburgh). Support for the
change was based on: (a) a better representation for the current focus of the Department (i.e.,
study, teach, and research physical activity); (b) a succinct and inclusive descriptor that was
compatible with other disciplines, such as Biology and Anthropology; and (c) having been
adopted by significant national organizations in the discipline such as the American Academy of
Physical Education which changed its name to the American Academy of Kinesiology and
Physical Education (AAKPE).

        Under past president Dr. David Adamany, the commitment of Temple University to
elevate its status among the Doctoral/Research-Extensive Institutions resulted in an earnest
assessment of how each college would develop its capacity to support this focus, to include the
fit between mission and the constituents (e.g., departments) comprising each academic unit.
Accordingly, it was recommended that the Department of Kinesiology, which was housed in the
College of Education, become a new Department (retaining the name Kinesiology) in the
College of Health Professions. After one and a half years of review and decision making,
initiated at the college level but in full collaboration with the Department faculty, the Temple
University Board of Trustees approved moving the Department of Kinesiology to the College of
Health Professions, effective July 1, 2005. The move was administrative with the Department
remaining intact in its current form: faculty, discipline-based specializations, courses, programs
(e.g., Basic Instruction Program), laboratories (e.g., Biokinetics Research Laboratory), and center
(i.e., Health-Fitness and Wellness Center).




                                                5
FULL- AND PART-TIME FACULTY
       The Department of Kinesiology’s full- and part-time faculty members are listed in Tables
1 and 2. Their degree, appointment type, and status are also provided.


Table 1. Department of Kinesiology Full-Time Faculty


          Name                  Degree             Appointment            Status
 Michael D. Brown                PhD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 Jeffrey Gehris                  MEd                Instructor      Non-Tenure Track
 Zebulon V. Kendrick             PhD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 Joseph R. Libonati              PhD               Tenure-track        Non-Tenured
 Dani Moffit                      MS                Instructor      Non-Tenure Track
 Melissa A. Napolitano           PhD               Tenure-track        Non-Tenured
 William E. Oddou                PhD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 Marcella V. Ridenour            PhD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 Thomas P. Rooney                PhD                 Lecturer       Non-Tenure Track
 Michael L. Sachs                PhD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 Mayra Santiago                  PhD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 Michael R. Sitler               EdD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 John Susko                       BS                Instructor      Non-Tenure Track
 Ricky Swalm                     PhD               Tenure-track          Tenured
 Ryan Tierney                    PhD                 Lecturer       Non-Tenure Track
 Vanessa R. Yingling             PhD               Tenure-track        Non-Tenured


Table 2. Department of Kinesiology Part-Time Faculty


          Name                  Degree             Appointment            Status
 Kati Brennan                 Yoga Cert.            Instructor           Adjunct
 Jeffrey Brown                   MA          Assistant Professor         Adjunct
 Dana Caracciolo                  BA                Instructor           Adjunct
 Robert Catalini                 MA          Assistant Professor         Adjunct
 Jeffrey Chapman              RAD Cert.             Instructor           Adjunct
 Mark Cherwony                   MA                 Instructor           Adjunct
 Theresa Cone                    PhD         Assistant Professor         Adjunct

                                               6
Betty Creighton          EdM              Instructor           Adjunct
Edward Doerr              MA         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Arnold Dort               MA         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
A.J. Duffy                MA         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Thomas Evaul             PhD              Professor            Adjunct
Robert Gallagher          BA              Instructor           Adjunct
Marian Garfinkel         PhD         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Thomas Graham             BA              Instructor           Adjunct
Traci Green               BA              Instructor           Adjunct
Michael Guckin        SCUBA Cert.         Instructor           Adjunct
Erin Halloran            MEd              Instructor       Non-Tenure Track
Monica Hankins         RAD Cert.          Instructor           Adjunct
Michelle Harmon        RAD Cert.          Instructor           Adjunct
Lois Hitt              Yoga Cert.         Instructor           Adjunct
Michael Jackson          PhD              Professor            Adjunct
Dawn Janich               MA              Instructor           Adjunct
David Jones               BA              Instructor           Adjunct
C. Karagiannopoulos    MA/EdM        Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Tara Keating              BA              Instructor           Adjunct
Robert Lyerly             BA         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Alen Malott           SCUBA Cert.         Instructor           Adjunct
Jamie Mansell             MA              Instructor           Adjunct
Joseph Masucci            BA              Instructor           Adjunct
Laura Messick             BA              Instructor           Adjunct
Shamika Mitchell       Yoga Cert.         Instructor           Adjunct
Timothy Moore          RAD Cert.          Instructor           Adjunct
Aaron Murphy              BA              Instructor           Adjunct
Paul Myers                MA         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Laurence Narcisi          JD         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Eric Nussbaum             MA         Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Hiroyoshi Okazaki     Karate Cert.        Instructor           Adjunct
Teruyuki Okazaki      Karate Cert.   Assistant Professor       Adjunct
Dawn Purington            MA              Instructor           Adjunct
Mark Rice                 MA              Instructor           Adjunct

                                      7
Paulette Richards         BA              Instructor       Adjunct
Angus Robertson           BA              Instructor       Adjunct
Jeffrey Ryan              BA              Instructor       Adjunct
Mark Saifer               BA              Instructor       Adjunct
James Scanlon             MA         Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Louis Schoener            JD         Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Marni Sclaroff            MA              Instructor       Adjunct
Daniel Shankin         Yoga Cert          Instructor       Adjunct
Sidney Skolnick          PhD         Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Stephen Spiro             MA              Instructor       Adjunct
Agnes Stegmuller          BA         Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Cheryl Turner-Paige       MA              Instructor       Adjunct
Fred Turoff               MA         Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Yukio Utada           Aikido Cert.   Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Robert Wagner            EdD              Instructor       Adjunct
Michael Wang             PhD         Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Philip Weiser            PhD         Assistant Professor   Adjunct
Anne Wilkinson            MA              Instructor       Adjunct
Jonathan Woodson      RAD Cert.           Instructor       Adjunct




                                      8
1. MISSION AND VISION
Mission
       To develop and maintain educational and research centers of excellence pertaining to the
study of physical activity.

         •   Education: We teach undergraduate and graduate students state-of-the-art concepts
             and techniques in Kinesiology and help these students to attain their professional
             goals. Central to the mission is the discovery and dissemination of knowledge
             through a multi-dimensional study of physical activity with special emphasis on the
             relationships among physical activity, health, and well-being. This approach
             incorporates biophysical, behavioral, and professional practice perspectives.

         •   Research: We conduct state-of-the-art research in integrative Kinesiology and train
             doctoral students to become highly competent investigators capable of performing
             and eventually directing competitive research programs in integrative Kinesiology.

         •   Application: We apply research and scholarly pursuits for professional and
             community benefits.

Vision

        The Department of Kinesiology’s evolution over the years to a discipline-based program
with multiple application specializations has occurred due to a diverse, but synergistic
relationship among its stakeholders. Through value-added commitment in focus and
contribution to the Department’s mission, the various specializations have resulted in the
Department of Kinesiology having a reputation for excellence in teaching, service, and research.
The status quo of this existence would likely have continued into the foreseeable future if not for
the recent commitment of Temple University to elevate its status among Doctoral/Research-
Extensive Institutions. This focus in purpose has had a profound impact on many of the colleges
and departments within the University, including the Department of Kinesiology. Decisions
concerning academic programming (development, consolidation, elimination) and the
concordant resource issues of personnel hiring decisions (faculty, staff) and budget are affected
by the direction which a college envisions most appropriate to reach capacity in fulfilling the
mission of the University.

        During the 2004-05 academic year, initiated by the College of Education but in full
collaboration with the Department of Kinesiology, extensive conversations and meetings took
place as to the fit between the discipline of Kinesiology and the College of Education as they
existed at that time. The opportunity to remain in the College of Education and embrace its
mission was explored and discussed. As a result of these deliberations and in consultation with
the Deans of the College of Health Professions and College of Education as well as the Provost
and Dean of the Graduate School, it was recommended that the Department of Kinesiology
become a new Department (retaining the name Kinesiology) in the College of Health
Professions. The fit in mission between the College of Health Professions and the Department of
Kinesiology is inextricably linked. Both are focused on and committed to training highly skilled
professionals through education, training, and research to better address health needs, eliminate
disparities in care, increase lifespan, and improve quality of life. The support of Dr. Ronald
Brown, Dean of the College of Health Professions, for the Department of Kinesiology joining the

                                                 9
College was predicated on building a Department with a focus on research and teaching
excellence. The Temple University Board of Trustees approved the move effective July 1,
2005.

        During the 2005-06 academic year, with its reporting line and future unequivocally
established within the College of Health Professions, authorization was given for the Department
to conduct a national search for one tenure-track position. No such searches had been conducted
to replace tenure-track faculty members (retirement or replacement) during the transition period
of the Department relocating to the College of Health Professions. The search consisted of
aggressively recruiting to support the Department's new concentrated focus on the investigation
of the translational and evidence-based practice aspects of physical activity on metabolic-related
diseases and injuries. The specific areas of research focus on obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes,
hypertension, and unintentional injuries; and their applications to psychological/behavioral
motivation and adherence and health educational models for physical activity. Because of the
high number of outstanding candidates, two additional lines were awarded to the Department,
resulting in three individuals (Dr. Michael Brown, Dr. Melissa Napolitano, and Dr. Vanessa
Yingling) accepting tenure-track appointments for the 2006-07 academic year.

        Another important component of the Department’s current transformation is the
University-mandated Periodic Program Review. The Review has been particularly important to
the Department as it provided the impetus to become focused in mission and set strategic
direction (goals, objectives, and timelines). Although not without angst among some of the
Department’s faculty, due primarily to different perspectives on educational mission, consensus
and commitment among the faculty resulted in the plan that is presented in this self-study report.
With the three new faculty members and seven current faculty members (i.e., Dr. Zebulon
Kendrick, Dr. Joseph Libonati, Dr. Marcie Ridenour, Dr. Michael Sachs, Dr. Mayra Santiago,
Dr. Michael Sitler, and Dr. Ryan Tierney), the Department has a critical mass of researchers to
support its strategic direction. The Department’s vision is to participate in the AAKPE rankings
of doctoral programs (see Section 8. Identification of Benchmarks) in 2009 and to be ranked in
the top 10 Kinesiology Departments. The Department has the conviction of returning to the
“high watermark” of its early years, only now in research and teaching instead of teaching and
service (see Section 3. Faculty) with varying levels of commitment to research. The College of
Health Professions’ leadership has provided the opportunity and resources required for the
Department to be successful in meeting its strategic direction.

        The Periodic Program Review process has involved an extensive and detailed
Department self study, led by Drs. Sitler, Kendrick, Sachs, and Oddou. It began in earnest in
Spring 2006 and was facilitated by the Department faculty holding a meeting on May 18, 2006 to
develop a strategic plan for 2006-07 to 2009-10. Through the 2006 summer, these and other
individuals met, discussed, and developed the plan presented in this report. The Department
faculty endorsed the plan during its August 21 to 25, 2006 re-orientation meetings, an annual
event held in preparation for the academic year. Dean Brown subsequently reviewed the plan
and approved its submission to the University as part of this Periodic Program Review.




                                                10
2. STRATEGIC DIRECTION

Strategic Goals

        Through its recent strategic planning process, the Department established three strategic
goals for the next four years (2006-2010) (see Table 3). The goals and plan have been reviewed
and approved by Dean Ron Brown and are as follows:

   •   Provide an outstanding educational environment for students to learn about Kinesiology.

   •   Provide an outstanding environment for faculty and students to advance the scientific
       basis of Kinesiology.

   •   Provide applications of Kinesiology to the profession and community.

Each goal will be fulfilled through the following objectives and activities:

       Provide an outstanding educational environment for students to learn about Kinesiology.

       In 2006-07
       • Enhance quality of teaching and learning
               o Begin to incorporate evidence-based practice into classroom instruction.
               o Continue to modernize classroom instructional technology and laboratory
                   equipment.
       • Strengthen value-added of Temple education
               o Restructure the undergraduate athletic training program to a major status per
                   the requirements of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training
                   Education with appropriate University review and approval.
               o Develop strategies to meet or exceed national averages of pass rates for 1st
                   time examinees.
               o Create systematic assessment plans for undergraduate and graduate students,
                   non-majors, graduates, and employers.
       • Strengthen the professional-track BS students in Kinesiology by developing a
           recruitment and retention plan.
       • Strengthen the master’s and doctoral programs
               o Restructure the MEd to an MS degree with appropriate University review and
                   approval.
               o Continue to recruit a cohort of diverse master’s and doctoral students who
                   have excellent GRE scores and high performance records as undergraduate
                   (and graduate) students. We will specifically target doctoral students who are
                   highly motivated to become researchers and scholars.
       • Establish enrollment management plan for graduate program.

       In 2007-08
       • Improve student services
              o Determine customer satisfaction of student services.
       • Enhance quality of teaching and learning
              o Fully incorporate evidence-based practice into classroom instruction.
              o Continue to modernize classroom instructional technology and laboratory
                  equipment.
                                             11
•   Strengthen the master’s and doctoral programs
        o Develop Graduate Teachers Certification Program with appropriate University
           review and approval.
        o Maintain recruitment of a cohort of diverse master’s and doctoral students
           who have excellent GRE scores and high performance records as
           undergraduate (and graduate) students.
•   Strength value added of Temple Education
        o The Department will work with Honor Students in Kinesiology (Juniors) to
           become active in research activities of the faculty so that they can qualify as a
           Diamond Scholar and Honor Students and other students as McNair Scholars.
           The Department will also try to acquire additional external funding to support,
           in part, these activities.
        o Establish a summer research opportunities program (SROP) that provides a
           stipend for at least five highly motivated undergraduate students to undertake
           research in the laboratories of our faculty members pursuing research
           problems.
        o With the Undergraduate Coordinator and other Departmental personnel, we
           will work with the SROP students to assist them in acquiring admission into
           graduate programs.
•   Continued commitment to diversity
        o Develop a recruiting and retention plan for under-represented students.

In 2008-09
• Enhance quality of teaching and learning
       o Continue to modernize classroom instructional technology and laboratory
           equipment.
• Strengthen the master’s and doctoral programs
       o Maintain recruitment of a cohort of diverse master’s and doctoral students
           who have excellent GRE scores and high performance records as
           undergraduate (and graduate) students.
• Strength value added of Temple Education
       o Expand the summer research opportunities program that provides a stipend for
           10 highly motivated undergraduate students to undertake research in the
           laboratories of our faculty members pursuing research problems, and continue
           to perform the SROP activities listed in 2007-08.
       o Begin to prepare for the AAKPE survey of doctoral programs in Kinesiology.

In 2009-10
• Enhance quality of teaching and learning
       o Continue to modernize classroom instructional technology and laboratory
           equipment
• Strengthen the master’s and doctoral programs
       o Maintain recruitment of a cohort of diverse master’s and doctoral students
           who have excellent GRE scores and high performance records as
           undergraduate (and graduate) students.
• Strength value added of Temple Education
       o Continue the SROP activities.
       o Participate in AAKPE survey of doctoral programs in Kinesiology.



                                         12
Provide an outstanding environment for faculty and students to advance the scientific
basis of Kinesiology.

In 2006-07:
• Be a center of excellence in research
    o Continue to support the identified research focus areas of the Department.
    o Conducted funded bench to bedside research
• Increase both research quality and productivity
    o The Department will recruit two new tenure-track faculty members for 2007-08
        appointment: one will have a successful research program in metabolic aspects of
        obesity, and one will have a successful research program in psychological/
        behavioral aspects of physical activity adoption and maintenance, including (but
        not limited to) the application of theoretical/health educational models, motivation
        and adherence, and performance enhancement. These researchers must have a
        record of external research funding (senior candidates) or the potential of such a
        program of research (junior faculty). Joint appointments with other departments
        and research centers are possible.
    o The Department will determine whether or not to invest in the Curriculum and
        Instruction doctoral program. If the program is maintained, the Department will
        recruit one researcher/scholar (during 2007-08) who has a successful program of
        research in the health benefits of physical activity in the prevention and
        amelioration of metabolic diseases. This person must have a record of external
        research funding (senior candidates) or the potential of such a program of research
        (junior faculty). The addition of a new faculty member in Curriculum and
        Instruction will result in the Department accepting a small number of new
        doctoral students in this area of research. If the program is placed into abeyance,
        no new students will be matriculated into the program.
    o Submit federal and non-federal research proposals and seek training grant funding
        support.
    o Increase publications in journals with impact factors > 1.0.
• Establish a mentoring process for junior faculty, including pairing senior and junior
    faculty for ongoing mentoring and consultation as well as providing faculty release
    time to establish a research agenda.
• Finalize our interactions with the Center for Obesity Research and Education to allow
    highly motivated master’s and doctoral students the opportunity to participate in
    research programs in this Center.

In 2007-08:
• Be a center of excellence in research
    o Formalize a B.S/M.S. clinical integrative physiology of exercise program.
       Prepare the document and submit it to the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies
       and the Graduate School for approval.
• Increase both research quality and productivity
    o The Department will recruit one researcher/scholar for 2008-09 appointment who
       has a successful program of research in translational and evidence-based practice
       aspects of unintentional injuries. This person must have a record of external
       research funding (senior candidates) or the potential of such a program of research
       (junior faculty).

                                        13
           o The Department will recruit one researcher/scholar who has a successful program
             of research in motor control. This person must have a record of external research
             funding (senior candidates) or the potential of such a program of research (junior
             faculty).
           o Acquire NIH and other external funding as well as training grant funding.
           o Provide funding support for post docs and seek funding support for pre docs
           o Increase number of publications in journals with impact factors > 1.0 by 10%
             based on 2006-07.

       In 2008-09
       • Increase both research quality and productivity
           o Increase NIH and other external funding by 15% from 2007-08
           o Provide funding support for post doc in each program area and pre docs
           o Increase number of publications in journals with impact factors > 1.0 by 10%
              based on 2007-08.

       In 2009-10
       • Increase both research quality and productivity
           o Increase NIH and other external funding by 15% from 2008-09
           o Provide funding support for post doc in each program area and pre docs
           o Increase number of publications in journals with impact factors > 1.0 by 10%
              based on 2008-09.



   Provide applications of Kinesiology to the profession and community.

       In 2006-07 to 2009-2010
       • Provide an effective Health-Fitness and Wellness Center that is financially
           independent.
       • Maintain professional involvement of faculty and students on editorial boards as well
           as on state and national organization committees

       In 2008-09
       • Increase the number of fellows in professional societies.



        The Department limited its strategic planning to the time period 2006-07 to 2009-10.
The objectives as presented are projected to remain the Department’s objectives for the next four
years or until fully attained. We are committed to providing in the future: (a) outstanding
educational and research environments to stimulate faculty and student scholarship, and (b)
assessing strategic goals, educational programs, research programs, and the application of these
programs for the profession of Kinesiology. The Department believes that ongoing self-
assessment is critical to its contributing fully to Temple’s mission and the Discipline of
Kinesiology through the respective practice areas.




                                               14
   Table 3. Strategic Vision for the Department of Kinesiology (2006-07 to 2009-10)
       Goal         Level          Objective                    Activities               Performance              Resources
                                                                                          Indicators               Needed
I. To provide an    UG      1. Strengthen the          1. Recruitment of             1. Increase quality       1. Faculty and
outstanding                 professional-track B.S.    professional-track            and yield of admitted     staff time.
educational                 students in Kinesiology.   students.                     students in targeted
environment for                                                                      professional-tracks.
                            2. Continue the Basic      2. Retention of
students to learn
                            Instruction Program        professional-track students   2. Increase retention.
about Kinesiology
                                                       through peer mentoring.
                                                       3. Maintain application of
                                                       Kinesiology through
                                                       educational programming
                                                       in the Basic Instruction
                                                       Pgm.
                            3. Enhance quality of      1. Incorporate evidence-      1. Inclusion of           1. Continuing
                            teaching & learning.       based practice into           evidence-based            education of
                                                       classroom instruction.        practice information      Faculty.
                                                                                     on course syllabi and
                                                       2. Engage students in         blackboard.               2. Travel
                                                       faculty and graduate                                    reimbursement
                                                       student research.             2. Inclusion of           for continuing
                                                                                     students in faculty       education.
                                                       3. Become active in the       and graduate student
                                                       Diamond & McNair              research.                 3. Funding for
                                                       Scholars Programs.                                      instructional
                                                                                     3. Request > 1            technology and
                                                       4. Modernize classroom        Diamond & McNair          laboratory
                                                       instructional technology      Scholar per year.         equipment.
                                                       and laboratory equipment.
                                                                                     4. Currency of
                                                                                     instructional
                                                                                     technology and
                                                                                     laboratory
                                                                                     equipment.
                            4. Strengthen value        1. Restructure UG AT          1. UG AT major            1. Faculty and
                            added of Temple            Pgm to major status           approved by TU            staff time.
                            education.                                               BOT.
                                                       2. Prepare students for
                                                       entry-level professional      2. Meet or exceed
                                                       examinations.                 national averages of
                                                                                     pass rates for 1st time
                                                       3. Conduct systematic         examinees.
                                                       assessment of majors &
                                                       non major student             3. Success on
                                                       learning.                     performance
                                                                                     indicators (e.g.,
                                                                                     GREs, Admission to
                                                                                     Grad Schools).
                            5. Improve student         1. Determine customer         1. 90% customer           1. Faculty and
                            services.                  satisfaction of student       satisfaction as based     staff time.
                                                       services.                     on assessment
                                                                                     surveys.

                            6. Continued               1. Recruit under-             1. Increase number of     1. Faculty and
                            commitment to              represented students.         under-represented         staff time.
                            diversity.                                               students by 10% per
                                                                                     year based on KIN
                                                                                     2006 benchmarks.




                                                           15
      Goal           Level       Objective                 Activities                 Performance                Resources
                                                                                       Indicators                 Needed
I. To provide an    Grad     1. Enhance quality    1. Incorporate evidence-      1. Inclusion of              1. Continuing
outstanding                  of teaching &         based practice into           evidence-based practice      education of
educational                  learning.             classroom instruction.        information on course        Faculty.
environment for                                                                  syllabi and blackboard.
                                                                                                              2. Travel
students to learn
                                                                                                              reimbursement
about
                                                                                                              for continuing
Kinesiology
                                                                                                              education.
                             2. Strengthen the     1. Actively recruit           1. Increase number of        1. Faculty and
                             master’s &            master’s & doctoral           applicants by 10% per        staff time.
                             doctoral programs.    students.                     year based on KIN 2006
                                                                                 benchmark.
                                                   2. Admit higher quality
                                                   and increase yield of         2. Increase quality (i.e.,
                                                   admitted master’s &           UG GPA, GRE, MAT)
                                                   doctoral students.            and yield of students
                                                                                 admitted by 10% per
                                                   3. Prepare doctoral           year based on KIN 2006
                                                   graduates for positions in    benchmarks.
                                                   research-active
                                                   institutions.                 3. Student dissertation
                                                                                 and publication record,
                                                   4. Restructure the MEd to     pre doc funding, & post
                                                   MS degree.                    doc placement.
                                                   5. Determine level of         4. MEd to MS deg
                                                   support for each              approved by TU BOT.
                                                   Kinesiology Program and
                                                   appropriate resource          5. Resource allocation
                                                   allocation required to meet   for Programs that train
                                                   current Temple mission.       graduates for positions
                                                                                 in research-active
                                                   6. Develop a Graduate         institutions.
                                                   Teacher Certification Pgm
                                                   with appropriate              6. Graduate Teacher
                                                   University approval.          Cert. Pgm approved.
                             3. Strengthen value   1. Identify external agency   1. Participate in            1. Faculty and
                             added of Temple       and review criteria &         agency’s next Program        staff time.
                             education.            develop strategies against    review.
                                                   benchmarks.
                                                                                 2. Ranked in top 15% of
                                                   2. Participate in external    Research Universities-
                                                   review of PhD Program by      Very High and top 5%
                                                   external agency.              of Urban Research
                                                                                 Universities.
                             4. Continued          1. Recruit under-             1. Increase enrollment       1. Faculty and
                             commitment to         represented students.         of under-represented         staff time.
                             diversity.                                          students by 10% based
                                                   2. Recruit international      on KIN 2006
                                                   students.                     benchmark.
                             5. Establish          1. Follow & record time to    1. Implemented actions       1. Faculty and
                             Enrollment            pinnacle points in degree     steps for improvement        staff time.
                             Management Plan       completion process.           from process.
                             for Graduate Pgm.
                                                   2. Determine & adhere to
                                                   faculty/student ratio.




                                                          16
       Goal               Objective              Activities              Performance                 Resources
                                                                          Indicators                  Needed
II. To provide an     1. Be a center of     1. Identify and focus     1. Increase federal     1. Additional research
outstanding           excellence in         on areas that support     research and            faculty.
environment for       research.             research capacity         training grant
                                                                                              2 .Startup packages and
faculty and                                 building.                 funding by 15%
                                                                                              laboratory space
students to                                                           per year based on
                                            2. Conduct funded                                 commensurate with
advance the                                                           KIN 2006
                                            bench to bedside                                  supporting research
scientific basis of                                                   benchmark.
                                            research.                                         faculty.
Kinesiology
                                                                      2. Increase non-
                                                                      federal research        3. Workload
                                                                      and training grant      commensurate with
                                                                      funding by 15%          funding activity.
                                                                      per year based on
                                                                      KIN 2006
                                                                      benchmark.
                      2. Increase both      1. Develop                1. Cohort of active     1. Increased number of
                      research quality &    infrastructure            researchers.            research faculty.
                      productivity.         required to enhance
                                            research capacity.        2.Support research      2. Appropriate level of
                                                                      culture (e.g., space,   support (e.g., workload).
                                            2. Generate & secure      equipment).
                                            contract &/or grant                               3. External funding for
                                            proposals.                3. Increase grant       post docs.
                                                                      &/or contract
                                            3. Attract and            proposals by 15%        4. Increase funding for
                                            support post docs.        per year based on       faculty and student
                                                                      KIN 2006                presentations at scholarly
                                            4. Submit papers to       benchmark.              meetings.
                                            high impact scholarly
                                            journals.                 4. Increase grants      5. Increase funding for
                                                                      &/ or contracts by      students to attend
                                            5. Attend & present       15% per year            conferences.
                                            at scholarly              based on KIN
                                            meetings.                                         6. Increase funding to
                                                                      2006 benchmark.         pay for publication page
                                            6. Collaborate with       5.Attract at least 1    costs.
                                            other Depts with          post doc for each
                                            common research           Pgm area.
                                            interests.
                                                                      6. Increase pubs in
                                            7. Collaborate with       journals with
                                            Centers at Temple.        impact factors
                                                                      greater > 1.0.
                                                                      7. Increase number
                                                                      of invited
                                                                      presentations.
                                                                      8. Conduct
                                                                      research with
                                                                      Obesity Center.
                      3. Establish a        1. Pair senior &          1. Collaborative &      1. RA support for junior
                      mentoring process     junior faculty for        supportive              faculty.
                      for junior faculty.   ongoing mentoring &       research.
                                            consultation.                                     2. Workload release
                                                                                              time for junior faculty.
                                            2. Conduct
                                            collaborative
                                            research between
                                            senior and junior
                                            faculty.
                                            3. Provide junior
                                            faculty release time
                                            to establish a
                                            research agenda.

                                                                 17
      Goal               Objective               Activities              Performance             Resources
                                                                          Indicators              Needed
 III. To provide     1. Provide an         1. Increase HWFC         1. Maintain balanced      1. Travel
applications of      effective HFWC        membership and           HFWC operating            money.
Kinesiology to the   that is financially   facility use.            budget.
profession and       independent.
                                           2. Serve on editorial    2. Maintain number of
community (e.g.,
                     2. Maintain           boards.                  faculty serving on
students, Temple
                     professional                                   editorial boards.
University, North                          3. Serve on
                     involvement of
Philadelphia, tri-                         committees and in        3. Maintain state and
                     faculty and
state area).                               leadership positions     national presence of
                     students
                                           for state and national   students and faculty by
                                           organizations.           volunteering in
                                                                    association activities.
                                           4. Support faculty in
                                           becoming a fellow        4. Increase number of
                                           within professional      fellows from 05-06
                                           societies.               benchmark.




                                                              18
3. FACULTY
Teaching
        The Department’s faculty members have long placed considerable importance upon the
quality of our teaching. Our teaching encompasses a variety of approaches and types (e.g.,
lectures, labs, seminars, undergraduate/graduate, research/clinical/applied). Even given this
diversity of types and approaches as well as levels of instruction, our teaching evaluation results,
as measured by the University’s Course and Teacher Evaluation (CATE; see Appendix A for
sample copy and data for Spring 2005 and Fall 2005), are generally at or higher than those of the
College of Health Professions and University averages. This is best reflected in upper level
undergraduate and graduate courses where the full-time faculty members predominantly teach, as
opposed to lower level undergraduate courses where teaching assistants and part-time faculty
primarily teach. Additional feedback from current students and from students who have
graduated about the Department’s teaching effectiveness is in the section on graduate student
satisfaction (Section 7. Student Qualifications and Performance). These results suggest a
considerable degree of satisfaction amongst our students.
        Although the teaching load of the Department has been fairly considerable, it has shifted
for some tenure-track faculty. Non-tenure tenure-track faculty members are assigned a one 3-
credit course load per semester (no load is assigned during summer) until after the mandatory
tenure review. This workload strategy is intended to provide them with minimal time constraints
to become highly competent investigators who conduct competitive research programs at the
federal-funding level. Accordingly, other faculty members (e.g., non-tenure track) are assigned
higher teaching loads, thereby maintaining credit-hour production.
         Our faculty have kept abreast of pedagogical innovations in technology. Budgetary
support for technology (i.e., upgrades, replacements, new purchases) is primarily made through
the College and Department (see Section 10. Overall Functioning of the Unit). All of our full-
time faculty use Blackboard and Power Point to support their teaching. Our graduate faculty
integrate their research efforts into their classrooms. One of our strategic objectives is to further
enhance the quality of our teaching and student learning, and we have identified several key
activities to do so (see Section 2. Strategic Direction).


Service
    The Department’s faculty members have a long history of service, both within Temple
University as well as to the community and to the profession. Indeed, this level of service, over
the past decade or so, increased to the point that it detracted from the quantity of scholarship
productivity of some of our faculty. This may not be uncharacteristic of faculty in the mid/late
stages of their career, as many of our faculty are at these stages (although this started to change
over the past few years). Given the needs of the Department for service (e.g., coordinators,
serving on numerous committees), as well as service at the College and University levels, much
time and effort has been expended on these endeavors. Additionally, some faculty members
have been active professionally in leadership roles in associations: president at the national –
AAASP (Sachs) and NATA Research and Education Foundation (Sitler), regional/district –
Eastern District (Swalm) and ACSM (Kendrick), and state - PSAHPERD (Swalm) levels.
Others provide service on various association committees (Brown, Gehris, Moffitt, Napolitano,
Ridenour, Rooney, Sachs, Santiago, Sitler, Swalm, Tierney, Yingling), NIH review panels
(Brown, Kendrick, Ridenour) as well as in-community based projects. Many faculty (Brown,
Kendrick, Libonati, Moffitt, Napolitano, Ridenour, Sachs, Santiago, Sitler, Tierney, Yingling)
serve as reviewers of article submissions for scholarly journals, and some currently serve or have
served on journal editorial boards (Sachs, Sitler, Swalm). These service activities have met a
                                                 19
variety of needs, including personal needs/desires for professional involvement as well as ‘public
relations’ for the Department nationally, regionally and locally. Additional details on these
activities are provided in the Faculty Statements on Their Teaching, Research, and Service as
well as in their Curriculum Vita, both of which are in the CD accompanying this self study.
    While some of this service activity is necessary (especially departmental work to keep the
department functioning), and some of the service to the profession represents ‘necessary’
involvement in advancing our various sub-disciplines, there is renewed awareness of the
time/energy involved in these activities and the need to make choices, with our choices geared
more towards research rather than service in the future. This discussion has taken place, and our
faculty is committed to this emphasis on research in the future.


   Research
       The Department’s faculty members are integrally involved with cross-disciplinary
collaboration with researchers and scholars within Temple University and at other
universities/settings. Faculty in the somatic sciences area conduct research with clinicians and
researchers at the Temple University School of Medicine in the Departments of Cardiology,
Physiology, and Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine; Temple University School of Podiatric
Medicine Gait Analysis Laboratory; and College of Health Professions Departments of
Therapeutic Recreation and Physical Therapy. Faculty in the behavioral sciences area
consult/assist with projects conducted by the Center for Social Policy and Bridging the Gap
program coordinated at the Health Sciences campus. Faculty also have joint appointments in
Temple University’s School of Medicine in the Department of Physiology and the Center for
Obesity Research and Education. Collaborative research with these medical specialists and
researchers serves to advance knowledge in the basic sciences and clinical practice. Areas in
which particular foci have been directed include: Heart Failure and Transplant Program,
conservative and surgical treatment outcomes, and causation and intervention of morbidity in the
physically active population. Outside of Temple, faculty members have collaborated with
researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, Pennsylvania Hospital 3B-
Orthopaedics, University of Tennessee, and San Jose State University.
        While this breadth of research activity has indeed taken place over the years, it is fair to
say that the quantity of research produced, especially in terms of presentations and publications,
is not at the level to which the Department aspires. The faculty have gotten caught up in the
demands of teaching and need/desire for service, and with some faculty having neared/entered
retirement, the level of research productivity decreased for a period of time. This has now
changed. All of the Department’s three new hires and a cohort among the current faculty are
committed to scholarship as part of their professional obligation at Temple University. Processes
have been implemented and commitments made to position the Department’s scholars to
successfully secure extramural funding. Currently, some success has been garnered at the
foundation and regional levels, but the aims for the Department are much higher. As a cohort of
scholars, we are striving to be competitive recipients of funding at the federal level (e.g., NIH,
NSF, CDC). Concerted time and effort have been dedicated to positioning the Department on its
current direction, but much remains to be completed.




                                                20
4. COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY
        The Department of Kinesiology has a long history of commitment to diversity in terms of
hiring faculty and staff, recruitment and retention of qualified students from under-represented
populations, and infusing issues of diversity into the curriculum where appropriate. The full-
time faculty totaled 16 members between 2001 and 2005 (fall 2004 and fall 2005 data are
incorrectly reported in the Program Review Supporting Data) with under-represented faculty
composing approximately 20% of the faculty. Of the five current staff members, two are
African-Americans and three are white. The recent hires for the 2006-07 academic year
consisted of two white female and one African-American male tenure-track faculty members.

       Undergraduate majors in the Department from 2001 to 2005 consisted of approximately
60% white and 40% minority students, with the latter consisting of 19 to 25% African-
Americans. Graduate students in the Department between 2001 and 2003 ranged from 88 to 80%
white and 12 to 20% minority (i.e., African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latino/Hispanic-
Americans, and Native American). In 2004 and 2005, minorities comprised 30% of the graduate
students in the Department, with African Americans comprising 6 and 7% of the student
population.

        Temple University offers scholarship programs to under-represented undergraduate and
graduate students. The McNair Scholar and the Diamond Scholars programs are two resources
that the Department has had some success in acquiring additional scholarship support for its
under-represented students (majority students can also become Diamond Scholars). The Future
Faculty Fellowship program provides full support for under-represented graduate students to
enter academic fields. Although the Department did not receive any Future Faculty Fellowships
during the 2001 to 2005 year period, the Department is committed to recruiting under-
represented students to compete for Future Faculty Fellowships. Dr. Zebulon Kendrick in his
role as the Associate Dean of the Graduate School is the co-PI for a federal NSF AGEP-SBES
grant. The purpose of the grant is to increase the number of under-represented populations in the
social and behavioral sciences.

       Through the efforts of recently retired (2006) Professor Tina Sloan-Greene, many
undergraduate under-represented students participated in the Black Women in Sports outreach
program in public, private, and charter schools, to include the School District of Philadelphia.
This program provides an excellent learning site for the volunteers and serves a recruitment tool
for undergraduate students entering programs in Kinesiology.

        Two of our recent tenure-track faculty hires for the 2006-07 academic year bring new
opportunities for supporting under-represented students to our Department. Dr. Michael Brown
served as a community mentor for the Biomedical Access Program at his prior place of
employment (University of Maryland). The purpose of the program is to increase the number of
disadvantaged groups in the biomedical field. Through this program, under-represented students
work as research assistants in his laboratory, acquiring exposure to and experience in basic and
applied research. Dr. Vanessa Yingling participated in the Minority Access to Research Careers
through the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at her prior place of employment
(Brooklyn College). This program offers special research training support to 4-year colleges,
universities, and health professional schools with substantial enrollments of minorities such as
African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans (including Alaska Natives), and
natives of the U.S. Pacific Islands. The goals of the program are to increase the number and
competitiveness of underrepresented minorities engaged in biomedical research by strengthening
the science curricula at minority-serving institutions and increasing the research training

                                               21
opportunities for students and faculty at these institutions. These and other members of our
faculty will be supported in participating in these and other similar programs so as to expand our
capacity in serving under-represented students.

        Issues of diversity are also addressed in the Department’s undergraduate course work.
Within the Department’s undergraduate core, gender, ethnicity/race, and life span are addressed
in the following four undergraduate courses: Introduction to Kinesiology (KIN 0001), Motor
Behavior (KIN 204), Psychosocial Bases of Human Movement (KIN W205), and Why Humans
Move: Philosophical Perspectives (KIN 206). They are also addressed in the graduate course:
Sociology of Kinesiology (KIN 508). The Department offers an undergraduate course in racism
as part of the University General Education Requirements in Studies in Race: Racism in College
Athletics (KIN 336). This course focuses on racism in college athletics in the United States.
Students explore the impact of racism on the past, present, and future African-American
collegiate athletes and sport leaders with particular emphasis on strategies for change in problem
areas.




                                                22
5. CURRICULUM
Undergraduate

         The undergraduate program in Kinesiology leads to the Bachelor of Science Degree.
Kinesiology is one of 140 undergraduate majors offered at Temple University. It is a unique
curriculum since it is centered on the holistic study of human movement and physical activity. It
is also a unique program in that it provides a broad-based arts and science education for the
development of lifelong learning skills and effective citizenship. In addition, students can select
a professional track, which prepares them for professional service and career opportunities. The
study of Kinesiology leads to careers involving health promotion, rehabilitation and sports
medicine, teaching, research, delivery of services related to physical activity and fitness, and
coaching. Positions are found in a variety of settings including schools, colleges and
universities, public and private agencies, sporting organizations, clinical environments, business,
and government.

        The undergraduate program employs the discipline model for the holistic, integrative
study of human movement and physical activity. The primary aims for students studying
Kinesiology are the development of the following:

        •   understanding the human body's physiological and psychological responses to acute
            short-term physical activity
        •   understanding the various adaptations of the human body to chronic long-term
            physical activity
        •   understanding the cultural, social, and historical importance of physical activity
        •   understanding the mechanical qualities of movement throughout the life span
        •   understanding the processes that control human movement and the factors that affect
            the acquisition of motor skills throughout the life span
        •   understanding the psychological effects of physical activity on human behavior
        •   understanding the relationship of human movement and physical activity to human
            health and well-being

        To achieve these aims, teaching and learning in Kinesiology requires the use of a variety
of scientific knowledge and research techniques from such fields as biology, chemistry, history,
philosophy, physics, psychology, sociology, and communication science. The undergraduate
program in Kinesiology leading to the Bachelor of Science degree requires students to complete
course work in three broad areas: The University General Education, The Kinesiology Core, and
a Professional application of the Discipline of Kinesiology.


       University General Education Requirements

       The University Community believes that all undergraduate students need to acquire a set
of knowledge and skills that will have a lasting value. The need for these knowledge and skills
transcend an individual’s chosen area of specialization as well as an individual’s career goal.
Different roles individuals accept as professionals, as parents, as informed citizens, and as
members of communities will be enhanced and made more rewarding when they have both a
broad and deep-seated understanding of the many factors that influence the conditions of our
lives. Achieving these goals requires a combination of factors such as:

       •    using language effectively
       •    developing the ability to handle quantitative data
       •    understanding our cultural and political history
       •    developing an understanding of a culture and/or a language other than our own
       •    acquiring an appreciation for the creative art
       •    understanding the differences between individual and communal needs
                                                 23
        The University General Education requirements are as follows
(http://www.temple.edu/bulletin/):

       University General Education Requirements

       •   Library Orientation                        0
       •   Composition                                3
       •   Intellectual Heritage                      6
       •   American Culture                           3
       •   Arts                                       3
       •   Individual in Society                      3
       •   Foreign Language/International Studies     3-8
       •   Quantitative Analysis                      6-8
       •   Science/Technology                         6-8
       •   Studies in Race                            3
       •   Three Additional Writing Courses           0-9


        Transfer Students (45+) General Education Requirements

       •   Library Orientation                     0
       •   Composition                             3
       •   Intellectual Heritage                   3
       •   American Culture                        0-3
       •   Arts                                    0-3
       •   Individual in Society                   3
       •   Foreign Language/ International Studies 3-4
       •   Quantitative Analysis                  3-4
       •   Science/Technology                     4-8
       •   Studies in Race                        3
       •   Two Additional Writing Courses         0-6

      In fall 2004, the Temple University Board of Trustees approved a new program of
General Education (Gen Ed) for the purpose of transforming the undergraduate experience at
Temple. The new Gen Ed was scheduled for implementation in fall 2007. As of this report,
implementation has been limited to selected courses to take place in the next academic year. The
Department is prepared to comply with the new Gen Ed when the University approves its full
implementation.

       The Kinesiology Core

        Kinesiology is a discipline that explores the biophysical, psychological, and professional
practice areas of human movement and physical activity. Physical activity takes on a variety of
forms, but one thing is certain, it is essential for life. The Kinesiologist seeks to understand why
we move and what physical, psychological, philosophical, and social factors influence, and are
influenced, by our movement. An education in Kinesiology leads to optimal growth and
development of the individual in all dimensions of humankind (physical, psychological, social,
emotion and spiritual) as well as the completion of one’s full human potential.


                                                 24
        All students enrolled in the undergraduate Kinesiology program study the “Core of the
Discipline”. These courses emphasize the theoretical and conceptual basis of physical activity
and are considered foundational for advance study through the professional application programs
or graduate work. Students are also required to gain experiential knowledge by fulfilling the
forms of movement requirement. All students experience physical activity by participating in a
variety of activity classes (Basic Instruction Program).

       Prerequisites to the Kinesiology Core:

              Psychology     C060     College Psychology
              Math           C055     College Mathematics
                             or
              Math           C073     College Algebra
              Kinesiology    C100     Human Anatomy and Physiology I
              Kinesiology    C101     Human Anatomy and Physiology II

       Core Courses in the Discipline of Kinesiology:

              Kinesiology    0001     Introduction to Kinesiology
              Kinesiology    8/9-99   Forms of Movement-Experiencing Physical Activity
              Kinesiology    0202     Biomechanics
              Kinesiology    0203     Physiological Basis of Human Movement
              Kinesiology    0204     Motor Behavior
              Kinesiology    W205     Psychosocial Basis of Human Movement
              Kinesiology    0206     Why Humans Move: Philosophical Perspectives


       Professional Practice Areas of the Discipline of Kinesiology

       There are many ways of applying the Discipline of Kinesiology professionally. The
Department of Kinesiology offers the following professional practice programs (see Appendix B
for program curricula):

       •   Athletic Training
       •   Exercise and Sport Science
              o Option 1 - Fitness and Wellness
              o Option 2 - Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional
       •   Teacher Preparation (PHETE)
       •   Kinesiology, Pre-Health Professional Program

       These programs are intended to provide students with the professional practice
knowledge and specialized skills to serve professionally in a variety of challenging and
rewarding real-world vocations. Many of these vocations require that students be graduated
from a certified or sanctioned undergraduate program. These vocations might also require
additional certification at the state or association level. Summaries of the professional
application programs are as follows:



                                                25
        Athletic Training. The undergraduate athletic training program housed in the Department
of Kinesiology is designed to prepare students for certification as athletic trainers by the National
Athletic Trainers' Association Board of Certification (NATABOC). The program of study is
approved by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
Students who successfully complete a degree program and all athletic training program
requirements are eligible to sit for the NATABOC certification examination and for licensure in
the State of Pennsylvania.

        Program requirements include completion of course work taken to develop the
competencies necessary to prevent, identify, rehabilitate, and care for injuries to the physically
active (e.g., athletic). The program of study extends over the four-year undergraduate
experience. Students may transfer into the program as upperclassmen; however the length of the
program will be no shorter than three years.

        The mission of the undergraduate athletic training program is the professional preparation
of students to become National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) certified athletic trainers.
Furthermore, the mission of the program is to produce clinicians who display sound decision-
making and good judgments through critical thinking and analysis of salient facts. The program
is designed to provide the learning opportunities necessary for the student to:

       •   develop the competencies required of the entry-level NATABOC certified athletic
           trainer
       •   obtain formal instruction of appropriate knowledge and skills in a structured
           classroom environment
       •   develop specific technical knowledge and skills through direct application in athletic
           training/sport medicine settings

         Exercise and Sport Science. Exercise and Sport Science has been a program option in the
Department of Kinesiology for more than 30 years. In that time the program has grown and
developed into a vital and dynamic area of study and many rewarding professional applications.
The exercise and sport scientist understands the complexity of the human body and the
interaction among physical activity, exercise and good health. The improved function, health,
and well-being of the total person (body, mind, and spirit) are the ultimate goals of professionals
in this field.

        The exercise scientist applies his/her knowledge, skills, and beliefs to all people
regardless of gender, age, social status, and current health-related fitness level or disease state.
Wherever there is a need to improve function ability, health-fitness, medical prognosis, optimal
aging, or wellness, one will find an exercise scientist providing leadership in programs that help
individuals optimize their lives and health. In summary, exercise science is a stimulating area of
study and a rewarding professional application with a very bright future. The Department of
Kinesiology offers two programs in Exercise and Sport Science at the undergraduate level. They
are:
        • Fitness/Wellness 4-Year Plan
        • Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional 4-Year Plan

        Fitness and Wellness. This undergraduate program at Temple University combines the
study of the Discipline of Kinesiology with the specific knowledge, skills and beliefs required
for success in a variety of professional settings. The program meets or exceeds the
recommendations for undergraduate preparation for both the Health-Fitness Specialist and the

                                                 26
Exercise Specialist certification as recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine
and for the Certification Programs of the National Strength and Conditioning Association. The
curriculum also meets the recommendations and suggested competencies set forward by the
National Association for Sport and Physical Education for exercise science programs. Successful
graduates of the exercise and sport science program go on to apply their degrees in a variety of
professional settings whose primary focus is in the following areas:

       •   Sports Specific Fitness (Strength and Conditioning Coach)
       •   Performance Enhancement (Conditioning and Personal Training)
       •   Adult Fitness
       •   Health-Related Fitness
       •   Employee Health and Fitness
       •   Community Health and Fitness
       •   Geriatric Health and Fitness (Optimal Aging)
       •   Therapeutic Exercise (Exercise Specialist)

        Successful exercise and sport science graduates most often find entry-level positions in
closely supervised health-fitness programs within business and industry or in a variety of clinical
exercise settings. These settings provide health-fitness and wellness services to members of
special populations such as the athlete, the adult worker, the obese individual, the diabetic or the
victim of cardiovascular disease. The commercial fitness center; community-based programs,
such as those offered by the Young Men's Christian Association; as well as personal training
opportunities provide meaningful and relevant work for the exercise scientist.

        Interest in fitness and health continues to grow, and as it does, the exercise scientist will
be there as a resource to help optimize the exercise, physical activity and lifestyle management
programs for all people. The goal of exercise science remains to help all individuals achieve an
optimal level of well-being and to maximize their full physical potential.

        Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional. Increasingly, undergraduate students completing
their degrees in the Department of Kinesiology are continuing their education in a variety of
allied health and professional programs. Such programs include: law, medicine, physician's
assistant, nursing, physical therapy, occupation therapy, nutrition, and exercise physiology. All
such programs require the highest of academic achievement and the dedication to serve people as
they seek to improve health and well-being.

        The Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional program provides the foundation for continued
study in the allied health professions. More importantly the program establishes the
philosophical basis for the role of physical activity in the lives and health of the people we serve.
Through the curriculum in the Department of Kinesiology, students will come to understand the
physical body and how it moves. They are also exposed to the social-psychological aspects of
human movement. Through their study, students develop an understanding and appreciation of
the human body and its tremendous potential. They come to understand the association between
positive lifestyle choices and long-term improvements in health and well-being. This knowledge
and understanding is ideal for those students headed toward the allied health professions as well
as graduate work in the physiology of exercise.

       The Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional program is an academically rigorous
undergraduate program, as are the requirements for entry into most allied health professional
programs. The program combines the Department's Exercise and Sport Science professional
                                                  27
application courses with a standard set of prerequisite courses desired by most professional
schools. In no way will the curriculum match up with all the possible prerequisites for the
various programs mentioned above. Students are advised to check with a number of professional
schools to determine the exact set of prerequisites. An attempt to incorporate these can be made,
but it typically requires summer school or additional semesters of work during the undergraduate
years.

        Physical Health Education Teacher Education (PHETE)-Teaching Certification. The
Department’s Physical Health Education Teacher Education Program prepares teachers with
specialization in the delivery, management, and assessment of physical education and health.
The physical and health education teacher has a unique opportunity for interaction with students
through which outcomes such as the learning of motor skills, lifetime sports, social awareness
and enjoyment, self reliance, and personal wellness can occur. To earn a certificate to teach
Physical and Health Education in public schools in Pennsylvania, students must complete the
PHETE program, pass all appropriate examinations, and be a United States citizen. Graduates of
the program are certified to teach Health and Physical Education, kindergarten through twelfth
grade, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

        Graduates of this track who have earned state certification in Pennsylvania legally qualify
for certification in all states participating in the Interstate Certification Compact. All PHETE
course work and Praxis Exam Scores are valid for 5 years. If certification is not achieved by that
time, courses and exams must be repeated.

         Kinesiology, Pre-Health Professional Program. The Department of Kinesiology offers
the Pre-Health Professional Program which affords students the opportunity to study Kinesiology
while preparing for graduate/professional school in the health professions. There exists a close
relationship between Kinesiology and many of the health professions. Graduate programs in
medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant and chiropractic
look for students with a knowledge and understanding of the human body in health and in
disease. Students preparing for the health professions benefit from a broad exposure to
movement science, health-fitness, and the social-cultural aspects of physical activity.
Kinesiologists believe that physical activity is an integral aspect of life and that through physical
activity people can better achieve optimal growth and development. A better understanding of
physical activity also helps future leaders in the health professions meet their clients’ needs for
long, healthy, and enjoyable lives.

        The Pre-Health Professional Program includes coursework in the Kinesiology Core and
an expanded Liberal Arts and Sciences base. This combination of course work and practical
experience gained through volunteer, internship, or work endeavors positions students for
continued study at the graduate level in a variety of health professions including occupational
therapy and physical therapy. The program includes the standard prerequisite courses for
occupational and physical therapy, but students are advised to check the pre-requisites for their
intended graduate program and work these into their programs where elective course work is
afforded.




                                                 28
Graduate Level

       Graduate Program Overview

        Temple University offers 133 master’s and 62 doctoral programs through 17 schools and
colleges. The graduate programs in Kinesiology are the Master of Education (M.Ed.) and the
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), both of which offer studies in the somatic sciences (athletic
training and integrative exercise physiology) and behavioral sciences (psychology of human
movement as well as curriculum and instruction). The primary focus of the somatic sciences is
the physiological, anatomical, and biomechanical perspective on health care of the individual.
The primary focus of the behavioral sciences is a psychosocial perspective on the individual,
including how pedagogy can most effectively make an impact on health through human
movement. The doctoral programs in the somatic and behavioral sciences provide an integrated
curriculum to advance the discipline of Kinesiology and prepare students for careers in academia
and research positions.

        Both the M.Ed. and Ph.D. programs underwent extensive review and revision during the
2004-05 academic year by its graduate faculty as a part of the move to the College of Health
Professions during the 2005-06 academic year. The M.Ed. and Ph.D. programs are built from
the baccalaureate degree in Kinesiology with curricula of a minimum of 36 and 78 semester
hours, respectively. We consider the following features of our graduate program to be
particularly strong.

           •   The overall objective of the program is to develop highly competent investigators
               capable of performing and eventually directing competitive research in modern
               sub-disciplines of Kinesiology. The revised doctoral program prepares students
               for careers as research scientists in academia, research institutions, and industry.
               We achieve this goal by providing a disciplined and well-organized pre-doctoral
               curriculum, and a research environment rich in interdisciplinary collaborations.

           •   With three new tenure-track faculty hires approved for the 2006-07 academic year
               and two additional tenure-track faculty searches being conducted for appointment
               in the 2007-08 academic year (searches are currently underway), our graduate
               student research has been significantly strengthened and the ability of faculty in
               the Department of Kinesiology to compete for federal funding has been
               significantly enhanced.

           •   The program of student research advisory committees combined with regular
               reviews of the graduate student’s research progress.


       Program Descriptions: Master of Education (Programs of Study are in Appendix B)

        Athletic Training. The M.Ed. program in Athletic Training is a NATA accredited
graduate program that is designed to accommodate both NATABOC certified and “certification
eligible” athletic trainers. The two-year curriculum is offered through the Department of
Kinesiology and College of Health Professions, and the Program of Study can be individualized
based on the student’s background, experience, and future goals. The combination of course
work, clinical, and research experiences are designed to develop the skills necessary to increase


                                                29
proficiency in sports injury, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation; and for doctoral programs
at Doctoral/Research-Extensive institutions.

        Through the clinical component of the program, students provide athletic training
services to many local school districts, clinics, and universities, which has been in existence for
over 20 years. These services provide local sponsors with highly qualified NATABOC certified
athletic trainers at a competitive cost. The services also enable the athletic training graduate
students to gain valuable clinical experience necessary to complete their academic requirements.
They also help to fund graduate athletic training student research projects and provide indirect
overhead to Temple University. Total service grant funding for the 2005-06 academic year was
$195,982, with $5,920 used to fund student research projects and $21,880 as overhead to the
University.

        Integrated Exercise Physiology. The M.Ed. is a two-year program that can be tailored for
students who desire advanced knowledge and competencies in clinical or applied integrative
physiology of exercise to practice in hospitals, clinics, and wellness centers as a part of the health
care team; and for students who are preparing for doctoral programs at Doctoral/Research-
Extensive institutions. The clinical or applied integrative physiology of exercise program is
designed to be a two-year non-thesis program. Students preparing for doctoral programs usually
complete a master’s research project or thesis. The coursework in cardiovascular, respiratory,
and musculoskeletal systems is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop advanced
knowledge and competencies in integrated exercise physiology.

       Curriculum and Instruction. The M.Ed. program is a two-year program designed for
individuals interested in the study of teaching, curriculum development, and/or
supervision/administration in physical education. The program of study includes the core,
research, specialization area, electives, and either a thesis, research project, or comprehensive
examination.

       Psychology of Human Movement. The M.Ed. program is a two-year program that
focuses on the scientific study of human behavior in exercise and sport, as well as other forms of
human movement. Students engage in theory, research, and practice in a diverse set of areas.
These include: performance enhancement, especially in sport; life skills, especially time
management/study skills, coping with athletic injury, alcohol and drug use/abuse and eating
disorders; and motivation and adherence as well as addiction to exercise.


       Program Descriptions: Doctorate of Philosophy (Programs of Study are in Appendix B)

        The doctoral specializations in the Department form a central core around which research
courses and graduate faculty energies are directed. The curricula in each of these specializations
is constantly monitored, and evaluated by the graduate faculty and Graduate Coordinator who
reports to the Department Chairperson and the faculty as a whole in regular faculty meetings.
Graduate policies are open to discussion, debate, and, if necessary, alteration. With the move of
the Department to the College of Health Professions, a comprehensive review of the doctoral
program was undertaken by the Department. Staying within the 68 semester hours of didactic
course work and 10 semester hours of comprehensive examination, dissertation proposal, and
dissertation approved by the Graduate Board, each specialization track identified a common
doctoral core of 15 semester hours of required courses that are research based, specialization
required courses, other required courses, and electives. The quality of the doctoral program
specializations were improved by requiring students to be enrolled in Mentored Research I
                                                30
during the second semester of the first year of study. Mentored Research I is designed to teach
students about how to write a grant for funding, which is followed up by Mentored Research II
where students prepare and submit a grant proposal. Another improvement in the quality of the
Ph.D. program is that the preliminary examination now consists of the student submitting and
having accepted at least one paper for publication in a Journal Citation Report scientific journal.
The requirement also includes that the student be first author on the publication and must
successfully pass an oral defense of the research conducted for the journal article.

         Each specialization track in the Ph.D. program evaluated its course work to assure that
students have the necessary didactic and research coursework and research experiences for
preparation for employment in academia or at a research institution. For example, students in the
Integrative Exercise Science Program take the Biomedical/Bioscience Interdisciplinary Courses
required of all doctoral students in the basic science departments in the School of Medicine and
doctoral students in Athletic Training take the human cadaver course. The Athletic Training,
Integrative Exercise Physiology, and Psychology of Human Movement specializations continue
to utilize their significant collaborative research efforts with other departments throughout
Temple University.

       Athletic Training. The Ph.D. in Kinesiology with specialization in Athletic Training is a
research-based degree that is designed to prepare students for research positions or
teaching/research positions in academia and research institutions, The program is designed for
NATABOC certified athletic trainers and/or other qualified health-care professionals who are
committed to advancing the faculty of reason and critical thinking skills through the evaluation
of accepted clinical practice. The program research expertise of the faculty include: (a)
neuromechanics as related to injury pathomechanics and sensorimotor characteristics to improve
function as well as provide protection from injury during physical activity though a broad
spectrum of physically active populations and extensive laboratory experiences, and (b)
evidence-based practice in athletic training and sports medicine with particular focus on
interventions to reduce unintentional injuries and treatment outcomes.

        Integrative Exercise Physiology. The Ph.D. in Kinesiology with specialization in
integrative exercise physiology is a research-based degree that is designed to prepare students for
research positions or teaching/research positions in academia, research institutions, and industry.
The program research expertise of the faculty include: acute effects and long-term changes
resulting from training on the cardiovascular system, renal function, and control of hypertension
in specific populations; musculoskeletal system and bone modeling; energy transformation;
disabilities; and obesity.

       Curriculum and Instruction. The Ph.D. in Kinesiology with specialization in curriculum
and instruction is designed for individuals interested in becoming members of teaching faculty in
academia and in research institutions. Because of the limited number of tenure-track faculty in
Kinesiology currently teaching in the curriculum and instruction area, admissions to the Ph.D.
program has been put into abeyance until which time more tenure-track faculty are hired for the
program.

        Psychology of Human Movement. The Ph.D. in Kinesiology with specialization in
exercise and sport psychology specialization focuses on the scientific study of human behavior in
exercise and sport, as well as other forms of human movement. The program research expertise
of the faculty include: performance enhancement, especially in sport; life skills, especially time
management/study skills, coping with athletic injury, alcohol and drug use/abuse, and eating
disorders; and, motivation and adherence as well as addiction to exercise.
                                                31
6. ASSESSMENT METHODS

Systematic assessment methods for determining student outcomes for Kinesiology majors

Overview

       Across all Departmental programs and academic levels (i.e., undergraduate, master, and
doctoral), we utilize a variety of ongoing assessment methods. Grades earned in classes are a
primary indicator of student outcomes. The Department also has a rich environment of
advisement at all academic levels that monitor student progress. For both master and doctoral
students, a program of study is developed and is reviewed periodically to assure proper progress
to degree completion.

        At both the undergraduate and graduate levels, we use conventional assessment methods
in assigning grades in accordance with University policy. For the University Core courses in
anatomy and physiology, we use open labs and tutoring sessions to assist students in their
learning and to help students learn to study for examinations. PHETE students must pass the
state PRAXIS examinations prior to receiving their credentials to teach. The undergraduate
Athletic Training students have to pass the NATABOC examination prior to receiving
certification as an Athletic Trainer.

        In addition to individual course outcomes, we have other standard mechanisms to
monitor student progress in our programs. At the undergraduate level, majors must maintain a
minimum GPA of 2.0 for courses or face academic probation or dismissal. The Department
follows the policy of the College of Health Professions in that no grade below a “C” may count
toward a student’s major. The Undergraduate Coordinator and the Academic Advisor are
notified of majors who receive grades below a “C” for intervention. The Department follows the
policies of the Graduate School and utilizes formative and summative assessments to document
student outcomes. Graduate School policy states that a student cannot receive more than 2 sub-
standard grades (below a B-) or more than one grade of F.

         Undergraduate students meet regularly with the Undergraduate Coordinator or the
Academic Advisor for the monitoring of their progress and to assist them in understanding
program requirements and expectations. Graduate students are assigned an advisor with their
acceptance into the graduate program. They meet with their advisor for curricular planning.
These meetings allow the students to understand the scope of the program and the requirements
and expectations. When the graduate student delineates his/her research project and has an
acceptable research proposal, the appropriate faculty member becomes the student’s advisor and
serves as the primary mentor for the student. The student also meets regularly with his/her
mentor and the thesis/dissertation sponsoring committee meetings for the updating of research
efforts.



Undergraduate Programs and Courses

         General learning outcomes for the undergraduate Kinesiology program have been
developed with the assistance of the faculty teaching in the Kinesiology core. These knowledges,
skills, and understandings are common to all Kinesiology students regardless of their program
option. Because of the uniqueness of each program option, specific assessment practices have
                                               32
been developed and are practiced on a recurrent basis. Each program option has a full-time
faculty coordinator who is responsible for assessment, which includes tracking student and
learning outcomes. The coordinators of the programs are as follows:


           •   Athletic Training-Ms. Dani Moffit
           •   Exercise Science (2 options)-Dr. William Oddou
           •   Physical Health Education Teacher Education -Dr. Ricky Swalm
           •   Pre-health professional program-Dr. William Oddou as UG Coordinator


       General learning outcomes for the undergraduate Kinesiology program:
           •   Learning Outcome 1: Students will use their holistic knowledge in kinesiology to
               critically think and solve problems related to the analysis of human movement
               within the varied spheres of physical activity.
           •   Learning Outcome 2: Students will use their understanding of kinesiology and
               their communication skills to promote the value of physical activity to all of
               humankind helping to improve the quality of life and health of self and others.
           •   Learning Outcome 3: Students will demonstrate their beliefs in the value of
               physical activity to self and others by actively participating in a variety of spheres
               of physical activity.


       Specific learning outcomes for the undergraduate Kinesiology program:

        Students graduating with a Bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology from Temple University
will be able to:

           •   demonstrate knowledge of and skill in a broad variety of motor skill and fitness
               activities
           •   understand the biological and physical bases of human movement within the
               varied
               spheres physical activity (sport, exercise, work, play)
           •   understand the behavioral and psychological bases of human movement within
               the varied spheres of physical activity (sport, exercise, work, play)
           •   understand the socio-cultural, historical, and philosophical perspectives of human
               movement within the varied spheres of physical activity (sport, exercise, work,
               play
           •   understand how motor skills are acquired and refined as well as the
               developmental basis of human movement within the varied spheres of physical
               activity (sport, exercise, work, play)
           •   use and apply measurement instruments and principles for qualitative and
               quantitative assessment of human movement within the varied spheres of physical
               activity (sport, exercise, work, play)


                                                 33
           •   apply critical thinking, writing, reading, oral communication, quantitative and
               qualitative analysis and information management skills to movement related
               questions
           •   use the computer and other technology to support inquiry and professional
               practice in movement related fields
           •   understand the scientific method and other systematic ways of knowing relative to
               research and scholarship in human movement with emphasis on sport and
               exercise phenomenon
           •   demonstrate ability to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge bases of Kinesiology
               in an applied, problem-solving context and be familiar with standards, ethics, and
               expectations of the Kinesiology professional

See Appendix C for Systematic assessment methods for determining student outcomes for
Kinesiology majors.



       Specific Program Assessments of Undergraduate Programs in Kinesiology

       Two of the Department’s programs are accredited by outside agencies: Athletic Training
(CAATE), and PHETE (PA Department of Education). Learning outcomes for these two
programs are consistent with accreditation standards.

        Athletic Training. The Athletic Training assessment plan includes both didactic and
clinical education components. The requirements of the program and the sequence of course
offerings are explained upon entry by the advising staff. This information is reinforced by the
coordinator of the athletic training program during the second semester of the student’s freshman
year as all aspiring athletic training students are enrolled in KIN 142 and 144. All qualified
students continue into the second year of the program and are assessed in the classroom on the
competencies necessary for program completion and NATABOC eligibility. This takes place
throughout the student’s second year. Each Kinesiology core course and each Athletic Training
course has set criteria for grading in the course syllabus and these procedures as well as the
learning objectives have been approved by CAATE.

        The student’s formal clinical education continues in the third year. The clinical
supervisor evaluates the students (KIN 247 and KIN 248) and copies of these evaluations are
placed in the students’ files. Clinical training continues into the student’s fourth year. Fourth
year students meet and are assessed on the competencies during KIN 347 and 348. These
practicum courses include preparation for the NATABOC exam. The final assessment takes
place when the students sit for the NATABOC certification examination.

       The undergraduate athletic training program undergoes periodic review by CAATE. In
2001, the program was re-accredited for an additional 7 years.


        PHETE (Teacher Certification). The PHETE (Teacher Certification) assessment plan
includes both formative and summative assessments. Students enter the PHETE program in their
second year and are informed of the program requirements in writing and are required to sign
their acknowledgement of these requirements. The students are evaluated by the teacher
education faculty and by cooperative teachers on six criteria that are measured in specific
program courses as well as during field experiences. The criteria are as follows: (a) physical
                                               34
skills and fitness performances; (b) micro-teachings and peer evaluations; (c) oral and written
examinations; (d) episode, lesson, and unit planning; (e) systematic observation assignments of
student teaching at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels; (f) field experiences each
semester in the program including adapted physical education and a full-semester of “student
teaching” which is completed in the last semester of the student’s senior year. Students must
earn a minimum 3.0 GPA as well as achieve a minimum B- grade in every PHETE course

        PHETE students are also assessed using the “PRAXIS TESTS”. Students must take and
pass four exams prior to admission to the certification level of the program: (a) reading, (b)
writing, (c) math, and (d) fundamental content knowledge. These exams are usually taken in the
sophomore year. Students must also take and pass the Content Knowledge test in Health and
Physical Education in the senior year prior to student teaching. The final step in achieving
certification is that students must submit their applications to the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania’s Department of Education for certification examination.

       The PHETE program undergoes periodic review by the Pennsylvania Department of
Education. In 2005 the PHETE program was commended by the Pennsylvania Department of
Education and re-certified for an additional five years.

         Non-Accredited Undergraduate Programs in Kinesiology. Exercise and sport science and
the pre-health professional program are the two non-accredited undergraduate programs in
Kinesiology. The former was an affiliated program of The American College of Sports
Medicine (ACSM) prior to advent of the ACSM’s University Connection and Endorsement
Program. Regardless, the exercise and sport science program meets the knowledge, skills, and
abilities guidelines as specified by the ACSM Committee on Certification and Registry Boards.
Since their inception, these guidelines have been used to develop the curriculum and determine
the content of course work within the curriculum. The program uses traditional methods of
assessment linking course objectives to course work to assessment instruments. More
importantly, the program uses three capstone courses to assess student competencies. In KIN
0360 “Principles and Practices of Graded Exercise Testing and Training” the guidelines for the
health-fitness specialist and exercise specialist are reviewed and assessed. In KIN 0314
“Neuromuscular Principles of Strength and Conditioning” the standards and practices for the
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist per the National Strength and Conditioning
Association are reviewed and assessed. The third capstone course in the exercise and sports
science program is a semester long internship in a professional environment of the student’s
choice. Students complete their internships in one of three primary areas: (a) clinical or
rehabilitative, (b) private or corporate health-fitness/wellness, or (c) private or public peak
performance or sports physiology. A summative assessment of the student’s internship includes
the evaluation of two case studies, one special project and one oral presentation. The internship
supervisor also submits an in-depth written assessment. Subsequent to graduation, students are
encouraged to sit for ACSM and/or NSCA Certification. This, however, is not a graduation
requirement.

        The fourth and final program offered by the Department of Kinesiology at the
undergraduate level is a general studies program intended for students pursuing entry into
graduate programs in the health professions. In this program students complete the University
Core, the Kinesiology Core and the prerequisites for their particular graduate program (physical
therapy, occupational therapy, etc.). Students in this program are required to complete
Independent Study (KIN 359) as their capstone experience. In this course students are assessed
on their research, writing, and oral communication skills. This course has a 90% pass rate with
an average grade of 2.96 (B+). The Department does not have a record of students’ success rates
                                                 35
entering the graduate programs of their choosing. This is likely important information and needs
to be addressed in the future.

        Additional assessment activities are described in Section 7: Student Qualifications and
Performance. Information about portfolio, performance, internship, and field placement reviews
is provided as well as information about the Department’s capstone courses. This information
follows Table 14.


Systematic assessment methods for determining student outcomes for non-majors

        No non-majors take our undergraduate professional preparation courses. Non-majors do
take courses in our Basic Instruction Program (e.g., aerobics, fitness for life, weight training,
yoga) and Human Anatomy and Physiology I (C100) and II (C101) courses. For the Basic
Instruction Program a web-based exit survey was implemented during the 2004-05 academic
year. The purpose of the survey was to gather information about the quality of the course
instruction and content, and to determine the level of value added to the over-all well-being of
the student. This information was used to improve the quality of the overall program as well as
the individual courses. The survey was not conducted during the 2005-06 academic year, but
will be reinitiated in 2006-07.

        The Department follows the grade distribution of the students enrolled in its two semester
Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. Approximately 700 students are enrolled in the two
semester sequence within an academic year. The coordinator of Anatomy and Physiology
regularly informs the appropriate school or college academic advising center of students who
have missed more than one test. The coordinator also schedules regular tutoring sessions using
the course teaching assistants to assist students who need additional help. The coordinator also
schedules “open labs” for students who need additional time and help to prepare for laboratory
exams.


Use of assessment outcomes for improvement of our academic programs

         Faculty currently have both formal and informal (feedback from students) mechanisms
for obtaining outcome information on our academic programs. The primary formal mechanism
is the CATE (see Appendix A for sample) assessment which is a University-wide course and
instructor evaluation. With few exceptions, it is required for each course each semester. These
mechanisms assist in enhancing the quality of our courses. An exit interview survey (developed
for this Periodic Program Review) will be used with each graduating cohort in the future
(January, May, August graduations) to obtain additional information of a larger, programmatic
nature, that may help in improving the quality of our academic programs.


Consultation with other departments to improve the relevance of our course offerings to their
academic programs

       This has not been done systematically (in part, as noted above, because few students in
other departments have taken our courses). However, given our position within the College of
Health Professions and potential interdisciplinary collaboration, it is anticipated that the
Undergraduate Coordinator in the Department of Kinesiology will establish a communication

                                               36
network with Undergraduate Coordinators in other departments to regularly (yearly) address this
issue.


Graduate Program and Courses

Systematic assessment methods for determining student outcomes for Kinesiology majors

        Almost all students in our graduate classes are Kinesiology ‘majors’ (few students from
outside the department take our graduate courses). Faculty get feedback through the grades our
students obtain as well as the quality of the work in our classes (and qualitative feedback as
well). Faculty can also obtain information on a student’s grades in all classes after each semester
through the University’s student information computer system (ISIS). When one of our students
is not doing well, we discuss with each other about the student and formulate a plan for helping
the student succeed.

        The application process to be admitted to our graduate programs is sufficiently
competitive that almost all students who are accepted successfully complete their
master’s/doctoral program if they wish to do so. There are certainly occasional students whose
interests change and who transfer to other schools, or who find that life’s circumstances require
they change directions or withdraw from the program, but we have only averaged about one
student every few years or so who is dismissed for failing to meet the University’s academic
standards (getting more than two grades below a B- or more than one F grade).

          Faculty members are required to meet with their students throughout the year. At both
the master’s and doctoral level advising occurs each semester in preparing for the upcoming
semester to ensure that the necessary courses are being taken and the student is on track to meet
her/his goals and graduate in a timely fashion. Doctoral students are required to complete a
Program of Study within their first semester, have it signed by their major adviser and another
faculty member, and submit it to the Graduate Coordinator. Master’s students are encouraged to
develop a Program of Study as well, although the degrees of freedom (in terms of electives)
available are more limited at the master’s level and not all students wind up needing to develop
and submit such a program of study. Our curriculum (see Appendix B) provides as much
flexibility as possible for our students, but has a sufficient number of required courses that most
students, especially at the master’s level, have a similar program of study within each of the
areas of specialization within the Department.

        Because of the close mentoring relationship of faculty to students, especially at the
doctoral level, through collaboration on research, supervision of applied experiences, advising
for courses, etc., there is almost a systematic assessment on a regular basis of each student’s
progress by her/his faculty adviser, as well as other faculty (a relationship which becomes
formalized when the student’s Dissertation Advisory Committee is formed at the dissertation
proposal writing stage and continues through the completion of the dissertation). This has
sometimes been a challenge with students who are part-time and/or have completed coursework
and moved elsewhere for employment, but as the department shifts towards a more full-time
cohort of students, we anticipate that the quality of this advising/mentorship will continue to
increase. The addition of new faculty who are eager to work with students and mentor them will
add to the quality of the advising/mentoring that our students receive.



                                                37
       The graduate (master’s only) athletic training program undergoes periodic review by the
NATA Educational Council. In 2004, the program was re-accredited for an additional five
years.



Systematic assessment methods for determining student outcomes for non-majors

        Very few non-majors take our graduate courses, usually only 1 to 2 students per class (at
the most), a very small percentage (less than 5%) of the enrollment. No systematic assessment
methods have been used to date to determine student outcomes for non-majors, other than review
of individual student performance at the end of each semester in each class (by the instructor).
Informal feedback networks are available for faculty in other departments to communicate with
our faculty in cases where students have had an especially positive (or perhaps even negative,
although we have yet to hear of such an event) experience in our classes.


Use of assessment outcomes for improvement of our academic programs

        Faculty currently have both formal (CATE scores and qualitative feedback) and informal
(informal feedback from students) mechanisms for obtaining outcome information on our
academic programs. These mechanisms assist in enhancing the quality of our courses. An exit
interview survey (developed for the Periodic Program Review) will be used with each graduating
cohort in the future (January, May, August graduations) to obtain additional information of a
larger, programmatic nature, that may help in improving the quality of our academic programs.
Current students will also be surveyed on a yearly basis for their feedback.

        Regular faculty meetings (and occasional ‘retreats’) also allow us to revisit the
curriculum and make changes as needed, based on feedback from students, faculty, higher
administration, and the profession. This has occurred on a regular basis, especially in our last
few years in the College of Education and now in our first few years in the College of Health
Professions. Changes have been especially pronounced in our Ph.D. program, with fewer
changes in the M.Ed. program.


Consultation with other departments to improve the relevance of our course offerings to their
academic programs

        This has not been done systematically (in part, as noted above, because few students in
other departments have taken our courses). However, given our position within the College of
Health Professions and potential interdisciplinary collaboration, the Graduate Coordinator in the
Department of Kinesiology has established a communication network with Graduate
Coordinators in other departments to regularly (at least yearly) address this issue. To some
degree it has been assumed that ‘no news is good news,’ and that if any problems arise/exist, we
would hear from other departments about these issues and address them as needed. The
communication network will help facilitate working together with other departments to decrease
the likelihood of any such issues arising in the first place.




                                                38
7. STUDENT QUALIFICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE


Qualifications of students upon entry to Temple University

Undergraduate

       All freshmen and transfer students, including those who have declared a major in
Kinesiology, are admitted by the University and not by the Department. Consequently, there is
no Department review of incoming student qualifications which makes it important the
Department continues its efforts to recruit highly qualified students. The total number of
applicants for the Department rose dramatically by 40 and 33% from the fall semester of 2001 in
2002 and 2003. Much of this increase was likely due to increases in the student body at Temple
and recruitment efforts of the Department. A manageable increase in applications occurred in
2004 (8%) and 2005 (18%). Between 2001 and 2005 the acceptance rate for freshmen
applications was between 55 and 69% with 36 to 45% enrolling in the Department’s program.
During the same period, the acceptance rate for transfer students ranged from 59 to 82% with 62
to 78% enrolling in the Department’s programs. The yearly acceptance and registration rates are
found in Tables 4 and 5. More than 40% of students enter the undergraduate program in
Kinesiology via the “intra-university” transfer route. The University stipulates that any student in
good academic standing (GPA > 2.00) can initiate a transfer to another college within the
University. The Department of Kinesiology places no added restrictions to this process.


Table 4. Undergraduate Admissions: Freshmen


                 Fall 2001       Fall 2002       Fall 2003      Fall 2004       Fall 2005
 Applied           163             245             232            175             188
 Accepted          100             135             133            114             130
Acceptance
   Rate             61%             55%              57%           65%             69%
Registered           45              50               48            49              53
Registration
   Rate             45%             37%              36%           43%             41%


Table 5. Undergraduate Admissions: Transfer Students


                 Fall 2001       Fall 2002       Fall 2003      Fall 2004       Fall 2005
 Applied            76              89              85             83              93
 Accepted           55              54              50             52              76
Acceptance
   Rate             72%             61%              59%           63%             82%
Registered           41              42               31            39              54
Registration
   Rate             75%             78%              62%           75%             71%


                                                39
         The academic measures of freshmen admitted to the Kinesiology program between 2001
and 2005 are found in Table 6. For GPA and high school class rank, the data indicate that the
academic measures of admitted freshmen to the Department of Kinesiology generally reflected
the mean data of the University. Class rank, average verbal and math SAT scores mirrored the
upward trend of the University between 2001 And 2005. The GPA of transfer students is below
that of the freshmen (see Table 7).

The College Board (http://www.collegeboard.com/about/news_info/cbsenior.html, accessed
8/14/2006) reports that the mean high school GPAs for college-bound seniors for fall 2005 was
on average 3.205. This varies substantially by race and ethnicity. Temple information for fall
2005 reflects comparable GPAs to national norms.

       Based upon SAT scores, Kinesiology students have been reasonably close to Temple’s
average SAT scores. The College Board reports that the combined SAT scores for college bound
students for Fall 2005 was 1028 as compared to Department of Kinesiology students entering at
1088, some 5.8% above the norm.


Table 6.   Academic Measures: Freshmen Admissions
              Avg HS           Avg HS          Avg SAT            Avg SAT           Avg SAT
                GPA           Rank (%)          Verbal              Math           Combined
            TU*    Dept. TU*        Dept. TU*       Dept.       TU*    Dept.      TU*    Dept.
Fall 2001 3.05     3.06     68      68      525     512         521    512        1046 1024
Fall 2002 3.20     3.24     71      70      533     519         535    521        1068 1039
Fall 2003 3.25     3.34     72      78      541     542         547    543        1088 1085
Fall 2004 3.24     3.23     73      70      541     517         547    537        1088 1054
Fall 2005 3.29     3.21     73      71      546     533         552    555        1098 1088
*Obtained from Student Profile posted on website.

Table 7. Academic Measures: Transfer Admissions


                          Fall Semester                                        GPA
                               2001                                            2.91
                               2002                                            2.75
                               2003                                            2.90
                               2004                                            2.93
                               2005                                            2.92


Master’s Program

        Applications for the Master’s program in Kinesiology are reviewed by the Admissions
Committee of each sub-discipline in Kinesiology (i.e., athletic training, curriculum and
instruction, integrative exercise physiology, and exercise sport psychology) in compliance with
the minimum admission standards of the Graduate School of Temple University: undergraduate
GPA of 3.0 or GRE > 65th percentile for combined verbal and quantitative GRE scores, 3.5 GPA
during the last two years in the undergraduate experience, or at least a 3.25 in at least 9 semester
hours of graduate work. The Graduate Coordinator and Department Chair provide oversight to
the review process. Admissions to the Master’s program in Kinesiology remain competitive with
                                                 40
the number of applications with relatively high GPA and sufficient GRE scores to allow for
some degree of selectivity. Table 8 contains the Master’s graduate admission data. The target
number of master’s students accepted per year is at 30, with an expectation that 18 to 20 will
enroll, to assure that there is sufficient advisement and mentoring of these students.

        The admitted master’s students in 2001 and 2002 did not have their undergraduate GPAs
recorded by the College of Education (see Table 9). In 2003 and 2004 the College recorded most
undergraduate GPAs of admitted students with the College of Health Professions requiring that
all undergraduate GPA are recorded in 2005. Between 2003 and 2004 there was a subtle
increase in the undergraduate GPA with a large increase in combined GRE scores (1001 to 1076)
and this has continued in 2006 with the combined GRE scores being 1092. During the
discussions of the move to the College of Health Professions, the Department defined its
commitment to research and increased its efforts to recruit and accept more qualified students
which may be represented in the large increase in GRE scores between fall 2004 and fall 2005
and the further increase for 2006-07.

Table 8. Graduate Admissions: Master’s Program


                 Fall 2001      Fall 2002      Fall 2003       Fall 2004      Fall 2005
  Applied           60             67             66              43             45
  Decisions         42             38             47              27             34
   Made*
  Accepted         34               26              38            25              30
 Acceptance
    Rate          57%             39%               58%          58%             67%
 Registered        18              18                21           13              19
Registration
    Rate          53%             69%               55%          52%             63%
* Complete Applications


Table 9. Academic Measures: Master’s Admissions

              Avg.
              UG                                                           Combined
              GPA      Avg GRE Verbal          Avg GRE Quant                 GRE
Fall 2001       -           463                     540                      1003
Fall 2002       -           442                     562                      1004
Fall 2003     3.32          423                     578                      1001
Fall 2004     3.38          471                     548                      1019
Fall 2005     3.40          467                     609                      1076


        The academic measures of master’s students accepted to the program but who did not
register is similar to that of those students who enrolled into the program. Tables 10 and 11
provide summative data of the accepted but not enrolled students.




                                               41
Table 10. Academic Measures: Accepted but Not Registered for Master’s Program

                                                           Range                    Range
             Avg UG          Range         Avg GRE         GRE        Avg GRE       GRE
              GPA           UG GPA          Verbal        Verbal       Quant        Quant
Fall 2001                                    438          350-590       585        310-750
Fall 2002                                    442          400-560       502        330-720
Fall 2003        3.45       2.89-3.87        480          400-640       615        460-800
Fall 2004        3.44       2.74-3.90        484          400-740       597        370-780
Fall 2005        3.5        3.00-3.92        513          390-630       651        590-780


Table 11. Registration Rate

                              Top Ten             Top Ten                   All Applicants
                              UG GPA            GRE Combined                 Combined
     Fall 2001                                      1035                         1002
     Fall 2002                                      1057                         1009
     Fall 2003                 3.44                 1126                         1040
     Fall 2004                 3.47                 1079                         1046
     Fall 2005                 3.66                 1124                         1076

Doctoral Program

        Applications for the doctoral program in Kinesiology are reviewed by the Admissions
Committee of each sub-discipline in Kinesiology (i.e., athletic training, curriculum and
instruction, integrative exercise physiology, and exercise sport psychology) in compliance with
the aforementioned minimum admission standards of the Graduate School of Temple University.
The Graduate Coordinator and the Department Chair provide oversight to this review process.
Admissions to the doctoral program in Kinesiology remain competitive with the number of
applications with relatively high GPA and sufficient GRE scores to allow for some degree of
selectivity. Table 12 contains the doctoral admission data. Following an in-depth assessment of
the doctoral program by the Department, the target number of doctoral students accepted per
year is between 8 and 10, depending upon the expected graduation rates to assume that there is
sufficient advisement and mentoring of these students.

Table 12. Graduate Admissions: Doctoral


                Fall 2001        Fall 2002      Fall 2003           Fall 2004     Fall 2005
  Applied           36              28             28                  26            25
  Decisions
   Made*            22                20             14                14            16
  Accepted          15                14             11                7             13
 Acceptance
    Rate          42%              50%               39%              27%           52%
 Registered         12              12                9                4             10
Registration
    Rate          80%              86%               82%              57%           77%
* Complete applications
                                                42
       The doctoral program underwent an extensive review in the 2004-05 academic year. The
major outcomes of this review resulting in modification of the doctoral program are as follows.

   •   Doctoral students are expected to be full-time students.
   •   Link the number of newly admitted doctoral students to availability for excellence in
       advisement and mentoring.
   •   The curriculum in each of the four sub-discipline tracks (i.e., athletic training, curriculum
       and instruction, integrative exercise physiology, and psychology of human movement)
       has a common core and research experience for all doctoral students.
   •   All doctoral students will begin their exposure to research during the first semester
       following matriculation and will enroll in Mentored Research I in the second semester of
       their first year of study.
   •   To pass the comprehensive examination, doctoral students must have published a
       research paper in a journal cited by Journal Citation Reports and must successfully pass
       an oral defense of the research conducted for the journal article.



Student Performance at Temple University


Undergraduate
        Information presented in Table 13 reflects both the accumulative and major GPAs for
graduates of the Department of Kinesiology from fall 2001 through fall 2005. These numbers
are higher than the Temple accumulative average for both fall 2004 and fall 2005 which were
2.94 and 2.93, respectively. They are not, however, out of line with national figures reported by
GradeInflation.com (http://www.gradinflation.com/, accessed 8/15/2006) as reported in the
figure on the next page.


Table 13. Cumulative GPA for Undergraduates over Three Graduation Periods (May, August
and January).


Undergraduate GPA Fall 2001 Fall 2002 Fall 2003 Fall 2004 Fall 2005
Accumulative GPA for
Department Graduates NA       2.90      3.03      3.17       3.06
Major GPA for
Department Graduates NA       3.02      2.99      3.09       3.11




                                                43
                          Recent GPA Trends Nationwide
                   3.50
                                                                                          Academic Year
                                                                                             1991-1992
                   3.40
                                                                                             1996-1997
                   3.30                                                            3.26      2001-2002

                                                                            3.19
                   3.20
     Average GPA




                                                                     3.11
                                        3.09
                   3.10

                                 3.00
                   3.00                                      2.97
                          2.94

                   2.90                               2.87
                                               2.82
                   2.80


                   2.70


                   2.60
                          All Schools          Public Schools       Private Schools




       The retention rate for freshmen students is considered to be very good (76 to 94% of
entering students) (see Table 14).

       The time to completion averages from 4.7 to 5.1 years between 2001 and 2005 (see Table
14). Most of the undergraduate students work extensively at jobs (>20 hours/week) in addition
to being full time students (>12 semester hours). As a result many students do not take a 16
semester hour load each semester.

        The National Center for Education Statistics (http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2003/
section3/ indicator21.asp) reporting in 2003 suggests that first-time students who had not stopped
out took on average 55 months (4.58 years) to degree completion. This time is increased to 59
months (4.9 years) for students who attended two colleges or universities. The University of
Idaho (University of Idaho, Institutional Research and Assessment Report, Volume 2002-03, No.
4, March 13, 2003) reports similar time to completion with students in the Life Sciences
averaging 4.69 years to degree completion and .47 additional years for transfer students. Since
more than half of undergraduate students in the Department of Kinesiology at Temple transfer
from one school or another our average time to completion seems to be about average.
Additionally, the Department’s revised Pre-Health Professional program affords students 5 to 7
free electives which should facilitate completing the Bachelor of Science degree more
expeditiously.


                                                        44
Table 14. Undergraduate Academic Measures
                Freshmen         GPA      GPA Upper                 B.S.          Avg. Time to
                Retention       Lower      Division               Awarded         Graduation
                  Rate         Division
 Fall 2001        82%            2.65        2.91                     86            5.1 years
 Fall 2002        76%            2.71        2.98                     79            5.0 years
 Fall 2003        78%            2.92        2.99                     79            4.7 years
 Fall 2004        94%            2.76        2.95                     83            4.8 years
 Fall 2005        88%            2.83        2.98                     60            4.7 years


       Portfolio, Performance, Internship and Field Placement Reviews

        The undergraduate programs in the Department of Kinesiology include extensive field
experience, practicum and internship opportunities. Student performance can be monitored by
examining grades in selected courses and from reviewing evaluations submitted by internship or
field experience supervisors. Review of 44 summative evaluations of site supervisors for KIN
0361-“Internship in Exercise and Sport Science” revealed a high level of student performance.
Site supervisors awarded an overall grade of “A” to 87% of the interns while just 13% were
awarded the grade of “B”. This would indicate that interns were well prepared for their
internship experiences and that they met or exceeded the professional standards desired by the
supervisors

       Performance in Capstone Courses

        In Table 15, grades for all students in specified capstone courses are listed by year. The
average grade for each class regardless of instructor is listed. The data indicates students doing
well in these courses which are indicators of academic rigor and student accomplishment.
The capstone courses are KIN W205-The Social-psychology of Physical Activity, KIN 206-The
History and Philosophy of Kinesiology, and KIN 359-Independent study in Kinesiology; KIN
343-Advanced Athletic Training and KIN 345-Special Topics in Athletic Training in the athletic
training program; KIN 360-Principles of Graded Exercise Testing in the exercise and sport
science program and, finally; PHETE 260-Senior Seminar for student teachers.

       In the spring of 2006, a Department committee was formed to review and revise capstone
writing classes KIN W205 and 206. This committee will work to improve academic rigor and
consistency of course offerings and grading respective of instructor. Their work is expected to
be completed in the fall of 2006.




                                                45
Table 15. Performance in Capstone Courses


               Fall    Spring     Fall   Spring      Fall   Spring   Fall    Spring    Fall
Course         2001    2002       2002   2003        2003   2004     2004    2005      2005
KIN W205       3.23    3.02       NA     3.72        3.75   3.89     3.78    3.75      3.65
KIN 206        2.73    3.15       3.13   3.02        2.91   3.02     3.25    2.69      3.19
KIN 343        3.04    ----       2.70   ----        2.74   ----     2.92    ----      2.62
KIN 345        ----    3.92       ----   3.71        ----   3.59     ----    3.71      ----
KIN 359        3.80    3.65       3.70   3.98        4.00   3.07     2.89    3.29      2.00
KIN 360        3.17    2.86       3.07   2.81        2.67   3.04     2.96    3.04      2.46
PHETE 260      ----    4.00       ----   3.81        ----   3.59     ----    3.52      ----



       Standardized Test Scores

      No records are currently kept on the standardized test scores for undergraduate students
moving on into graduate studies (i.e., GRE, MCAT, LSAT).

       Pass rates on licensing or certification examinations

         Kinesiology has two programs that are accredited both having certification and
credentialing procedures: PHETE and undergraduate athletic training. Certification outcomes
data are in Tables 16 and 17. The PHETE program has a long standing record of success with
exceptionally high pass rates nearing the 100% standard. The athletic training program has a
mixed record of success: two of the four years for which data are available were at or above the
national standards, while the other two were not. The latter is attributed to the following: (a) a
large fluctuation in percent outcomes exits due to the relatively low number of Temple students
sitting annually for the examination (n = 8 to 11), and (b) a vacuum in program leadership
existed during the 2005-06 academic year. A new program director has been hired for the 2006-
07 academic year with the directive to increase enrollment in the program and the pass rate on
the certification examination.




                                                46
Table 16. PHETE PRAXIS Exam Results: 2000 to 2004

   Year           Area                   PA                       Temple                    PHETE
 2000        Basic               9906/10,301 (96%)             366/424 (86%)              13/13 (100%)
             Prof Know           8688/9,467 (92%)              290/371 (78%)              13/13 (100%)
             Academic             8280/9,272 (89%)             298/368 (81%)              13/13 (100%)
             Summary             9058/10,572 (86%)             322/436 (74%)              13/13 (100%)

 2001        Basic                9400/9,913 (95%)             443/518 (86%)              16/16 (100%)
             Prof Know           9058/9,485 (95%)              375/432 (87%)              16/16 (100%)
             Academic             8279/8,863 (93%)             336/394 (85%)              16/16 (100%)
             Summary             9055/10,086 (90%)             423/527 (80%)              16/16 (100%)

 2002        Basic               8873/9,632 (92%)              309/400 (77%)               9/9 (100%)
             Prof Know           8414/9,103(92%)               275/328 (84%)               9/9 (100%)
             Academic            7482/8,212 (91%)              268/314 (85%)               9/9 (100%)
             Summary             8293/9,795 (85%)              281/404 (74%)               9/9 (100%)

 2003        Basic               9478/10,006 (95%)             374/446 (84%)              13/13 (100%)
             Prof Know           8910/9,471 (94%)              312/379 (82%)              12/13 (92%)
             Academic             9046/9,705 (93%)             401/460 (87%)              13/13 (100%)
             Summary             8994/10,231 (88%)             346/467 (86%)              12/13 (92%)

 2004        Basic              10588/11,026 (96%)             409/462 (89%)              19/19 (100%)
             Prof Know                 NA                           NA                         NA
             Academic           10510/11,261 (93%)             432/514 (84%)              19/19 (100%)
             Summary            10355/11,232 (92%)             416/484 (86%)              19/19 (100%)




Table 17. Undergraduate Athletic Training Exam Results: 2002 to 2005

YEAR       TEMPLE PASS RATE                                NATIONAL PASS RATE
2002       Written Practical Simulation   All Three        Written Practical Simulation   All Three
              60.0      80.0    50.0        40.0             67.0     74.5      61.1       43.6
           N = 10                                          N = 1,497
2003       Written Practical Simulation   All Three        Written Practical Simulation   All Three
              55.6    66.7      66.7        11.1              65.4    64.9     65.1         35.3
           N=9                                             N = 1,537
2004       Written Practical Simulation   All Three        Written Practical Simulation   All Three
              90.9    88.9       81.8        63.3              67.3   72.9     67.2         44.9
           N = 11                                          N = 1,790
2005*      Written Practical Simulation   All Three        Written Practical Simulation   All Three
              50.0    14.3       75.0         0.0              46.8   55.6     61.0         26.3
           N=8                                             N = 2,070
* Date of Report = May 16, 2006




                                                      47
Graduate Program

Enrollment Management

        In 2004, the Department acquired the Graduate Enrollment Management software from
the Council of Graduate Schools. This excel software was developed by Dr. Les Sims at the
University of Iowa. The software allows a department to project the appropriate number of
graduate students based on faculty mentoring, rate of placement of students in academic and
non-academic roles, mission of the department, and funding resources. The Department adopted
the software, with some modifications, to track the progress of admitted students (see Appendix
D). Major events for doctoral students – time from enrollment to passing the preliminary
examination, acceptance of the dissertation proposal, and defense of the dissertation are
monitored for all students entering the program beginning in the 2001-02 academic year.

         The Department chose the 2001-02 academic year to begin to monitor the progress of
graduate students because this was the first year of the commitment to accept primarily full-time
students. In the 2000-01 academic year the Department underwent a self-study on the mentoring
of master and doctoral students and the time to completion for each program. The outcome of
this self-study was to accept primarily full-time students beginning with the 2001-02 academic
year. The athletic training and integrative exercise physiology programs were the first to shift to
accepting only full-time doctoral students beginning in the 2002-03 academic year. The
curriculum and instruction and psychology of human movement programs continue to accept
mostly full-time students. As a result of this major shift in acceptance policy, the following
assessment measures will include outcomes of the Department actively controlling its enrollment
and progress of its students.


       Master’s Program
        Students in the Master’s programs in athletic training, integrative exercise physiology,
and psychology of human movement are recruited throughout the United States and
internationally. Most of the students in the curriculum and instruction program are regional.

        The De partment recognized in the 2000-01 academic year that the time to completion for
the Master’s degree was not acceptable. The Department shifted this culture to primarily
accepting full-time students for the fall semester of 2001. The Department also became stricter
in allowing multiple leaves of absence in its programs. The time to graduation data found in
Table 18 indicates the improvement in lessening the time to graduation of master’s students
graduating between 2001 and 2005. Please note that the time to graduation for the 2004-05
academic year was adversely influenced by six students who were enrolled in the master’s
program for 5 to 8 years. The data in Table 19 indicate that students accepted between 2001 and
2005 are graduating in about 2 years, supporting the Department’s efforts to reduce the time to
graduation.




                                                48
Table 18. Graduate Master’s Academic Measures
                                                                           Avg. Time to
                        M.Ed. Awarded1          Cum GPA1                 Graduate2 (years)
2001-2002                       26                 3.52                        3.64
2002-2003                       21                 3.69                        3.02
2003-2004                       20                 3.64                        2.88
2004-2005                       26                 3.76                        3.41
2005-2006                       24                 3.71                        2.50
1
  Data from Temple University: OPPA
2
  Data complied directly from ISIS and Web Focus Degree Lists.


Table 19. Graduate Master Students Average Time to Completion Accepted in 2001 to 2005


                   2001            2002              2003         2004            2005
Enrolled            19              17                23           15              15
Graduated           17              15                19           12              0
Transferred          0              1                 2            1               1
Withdrew             2               1                 0            0              0
Not Finished         0               0                 2            2               0
Time to
Graduation        2.24         2.14          2.11         1.96                      -
Data compiled from Enrollment Management Program (Appendix E)


       Doctoral Program
       Students in the doctoral programs in athletic training, integrative exercise physiology,
and exercise sport psychology are recruited throughout the United States and internationally.
Many of the students in the curriculum and instruction program are regional.

        The Department recognized in the 2000-01 academic year that the time to completion for
the doctoral degree was not acceptable. The athletic training and integrative exercise physiology
programs were the first to shift to accepting only full-time doctoral students with the curriculum
and instruction and psychology of human movement programs accepting primarily full-time
students. Another important change in the previous culture of the Department was to involve
newly accepted doctoral students in research activities early in their doctoral studies. By the
2003-04 academic year both the athletic training and integrative exercise physiology programs
had all of the newly accepted doctoral students involved in research by the end of their first
semester. The psychology of human movement and curriculum and instruction programs had
most newly accepted doctoral students involved in research by the end of their first year.

        Two other changes in the doctoral program will stimulate students to complete their
doctoral studies in a timely fashion and were implemented beginning in the fall of 2006. All
newly accepted doctoral students will take Mentored Research I in the second semester of their
first year. This course is designed to introduce the student to grant writing, in preparation for
grant submission (Mentored Research II) and begin to collect the data necessary for the
submission. The second change is to require the student to have published one paper to pass the
preliminary examination for candidacy.

                                                49
       Table 20 provides a summary of academic standing of doctoral students accepted
between 2001 and 2005. With the administrative move of the Department to the College of
Health Professions, the combined verbal and quantitative GRE scores of accepted students for
2006-07 have increased to 1200. The admitted students have an average undergraduate GPA of
3.34.

       As previously mentioned, the Department recognized that doctoral students were not
graduating in a timely fashion in its self-study of 2000-01. Tables 21 and 22 indicate the
progress in time to graduation of doctoral students. Prior to accepting primarily only full-time
students the time to graduation was greater than six years between 2001 and 2004 (Table 21). In
the 2005-2006 academic year the time to graduation was decreased, primarily due to the six of
the seven graduating doctoral students began their doctoral studies in the fall of 2001 (Table 22).
The Department is striving to have a time to completion rate of less than 5 years for doctoral
students.

Table 20. Graduate Doctoral Academic Measures
                      Avg. UG        Avg. GRE                                       Combined
                        GPA           Verbal               Avg. GRE Quant             GRE
    Fall 2001             -             499                      563                  1062
    Fall 2002             -             476                      540                  1016
    Fall 2003           3.30            498                      583                  1081
    Fall 2004           3.39            525                      543                  1068
    Fall 2005           3.25            464                      598                  1062


Table 21. Graduate Doctoral Average Time to Graduation
                                                Avg. Time to Graduate
                       Doctorate Awarded1               (years)1
2001-2002                 7 PhD, 1 EdD                    7.44
2002-2003                    7 PhD                        7.71
2003-2004                    7 PhD                        6.29
2004-2005                 6 PhD, 1 EdD                    9.86
2005-2006                    7 PhD                        5.29
1
  Compiled directly from Web Focus Report and ISIS Student Data.


Table 22. Graduate Doctoral Average Time to Comprehensive Exams, Dissertation Proposal,
and Dissertation Defense for Students Accepted in 2001 to 2005

                             2001         2002         2003    2004                2005
Enrolled                      10*          11            9      4                  10**
Time to Preliminary
Exam                       3.44 (8)    3.30 (10)      2.28 (4)   -                   -
Time to Proposal           3.71 (7)     3.70 (5)      3.25 (4)   -                   -
Time to Dissertation
Defense                    4.50 (6)     3.75 (2)         -       -                   -
Data compiled from Enrollment Management Program (Appendix XX)
* One student transferred to the University of Buffalo
** One student has transferred to the University of Delaware.

                                                50
        The publication and presentations at professional meeting record of graduate students is
presented in Table 23 (see Appendix E for data, as well as Theses, Projects, and Dissertations
Titles). The majority of the presentations and published articles between 2003 and 2004 are
those of students who entered their graduate programs between 2001 and 2003. Because of the
Department’s focus on publishing in journals with impact factors >1.0 for graduate students nine
of the 11 published articles in 2005-06 were published in journals with impact factors >1.0. Six
articles were published in journals with impact factors >2.0.


Table 23. Graduate Student Productivity 2001-2005: Published Articles and Presentations at
Professional Meetings

                                 2001          2002           2003          2004          2005
Publications (First Author)
                                 7 (5)        14 (12)         5 (5)         4 (4)        11 (10)
Presentations (Primary
Presenter)                       6 (5)          4 (2)         8 (4)        10 (10)       13 (13)


Post Graduation Survey of Undergraduate Student Satisfaction

        Exit interviews have been historically conducted informally at the time of graduation
clearance. Graduation clearance is the responsibility of the undergraduate coordinator.
Information derived from exit interviews has been used by the undergraduate coordinator to
make recommendations for curricular change, for the placement of instructors within the
curriculum, and to provide feedback to the Kinesiology Assembly (i.e., policy making branch of
the Department, comprised primarily of tenure and non-tenure track faculty) as to the level of
student satisfaction with the program at large.

        In preparation for this Periodic Program Review, a more formal process has been
adopted. A survey of “Student Satisfaction” was developed and approved by the Department
and the University’s “Institutional Review Board”. A copy of the survey is in Appendix F. The
survey has been placed online using the services of “SurveyMonkey.com”. Students graduating
over the last 4 graduation periods can now access this instrument. Completing the survey online
will become a requirement for students, beginning with the graduating class of May 2007. The
undergraduate coordinator will conduct regular follow-ups to this exit interview to see if student
satisfaction changes over time after graduation.

        In June of 2006, the survey of “Student Satisfaction” was mailed out to all Kinesiology
Bachelor of Science degree recipients from fall 2001 through fall 2005. The total number of
graduates in that time period was 387. The list of Kinesiology graduates and their addresses was
supplied by the Alumni Office at Temple University. Forty-nine (13%) were returned with
faulty or incorrect addresses with no forwarding address available. Of the remaining 338
surveys’ thought to reach the intended hands, 52 (15.4%) were returned with reasonable enough
information to process. The survey yielded valuable information and response information is in
Appendix F.

        A brief summary of the survey of “Student Satisfaction” would indicate a rather high
level of student satisfaction. Ninety-two percent of respondents reported to be satisfied or very
satisfied with their overall Temple University experience. Similarly, 88% were satisfied or very
satisfied with the Department of Kinesiology experience. Eight-two percent of respondents were
                                                51
either satisfied or very satisfied with their program specific experience, and 80% of those
responding to the survey indicated that their TU experiences met their short term educational or
professional objectives.

        A high percentage of students (86%) were satisfied with the academic rigor afforded by
the Kinesiology curriculum. Eighty-eight percent were satisfied with the quality of instruction,
77% were satisfied with the course offerings, and 73% said that the program prepared them well
for graduate school and the professions.

       Finally, 90% of the respondents were satisfied or very satisfied in regard to their
development of both knowledge and understanding in regard to the Discipline of Kinesiology
and 94% confirmed their belief in the value of physical activity in life and health. .

        Student performance post-baccalaureate was assessed via a “Survey of Employers”.
These employers were identified from feedback provided by graduates of the Kinesiology
Department and by contacts maintained by program coordinators. Approximately 150 surveys
were mailed out and 28 fully completed surveys were used in the summary. Summary results of
the survey are in Appendix F. Of the respondents, 84% had worked closely with Temple
graduates over the past five years. Employers reported a 92% over-all satisfaction with
employees graduated from the Department. Employers reported that Temple University
employees compared favorably with graduates from other programs at a similar 92% rating of
satisfaction. They were least satisfied with the graduates work related experience and broad
knowledge beyond the major. Seventy-two percent of the employees surveyed anticipate hiring
a Department of Kinesiology undergraduate in the next 1 to 2 years.

Survey of Graduate Student Satisfaction

         Graduate student satisfaction was addressed in two ways. First, our M.Ed. and Ph.D.
program graduates were surveyed. Second, current graduate students were surveyed. With
respect to our graduates, exit interviews have been historically conducted informally at the time
of graduation. Graduation clearance is the responsibility of the graduate coordinator.
Information derived from exit interviews has been used by the graduate coordinator to make
recommendations for curricular change and to provide feedback to the Kinesiology Assembly as
to the level of student satisfaction with the program at large.

        In preparation for this Periodic Program Review, a more formal process has been
adopted. A survey of “Student Satisfaction” was developed and approved by the Department
and the University’s “Institutional Review Board”. A copy of the survey is in Appendix F. The
survey has been placed online using the services of “SurveyMonkey.com”. Students graduating
since 2001 were able to access this instrument. Completing the survey online will be requested
of all graduating students beginning in January 2007. The graduate coordinator will conduct
regular follow-ups to this exit interview to see if student satisfaction changes over time after
graduation.

        In August of 2006, a link to the survey of “Student Satisfaction” was mailed out via e-
mail to all Kinesiology M.Ed. and Ph.D. degree recipients for whom e-mail addresses were
available from fall 2001 through spring 2006 (102 of the 127 graduates – 80%). The list of
Kinesiology graduates and their e-mail addresses was derived from a master list maintained by
the graduate coordinator over the years. Nine (9%) were returned with faulty or incorrect e-mail
addresses. Of the remaining 93 surveys, 36 (38.7%) were returned. The survey yielded valuable
information and response information is in Appendix F.
                                                 52
        A brief summary of the survey of “Student Satisfaction” would indicate a rather high
level of student satisfaction. When asked about their feelings about their overall training at
Temple University and how it prepared them for work in their present job, 51.5% (n=16)
indicated their training was above average and an additional 19.4% (n=6) indicated it was
excellent. Advising in the department was deemed adequate and appropriate by 90.3% (n=28) of
the respondents.

         As can been seen in Appendix F about the development of a variety of skills while at
Temple, ratings were all consistently close to above average (approximately 3.85 on a scale of 1
to 5), indicating a general degree of satisfaction but still leaving room for improvement on the
part of the department. Similarly, 78.6% indicated they would choose Temple University again
for their graduate work, an encouraging number but not the 100% one would ideally prefer.

        The results of the Current Student survey are provided in detail in Appendix F. There
were 25 current students who responded out of the 75 sent (7 e-mail addresses were not active,
leaving a return of 25 out of 68 = 37%). A variety of factors were important in choosing to come
to Temple, but primarily Temple’s faculty (4.21 on a scale of 1 to 5). Similarly, students rated
their Temple faculty mentor (4.5), faculty members in the department (4.33), a specific research
focus (4.17) and the classes they are taking (4.13) as important aspects of their graduate training
Ratings of faculty mentors in various aspects were generally above average (3.74 to 4.43), but
show some areas for improvement on the faculty’s part. Two key questions indicated that the
department can do a better job providing the quality of educational experience our students
desire – 47.8% (11 of 23) said they would definitely make the same decision and attend Temple,
with an additional 26.1% (6 respondents) indicating possibly yes,. However, 17.4% (4
respondents) were not sure and 8.7% (2 respondents) said possibly no. Similarly, when asked if
they would recommend Temple to a potential student, 43.5% (10 of 23) said definitely yes and
47.8% (11 of 23) said possibly yes, with an additional 8.7% (2 respondents) not sure. While
there were no definite no responses in answering these two questions, one would always like to
see a more positive (definitely yes) set of responses.

       It appears clear that our current students and graduates are generally satisfied with the
education they received and rate our faculty and program highly. As with all programs,
however, there is room for improvement, and these surveys have provided some valuable
feedback for areas in which the department can improve in providing the highest quality
educational experience for our graduate students.




                                                53
8. IDENTIFICATION OF BENCHMARKS


Peer Institutions in Kinesiology

        The first national benchmark review of doctoral programs in Kinesiology between 2000
and 2004 was conducted by the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education
(AAKPE web site - http://www.aakpe.org/ ; JR Thomas & TG Reeve, A review and evaluation
of doctoral programs 2000-04 by the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical
Education. Quest, 58: 176-196, 2006). Currently there are 61 doctoral granting institutions in
Kinesiology in the United State with 32 of these institutions participating in the AAKPE survey.
Although Temple did not participate in the survey of doctoral programs in Kinesiology, the
Department has extensively studied the data for comparisons of its programs to those of the
participating institutions, to estimate where it may have been ranked, and to assist in identifying
peer and aspirant institutions. The survey had two major categories - Student Indices (34%) and
Faculty Indices (66%) which were used to derive scaled scores: Student indices - Admissions -
4%, Student Quality - 10%, Student Support – 13%, and Employment -7%; and Faculty indices -
Productivity (30% consisting of Research Publications – 20%, Books – 5%, and Presentations –
5%, Funding (26% consisting of Federal – 15%, Other External – 8%, and Internal – 3%, and
Visibility (10% consisting of Editorial Boards – 6%, Number of AAKPE Fellows – 2%, and
Other Fellow Status – 2%).

         If Temple had participated in the AAKPE survey of doctoral programs, Temple most
likely would have been ranked in the middle of the institutions surveyed. The quality of
graduate students, graduate student support, and admissions as well as students who become
post-doctoral fellows and job placement may have placed the Department in the top 10 of the
institutions in the rankings. This conclusion is based on the level of graduate student support
through available teaching/research assistantships, graduate externships, an increase in combined
verbal and quantitative GRE scores of admitted students since moving to the College of Health
Professions (i.e., 1019 [25 accepted students in the College of Education for Fall 2004] and 1076
[30 students] and 1122 [26 students] into the College of Health Professions for fall 2005 and
2006, respectively).

        Factors associated with faculty would most likely have placed the Department near or in
the lower third of the institutions. This conclusion for faculty ranking is based on the limited
number of published articles and books by the faculty, lack of current federal funding and the
lack of a clear research focus. It is important to note, however, that the Department had a high
presence through its presentations of research at national meetings (i.e., NATA, ACSM,
AAHPERD, and AASP) during the survey time period.

         The consensus of the faculty in the Department of Kinesiology is that the following
institutions are broadly comparable to our undergraduate and graduate programs: University of
Pittsburgh, West Virginia University (Division of Exercise Physiology and School of Physical
Education), University of North Carolina at Greensboro, University of Texas - Austin,
University of Tennessee, and Indiana University. Two of these institutions (University of
Pittsburgh and University of Tennessee) did not participate in the AAKPE review of doctoral
programs. In selecting these peer institutions, the Department studied the AAKPE ranking and
its ranking categories, number and diversity of faculty, number of publications and publications


                                                54
with impact factors above 1.50, external funding from vitae available at institution websites, and
name recognition of faculty (see Table 24).

         Temple compared favorably with these institutions in its programmatic offerings with
fewer full-time faculty in most cases. Temple also compared favorably with all of the identified
peer institutions except the University of Pittsburgh in terms of faculty to publication ratio.
Overall funding was difficult to assess, however, it is clear from the review of vitae found on the
institution websites that the peer institutions were more productive in terms of external funding,
number of publications, and quality of publication with impact factors above 1.5.


Aspirant Institutions in Kinesiology

         The consensus of the faculty in the Department of Kinesiology identified the following
institutions as aspirant institutions: University of Maryland, The Pennsylvania State University,
University of Florida, University of Massachusetts, and University of Illinois – Champaign
Urbana. The University of Florida did not participate in the AAKPE rankings of doctoral
programs. In selecting these aspirant institutions, the Department studied the AAKPE ranking
and its ranking categories, number and diversity of faculty, number of publications and
publications with impact factors above 1.50, external funding from vitae available at institution
websites, and name recognition of faculty (see Table 25).

        The evaluation of the vitae of faculty from the aspirant institutions clearly indicate that a
major difference among these institutions and Temple is the number of faculty who receive
federal funding or other significant external funding which, in turn, also accounts for much of the
high level of research publication productivity. Each of these institutions has a limited number
of very identified and centralized areas of research with a team of faculty, instead of the
traditional broad-scope research areas as has existed in the Department of Kinesiology at
Temple. The Department has already addressed the lack of a central research focus through the
revisions of its doctoral curriculum and identifying the investigation of the translational and
evidence-based practice aspects of exercise on metabolic-related diseases and injuries as the
central research focus of the Department.

         It is evident that, with the exception of the University of Massachusetts, the aspirant
institutions have larger number of full-time faculty than Temple. The Department made a
commitment with its administrative move to the College of Health Professions to actively recruit
new faculty who are established and competitive researchers or young faculty with great promise
to attract federal funding. With the leadership of Dean Ron Brown, the Department has three
new tenure track hires for the 2006-07 academic year. These faculty hires are the first major step
to moving the Department towards federal funding. These faculty members have already begun
collaborative research efforts with other units within Temple that receive federal funding. This
addition of faculty, continuing hiring senior faculty or very promising junior faculty in the near
future, and collaborative efforts with other units at Temple University will allow the Department
to quickly become a prominent Department of Kinesiology and have a competitive core faculty
for state-of-the-art research and receive federal funding.

        In summary, with the administrative move of the Department to the College of Health
Professions, the commitment to become a premier Department of Kinesiology was made. Since
the move to the College of Health Professions, the Department has been able to recruit a higher
level graduate student. The Department also recognized its failure to acquire federal funding,
other significant external funding, and publishing at a level which would establish it as a premier
                                                55
institution. To accomplish greater funding possibilities, the Department narrowed its research
efforts to a central focus of the investigation of the translational and evidence-based practice
aspects of exercise on metabolic-related diseases and injuries. With the support of Dean Ron
Brown the Department is recruiting faculty that can move it to prominent position to receive
federal funding and to improve its research publication productivity.




                                                56
Table 24. Evaluation of Peer Institutions: 2001-02 to 2005-06
          Institution/              AAKPE                  Undergraduate                                    Graduate                                         Number        Articles with
        School-College              Ranking                 Program(s)                                     Program(s)                         Faculty       Publications   Impact >1.5

University of Pittsburgh            Did not       BS – Exer. Sci.                        MS – Developmental Movement                        18 Full-time    338 Articles
School of Education                Participate    BS- Wellness                           MS & PhD – Exer. Physiol.                                          28 Reviews     179 Articles
                                                                                                                                                            44 Abstracts
School of Health and Rehab.                       BS with concentration in AT            MS – Sports Medicine                               12 Full-time
Sci. Dept of Sports Med. &                                                               PhD Neuromuscular Aspects of Sport Injury
Nutrition

West Virginia University                          BS- Exer. Physiol., Athletic           MS & PhD– Exercise Physiology                      20 Full-time
Robert C. Byrd Health Science        22 tied      Coaching Ed., AT, TE, Sport Mgmt       MS – Athletic Coach. Ed., AT, Sports Mgmt..,       (Div. Exer       69 Articles    42 Articles
Center - Div. Exer. Physiol.                      BS – Sport and Exer. Physiol.          PETE                                               .Sci)             1 Review
   and                                                                                   EdD – PETE                                                         31 Abstracts
West Virginia University                                                                 EdD – Sport and Exercise Physiology                24- Full time
School of Physical Education                                                                                                                (Sch. PE)


University of North Carolina at                   BS- Aquatic Instr. Leader.., Fitness   MS – AT, Exer. Physiol., Sport & Exer., Sport                      114 Articles
Greensboro                             24         Leader., Aquatics for Ther./ Rehab.    Sci, Pedagogy, Psychology, Motor Behav.,           15 Full-time     6 Reviews      59 Articles
Exercise and Sports Science                       Community Youth Leadership,            EdD in Exer. & Sport Sci.                                          26 Abstracts
                                                  PETE, Sports Medicine                  PhD – Exer. Physiol.

                                                  BA, BS Kinesiology Areas of            M.Ed/M.A. & Ph.D Exer. Physiol., Movement                          119 Articles
University of Texas – Austin           13         Study in: PETE, Health Promotion       Sci., Health Promotion, Sport Psych.               26 Full-time     6 Reviews      77 Articles
                                                  & Fitness, Sport Mgmt., Athletic                                                                          6 Abstracts
                                                  Training

                                  Did not         BS – Exer. Sci., Recreation &          MS – Exercise Science, Recreation & Leisure        21 Full-time     93 Articles
University of Tennessee           Participate     Leisure Std., Sport Mgmt,              Std., Sport Mgmt., Therapeutic Rec.                                 4 Reviews      30 Articles
                                                  Therapeutic Rec.                       PhD Sport Studies, Exer. Sci.                                      21 Abstracts

                                                  BS in Kinesiology -Areas of Study      MS in Kinesiology - Areas of Study: Exer.
Indiana University                      7         in: AT, AT/PETE, Exer. Sci.,           Physiol., Biomechanics, Motor Control, Applied                     168 Articles
                                                  Fitness Specialist, PETE, Sports       Sport Sci., Ergonomics, Clinical Exer. Physiol.,   29 Full-time     9 Reviews     107 Articles
                                                  Communication, Sports Marketing        AT                                                                 11 Abstracts
                                                  & Mgmt.
                                                                                         PhD in Kinesiology: - Areas of Stuty: Adapted
                                                                                         PE, Biomechanics, Exer. Physiol., Clinical Exer.
                                                                                         Physiol., Motor Control, Sport Mgmt.
Publication Data form ISI Web of Knowledge – www.isiknowledge.com
School/College and Departmental data collected from web pages in July of 2006.
AT – Athletic Training, PETE – Physical Education Teaching Education,
Table 25. Evaluation of Aspirant Institutions: 2001-02 to 2005-06
            Institution/               AAKPE               Undergraduate                          Graduate                                     Number          Articles
          School-College               Ranking              Program(s)                           Program(s)                      Faculty      Publications   with Impact
                                                                                                                                                                 >1.5

 University of Maryland            3 tied          BS in Kinesiology               MS and PhD in Kinesiology – Areas of       25 Full-time   155 Articles
                                                   BS in Physical Education        Study: Cognitive Motor Neuroscience,       Faculty        6 Reviews       116 Articles
                                                                                   Exer. Sci., Pedagogical Studies, Sport                    6 Abstracts
                                                                                   Commerce and Culture Program

                                                   BS in Kinesiology - Areas of    MS & PhD Kinesiology - Areas of                           366 Articles
 Pennsylvania State University     1               Study: AT, Fitness Studies,     Study: AT & Sports Medicine,               40 Full-time   17 Reviews      245 Articles
                                                   Movement Science, PETE, Exer.   Biomechanics, Exer. Physiol., History of   Faculty        13 Abstracts
                                                   Sci.                            Sport, Motor Control, Pedagogy, Sport
                                                                                   Psychology

                                                   BS in Applied Physiology &      MS & PhD in Applied Physiology and                        201 Articles
 University of Florida             Did Not         Kinesiology - Areas of Study:   Kinesiology - Areas of Study: AT,          28 Full-time   7 Reviews       114 Articles
                                   Participate     AT, Exer. Physiol.,             Biomechanics, Exer. Physiol., Motor        Faculty        6 Abstracts
                                                   Fitness/Wellness                Learning & Control, Sport and Exer.
                                                                                   Psychology, Human Performance (MS
                                                                                   only)

                                                   BS in Kinesiology - Areas of    MS & PhD – Kinesiology                     16 Full-time   136 Articles
 University of Massachusetts       6               Study: Allied Health,           Areas of study in: Biomechanics &          Faculty        6 Reviews       85 Articles
                                                   Biomechanics, Fitness, Data     Motor Systems, Physical Activity and                      4 Abstracts
                                                   Analyses, Motor Control,        Health, Physiology
                                                   Nutrition, Physiol./Biochem.

 University of Illinois-                            BS in Kinesiology - Areas of   MS & PhD Kinesiology - Areas of Study      39 Full-time   145 Articles
 Champaign                         3 tied           Study: PETE, Coaching, Exer.   in: Biobehavioral, Pedagogical/Cultural;   Faculty        7 Reviews       101 Articles
                                                    Physiol., Physical Training/   Exer. Physiol., AT                                        17 Abstracts
                                                    Fitness Director, Sport
                                                    Psychology, AT, Pre PT/OT/
                                                    Med/PA, Chiropractic
  Publication data from ISI Web of Knowledge - www.isiknowledge.com
  School/College and Departmental data collected from web pages in July of 2006.
  AT – Athletic Training, PETE – Physical Education Teaching Education,




                                                                                                              58
9. RELATIONSHIP OF SIZE AND RESOURCES

       Student Body and Faculty Size
        The total number of matriculated students in the Department of Kinesiology remained flat in the
years 2001 through 2003 (see Table 26). The Department then experienced an increase in students of
9.4% in 2004 and an additional 13.1% in fall 2004 to fall 2005. This was due to increases at the
undergraduate level in contrast to the graduate enrollment which declined in 2004 and 2005. The
undergraduate number of credit hours generated and class size steadily increased from 2000-01 to 2004-
05 (see Table 27). The graduate number of credit hours generated and class size were fairly flat during
this five-year time period (see Table 28). The Department of Kinesiology is the largest Department in
the College of Health Professions, representing 28.6% of the registered student population
(www.temple.edu/ factbook/profile05/hlthprofile.html, accessed 8/25/06).


Table 26. Undergraduate and Graduate Enrollments Fall 2001 to Fall 2005.


                   Fall 2001       Fall 2002      Fall 2003       Fall 2004       Fall 2005
Undergraduate        360             360            352             390              471
Master’s              58               53            54               46              37
Doctoral              41              49             55              47              48
Total                459             462            461             483              556
                                                                   9.4%↑           13.1%↑

         The number of full-time faculty members during the review time period remained constant (n =
16). The number of tenured and tenure-track faculty members at each of the professorial ranks
decreased, and the number of non-tenure track faculty (i.e., instructor, lecturer) increased, particularly in
fall 2005. This was due to the decision not to conduct faculty searches for tenure-track appointments
during the latter years the Department was in the College of Education. Accordingly, the percentage of
Kinesiology undergraduate courses instructed by tenured and tenure-track faculty members in the
Department steadily declined (see Table 27), with non tenure-track faculty members increasingly
handling the undergraduate teaching load. In contrast, the percentage of graduate courses instructed by
tenured and tenure-track faculty members remained fairly constant (see Table 28). FTE (course)
Students per FTE Faculty (see Table 29) steadily increased from 12.6 (2000-01) to 14.5 (2005-06), with
the latter being slightly lower than the average (15) reported for Kinesiology Departments in research
institutions (Delaware Study). Increasingly, the challenge for the Department has been to ensure that
highly qualified part time (n = 60, see Table 2) and non tenure-track instructors (2006-07 = 5 full time)
are hired.


Table 27. Undergraduate Credit Hours Generated, Class Size, % Taught by Tenured/Tenure Track
Faculty

                                  2000-01       2001-02       2002-03         2003-04      2004-05
Credit Hours Generated             13,871        14,065        14,148          14,869       15,740
Class Size                           20            20            21              21           22
% Taught by Tenured/TT               50            45            37              31           31



                                                     59
Table 28. Graduate Credit Hours Generated, Class Size, % Taught by Tenured/ Tenure Track Faculty

                                 2000-01       2001-02      2002-03       2003-04       2004-05
Credit Hours Generated            1,131         1,125         997          1,193         1,005
Class Size                          9             9            9            10             9
% Taught by Tenured/TT             90             84           91            87            93


Table 29. FTE (Course) Students per FTE Faculty

                    2000-01          2001-02         2002-03          2003-04          2004-05
Undergraduate         14.7             15.0            15.4             15.9             16.4
Graduate              6.2              6.0             5.9              7.0              6.9
Collapsed             12.6             12.8            13.2             13.8             14.5


Space Portfolio
          The Department is located primarily in Pearson Hall with minimal occupancy in McGonigle
Hall. The two buildings are connected at several levels. The Department has been assigned 81,276 sq.
ft. in its space portfolio by the University. The facilities include offices, classrooms, research space,
general-purpose gymnasiums, fitness facilities, pool, and support space. The Department oversees space
utilization of Pearson Hall and part of McGonigle Hall, which for Fall 2006 is at 86% capacity. The
Department’s faculty offices are located primarily on the first floor of Pearson Hall in an “office
corridor” with one faculty member per office.
        The Department’s personnel (fall 2006 = 16 full-time faculty, 60 part-time faculty, 5 staff, and
23 teaching assistants) provide instruction and support to over 550 matriculated undergraduate and
graduate students as well as support the research capacity of the Department. Of the four undergraduate
professional practice program areas (i.e., athletic training, exercise and sport science, PHETE, and pre-
health profession program), two have dedicated laboratory spaces for classroom instruction. Of the
other two program practice areas, one (PHETE) uses the Pearson and McGonigle Hall gymnasiums and
general classrooms for instructional purposes, and the other has no specific dedicated classroom needs.
All four graduate program areas (i.e., athletic training, integrative exercise physiology, psychology of
human movement, as well as curriculum and instruction) have dedicated research labs within the
Biokinetics Research laboratory space portfolio.
        At present, the Department’s general space needs are being met but have the following five
space concerns:
       • Inter-disciplinary research opportunities with other faculty in the College of Health Professions
         have only increased for the Department of Kinesiology since joining the College in 2005.
         With the eight departments of the College spread out on two separate campuses (i.e., Health
         Science, Main); however, the physical distance has had a negative impact on collaborative
         research due to time (e.g., transportation) and parking constraints.

       • The Biokinetics Research Laboratory space is reaching capacity. With future research tenure-
         track faculty appointments in the Department, the ability to accommodate their research space
         needs will not be met. This will impede the Department’s ability to support its research
         mission.



                                                   60
       • A full-time academic advisor and faculty undergraduate program coordinator provide
         comprehensive student services to the Department’s undergraduate majors. These two
         personnel provide the services in their offices. Both offices are extremely small for these
         functions and are located adjacent to the men’s and women’s faculty restrooms. Students and
         parents wait outside of the restrooms for appointments with the advisor and program
         coordinator. This is embarrassing and unprofessional for the Department and Temple
         University.

       • Four Department staff members provide administrative support to the Department’s
         administrators, faculty, and students. Their offices are disjointed in location, although their
         functions are inter-related. Service delivery to the Department is compromised and needs to be
         addressed.

       • Teaching assistants are assigned, with few exceptions, three to an office. In comparison, one
         faculty member is in the same size office. As the research capacity of the faculty expands, the
         office space for research assistants as well as pre- and post-docs will need to be met.


Support Staff Size
       The Department currently has five full-time non-teaching support staff members: one
administrative assistant, one building/equipment manager, two secretaries, and one undergraduate
academic advisor. The first two are non-bargaining unit members, the two secretaries are members of
the 1199c Union, and the advisor is a member of the Temple Association of University Professional
(TAUP), American Federation of Teachers (AFL-CIO Local 4531). All five report to the Department
Chair and provide support to the Department as follows:

       •   administrative assistant: responsible for providing human relation functions for faculty (full
           and part-time), staff, and teaching assistants; Pearson Hall facility scheduling, budget
           oversight support, and various administrative support activities
       •   building/equipment manager: responsible for ensuring that the Pearson Hall facilities and the
           Department’s teaching and research equipment are operational and safe; purchase order
           requisition and delivery, and equipment set up; and budget reconciliation
       •   secretaries: responsible for supporting the instructional needs of the faculty and teaching
           assistants as well as the Department’s administrators
       •   undergraduate advisor: responsible for advising undergraduate majors, which is shared in
           responsibility with the Department’s undergraduate program coordinator

        At present, the staffing needs of the Department are being met. If the recent increase in
matriculated undergraduate Kinesiology students continues, however, advisement will be at capacity and
require personnel decisions to ensure customer satisfaction. In addition, Department staff support of
Kinesiology research faculty is adequate, but with additional faculty hires it too will be at capacity and
require attention so as not to compromise faculty and student research.

Student Funding Support
       Undergraduate and Graduate Endowed Scholarships
        The Department has 7 endowed student scholarships. Five are at the undergraduate level, and
two are at the graduate level. Criteria for award selection generally include full- or part-time
matriculation status and academic merit. An ad hoc Department Awards Committee, with some input
from the namesake (or family member) of the particular scholarship, review applications and select the
recipient(s) for each scholarship. The scholarships include financial support in the form of cash, tuition
                                                    61
remission, and/or book fees. The scholarships are awarded annually at the Department’s Scholarship
Luncheon (held in late spring), which is attended by: the award recipient and family members, the
namesake of the award (or a family member), Department faculty and staff, College administrators, and
University administrators. Endowment for the 7 awards currently totals $422,296, with the interest
providing the funding for the annual scholarships (2005-06 = $10,000).


       Graduate Student Support
        The Department had primarily 24 teaching assistants (1 was classified as an academic intern)
assigned annually to the Department by Temple University’s Graduate School from 2001-02 to 2005-06.
The teaching assistants’ workloads, with few exceptions, were instructors of record in the Department’s
Basic Instruction Program (e.g., aerobic dance, weight training, fitness for life, tennis); and laboratory
instructors in C100 and C101 (Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II), KIN 202 (Biomechanics), and
KIN 203 (Exercise Physiology). The academic intern provided service support to the Department’s
Health-Fitness and Wellness Center. Three of the teaching assistants’ loads included assignment to the
Department’s Biokinetics Research Laboratory where they provided assistance for faculty and graduate
student research.
       Twenty-nine Kinesiology graduate student stipends were supported through external funding
(see Appendix G for data). Twenty-five of these students were supported through funds to the Graduate
Athletic Training Program via sponsorship by area sports medicine clinics, colleges, and high schools.
One student was supported on pre-doctoral funds from an NIH grant awarded to Dr. J. Jallo, Department
of Neurosurgery. Three graduate students were supported by NATA Research and Education
Foundation grant and service funds from 2001-02 to 2005-06.

        The Department began in earnest in 2005-06 to actively seeking external funding support for pre-
and post-docs. Since joining the College of Health Professions in July 2005, collaboration with other
researchers within the College fostered two Department of Kinesiology faculty members serving as co-
investigators on a Training Program Grant in Musculoskeletal Research, sponsored by NRSA NIH-
NIAMS, (proposed project period 4/1/2007 to 3/31/2012 totaling $1,372,175). The funding is to support
pre- and post-docs in the areas of musculoskeletal training and research development. The application is
currently under review. Securing training grant funding is an important priority in the Department’s
strategic plan. Additional external funding support requests for pre- and post-doc as well as graduate
students is expected to occur with future grant applications by Kinesiology research faculty.




                                                   62
10. OVERALL FUNCTIONING OF THE UNIT
        The Department of Kinesiology is a large and complex department. It has undergone
tremendous change (e.g., colleges, faculty retirements and hires, mission) during the last five years, but
the faculty and staff through commitment and collective effort have created a new strategic direction.
The Department is making the necessary changes required to maintain a position of leadership within
the current environment of Doctoral/Research-Extensive Institutions. Being in the College of Health
Professions has provided the leadership and administrative support necessary for much of the current
changes that are occurring.


Effectiveness of Unit’s Staff
        The Department’s five-member staff is fully committed to supporting the faculty and
administrators of the Department. Each is willing to go above and beyond the normal call of duty to
ensure that work is completed fully and in a timely manner. In 2003-04, Temple University initiated a
Professional Development System for all non-faculty (e.g., staff) and administrators. The purpose of the
System is to ensure a structured on-going process for communicating about performance and helping
staff achieve excellence in their jobs. The plan involves goal setting, development planning, feedback,
coaching, and evaluation. The System has the following features: (a) drive a culture change toward a
learning environment, (b) raise skills, (c) increase productivity through continual feedback, (d) clarify
job expectations/performance standards, (e) develop competencies, (f) link pay to performance, and (g)
support strategic alignment. Goal setting is established at the beginning of the budget year and a review
process with feedback is conducted at the end of the budget year for each staff member. Both functions
are conducted by the Department Chair with web-based reports provided to the University. Three of the
staff members (non-bargaining unit and TAUP) are eligible for merit, based on performance, and have
received it since the program was first implemented. The two other staff members are in the 1199c
Union and are not eligible for merit, based on performance.


Quality of Investment Decisions
        The Department has made two important investments towards its future. The most important
investment has been its faculty. The totals in research and scholarship awards from 2001 to 2005 were
$640,300 and $770,462 (see Table 30), respectively. The latter was for the Graduate Athletic Training
Program (discussed previously in Section 9: Relationship of Size and Resources). Between the three
new 2006-07 faculty hires and several other current faculty members (i.e., Libonati, Tierney), a total of
$7,205,000 in external funding is being requested for 2006-07: $6,875,000 from NIH and $330,000 from
foundations and other similar organizations. The outcomes of these requests are unknown at this time,
but the focused and considered effort being put forward by the Department’s faculty is providing the
impetus to our meeting the mission and research strategic goals and objectives that we have set for
ourselves. External funding success is critical as buyout and overhead from these grants will add further
to the advancement of the Department through new faculty hires (e.g., non-tenure track), research and
teaching equipment acquisition, etc.


Table 30. Research and Scholarship Awards: 2001 to 2005


                    2001           2002            2003            2004           2005

Research         $3,500        41,221             3,500          469,204        122,875
Scholarships   $146,238        152,772           147,425         128,045       $195,982*
*Sponsored Training Service Grant
                                                    63
         The second important investment that the Department has been making is the purchase of non-
expendable equipment (See Appendix H for Kinesiology Major Equipment Purchases and Inventory).
From 2001-02 to 2005-06), a total of $300,967 was invested in Department research and teaching
equipment, often serving in both capacities. Key to this success has been the careful management of the
Department’s budget and cost sharing with the College (i.e., Health Professions and Education). The
annual process begins with faculty members being queried by the Department Chair as to their
equipment needs, and, with few exceptions, ends with the equipment being purchased. The new
equipment has served to strengthen our teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels and to provide
the means by which research lines are established and external funding for research is based. The latter
is particularly true for the two somatic science program areas (i.e., athletic training and integrative
exercise physiology).

Management of Development Activities
        The Department’s Development fund has been used to support three primary activities: esprit de
corps events in the Department, Kinesiology Student Scholarship Luncheon, and non-expendable
equipment purchases. The first use centers primarily on the Department’s annual re-orientation week
when the faculty and teaching assistants return prior to the beginning of fall classes to prepare for their
work assignments for the year. This is a week-long event that is intense in effort, requiring collegiality
among the stake holders. As a capstone event for the week, the Department has had a luncheon and
outing to one of the art, cultural, or historical venues in the City of Philadelphia each year. Similarly,
another use of the Development funds has been for the purchase of soft-shell brief cases with the
Department and College names as well as Temple Logo. This has coincided with the Department
joining a new college (i.e., Health Professions and Education) and served as an advertising tool for the
Department.

        The Department’s Student Scholarship Luncheon has been supported through its Development
Fund as well. The endowed scholarships provide funding for the student recipient award only. As no
University or College event has been a fit for public recognition of these exceptional students, the
Department has held its own scholarship luncheon with recipients, family members, Department faculty
and staff, University administrators, and College administrators attending free of charge. This has been
well received and is an important venue for showcasing Kinesiology students who have excelled in their
educational and life experiences.

        The Department’s Development fund has also been used to purchase nonexpendable equipment
for teaching and research as previously described. These activities and others (e.g., faculty positions,
support for faculty and student travel) will continue to be supported through the generous financial gifts
to the Department. Support for development activities at the Department level in the College of Health
Professions is very strong and will be used in the future to help build on capacity.

Effectiveness of Communication

         The Department of Kinesiology is organized with a policy making and an administrative branch.
The former is the Kinesiology Assembly consisting of Department faculty and academic professional;
the latter consists of the Department Chairperson, Department Program Coordinators, and Assembly
Chairperson. The Function of the Assembly is to establish policy for the operation of the Department.
The function of the administration is to establish procedures to implement these policies and to ensure
their effective implementation. The authority and responsibility of each branch extends only as far as
Temple University and the College policies and procedures permit.


                                                    64
        The Kinesiology Assembly is responsible for electing the Department’s administrators, with the
exception of the Department Chair. The Chair position is subject to the Collective Bargaining
Agreement between Temple University and the Temple Association of University Professionals. Per
this agreement, the Dean may appoint Department Chairs after consultation with the tenured and tenure-
track faculty. Standing and ad hoc committees within the Department provide the basic structure by
which much of the Department’s work is conducted (see Appendix I: Department of Kinesiology
Standing Committees). The Assembly generally meets at least once per month during the academic year
but is mandated to meet at least semi-annually.
        The Department’s administrators use a collaborative leadership style with appropriate input and
shared decision-making among the stakeholders. Communication within the Department is conducted
through three primary ways. First, administrators provide written reports a priori to an Assembly
meeting as well as oral and supplemental reports at the meeting. Assembly minutes are recorded and
subsequently approved by the members of the Assembly and preserved for historical purposes. Second,
written memos are distributed to the faculty and staff by the Department administrators as work flow
dictates, and, thirdly, the internet (e.g., email) has proven to be an effective and efficient means of
communication for accomplishing the latter as well. Department administrators recently began to use
Meeting Wizard (http://meetingwizard.com) for scheduling Department meetings. Its key features
include: (a) completely online and no downloads, (b) can view responses in one convenient place, (c)
keeps personal schedules private, and (d) sends automatic reminders. The program is web-based,
resulting in greater efficiency in organizing meetings and events.

Effective use of Facilities
        An important component of the Department’s transformation from 2001-02 to the present has
been renovations of its research (Biokinetics Research Laboratory), teaching, and student lounge spaces
within Pearson Hall. Significant renovation (anatomy and physiology labs, exercise science laboratory,
fitness rooms) and creation (adventure gymnasium) of teaching space have been completed for the
purpose of improving classroom instruction and student learning. In addition, the early determination to
advance the research culture within the Department was supported by the dedication of research space
within the Biokinetics Research Laboratory for each graduate program area (i.e., athletic training,
integrative exercise physiology, exercise and sport psychology, as well as curriculum and instruction).
This effort continues today with the hiring of our three new faculty members. As part of the startup
packages for two of these individuals, space within the Biokinetics Research Laboratory is being fully
renovated to meet their research needs. This will result in further expansion of the research capacity in
the Department.
        The Department’s Health-Fitness and Wellness Center was recently moved tp Pearson Hall,
combining the facility with other fitness facilities within Pearson Hall. This Center is dedicated to
creating and providing high quality health-fitness and wellness services to the Temple Community.
Through the use of physical activity, exercise, education, and counseling services, participants are
supported in their quest for optimal fitness, health, and well-being. The goals of the program are to
increase the level of knowledge and understanding in the Temple Community regarding the role of
human movement in life and in health and to facilitate healthy lifestyles through active participation in
the program’s activities. The recent renovations of the Center have resulted in a more effective delivery
of client-based services and greater visibility of the Center’s offerings and programs.


Strategic Use of New Technology
       The faculty have kept abreast of innovations in technology and, subsequently, integrated these
advances into their teaching and research. This focus has required that faculty (and staff) computers and
accessories as well as computers in the research laboratories within the Biokinetics Research Laboratory
be upgraded on regular basis. This is completed annually with particular attention to individual needs.
                                                   65
Although the Department has benefited from instructional technology proposal requests within its
previous college, the support provided in the College of Health Professions in this regard has been
exceptional. For 2005-06, over $50,000 was invested in instructional technology in the anatomy and
physiology laboratories, exercise and sport science exercise laboratory, and dedicated computer smart
carts for Kinesiology. Our faculty members are very responsive to requests for proposals and will
continue to be pro-active in this regard in the future.


Professional Development Opportunities and Rewards for Achievement
        Department support for professional development has centered primarily on support for travel,
with the priority for each faculty member to be funded at least once annually. Although the
Department’s travel policy provides for funding support for tenured-track faculty only, non-tenured-
track faculty members have also been supported, based on the funding availability within the
Department’s budget and value added to its mission. Similarly, graduate students have been supported
as well, which typically occurs through cost sharing between the Department and Temple’s Graduate
School.
        Rewards for achievement are generally based on the Collective Bargaining Agreement between
Temple University and the Temple Association of University Professionals. This occurs principally
through a merit pool process in the form of a salary increase. Specific criteria exist for tenured and non-
tenure track faculty. For tenured faculty, merit is principally based on outstanding performance in
teaching/instruction and in research/scholarship/creative activity. Outstanding performance in service
may also be considered, but the greatest weight is given to the former two criteria. For non-tenure track
faculty, special weight is given to the area of professional activity that their letter of appointment defines
as their principal responsibility. The Department’s faculty members have been reasonably successful in
receiving merit.

        Individual faculty requests for support outside of the parameters aforementioned (e.g., special
travel, page costs for publications) are honored within the limits of the Department’s budget and the
value-added benefit to the Department.

Clarity about Resource Allocation Decisions
        The Department Chair has fiduciary responsibility for the Department’s budget. The leadership
style of the current Department Chair is one of collaboration decision-making. This is best
demonstrated in four important areas: (a) solicitation of faculty for their equipment needs (previously
addressed), (b) solicitation of program coordinators for development of the course offerings each
semester (fall, spring, and summer I and II), (c) solicitation of the program coordinators and faculty for
course instructors, and (4) solicitation of program coordinators and faculty for teaching assistant
decisions and assignments. All of these functions require considerable time, effort, and planning, but
the benefit is faculty buy-in to the decisions that result in a cohesive, well-functioning, and forward
moving Department.




                                                     66
                   Appendix A
                Temple University
Course and Teacher Evaluation: Sample Copy and Data




                        67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
                                              Appendix B
                                               Curricula

Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Kinesiology

       The Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Kinesiology can be earned in any of the following
professional practice programs:

              Athletic Training
              Exercise and Sport Science
                     Option 1 - Fitness and Wellness
                     Option 2 - Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional
              Teacher Preparation (PHETE)
              Kinesiology, Pre-Health Professional Program




                                                  75
Athletic Training

                                         University Core

Core Requirements                               Transfer Students (45+)
 Area                               Credits      Area                                 Credits

Library Orientation                        0     Library Orientation                        0

Composition                                3     Composition                                3

Intellectual Heritage                      6     Intellectual Heritage                      3

American Culture                           3     American Culture                          0-3

Arts                                       3     Arts                                      0-3

Individual in Society                      3     Individual in Society                      3

Foreign Language/International Studies   3-8     Foreign Language/ International Studies   3-4

Quantitative Analysis                    6-8     Quantitative Analysis                     3-4

Science/Technology                       6-8     Science/Technology                        4-8

Studies in Race                            3     Studies in Race                            3

Three Additional Writing Courses         0-9     Two Additional Writing Courses            0-6

*approximately 40 semester hours

                                         Kinesiology Core

KN 001 Introduction to Kinesiology
KN 8-99 Forms of Movement
KN 100 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1
KN 101 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2
KN 202 Biomechanics
KN 203 Physiological Basis of Human Movement
KN 204 Motor Behavior
KN 205 Psychological Basis of Human Movement
KN 206 Why Humans Move: Philosophical Perspectives

                        Required Courses in the Athletic Training Program

KN 142 Basic Techniques in Athletic Training
KN 144 Movement Injuries: Care and Prevention
KN 241 Lower Extremities: Assessment and Treatment of Injuries
KN 242 Upper Extremities: Assessment and Treatment of Injuries
KN 243 Head, Neck, and Spine: Assessment and Treatment of Injuries
KN 244 Organization and Management in Athletic Training
KN 247 Practicum in Athletic Training 1
KN 248 Practicum in Athletic Training 2
KN 310 Physiology of Exercise
KN 341 Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training

                                               76
KN 342 Therapeutic Exercises in Athletic Training
KN 343 Advanced Athletic Training
KN 345 Special Topics in Athletic Training
KN 347 Practicum in Athletic Training 3
KN 348 Practicum in Athletic Training 4
Public Health 104 Nutrition and Health
Public Health 351 Emergency Medical Practice




                                                77
                             Athletic Training 4 years matrix
                                       Freshman
            Fall                                            Spring
Course                         Credit        Course                      Credit
KN001 Introduction to Kinesiology    3      KN101 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2   4
KN100 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1   4      KN142 Basic Techniques in AT         2
English C050 English Comp            3      KN144 Movement Injuries              3
Psych C060 Psych as a Social         3      PH104 Nutrition & Health             3
      Science                               Quant Analysis (QB)                  3
Quant Analysis (QA)                  3      KN Forms of Movement                 1
KN Forms of Movement                 1

                                     Sophomore
             Fall                                        Spring
Course                         Credit      Course                        Credit
KN202 Biomechanics                   4      KN203 Physiological Basis of HM      4
KN204 Motor Behavior                 3      KN242 Upper Extremities:             3
KN241 Lower Extremities:             3            Assessment/Treatment
      Assessment/Treatment                  IHX052 Intellectual Heritage         3
PH351 Emergency Medical Practice     3      RS W Studies in Race                 3
IHX051 Intellectual Heritage         3      KN Forms of Movement                 1
KN Forms of Movement                 1      ELECTIVE                             3

                                         Junior
               Fall                                        Spring
Course                         Credit      Course                        Credit
KN243 Head/Neck/Spine:               3      KN248 Practicum in AT 2             3
      Assessment/Treatment                  KN342 Therapeutic Exercises in AT   4
KN247 Practicum in AT 1              3      KN343 Advanced Athletic Training    3
KN310 Advanced Physiology of         3      AC R American Culture               3
      Exercise                              KN099 Physical Fitness for Majors   2
KN341 Therapeutic Modalities in AT   4      KN Forms of Movement              1-2
Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W          3

                                         Senior
               Fall                                      Spring
Course                         Credit      Course                        Credit
 KN205 W Psychosocial Basis of HM    3    KN206 Why Humans Move:                 3
 KN244 Organization & Management     3          Philosophical Perspectives
       in Athletic Training               KN345 Special Topics in AT            3
 KN347 Practicum in AT 3             3    KN348 Practicum in AT 4               3
 AR W Art Core                       3    Lang/Int'l Std's (LB)/(IS)            3
 ELECTIVE                          3-4    ELECTIVE                            3-4
Note. Writing electives should be taken within other Core requirements.
KN Forms of Movement (activity course or workshop)
Junior courses completed after the formal admission process.




                                           78
Exercise and Sport Science-Option 1 - Fitness and Wellness

                                           University Core
*approximately 40 semester hours as stated above

                                          Kinesiology Core

KN 001 Introduction to Kinesiology
KN 8-99 Forms of Movement
KN 100 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1
KN 101 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2
KN 202 Biomechanics
KN 203 Physiological Basis of Human Movement
KN 204 Motor Behavior
KN 205 Psychological Basis of Human Movement
KN 206 Why Humans Move: Philosophical Perspectives

Required Courses in the Exercise and Sport Science-Option 1 - Fitness and Wellness

KN 144 Care and Prevention of Movement Injuries
KN 162 Introduction to Exercise and Sport Science
KN 163 Basic Electrocardiography
KN 180 Computer Applications in Exercise Science
KN 268 Management of Health-Fitness Programs
KN 310 Advanced Physiology of Exercise
KN 312 Exercise and Nutrient Metabolism
KN 313 Exercise and Aging
KN 314 Neuromuscular Principles of Strength. and Conditioning
KN 360 Principles of Graded Exercise Testing/Training
KN 361 Internship in Exercise and Sport Science
PH 104 Nutrition and Health
PH 324 Health Counseling
Advanced First Aid/CPR/AED or equivalency




                                                 79
                      Exercise and Sport Science (Option I) 4 years matrix
                                          Freshman
            Fall                                               Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                      Credit
KN001 Introduction to Kinesiology       3      AC R American Culture                  3
KN100 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1      4      KN101 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2     4
Quant Analysis (QA)                     3      Psych060 College Psychology            3
C050 Composition                        3      Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W            3
KN Forms of Movement                    1      KN Forms of Movement                   1
ELECTIVE                                3      ELECTIVE                               3

                                        Sophomore
             Fall                                            Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                  Credit
KN099 Fitness for Majors                2      KN180 Computer Applications in         3
KN203 Physiological Basis of HM         4            Exercise Science
Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W             3      Quant Analysis (QB) (Statistics)       3
IHX051 Intellectual Heritage            3      IHX52 Intellectual Heritage            3
PH104 Nutrition                         3      KN162 Introduction to Exercise and     3
KN Forms of Movement                  1-2            Sport Science
                                               KN Forms of Movement                   1
                                               ELECTIVE                               3

                                            Junior
               Fall                                           Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
KN163  Basic Electrocardiography        3      KN144 Care & Prevention Movement       3
KN202  Biomechanics                     4      Injuries
KN204  Motor Behavior                   3      KN312 Exercise & Nutrient              3
KNW205 Psychosocial Basis of HM         3            Metabolism
KN310  Advanced Physiology of           3      KN313 Exercise and Aging               3
       Exercise                                KN314 Neuromuscular Principles         4
KN Forms of Movement                    1            of Strength & Conditioning
                                               RS W Studies in Race                   3
                                               KN Forms of Movement                   1

                                            Senior
             Fall                                          Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                  Credit
 AR W Art Core                       3    KN361 Internship in Exercise              12
 KN268 Management of HR Fitness      3          Science
       Programs                           ELECTIVE                                  0-3
 KN206 Why Humans Move:              3
 Philosophical Perspectives
 KN360 Principles of Graded          4
       Exercise Testing/Training
 PH324 Health Counseling             3
 (CPR/1st Aid)
Note. Writing electives should be taken within other Core requirements.
KN Forms of Movement (activity course or workshop)




                                              80
Exercise and Sport Science-Option 2 - Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional

                                           University Core
*approximately 40 semester hours as stated above

                                         Kinesiology Core

KN 001 Introduction to Kinesiology
KN 8-99 Forms of Movement
KN 100 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1
KN 101 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2
KN 202 Biomechanics
KN 203 Physiological Basis of Human Movement
KN 204 Motor Behavior
KN 205 Psychological Basis of Human Movement
KN 206 Why Humans Move: Philosophical Perspectives

                 Required Courses in the Fitness/Wellness/Pre-Professional Program

KN 144 Care and Prevention of Movement Injuries
KN 162 Introduction to Exercise and Sport Science
KN 163 Basic Electrocardiography
KN 180 Computer Applications of Exercise Science
KN 310 Advanced Physiology of Exercise
KN 312 Exercise and Nutrient Metabolism
KN 313 Exercise and Aging
KN 314 Neuromuscular Principles of Strength. And Conditioning
KN 360 Principles of Graded Exercise Testing/Training
KN 361 Internship in Exercise Science (Optional)
PH 104 Nutrition for Health
Chem. 71-74 General Chemistry
Bio 83-84 General Biology
Physics 83-84 College Physics
Psychology Advanced Psychology (200 or above)
Sociology Advanced Sociology (200 or above)
Statistics (67 or Psych 122)




                                                 81
                      Exercise and Sport Science (Option 2) 4 years matrix
                                          Freshman
            Fall                                               Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                      Credit
KN001 Introduction to Kinesiology        3      IHX051 Intellectual Heritage         3
Chem071, 073 Chemistry 1                 4      Chem072, 074 Chemistry 2             4
Bio083 Biology 1                         4      Bio084 Biology 2                     4
CO50 Composition                         3      Quant Analysis (QA) (Int' Algebra)   3
Psych060 College Psychology              3      ELECTIVE                             3

                                        Sophomore
             Fall                                            Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
KN100 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1       4      KN101 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2   4
KN204 Motor Behavior                     3      KNW 205 Psychosocial Basis of HM     3
IHX052 Intellectual Heritage             3      AR W Art Core                        3
PH 104 Nutrition                         3      Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W          3
Quant Analysis (QB) (Statistics)         3      KN Forms of Movement                 1
KN Forms of Movement                     1      ELECTIVE                             3

                                             Junior
               Fall                                           Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
Phys083 College Physics 1                4      Phys084 College Physics 2            4
RS W Studies in Race                     3      KN162 Introduction to Exercise &
KN99 Fitness for Majors                  2            Sport Science                  3
KN203 Physiology of Exercise             4      KN180 Computer Applications in       3
AC R American Culture                    3            Exercise Science
KN Forms of Movement                     1      KN144 C & P of Movement Injuries     3
                                                Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W          3
                                                KN Forms of Movement                 1

                                             Senior
             Fall                                          Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
KN202 Biomechanics                       4      KN360 Principle of Graded           4
KN163 Basic Electrocardiography          3            Exercise Training/Testing
KN206 Why Humans Move                    3                      And/Or
Philosophical Perspectives                      KN314 Neuromuscular Principles of   4
KN310 Advanced Physiology of             3            Strength and Conditioning
      Exercise                                  KN312 Exercise and Nutrient
Soc Advanced Sociology                   3            Metabolism                    3
KN Forms of Movement                     1      KN313 Exercise and Aging            3
                                                Psych Advanced Psychology           3
                                                ELECTIVE                          0-3
Note. Summer Internship Highly Recommended
Writing electives should be taken within other Core requirements.
KN Forms of Movement (activity course or workshop)




                                               82
Teacher Preparation (PHETE)

                                           University Core
*approximately 40 semester hours as stated above

                                           Kinesiology Core

KN 001 Introduction to Kinesiology
KN 8-99 Forms of Movement
KN 100 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1
KN 101 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2
KN 202 Biomechanics
KN 203 Physiological Basis of Human Movement
KN 204 Motor Behavior
KN 205 Psychological Basis of Human Movement
KN 206 Why Humans Move: Philosophical Perspectives

            Required Courses in the Physical and Health Education Certification Program

ED 155 Inclusive Education for a Diverse Society
PHETE 244 Introduction to Health Education 1
PHETE 245 Introduction to Health Education 2
PHETE 246 Basic Movement 1
PHETE 247 Basic Movement 2
PHETE 248 Advanced Movement 1
PHETE 249 Advanced Movement 2
PHETE 250 Micro-Teaching
PHETE 251 Tutorial Experience
PHETE 252 Teaching - Teacher and Program
PHETE 253 Teaching - Learner and Process
PHETE 254 Teaching - School Environment
PHETE 255 Student Teaching
PHETE 256 The Handicapped and Normal Child
PHETE 257 Practicum in Physical and Health Education 1
PHETE 258 Practicum 2
PHETE 259 Practicum 3
PHETE 260 Seminar in Student Teaching

                                Required Courses in the Public Health

Twelve (12) semester hours of Health Education are required for certification. Elect one additional
course from the following course offerings.

PHETE (Public Health) 230 Health Science 1
PHETE (Public Health) 231 Health Science 2
PHETE (Public Health) 232 Health Science 3




                                                   83
                                    Public Health Electives

Public Health 101 Society, Drugs, and Alcohol Perspectives
Public Health 102 Disease Prevention and Control
Public Health 104 Nutrition and Health
Public Health 106 Human Sexuality
Public Health 107 Consumer Advocacy & Environmental Health
Public Health 110 Contemporary Health Issues
Public Health 328 Death and Dying




                                              84
                       Teacher Certification (PHETE) 4 years matrix
                                          Freshman
               Fall                                           Spring
Course                           Credit      Course                    Credit
KN001 Introduction to Kinesiology   3        KN099 Physical Fitness for Majors    2
English C050 English Comp           3        AR W Art Core                        3
Quant Analysis (QA)                 3        American Culture (W)                 3
Psych C060 Psych as a Social        3        IHX051 Intellectual Heritage         3
      Science                                Quant Analysis (QB)                  3
PH ___ ELECTIVE                     3        ELECTIVE                             3
KN Forms of Movement              1-2

                                         Sophomore
                Fall                                         Spring
Course                          Credit       Course                    Credit
KN100 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1    4      KN101 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2   4
KN204 Motor Behavior                  3      PHETE 245 Introduction to Health     1
PHETE 244 Introduction to Health      1            Education 2
      Education 1                            PHETE 247 Basic Movement 2           1
PHETE 246 Basic Movement 1            1      PHETE 251 Tutorial Experience        1
PHETE 250 Micro-Teaching              1      Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W          3
IHX052 Intellectual Heritage          3      RS W Studies in Race                 3
Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W           3      ELECTIVE                             3
KN Forms of Movement                  1

                                          Junior
               Fall                                          Spring
Course                           Credit      Course                    Credit
KNW 205 Psychosocial Basis of HM      3      KN202 Biomechanics                   4
PHETE 248 Advanced Movement 1         3      PHETE 249 Developmental Movement 2   3
PHETE 252 PHETE 1                     4      PHETE 253 PHETE 2                    4
PHETE 257 PHETE Practicum 1           1      PHETE 258 PHETE Practicum 2          1
PH230 Health Science 1                3      PH 231 Health Science 2              3
ED155 Inclusive Education for a       3
      Diverse Society

                                          Senior
               Fall                                          Spring
Course                           Credit      Course                    Credit
 KN203 Physiology of Exercise        4    PHETE 255 Student Teaching              12
 KN206 Why Humans Move               3    PHETE 260 Seminar in Student
 Philosophical Perspectives                         Teaching                      1
 PHETE 254 School Environment        2
 PHETE 256 Adapted Education         3
 PHETE 259 PHETE Practicum 3         1
 PH 232 Health Science 3             3
Note. Writing electives should be taken within other Core requirements.
KN Forms of Movement (activity course or workshop)
Junior courses completed after the formal admission process.




                                            85
Kinesiology, Pre-Health Professional Program

                                         University Core
*approximately 40 semester hours

                                        Kinesiology Core

KN 001 Introduction to Kinesiology
KN 8-99 Forms of Movement
KN 100 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1
KN 101 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2
KN 202 Biomechanics
KN 203 Physiological Basis of Human Movement
KN 204 Motor Behavior
KN 205 Psychological Basis of Human Movement
KN 206 Why Humans Move: Philosophical Perspectives
KN 359 Independent Study in Kinesiology

                               Foundation Courses for Allied Health

Bio 83-84 General Biology
Chem. 71-74 General Chemistry
Physics 83-84 College Physics
Psychology Advanced Psychology (200 or above)
Sociology Advanced Sociology (100 or above)
Statistics (67 or Psych 122)

                       Pre-Health Professional Program Suggested Electives

HRP 100 Introduction to Health Professions
Psych 200 Developmental Psychology
Psych 220 Psychopathology
Soc 152 Health and Disease in American Society
PH 102 Disease Prevention and Control
Eng W103 Writing the Research Essay
Phil 077 Science in Context
Chem 121 Organic Chemistry with Lab (123)
Chem 122 Organic Chemistry with Lab (124)
Chem 371 Biochemistry 1
Chem 372 Biochemistry 2
Nursing 110 Microbiology
Bio 317 General Microbiology
Bio 327 Immunology
Bio 329 Developmental Genetics




                                                 86
                   Kinesiology, Pre-Health Professional Program 4 yearmatrix

                                         Freshman
            Fall                                             Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
KN001 Introduction to Kinesiology   3           HRP 0100 Introduction to the        3
Chem 071, 073 General Chemistry 1   4           Health Professions
CO50 Composition                    3           Chem 072, 074 General Chemistry 2   4
Psych 060 College Psychology        3           IHX051 Intellectual Heritage        3
ELECTIVE                          3-4           Math 073 Intermediate Algebra       4
                                                KN Forms of Movement              1-2

                                         Sophomore
             Fall                                            Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
Bio 083 Biology 1                   4           Bio 084 Biology 2                   4
KN100 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 4            KN101 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2 4
IHX052 Intellectual Heritage        3           AR W Art Core                       3
ELECTIVE                          3-4           ACX064 American Culture             3
KN Forms of Movement              1-2                  American Ethnicity
                                                KN Forms of Movement              1-2

                                             Junior
               Fall                                           Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
Phys083 College Physics 1                4      Phys084 College Physics 2             4
Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W              3      Lang/Int'l Std's (LA)/(IS)W           3
KN204 Motor Behavior                     3      KN203 Physiological Basis of HM       4
Quant Analysis (QB) (Statistics)         3      KN099 Physical Fitness for Majors     2
ELECTIVE                               3-4      ELECTIVE                            3-4

                                             Senior
             Fall                                           Spring
Course                            Credit       Course                   Credit
KN202 Biomechanics                       4KN206 Why Humans Move:                     3
KNW 205 Psychosocial Basis of HM         3Philosophical Perspectives
RS W Studies in Race                     3KN359 Independent Study in                 3
Psych200+ Advanced Psychology            3      Kinesiology
KN Forms of Movement                   1-2Soc100+ Advanced Sociology                  3
ELECTIVE                               3-4ELECTIVE                                  3-4
                                          ELECTIVE                                  3-4
Note. Writing electives should be taken within other Core requirements.
KN Forms of Movement (activity course or workshop)




                                               87
Master of Education in Kinesiology.

       The MEd in Kinesiology can be earned in any of the following professional practice programs:

       Somatic Science
             Athletic Training
             Integrative Exercise Physiology

       Behavioral Science
             Curriculum and Instruction
             Exercise and Sport Psychology




                                                 88
Athletic Training

Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 37 s.h. (Note: Please refer to Policies and Procedures of
the Temple University Graduate School for advanced standing or transfer of credit for graduate coursework taken as a non-
matriculated student)

    Required Courses           Course Number (s.h.)                                 Course Title
          (20 s.h.)
 Kinesiology                  443 (3)                    Orthopedics in AT/SM
 Kinesiology                  444 (4)                    Rehabilitation Methods and Techniques for Sports-Related
                                                         Injuries
 Kinesiology                  446 (1)                    AT/SM Practicum B
 Kinesiology                  447 (2)                    AT/SM Practicum A
 Kinesiology                  448 (3)                    Advanced Laboratory Techniques
 Kinesiology                  449 (4)                    Cadaver Anatomy
 Kinesiology                  501 (3)                    Biomechanics
     Elective Courses          Course Number (s.h.)                               Course Title
           (3 s.h.)
 Kinesiology                  410 (3)                    Exercise Physiology
 Kinesiology                  413 (3)                    Exercise and Aging
 Kinesiology                  502 (3)                    Cardiovascular Physiology
 Kinesiology                  412 (3)                    Exercise and Nutrient Metabolism
 Kinesiology                  508 (3)                    Sociology of Kinesiology
 Kinesiology                  510 (3)                    Pedagogy in Higher Education
 Kinesiology                  511 (3)                    Cellular Adaptations to Exercise
 Kinesiology                  512 (3)                    Neuromuscular Physiology
 Kinesiology                  515 (3)                    Exercise Testing and Prescription
 Kinesiology                  618 (3)                    Environmental Physiology
 Physical Therapy             513                        Neuroanatomy
 Physical Therapy             521                        Neuroscience
 Physical Therapy             605                        Advanced Anatomy
          Research             Course Number (s.h.)                                Course Title
          (14 s.h.)
 Kinesiology                  649 (5)                    Seminar in AT/SM
 Kinesiology                  901 (1)                    Research Methods I
 Kinesiology                  902 (2)                    Research Methods II
 Kinesiology                  960 (3)                    Masters Research
 MED                          502 (3)                    Introduction to Biostatistics




                                                           89
Integrative Physiology of Exercise

Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 30 or 33 s.h. (Note: Please refer
to Policies and Procedures of the Temple University Graduate School for transfer of credit for
graduate coursework taken as a non-matriculated student)
Required Courses (15 s.h.)        Course Number (s.h.) Course Title
Kinesiology                       410 (3)                 Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology                       503 (3)                 Cardiovascular Physiology
Kinesiology                       512 (3)                 Neuromuscular Physiology
Kinesiology                       901 (3)                 Research Methods
Intermediate Statistics Course    From approved courses
                                  for 3 s.h.

Elective Courses (15 to 18 s.h.)   Course Number (s.h.)   Course Title
Kinesiology                        412 (3)                Ex. And Nutrient Metabolism
Kinesiology                        413 (3)                Exercise and Aging
Kinesiology                        511 (3)                Cellular Metabolism
Kinesiology                        515 (3)                Stress Testing
Kinesiology                        618 (3)                Environmental Physiology
Electives offered in Kinesiology
or other graduate departments.
Approval by two graduate
faculty members required.

Research/Clinical Practicum
Options (3 or 6 s.h.)              Course Number (s.h.)   Course Title
Research Project Option (3
s.h.): Kinesiology                 960 (3)                Master’s Research
Thesis Option (6 s.h.)
Kinesiology                        960 (3)                Master’s Research
Kinesiology                        961 (3)                Master’s Thesis
Clinical Practicum Option          709 (6)                Internship




                                                 90
Curriculum and Instruction

Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 30 or 33 s.h. (Note: Please refer to Policies and Procedures
of the Temple University Graduate School for transfer of credit for graduate coursework taken as a non-matriculated
student)

         Required Courses                 Course Number (s.h.)                           Course Title
             (15 s.h.)
Kinesiology                             455 (3.)                     Creative Approaches to Teaching
Kinesiology                             554 (3.)                     The Physical Education Curriculum Seminar in
                                        595 (3)                      Physical Education
Kinesiology                             901/902 ( 1 + 2)             Research Methods 1 & II
Kinesiology                             525 (3 )                     Introduction to Statistics
Educational Psychology
Professional Enrichment Courses         Course Number (s.h.)         Course Title
(15 to 18 s.h)
Kinesiology                             550 (3)                      Measurement & Evaluation
Kinesiology                             552 (3)                      The Analytic Study of Teaching
Selected Content Course                 (3 )                         History & Philosophy of Ed
Selected Content Course                 (3)                          Educational Psychology
Selected Content Course                 (3)                          Educational Technology
Elective                                (3)
Elective                                (3)
    Research/Clinical Practicum           Course Number (s.h.)                           Course Title
         Options (3 or 6 s.h.)
Research Project Option (3 s.h.):
Kinesiology                             960 (3)                      Master’s Research
Thesis Option (6 s.h.)
Kinesiology                             960 (3)                      Master’s Research
Kinesiology                             961 (3)                      Master’s Thesis
Clinical Practicum Option               709 (6)                      Internship




                                                           91
Exercise and Sport Psychology

Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 30 or 33 s.h. (Note: Please refer to Policies and Procedures
of the Temple University Graduate School for transfer of credit for graduate coursework taken as a non-matriculated
student)

         Required Courses                  Course Number (s.h.)                         Course Title
             (15 s.h.)
Kinesiology                              507 (3)                       Psychology of Exercise
Kinesiology                              508 (3)                       Sociology of Kinesiology
Kinesiology                              537 (3)                       Psychosocial Interactions and Skilled
                                                                       Performance
Kinesiology                              901 (3)                       Research Methods
Intermediate Statistics or Qualitative   From approved courses for 3
Research Methods Course                  s.h.
          Elective Courses                  Course Number (s.h.)                        Course Title
            (15 to 18 s.h.)
Kinesiology                              410 (3)                       Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology                              538 (3)                       Tests and Measures in Exercise and Sport
                                                                       Psychology
Kinesiology                              595 (3)                       Seminar in Kinesiology
Counseling Psychology                    521 (3)                       Group Counseling
Counseling Psychology                    591 (3)                       Introduction to Counseling Psychology
Electives offered in Kinesiology or
other graduate departments. Approval
by two graduate faculty members
required.
    Research/Clinical Practicum            Course Number (s.h.)                         Course Title
                Options
              (3 or 6 s.h.)
Research Project Option (3 s.h.):
Kinesiology                              960 (3)                       Master’s Research
Thesis Option (6 s.h.)
Kinesiology                              960 (3)                       Master’s Research
Kinesiology                              961 (3)                       Master’s Thesis
Clinical Internship/Practicum Option     709 (6)                       Internship/Practicum




                                                           92
Doctor of Philosophy in Kinesiology.

      The PhD in Kinesiology can be earned in any of the following professional practice
programs:

       Somatic Science
             Athletic Training
             Integrative Exercise Physiology

       Behavioral Science
             Curriculum and Instruction
             Exercise and Sport Psychology
Athletic Training
Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 70 s.h. Elective Courses may be replaced with the
approval of two graduate faculty members (i.e., advisor and faculty member) within the student’s program group.
(Note: Please refer to Policies and Procedures of the Temple University Graduate School for advanced standing or
transfer of credit for graduate coursework taken as a non-matriculated student).

         Required Courses (15 s.h.)              Course Number (s.h.)                        Course Title
Kinesiology                                   901 (3)                        Research Methods
Kinesiology                                   910 (3)                        Mentored Research I
Kinesiology                                   911 (3)                        Mentored Research II
Intermediate Statistics                       Approved courses for 6
Advance Statistics                            semester hrs
         Required AT Core (21 s.h.)              Course Number (s.h.)                         Course Title
Kinesiology                                   448 (3)                        Lab Tech in Athletic Training
Kinesiology                                   649 (3)                        Seminar in Athletic Training
Physical Therapy                              510 (3)                        Human Anatomy –Lecture
Physical Therapy                              512 (3)                        Human Anatomy-Laboratory
Advanced Anatomy (Select 1 of 2)              605 (3)                        Adv Musculoskeletal Anatomy
Physical Therapy           Physical Therapy   513 (3)                        Neuroscience
Statistics (Select 2 of 6)
     Psychology
     Psychology                               523 (3)                        Multivariate Techniques
     Educational Psychology                   525 (3)                        Factor Analysis & Scaling
     Educational Psychology                   529 (3)                        Test and Measurement Multivariate Research
     Educational Psychology                   826 (3)                        Methods Experimental Design
                                              827 (3)
         Elective Courses (24 s.h)                Course Number(s.h.)                          Course Title
Kinesiology                                   410 (3)                        Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology                                   412 (3)                        Exercise and Nutrient Metabolism
Kinesiology                                   413 (3)                        Exercise and Aging
Kinesiology                                   442 (4)                        Physical Agents in Sports Med.
Kinesiology                                   443 (3)                        Orthopedics in AT/SM
Kinesiology                                   444 (4)                        Rehabilitation in AT/SM
Kinesiology                                   501 (3)                        Biomechanics of Human Mmvt.
Kinesiology                                   502 (3)                        Cardiovascular Ex. Physiology
Kinesiology                                   503 (3)                        Nutrient Metabolism
Kinesiology                                   506 (3)                        Psych of Human Mvmt. & Dev.
Kinesiology                                   507 (3)                        Psychology of Kinesiology
Kinesiology                                   510 (3)                        Pedagogy in Higher Education
Kinesiology                                   511 (3)                        Cellular Adaptations to Exercise
Kinesiology                                   512 (3)                        Neuromuscular Physiology
Kinesiology                                   515 (3)                        Exercise Testing &Prescription
Kinesiology                                   618 (3)                        Intro to Environmental Physio.
Kinesiology                                   956 (3)                        Independent Study
Physical Therapy                              525 (3)                        Advances Sports Orthopedics
Physical Therapy                              616 (3)                        Advanced Neuromuscular Physio
   Required Comprehensive Exam for               Course Number (s.h.)                          Course Title
Candidacy and Dissertation Res. (12 s.h.)
Kinesiology                                   799 (3)                        Preliminary Exam
Kinesiology                                   899 (3)                        Dissertation Proposal
Kinesiology                                   999 (6)                        Dissertation




                                                        94
Integrative Physiology of Exercise

Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 68 s.h. (Note: Please refer
to Policies and Procedures of the Temple University Graduate School for advanced standing
or transfer of credit for graduate coursework taken as a non-matriculated student)
Required Courses (15 s.h.)        Course Number (s.h.)     Course Title
Kinesiology                       901 (3)                  Research Methods
Kinesiology                       910 (3)                  Mentored Research I
Kinesiology                       911 (3)                  Mentored Research II
Intermediate Statistics           Approved courses for 6
Advance Statistics                semester hours
Required Exercise Physiology
Core (12 s.h.)
Kinesiology                       410 (3)                  Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology                       502 (3)                  Cardiovascular Physiology
Kinesiology                       511 (3)                  Cellular Adaptations to Exercise
Kinesiology                       512 (3)                  Neuromuscular Physiology
Required Biomedical
Interdisciplinary Core (8 s.h.)
Medical School                    503 (4) or               Fundamentals of Biochemistry or
                                  504 (4)                  Structure and Function of Macromolecules
                                  and
Medical School                    505 (4) or               Fundamentals of Molecular & Cell Biology or
                                  506 (4)                  Basis of Microbiology & Immunology
Required Integrated
Bioscience Course (Two of the
Following Courses – 6 -8 s.h.)
Molecular Biology & Genetics      403 (3)                  Principals of Genetics
Micobiology & Immunology          433 (3)                  Host-Pathogen Interactions
Pathology                         501 (3)                  Principals of Organ Pathology
Anatomy and Cell Biology          503 (4)                  Cell Structure and Function
Molecular Biology & Genetics      505 (3)                  Cancer Biology
Pharmacology                      506 (3)                  Principals of Pharmacology
Physiology                        507 (3)                  Principals of Physiology
Micorbiology & Immunology         520 (3)                  Molecular Approaches to Research
Biochemistry                      523 (3)                  Proteins and Enzymes
Molecular Biology & Genetics      560 (3)                  Principals of Development
Elective Courses (25 to 27s.h)
Kinesiology                       412 (3)                  Exercise and Nutrient Metabolism
Kinesiology                       413 (3)                  Aging and Exercise
Kinesiology                       501 (3)                  Biomechanics of Human Movement
Kinesiology                       506 (3)                  Psychological Basis of Motor Behavior
Kinesiology                       507 (3)                  Psychology of Kinesiology
Kinesiology                       510 (3)                  Pedagogy in Higher Education
Kinesiology                       515 (3)                  Exercise Testing and Prescription
Kinesiology                       618 (3)                  Environmental Physiology
Biology                           467 (3)                  Endocrinology
Biology                           475 (3)                  Biochemistry
Physiology                        511 (2)                  Ion Channels/Nerve & Muscle
Physiology                        514 (2)                  Neurophysiology
Physiology                        516 (2)                  Concepts of Molecular Physiology
Physiology                        520 (3)                  Molecular Physiology
Physiology                        522 (1)                  Renal Physiology
Physiology                        531 (1)                  Gastrointestinal Physiology
Physiology                        537 (2)                  Pulmonary Physiology
Physiology                        545 (2)                  Cardiovascular Physiology
Physical Therapy                  510/511 (6)              Human Gross Anatomy


                                                      95
Physical Therapy                605 (3)        Advanced Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Electives offered in
Kinesiology or other graduate
departments. Approval by two
graduate faculty members
required.
Required Comprehensive
Exam for Candidacy and
Dissertation Research (10
s.h.)
Kinesiology                     799 (1)        Preliminary Exam
Kinesiology                     899 (3)        Dissertation Proposal
Kinesiology                     999 (6)        Dissertation




                                          96
Curriculum and Instruction

Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 70 s.h. (Note: Please refer to Policies and
Procedures of the Temple University Graduate School for advanced standing or transfer of credit for graduate
coursework taken as a non-matriculated student)

          Required Courses                 Course Number (s.h.)                              Course Title
                (15 s.h.)
Kinesiology                               901 (3)                    Research Methods
Kinesiology                               910 (3)                    Mentored Research I
Kinesiology                               911 (3)                    Mentored Research II
Intermediate Statistics                   Approved courses for 6
Advance Statistics                        semester hours

Required Curriculum and Instruction        Course Number (s.h.)                              Course Title
               Courses
               (21 s.h.)
Kinesiology                               455 (3)                    Creative Approaches to Teaching
Kinesiology                               510 (3)                    Pedagogy in Higher Education
Kinesiology                               550 (3)                    Measurement & Evaluation
Kinesiology                               552 (3)                    The Analytic Study of Teaching
Kinesiology                               554 (3)                    The Physical Education Curriculum
Kinesiology                               595 (3)                    Seminar in Physical Education
Selected Content Course                   (3)                        Learning & Human Development
 Professional Enrichment Courses (24       Course Number (s.h.)                           Course Title
                  s.h)
Selected Content Course                   (3)                        History & Philosophy of Ed
Selected Content Course                   (3)                        Educational Psychology
Selected Content Course                   (3)                        Educational Technology
Elective                                  (3)                        Elective
Elective                                  (3)                        Elective
Elective                                  (3)                        Elective
Elective                                  (3)                        Elective
Elective                                  (3)                        Elective
 Comprehensive Exam for Candidacy          Course Number (s.h.)                           Course Title
  and Dissertation Research (12 s.h.)
Kinesiology                               799 (3)                    Preliminary Exam
Kinesiology                               899 (3)                    Dissertation Proposal
Kinesiology                               999 (6)                    Dissertation




                                                       97
Exercise and Sport Psychology

Number of Didactic Credits Required Beyond the Baccalaureate: 70 s.h. (Note: Please refer to Policies and
Procedures of the Temple University Graduate School for advanced standing or transfer of credit for graduate
coursework taken as a non-matriculated student)

         Required Courses (15 s.h.)            Course Number(s.h.)                         Course Title
Kinesiology                                 901 (3)                         Research Methods
Kinesiology                                 910 (3)                         Mentored Research I
Kinesiology                                 911 (3)                         Mentored Research II
Intermediate Statistics, Advanced           Approved courses for 6
Statistics, and/or Qualitative Research     semester hours
Methods
       Required Exercise and Sport              Course Number (s.h.)                         Course Title
         Psychology Core (18 s.h.)
Kinesiology                                 410 (3)                         Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology                                 507 (3)                         Psychology of Kinesiology
Kinesiology                                 508 (3)                         Sociology of Kinesiology
Kinesiology                                 537 (3)                         Psychosocial Interactions and Skilled
                                                                            Performance
Kinesiology                                 538 (3)                         Tests and Measures in Exercise and Sport
                                                                            Psychology
Counseling Psychology                       591 (3)                         Introduction to Counseling Psychology
        Elective Courses (27 s.h)              Course Number(s.h.)                            Course Title
Kinesiology                                 501 (3)                         Biomechanics of Human Movement
Kinesiology                                 510 (3)                         Pedagogy in Higher Education
Kinesiology                                 595 (3)                         Seminar in Kinesiology
Counseling Psychology                       521 (3)                         Group Counseling
Counseling Psychology                       525 (3)                         Multi-Cultural Counseling
Counseling Psychology                       690 (3)                         Theories in Counseling
Adult and Organizational Development        522 (3)                         Facilitating Adult Learning
Adult and Organizational Development        523 (3)                         Training Design and Deliver
Electives offered in Kinesiology or other
graduate departments. Approval by two
graduate faculty members required.
   Required Comprehensive Exam for              Course Number (s.h.)                         Course Title
 Candidacy and Dissertation Research
                  (12 s.h.)
Kinesiology                                 799 (3)                         Preliminary Exam
Kinesiology                                 899 (3)                         Dissertation Proposal
Kinesiology                                 999 (6)                         Dissertation




                                                       98
                                          Appendix C
Systematic Assessment Methods for Determining Student Outcomes for Kinesiology Majors


                                                                                         Results
                                        Core         Assessment               Passing    % Students
                                                                                         Ppassing
                                        Course       Tool(s)                  Standard
Student Learning Outcome                                                                 Standard

1. demonstrate knowledge of and skill FOM            Specific component       70%        95%
in a broad variety of motor skill and                exams, physical
                                      K0099
                                                     competency skills
fitness activities                                   exams

2. understand the biological and        KC100 and    Specific component       70%        77%
physical bases human movement with      C101         exams, instructor
                                                     evaluation of exams,
an emphasis on sport and exercise       K0202 and
                                                     laboratory write-ups
phenomenon                              0203



3. understand the behavioral and        K001,        Specific component       70%        88%
psychological bases of human            K0204 and    exams, instructor
                                        KW205        evaluation of exams,
movement with an emphasis on sport                   laboratory write-ups
and exercise phenomenon


4. understand the sociocultural,        K001,        Specific component       70%        95%
historical, and philosophical           KW205 and    exams, instructor
                                        K0206        evaluation of research
perspectives of human movement                       paper, oral
with an emphasis on sport and                        presentation
exercise phenomenon
5. understand how motor skills are      K0204                                 70%        88%
acquired and refined as well as the
developmental basis of human
movement within the varied spheres
physical activity (sport, exercise,
work, play


6. be able to use and apply             K0202 and    Specific component       70%        78%
measurement instruments and             K0203        exams, instructor
                                                     evaluation of exams,
principles for qualitative and                       laboratory write-ups
quantitative assessment of human
movement with an emphasis on sport
and exercise phenomenon

7. apply critical thinking, writing,    K001,        Specific component       70%        90%
reading, oral communication,            K0206        exams, instructor
                                                     evaluation of research
quantitative and qualitative analysis                paper, oral



                                                99
and information management skills to                    presentation
movement related questions
8. be able to use the computer and       K0180,         Specific component       70%   88%
other technology to support inquiry                     exams, instructor
                                         K0204
                                                        evaluation of research
and professional practice in                            paper, oral
movement related fields                                 presentation
9. understand the scientific method      K0203,         Specific component       70%   80%
and other systematic ways of                            exams, instructor
                                         K0204,
                                                        evaluation of research
knowing relative to research and         K0359 and
                                                        paper, oral
scholarship in human movement with       Capstone
                                                        presentation
                                         Program
emphasis on sport and exercise
                                         Courses
phenomenon

10. demonstrate ability to integrate     K001,          Specific component       70%   86%
multidisciplinary knowledge bases of     K0206 and      exams, instructor
                                         K0359          evaluation of research
Kinesiology in an applied, problem-                     paper, oral
solving context and be familiar with                    presentation
standards, ethics, and expectations of
the Kinesiology professional




                                                  100
         Appendix D
Graduate Enrollment Management




             101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
          Appendix E
  Graduate Student Scholarship
           -Publications
          -Presentations
-Theses/Projects/Dissertation Titles




                112
                               Graduate Student Published Articles

                                             2005-06

Cleary, M., Sweeny, L., Kendrick, Z., & Sitler, M. (2005). Dehydration and symptoms of
delayed-onset muscle soreness in hyperthermic males. Journal of Athletic Training, 40(4), 288-
297.

Dean A. S., Margulies, K. B., Nicholas, J.J., Rubin, S., & Libonati, J. R. (2005). Imparied
vaseoreactivity in end-stage heart failure patients on intravenous inotropic support. Journal of
Cardiac Failure, 11(5), 351-357.

Epler, M., Sitler S., & Moyer R. (2005). Kinematics of healthy and meniscal repaired knees.
Research in Sports Medicine: An International Journal, 13(2), 91-109.

Hamstra-Wright, K. L., Swanik, C. B., Sitler, M. R., Swanik, K. A., Ferber, R., Ridenour, M.,
& Huxel, K. C. (2006). Gender comparisons of dynamic restraint and motor skill in children.
Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, 16, 56-62.

Hart, J. M., Swanik, C. B., & Tierney, R T. (2005). Effects of sport massage on limb girth and
discomfort associated with eccentric exercise. Journal of Athletic Training, 40(3), 181-185.

Lake, A. W., Sitler, M. R., Stearne, D. J., Swanik, C. B., Tierney, R. T. (2005). Effectiveness
of prophylactic hyperextension elbow braces on limiting active and passive elbow extension
preohysiological and postphysiological loading. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical
Therapy, 35(12), 837-843.

MacDonnell S. M., Kubo, H., Crabbe, D. L., Renna, B. F., Reger, P. O., Mohara, J.,
Smithwick, L. A., Koch, W. J., Houser, S. R., & Libonati, J. R. (2005). Improved myocardial
beta adrenergic responsiveness and signaling with exercise
training in hypertension. Circulation, 111, 3420-3428.

Mansell, J., Tierney, R. T., Sitler, M. R., Swanik, K. A., & Stearne, D. (2005) Resistance
training and head-neck segment dynamic stabilization in male and female collegiate soccer
players. Journal of Athletic Training, 40(4), 310-319.

Reger P. O., Barbe, M. F., Amin, M., Renna, B. F., Hewston, L. A., MacDonnell, S. M.,
Houser, S. R., & Libonati, J. R. (2006). Myocardial hypoperfusion/reperfusion
tolerance with exercise training in hypertension. Journal of Applied Physiology, Feb; 100(2),
541-547.

Renna B. F., Kubo, H., MacDonnell, S. M., Crabbe, D. L., Reger, P. O., Houser, S. R., &
Libonati, J. R. (2006). Enhanced acidotic myocardial Ca2+ responsiveness with training in
Hypertension. Medicine and Science in Sport & Exercise, May; 38(5), 847-855.

Tierney, R. T., Sitler, M. R., Swanik, C. B., Swanik, K. A., Higgins, M., & Torg, J. S. (2005).
Gender differences in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head acceleration.
Medicine and Science in Sport & Exercise, 37(2), 272-279.



                                               113
                                             2004-05

Epler, M., Sitler, M., & Moyer, R. (2004). Inside-outside repair of an isolated meniscal tear
results in predictable, favorable clinical and functional outcomes. Research in Sports Medicine:
An International Journal, 12(4), 283-300.

Miller, T. L., Mattacola, C. G., & Santiago, M. C. (2004). Influence of varied, controlled
distances from the crank axis on physiological responses during arm crank ergometry. Journal
of Exercise Physiology, 7(3), (available from URL: http://www.asep.org/FLDR/Jep
/Doc/June2004/MillerV2.doc)

Tierney, R., Sitler, M., Swanik, B., Swanik, K., Higgins, M., & Torg, T. (2005). Gender
differences in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head acceleration. Medicine and
Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(2), 272-279.

Weise, K., Sitler, M., Tierney, R., & Swanik, K. (2004). Effectiveness of glenohumeral joint
stability braces on limiting active and passive shoulder range of motion in collegiate football
players. Journal of Athletic Training, 39(2), 151-155.


                                            2003-04

Chimura, N., Swanik K. A., & Swanik C. B. (2004). The effect of plyometric training on
functional performance and muscle activations patterns. Journal of Athletic Training, 39(1), 48-
55.

Gorden, J. A., Straub, S. J., Swanik, C. B., & Swanik, K. A. (2003). Effects of football collars
on cervical hyperextension and lateral flexion. Journal of Athletic Training, 38(3), 209-215.

Grant-Ford, M., Sitler, M., Kozin, S., & Barbe, M. (2003). Biomechanical assessment of a
prophylactic wrist orthosis during mechanical loading in a cadaveric model. American Journal
of Sports Medicine, 31(5), 736-743.

Karagiannopoulos, C., Sitler, M., & Michlovitz S. (2003). Reliability of two functional
goniometric methods for measuring forearm pronation and supination active range of motion.
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 33(9), 523-531.

Ramsi, M., Swanik, K. A., Mattacola, C.,G., & Swanik, C. B. (2004). Isometric shoulder
rotator strength characteristics of high school swimmers over the course of a competitive season.
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 13(1), 9-18.


                                            2002-03

Chen, W., & Cone, T. P. (2003). Links between children's use of critical thinking and expert
teacher=s teaching in creative dance. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 22, 169-185.



                                               114
Chen, W., Rovegno, I., & Iran-Nejad, A. (2002). Application of a whole theme perspective to
the movement approach to teaching physical education in elementary school. Education, 123,
401-415.

Covassin, T., Swanik, C. B., & Sachs, M. L. (2003). Epidemiological considerations of
concussions among intercollegiate athletes. Journal of Applied Neuropsychology, 10, 12-22.

Covassin, T., Swanik, C. B., & Sachs, M. L. (2003). Prevalence, severity and gender
differences of concussion among intercollegiate athletes. Journal of Athletic Training, 38(3),
248-244.

Covassin, T., Swanik, C. B., & Sachs, M. L. (2003). Sex differences and the incidence of
concussions among intercollegiate athletes. Journal of Athletic Training, 38(3), 238-244.

Gorden, J. A., Straub, S. J., Swanik, C. B., & Swanik, K. A. (2003). Effects of football collars
on cervical hyperextension and lateral flexion. Journal of Athletic Training, 38(3), 209-215.

Hamstra, K., Cherubini, J., & Swanik, C. B. (2002). The influence of parental misconduct on
youth sports injury and performance. Athletic Therapy Today, 7, 36-41.

Swanik, C. B., & Moffit, D. (2003) The Pathoetiology and rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis.
Rehab Management, 16, 30-33.

Tierney, R. (2003, May). Measuring isometric strength in the cervical spine. Athletic Therapy
Today, 8, 56-57.

Tierney, R., Mattacola, C., Sitler, M., & Maldjian, C. (2002). Head position and football
equipment influence cervical spinal space during immobilization. Journal of Athletic Training,
37, 185-189.

Tierney, R., Maldjian, C., Mattacola, C., Straub, S., & Sitler, M. (2002). Cervical spinal
measures in normal subjects. Journal of Athletic Training, 37, 190-193.

Wall, S. P., Mattacola, C. G., Swanik, C. B., & Levenstein, S. (2003). Sleep efficiency and
overreaching swimmers. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 12, 1-12.


                                            2001-02

Allen, A., Sitler, M., Marchetto, P., Kelly, J., & Mattacola, C. (2001). Assessment of the
endoscopic semmitendinosis/gracilis autograft procedure with interference screw fixation for
reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Orthopaedics, 24(4), 347-353.

Binkley, H., Kendrick, Z. V., Doerr, E. A., Perfetti, G., & Pina, I. L. (2002). Effects of water
exercise on cardiovascular responses, of hypertensive elderly inner-city women. Aquatic
Physical Therapy, 10, 28-33.




                                               115
Cleary, M., Kimura, I., Sitler, M., & Kendrick, Z. (2002). Temporal pattern of the repeated bout
effect of eccentric exercise on delayed onset muscle soreness. Journal of Athletic Training,
37(1), 32-36.

Hamstra, K., Cherubini, J., & Swanik, C. B. (2002). The influence of parental misconduct on
youth sports injury and performance. Athletic Therapy Today, 7, 36-41.

Howell, A., Cairns, M. A., Faigenbaum, A. D., & Libonati, J. R. (2001). The effect of muscle
hypoperfusion/hyperemia on repetitive vertical jump performance. Journal of Strength and
Conditioning Research, 15(4), 446-449.

Kendrick, Z.V., Binkley, H., McGettigan, J., & R. G. Ruoti. Effects of water exercise on
improving muscular strength and endurance in suburban and inner-city older adults. Journal of
Aquatic Physical Therapy. 10: 21-27, 2002.

Libonati, J. R., Incanno, N. M., Howell, A., Peter, K., Guazzi, M., & Glassberg, H. L. (2001).
Brief muscle hypoperfusion/ hyperemia: An ergogenic aid? Journal of Strength and
Conditioning Research, 15(3), 362-366.




                                              116
                                 Graduate Student Presentations

                                             2005-06

Bartosik, K.E., Sitler, M.R., Hillstrom, H.J., Palamarchuk, H., Huxel, K.C., & Kim E. (2006,
January). Anatomical and biomechanical assessments of medial tibial stress syndrome. Eastern
Athletic Trainers’ Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

Dean A. S., Libonati , J. R., Madonna, D., Bratinov, G., & Margulies, K. B. (2005). Endothelial
function/vasoreactivity rescue in heart failure. Heart Failure Society of American, Boca Raton,
FL.

Driban, J.B., Barbe, M.F., Michlovitz, S., & Swanik, C.B. (2006, January). Anatomical
evaluation of the tibial nerve within the popliteal fossa. Eastern Athletic Trainers’ Annual
Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

Flynn-Miller K.V., Swanik C.B., & Moffit D.M. (2005). Effect of Mechanical Vibration on
Muscle Recruitment and Balance. National Athletic Trainers’ Association Annual Conference,
Indianapolis, IN.

Huxel, K.C., Swanik, C.B., Swanik, K.A., Bartolozzi, A.R., Hillstrom, H.J., Sitler, M.R., &
Moffit, D.M. (2006, June). Muscle recruitment and stiffness regulation strategies of the
shoulder. National Athletic Trainers’ Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA.

MacDonnell, S.M., Kubo, H., Barbe, M.F., Renna, B.F., Reger, P.O., Smithwick, L.A., Koch,
W.J., Houser, S. R., & Libonati J. R. (2005). Exercise training increases beta adrenergic
responsiveness in hypertension. National American College of Sports Medicine, Nashville, TN.

Mansell, J., Tierney, R. T., Sitler, M. R., Swanik, K. A., & Stearne, D. (2005, June). Effect of
resistance training on head-neck segment dynamic stabilization in male and female
intercollegiate soccer players. Poster presentation at National Athletic Trainers' Association
Annual Convention (Student Research Award Finalist),

Mansell, J., Tierney, R., Sitler, M., Swanik, K., & Stearne, D. (2006, January). A randomized
clinical trial of resistance training on head-neck segment dynamic stabilization in male and
female intercollegiate soccer players. Eastern Athletic Trainers’ Annual Conference,
Philadelphia, PA.

Moffit D.M. & Swanik C.B. 2D:4D Ratio and Level of Competition in Sports. (June 3, 2005).
6th Annual Philadelphia Sports Medicine Congress. Philadelphia, PA.

Reger, P.O., Barbe, M.F., Amin, M., Renna, B.F., MacDonnell, S.M, Hewston, L.A., &
Libonati, J.R. (2005). Compensatory hypertrophy secondary to pressure and volume overload
improves myocardial hypoperfusion/reperfsuion tolerance. National American College of Sports
Medicine, Nashville, TN.




                                               117
Renna, B.F., MacDonnell, S.M., Crabbe, D. L, Reger, P.O., Hewston, L.A., Pham, S.M.,
Smithwick, & Libonati, J. R. (2005). Exercise training improves calcium dependent myocardial
performance during acidosis in chronic hypertension. National American College of Sports
Medicine, Nashville, TN.

Stearne, D., Sitler, M., Tierney, R., Covassin, T., Davis, K, & Swanik, C. (2006, June). Gender
differences on neuromuscular control of the hip: Implications for knee joint stability and non-
contact anterior cruciate ligament injury. National Athletic Trainers’ Annual Conference,
Atlanta, GA.

Suzuki H., Swanik K.A, Huxel K.H., & Kelly JD IV. (2005). The Effect of Isolated Scapular
Muscle Fatigue on Shoulder and Elbow Kinematics. National Athletic Trainers’ Association
Annual Conference, Indianapolis, IN.

Thomas, S.J., Swanik, K.A., Swanik, C.B., & Huxel, K.C. (2006, January). Glenohumeral
rotation and scapular position change following competitive high school sports. Eastern Athletic
Trainers’ Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

Thomas, S.J., Swanik, K.A., Swanik, C.B., Huxel, K.C., & Kelly, J.D. (2005). Glenohumeral
rotation and scapular position change following competitive high school baseball. American
Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Conference, Hershey, PA.

Wall, K.B., Swanik, K.A., Swanik, C.B., & Stearne, D.J. (2006, January). Augmented low-dye
arch taping affects on muscle activity and ground reaction forces in people with pes planus.
Eastern Athletic Trainers’ Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA.


                                             2004-05

Alleyne, R., Roper, E. A., Butryn, T., Hall, R., & Oglesby, C. (2004). Practical suggestions for
integrating issues of race and ethnicity into the field of sport psychology. Symposium presented
at the Annual Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology Conference,
Minneapolis, MN.

Dean A. S., Margulies, K. B., Nicholas, J. J., Rubin, S., & Libonati, J. R. (2004). Resistance
training improves vasoreactivity in end-stage heart failure patients on inotropic support.
National American College of Sports Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

MacDonnell S. M., Barbe, M. F., Kubo, H., Mahora, J., Reger, P. O., Renna, B. F & Libonati,
J. R. (2004). Decreased hypertrophy and diastolic performance with exercise training in chronic
hypertension. American Physiologic Society, Austin TX.

MacDonnell S. M., Crabbe D. L., Pham S. M., Renna B. F., Reger P. O., Hewston L.A. &
Libonati J. R. (2004). Exercise reduces myocardial workload in female spontaneously
hypertensive rats. National American College of Sports Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.




                                               118
MacDonnell S. M., Kubo, H., Crabbe, D. L., Barbe, M. F., Mahora, J, Renna, B. F., Reger, P.
O., Houser, S. R. & Libonati, J. R. (2004). Increased phospholamban phosphorylation with
exercise training improves diastolic function in hypertension. National American Heart
Association, New Orleans, LA.

Mansell, J., Tierney, R. T., Sitler, M. R., Swanik, K. A., & Stearne, D. (2005, June). Effect of
resistance training on head-neck segment dynamic stabilization in male and female intercollegiate
soccer players. National Athletic Trainers' Association Annual Meeting and Clinical Symposium,
Baltimore, MD.

Polasek, K., Roper, E. A., & Halloran, E. M. (2004). Trash talking in women's professional
sport. Poster presentation at the Annual Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport
Psychology Conference, Minneapolis, MN.

Reger P. O., MacDonnell, S. M., Mahora, J., Renna B. F., Hewston, L. A., & Libonati, J. R.
(2004). Exercise training and coronary resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats. National
American College of Sports Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

Renna B. F., MacDonnell S. M., Hewston L. A., Reger P. O., & Libonati J. R. (2004). Heart rate
and blood pressure are well correlated in female spontaneously hypertensive rats. National
American College of Sports Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

Tierney, R.T., Sitler, M.R., Swanik, C.B., Swanik, K.A., Higgins, M., & Torg, J.S. (2004).
Gender Differences in Head-Neck Segment Dynamic Stabilization During Head Acceleration.
National Athletic Trainers' Association Annual Convention.


                                              2003-04

Covassin, T., McKeever, C., Sachs, M. L., Schatz, P., & Zillmer, E. (2003, October 11).
Implementation of the Philadelphia Sport Concussion Project: A model for neuropsychologists and
certified athletic trainers in the rehabilitation of sport concussions. Poster presentation at the
annual conference of the Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology,
Philadelphia, PA.

Covassin, T., Swanik, C., Sachs, M. L., Kendrick, Z., Schatz, P., Zillmer, E. A., & McKeever, C.
K. (2004, June). Sex differences, post-concussion symptoms, and neuropsychological recovery of
concussions among collegiate athletes. Paper presented at the annual conference of the National
Athletic Trainers’ Association, Indianapolis, IN.

Dean A. S., Margulies, K. B., Nicholas J.J., Rubin, S., Gaughan J. P. & Libonati, J. R. (2003).
Peripheral blood flow response to exercise in end stage CHF patients on inotropic support.
National American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, CA.

McKeever, C., Schneider, J., Covassin, T., Sachs, M., Neva, C., Kendzior, S., Schatz, P., &
Zillmer, E. (2003, October). The assessment of baseline neuropsychological functioning among
collegiate athletes: The relevance of concussion history and concussion severity. Poster
presentation at the 23rd annual conference of the National Academy of Neuropsychology, Dallas,
TX.


                                                119
McKeever, C. K., Schatz, P., Covassin, T., Sachs, M. L., Schneider, J., Heydt, J., & Zillmer, E. A.
(2003, February). Sports-related concussions in collegiateathletes: Gender differences across
neuropsychological test performances. Poster presented at the 32nd annual meeting of the
International Neuropsychological Society, Baltimore, MD.

Schatz, P., Covassin, T., McKeever, C., Palumbo, J., Zillmer, E., & Sachs, M. (2003, October).
History of concussion and baseline test performance for collegiate club sport versus varsity
athletes. Poster presentationat the 23rd annual conference of the National Academy of
Neuropsychology, Dallas, TX.

Schneider, J., McKeever, C., Covassin, T., Sachs, M., Wait, S., Clayborne, J., Schatz, P., &
Zillmer, E. (2003, October). Theevaluation of pre- and post-measures of emotional indices
associated with sports-related concussion. Poster presentationat the 23rd annual conference of the
National Academy of Neuropsychology, Dallas, TX.

Yanelli, S., Nguyen, S., Sachs, M. L., & Roper, E. (2003, October 11). The Asian American
athlete: Some issues sport psychologists and sociologists must address as the face of sports
changes. Poster presentation at the annual conference of the Association for the Advancement of
Applied Sport Psychology, Philadelphia, PA.


                                              2002-03

Burke, K. L., Sachs, M. L., & Schrader, D. (November 2, 2002). Selecting the appropriate sport
psychology graduate program. Colloquium presented at the annual conference of the Association
for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology, Tucson, AZ.

Dean A. S., Margulies, K. B., Nicholas J.J., Rubin, N. S., & Libonati, J. R. (2002). Arterial flow-
mediated dilation response in isotropic-end stage heart failure patients awaiting cardiac transplant.
Heart Failure Society of America, Boca, Raton, FL.

McKeever, C., Covassin, T., Schatz, P., Zillmer, E., & Sachs, M. L. (October 12, 2002).
Determining a schedule for serial post-concussion assessments: The Philadelphia sports concussion
project. Poster presentation, annual conference of the National Academy of Neuropsychology,
Miami, FL.

Waldman, K., & Sachs, M. L. (2003, January 22). Riding the roller coaster of youth sports: A
parent’s guide to success in youth sports. Youth Sport Parenting Workshop, Williamstown School
District, NJ.

                                              2001-02

Burke, K. L., Sachs, M. L., & Schrader, D. (2001, October 5). Selecting the appropriate sport
psychology graduate program. Colloquium presented at the annual conference of the Association
for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology, Orlando, FL




                                                120
Cherubini, J. M., Riley, D., Bundy, G., Lee, J., Peiper, K., Sachs, M. L., & Oglesby, C. A. 2001,
October 4). The X-factor: Development of a sport psychology newsletter and consulting
opportunities with intercollegiate athletes. Poster presentation presented at the annual conference
of the Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology, Orlando, FL.

Covassin, T., Swanik, C., & Sachs, M. L. (2002, May 7). Prevalence, severity and gender
differences of concussions among intercollegiate athletes. Presentation at the annual conference of
the Temple Education Research Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Milham, D., & M. Santiago. (2001, June). The effects of an auditory quantum behavior on selected
cardio-respiratory and metabolic variables during steady-rate exercise. Slide presentation at the
48th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Tierney, R.T., Mattacola, C.G., Sitler, M.R., & Maldjian, C. (2001). Comparison of Cervical
Stenosis Measures in Normal Subjects. National Athletic Trainers' Association Annual
Convention.

Tierney, R.T., Mattacola, C.G., Sitler, M.R., & Maldjian, C. (2001, May) . Comparison of
Cervical Stenosis Measures in Normal Subjects. Temple University Educational Research
Association. Oral Presentation.




                                                121
                                  Theses/Projects/Dissertations

   The following list is a sampling of theses, projects, and dissertations completed in the
Department of Kinesiology from 2001-1006.

Allen, S. (2004) Rowers’ experiences of athletic burnout and coping strategies for dealing with
athletic burnout (Master’s thesis, MA: Emily Roper)
Alleyne, R. (2004) An Examination of the Knowledge, Perceptions, and Needs of Elite
Barbados’
Cricketers, Coaches, and Administrators. (Master's project, MA: Zeb Kendrick)
Arrington, M. (2002) Factors influencing sport motivation among African American male
adolescents. (Master’s thesis, MA: Michael Sachs)
Bartosik, K. (2004) Anatomical and biomechanical differences of medial tibial stress syndrome.
(Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Beckenhauer, B. (2004) Effects of Pycnogenol™ supplementation on muscle soreness and
urinary hydroxyproline:Creatinine ratios following eccentric exercise. (Doctoral dissertation,
MA: Zeb Kendrick)
Benjamin, L. (2006) Relationships among neuropsychological and neuromuscular factors in
physically-active healthy males. (Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Brambrink, J. (2002) Exercise-induced hypoxemia and pulmonary diffusion capacity during
exercise. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Mayra Santiago)
Butcher, L. (2003) 1-2-3 Kick: The effect of an audible rhythm pattern on kicking performance.
(Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sachs)
Cammarato, B. (2002) Validity and intra-tester reliability of the prone internal rotation method
for measuring posterior shoulder tightness. (Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Cherubini, J.M. (2003) The model of intentional development: A grounded theory of individual,
social environmental,and physical environmental influences on physical activity in adult African
American women. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sachs)
Cleary, M. (2001) Effects of dehydration on delayed onset muscle soreness. (Doctoral
dissertation, MA: Michael Sitler)
Cohen, B. (2003) Excusercise: Differentiating the relapse stage of exercise behavior change in
terms of perceivedbarriers, self-efficacy, and motives via an internet based data collection.
(Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sachs)
Covassin, T. (2003) Gender differences and neuropsychological impairments of concussions
among collegiate athletes. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sachs)
Davis, K. (2006) Gender differences in hip strength, hip muscle activation, and dynamic
stability. (Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Dean, A.S. (2006) Endothelial Dysfunction in Heart Failure: The Role of Shear Stress. (Doctoral
dissertation, MA: Joseph Libonati)
Diehl, C. (2004). Cross-cultural issues in applied sport psychology. (Master’s project, MA:
Emily Roper)
DiLorenzo, P. (2005) Effects of physical education homework on physical fitness scores and
understanding fitness concepts among fourth grade students. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Rick
Swalm)


                                               122
Elliot, M. (2005) Fluid Therapies for Traumatic Brain Injury. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Zeb
Kendirck)
Honorio, M. (2004) Burnout in ethnic minority NATABOC certified athletic trainers.
(Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Jimenez, C. (2001) Acute effects of single bout of resistive exercise on insulin sensitivity in
persons with Type-I diabetes mellitus. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sitler)
Karagiannopoulos, C. (2002) Reliability of two goniometric assessment methods for measuring
active forearm pronation and supination range of motions. (Master’s thesis, MA: Michael Sitler)
Lake, A. (2004) Effectiveness of elbow hypertension prophylactic braces on limiting active and
passive elbow extension pre- and post-physiological loading. (Master’s project, MA: Michael
Sitler)
Mansell, J. (2004) Resistance training effects on head-neck segment dynamic stabilization.
(Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Mastrangelo, A. (2002) A comparison of kinematic and metabolic cost during forward and
backward treadmill walking. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Mayra Santiago)

McBride, M. (2006) Cardiovascular exercise performance following repair for total anomalous
venous connection during infancy. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Mayra Santiago)

McDonnell, S.M. (2006) Beta Adrenergic Responsiveness in Hypertension: Impact of Exercise
Training. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Joseph Libonati)

McNamara, J. (2005) Traditional, hybrid, and online weight training sections: Comparing
strength and knowledge outcomes. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Rick Swalm)
Milham, D. (2002) The effects of an external auditory quantum behavior on selected cardio-
respiratory, metabolic, and effort perception variables during steady-rate exercise. (Master's
thesis, MA: Mayra Santiago)
Moffitt, T. (2003) Tactile stimulation inhibits neuromuscular recruitment in healthy, untrained
individuals during isometric maximum voluntary contractions. (Master’s project, MA: Michael
Sitler)
Polasek, K. (2005) A qualitative examination of male ballet and modern dancers’ masculinity
and relational patterns. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Emily Roper)
Porrazzo, T. (2005). Utilization of evidence-based clinical practice by certified athletic trainers.
(Doctoral dissertation, MA: Rick Swalm)
Raffin, J. (2002) Perceptual and physiological responses to exercise at varied crank rates in
females. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Mayra Santiago)
Reger, P.O. (2006) Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Tolerance with Exercise In
Hypertension. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Joseph Libonati)
Rodenas, C. (2004) Prophylactic ankle braces effect on soleus H-Reflex excitability in the
chronic unstable ankle. (Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Rogers, K. (2003) Posterior humeral greater tuberosity subchondral cyst effects on the treatment
disposition of rotator cuff pathology. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sitler)




                                                123
Sanchez, C. (2006) Performance psychology for military applications. (Master’s project, MA:
Michael Sachs)
Smith, E. (2004). A survey of perceptions of parents of Caucasian and African American, male
and female, high school athletes in order to assess effects of family sport environment. (Doctoral
dissertation, MA: Carole Oglesby)
Smith, G. (2004). Effects of a home study course on communication skills knowledge in male,
high school varsity basketball coaches. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sachs)
Stearne, D. (2006) Effect of gender on neuromuscular control of the hip: Implications for knee
joint stability and non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury. (Doctoral dissertation, MA:
Michael Sitler)
Straub, S. (2002) Skill level differences in lower extremity kinematics and neuromuscular
characteristics of female gymnasts during drop landings. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael
Sitler)
Suter, A. (2001) Three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity while
landing from a jump with a prophylactic ankle brace. (Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Tierney, R. (2003) Gender differences in head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during head
acceleration. (Doctoral dissertation, MA: Michael Sitler)
Tucker, R. (2002) The relationship of exercise incentives and total exercise volume to exercise
adherence in cardiac rehabilitation patients. (Master’s thesis, MA: Michael Sachs)
Uhrich, T. (2005) Effects of bimanual activity on reading achievement. (Doctoral dissertation,
MA: Rick Swalm)
Weise, K. (2002) Effect of glenohumeral joint stability braces on limiting active and passive
shoulder range of motion. (Master’s project, MA: Michael Sitler)
Wood, N. (2005). Youth sport: Do peer relationships influence athlete withdrawal. (Master’s
thesis, MA: Michael Sachs)




                                               124
                                        Appendix F
                                         Survey Data



Undergraduate
      Survey of Recent Undergraduate Graduates
      Survey of Employers/Supervisors


Graduate
      Current Graduate Student Survey
      Graduate Student Exit Survey




                                            125
                     Survey of Recent Undergraduate Graduates
                              August 2001-August 2006
                                     Summary

1.   Please indicate your program of study in Kinesiology.
     #          %
     08         16     Athletic Training
     10         34     Exercise Science
     17         20     PHETE (Teacher Education)
     02         04     General Studies
     13         26     Kinesiology (Pre-Health Professional)
                                                program of study

                                   18
                                   16
                                   14
                 response number




                                   12
                                   10
                                    8
                                    6
                                    4
                                    2
                                    0
                                         AT    EX SCI    PHETE     GS   KINES
                                                         program



                 40%

                 35%

                 30%

                 25%

                 20%

                 15%

                 10%

                      5%

                      0%
                                        AT    EX SCI     PHETE     GS   KINES




                                                   126
2.   Please identify the reasons why you chose Temple for Kinesiology (check all that apply)
     #__        %
     14         09     Alumni/family/friend recommendation
     23         15     Cost
     28         19     Curriculum
     09         06     Faculty
     27         18     Geographical Location
     12         08     Received Financial Support
     26         17     Reputation
     01         01     Only option
     10         07     Other (please specify):

                                                                       Reasons for Choosing TU


                              30



                              25



                              20
            Response Number




                              15



                              10



                              5



                              0
                                   Alum/fam/fr   Cost       Curriculum      Faculty          Geo         RFS           Rep        OO   OTHER
                                                                                           Reason




                                                            Reasons for Choosing Temple

                                   20
                                   18
                                   16
                                   14
                                   12
                      %




                                   10
                                    8
                                    6
                                    4
                                    2
                                    0
                                                                               lt y




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                                                                                  e   iv
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                                                                             R




                                                                                             Reason




                                                                                       127
3. Please rate your satisfaction with your undergraduate experience at Temple.

                                              Very     Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied   Very
                                             Satisfied                                Dissatisfied
Please indicate your feelings                22        26        2       2            0
of satisfaction about your
OVERALL                                      42%       50%        4%      4%           0%
educational experience at
Temple University
Please indicate your feelings                21        24         4       2            0
of satisfaction about your
OVERALL educational                          41%       47%        8%      4%           0%
experience within the
Department of Kinesiology
Please indicate your feelings                19        23         6       3            1
Of satisfaction about your
OVERALL educational
experience within your                       36%       44%        12%     6%           2%
program specific curriculum
Please indicate your feelings                20        23         6       3            1
of satisfaction about your
OVERALL educational
experience in relationship to                39%       42%        15%     2%           2%
the fulfillment of your short-
term educational and/or
professional objectives

                                  Satisfaction with Undergrad Experience at TU

                        28
                        26
                                                                                           Overall Ed at
                        24                                                                 TU
                        22
      Response Number




                        20
                                                                                           w ithin Kines
                        18                                                                 Dept
                        16
                        14                                                                 Within
                        12                                                                 program
                                                                                           specefic
                        10
                                                                                           cirriculum
                         8                                                                 In relation to
                         6                                                                 short term
                                                                                           ed/proffessio
                         4                                                                 nal goals
                         2
                         0
                             VS          S            N           D       VD
                                             Satisfaction Level




                                                            128
                        Satisfaction wiht Undergrad Experience at TU(% )

           50

           45

           40

           35

           30                                                                          Overall Ed at TU
       %




           25
                                                                                       w /in Kines Dept
           20

           15
                                                                                       w /in program spec
           10                                                                          cirriculum


           5                                                                           in relation to short
                                                                                       term ed/prof goals
           0
                   VS           S           N               D          VD

                                    Satisfaction Level



4. Please rate your satisfaction with these specific items as they relate to Kinesiology.

                                        Very          Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied     Very
                                       Satisfied                                       Dissatisfied
Academic Advising                      10             20        11       9
Academic Resources                     11             26        12       2             2
Academic Rigor                         14             29        8        0             1
Breadth of course offerings            15             25        10       2             0
Develop of health-fitness              20             26        5        2             0
Wellness values
Facilities                             18             24        5        5             0
Instruction                            20             26        4        1             1
Internship/field experience            26             12        7        5             1
opportunities
Opportunities for professional         17             13        14       6             2
involvement outside the classroom
Preparation for certification          17             15        11       3             3
And licensure
Preparation for graduate school        20             17        6        7             1
Or employment
Technology                             12             25        13       1             0




                                                129
                                                                                                            Response Numbers
                                                    %




                                                                                             0
                                                                                                 5
                                                                                                           10
                                                                                                                     15
                                                                                                                              20
                                                                                                                                        25
                                                                                                                                             30




                               0
                                   10
                                          20
                                                        30
                                                                 40
                                                                      50
                                                                           60
                                                                                        1
                 Academic
                  Advising




                                                                                        2
               Academic
               Resources




                                                                                        3
                 Acacemic
                   Rigor




                                                                                        4
                Breadth of
                 Course
                Offerings



                                                                                        5
               Devel of
             health-fitness
               Wellness                                                                 6


                  Facilites
                                                                                Items




130
                                                                                        7




      Item
                Instruction


              Intern/field
                                                                                        8




              experience
             opportunities
              Opportunity
                                                                                        9




                   for
                                                                                                                                                  Satisfaction with specific items as related to Kines




             proffessional
                 Prep for
                                                                                        10




               certification
                   and
             Prep for grad
                                                                                        11




               school or
                employ
                                                                                        12




                      Tech
                                                                                                                               S




                                                             S
                                                                                                                     D
                                                                                                                          N




                                                    D
                                                         N
                                                                                                                                   VS




                                                                 VS
                                                                                                                VD




                                               VD
                                                                                                     N/A




                                        N/A
5. Please rate your level of satisfaction to the degree in which these areas were developed at
Temple.
                                          Very     Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied     Very
                                        Satisfied                                   Dissatisfied
Belief in the value of physical         29         20         2        1            0
activity in life                        56%        38%        10%      4%           0%
Communication skills                    22         20         8        2            0
                                        42%        38%        16%      4%           0%
Cultural awareness                      25         19         5        2            1
                                        48%        36%        10%      4%           2%
Ethics                                  18         23         10       1            0
                                        34%        44%        20%      2%           0%
Interpersonal skills                    22         22         7        1            0
                                        42%        42%        13%      2%           0%
Knowledge of the discipline of          26         21         4        1            0
kinesiology                             50%        40%        8%       2%           0%
Knowledge of program specific           26         25         3        0            0
content                                 48%        46%        6%       0%           0%
Problem-solving skills                  12         29         8        2            0
                                        23%        57%        16%      4%           0%
Professional research and writing       14         26         10       1            0
skills                                  27%        51%        20%      2%           0%
Scientific inquiry skills-analysis and 19          20         9        4            0
interpretation of research and data     37%        38%        17%      8%           0%
Theoretical and practical basis for     13         25         9        3            0
client service                          25%        49%        18%      6%           0%

Your ability to influence people’s     19           22      9         1             0
activity behavior                      37%          43%     18%       2%            0%




                                              131
                                                                                                                     %
                                                  Be
                                                    lie                                                                                                        Response Number
                                                       fi




                                                                                                                                                  0
                                                                                                                                                      5
                                                                                                                                                          10
                                                                                                                                                                          15
                                                                                                                                                                                           20
                                                                                                                                                                                                25
                                                                                                                                                                                                     30




                                                            n
                                                                va
                                                                   l   ue
                                                                            of




                                                                                                                                             1
                                                                               P




                                                                                                   0
                                                                                                       10
                                                                                                            20
                                                                                                                     30
                                                                                                                              40
                                                                                                                                   50
                                                                                                                                        60
                                                                                   A
                                                                                       in
                                                                                            life
                                                                        Co
                                                                           m




                                                                                                                                             2
                                                                            m
                                                                                       sk
                                                                                  lls     i
                                                                  Cu
                                                                     l   ta




                                                                                                                                             3
                                                                           wa
                                                                              re
                                                                                ne
                                                                                   ss




                                                                                                                                             4
                                                                              Et
                                         Kn             In                       hi
                                                           te                       cs
                                           ow                 rp
                                             le                   er
                                                                     so
                                                dg




                                                                                                                                             5
                         kn
                              ow                   e                      na
                                   le                of                       ls
                                      dg                 di                       ki
                                         e                  sc                       lls
                                            of                   ip
                                                                   lin
                                                                        e



                                                                                                                                             6
                                                pr
                                                  og                       of
                                                      ra                        ki
                                                         m                         ne
                                                              sp                        s
      Sc                                                          ec




132
        ie
                                                                                                                                             7
                                                                     ific
          nt
            if                                                              co
               in                                        Pr                     nt
                 qu                                                                en
                   iry                                      ob                           t
                       sk                  Pr                    -s
                                              of                    ol
                                                                                                                                             8



                         il ls                   re                    vi
                              -a                    se                    ng
                                   na                   ar                      sk
                                      ly                   ch                       ill s
                     Th                  s
                                           an                    an
                       eo                      d                    d
                                                                         w
                                                                                                                                             9
                                                                                                                                                                                                          Satisfaction in degree of development at TU




                            re                   in
                               t ic                 te                      rit
                                   al                  rp                       sk
                                       an                  or                       ill s
                      Ab                   d                    re
                                                                   se
                                             pr
                        il it                   ac                     ar
                                                                                                                                             10




                             y                     tb                       ch
                                to                     as
                                    in                                           da
                                       flu                 is                        ta
                                           en                  fo
                                              ce                  rc
                                                                      l ie
                                                                                                                                             11




                                                  pe                       nt
                                                      op                        se
                                                          le                        rv
                                                             's                         e
                                                                 ac
                                                                    t iv
                                                                                                                                             12




                                                                         it y
                                                                               be
                                                                                   ha
                                                                                        v
                                                                                                                                                                                  S


                                                                                                                                                                          D
                                                                                                                                                                              N




                                                                                                                          S


                                                                                                                 D
                                                                                                                     N
                                                                                                                                                                                      VS




                                                                                                                                                                     VD
                                                                                                                                                               N/A




                                                                                                                              VS




                                                                                                            VD
6. Please rate your level of satisfaction with the following Kinesiology core courses:
                                                                   Very          Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied                        Very
                                                                  Satisfied                                                          Dissatisfied
The Introduction to Kinesiology                                   15             22              8           4                       1
                                                                  30%            44%             16%         8%                      2%
The Biomechanics of Physical                                      20             17              11          3                       0
Activity                                                          40%            36%             22%         6%                      0%
The Physiology of Physical Activity                               32             12              7           0                       0
                                                                  64%            24%             14%         0%                      0%
Motor Behavior                                                    11             21              15          2                       2
                                                                  22%            42%             30%         4%                      4%
The Social-Psychology of Physical                                 13             27              6           3                       2
Activity                                                          26%            52%             12%         6%                      4%
Why Human Move: The History and                                   14             24              6           3                       3
Philosophy of Physical Activity                                   28%            48%             12%         6%                      6%
The Physical Activity experience                                  29             17              3           2                       0
courses                                                           58%            34%             6%          4%                      0%
                                                            Satisfaction with Kines Core Courses


                     35




                     30




                     25
  Response Numbers




                                                                                                                                            VS
                     20                                                                                                                     S
                                                                                                                                            N
                                                                                                                                            D
                     15                                                                                                                     VD
                                                                                                                                            N/A


                     10




                     5




                     0
                          1                  2               3               4               5                6                  7

                              Courses: 1(Intro to Kines), 2(Biomech), 3(Phys of PA), 4(MB), 5(Soc-Psych), 6(WHY Hum Movement),
                                                                      7(PA exper courses)




                                                                           133
      70




      60




      50




      40
                                                                                                                     VS
                                                                                                                     S
  %                                                                                                                  N
                                                                                                                     D
      30
                                                                                                                     VD



      20




      10




      0
           Intro to Kines   Biomech   Phys of PA   Motor behavior Soc-Psych of PA WHY Hum Move:      PA experience
                                                                                     history and        courses
                                                                                  philosophy of PA



7. Considering your total educational experience in this Department, what aspects of the
program were particularly good?




8. Considering your total education experience in this Department, what aspects of the program
were particularly bad?




9. Would you or have you recommend studying Kinesiology at Temple University to any
   family or friends since graduating from the Department? Please explain.




                                                      134
                          Survey of Employers/Supervisors of Temple University
                                 Department of Kinesiology UG Students
                                               Summary

From the Undergraduate programs listed below, identify the program(s) which you have had a direct
association as either an employer or supervisor.

__          11.1%   ___     Athletic Training
__          70.4%   ___     Exercise and Sport Science
__          7.4%    ___     Teacher Education (PHETE)
__          3.7%    ___     General Studies or Pre-professional Studies
__          7.4%    ___     N/A


                             Program within Dept of Kines

       80
       70
       60
       50
     % 40
       30
       20
       10
        0
               Atheltic     Exercise and     PHETE          Gen           n/a
               Training        Sport                    Studies/Pre-
                              Science                   professional
                                                          studies




                                                      135
1.   Have you supervised or hired a Department of Kinesiology undergraduate in the past 5
     years?
     ◊Yes __ 84%
     ◊ No __ 8%
       N/A__ 8%
                1. Have you supervised/hired a Dept of Kines undergrad in
                                    the past 5 years?

           90
           80
           70
           60
           50
       %
           40
           30
           20
           10
           0
                        yes                   no                   n/a



2.   If yes, in what capacity?

     (See Surveys)




                                                136
3. Please rate your OVERALL satisfaction with employees from Temple Kinesiology.
                        Very                                        Very
                        Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Dissatisfied

Your OVERALL Rating 48%             44%       0         0           0
of Satisfaction



         3. Overall satisfaction with employees from TU

    60

    50

    40

  % 30

    20

    10

     0
           VS         S         N         D        VD        n/a




                                          137
4. Please rate your level of satisfaction of Temple undergraduates compared to undergraduates
from other programs you have supervised or hired.
                             Very                                         Very
                             Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Dissatisfied

Your OVERALL Rating 32%                  60%        0          0              0
Of Satisfaction


              4. Level of satisfaction of TU undergrads compared to other
                                         programs

         70
         60

         50
         40
     %
         30
         20

         10
         0
                 VS          S          N          D         VD         n/a




                                                 138
5. Please rate your level of satisfaction of the Temple undergraduate in the following areas
   (%):
                                      Very                                           Very
                                      Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Dissatisfied

Broad Knowledge beyond major                          36                       48                   8                  0                               0
Broad Knowledge of                                    40                       40                   8                  0                               0
Kinesiology
Specific Knowledge of program                         44                       40                   4                  0                               0
content (i.e. athletic training)
Specific Skills related to                            48                       44                   0                  0                               0
professional programs (i.e.
exercise science)
Belief in the importance of                           56                       32                   0                  0                               0
physical activity in life
Role model for the physically                         48                       44                   0                  0                               0
active lifestyle
Awareness of professional issues                      48                       32                   12                 0                               0

                                                       5. Satisfaction of TU undergrad


         60


         50

                                                                                                                                                           VS
         40
                                                                                                                                                           S
                                                                                                                                                           N
     %   30
                                                                                                                                                           D
                                                                                                                                                           VD
         20
                                                                                                                                                           n/a

         10


         0
                                                                                                    active lifestyle
                                                                                                    Role model for
                                                            activity in life




                                                                                 activity in life
                             Knowledge of




                                            Knowledge of




                                                           importance of




                                                                                importance of




                                                                                                                       Awaremess of
              beyond major




                                                                                                                                       Communication
                                                                                                    the physically
                                                            Belief in the




                                                                                 Belief in the




                                                                                                                        professional
                              Kinesiology
               Knowledge




                                              Specific

                                              program




                                                              physical




                                                                                   physical
                                              content
                                 Broad
                 Broad




                                                                                                                           issues




                                                                                                                                          abilities




                                                                         139
6. Please indicate your level of satisfaction as to the extent Temple graduates possess the
   following qualifications (%):
                                     Very                                            Very
                                     Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Dissatisfied

Resume preparation, interviewing                             36                    48                    4                  0                         0
skills, professional etiquette
Career-related work experience                               24                    48                    12                 0                         0
Computer knowledge                                           36                    44                    8                  0                         0
Problem-solving skills                                       24                    56                    4                  0                         0
Interpersonal skills (team work,                             32                    52                    4                  0                         0
group projects)
Communication skills (writing                                32                    44                    8                  0                         0
,research, public speaking,
listening and presentation)
Logic and reasoning skills                                   36                    48                    4                  0                         0
Broad knowledge beyond major                                 20                    60                    8                  0                         0
Leadership experience                                        24                    56                    8                  0                         0

                                    6. Satisfaction as to the extent TU grads possess the following

      70

      60

      50
                                                                                                                                                          VS
                                                                                                                                                          S
      40
                                                                                                                                                          N
  %                                                                                                                                                       D
      30                                                                                                                                                  VD
                                                                                                                                                          n/a
      20

      10

       0
             Resume       Career-related   Computer    Problem-solving   Interpersonal   Communication    Logic and          Broad       Leadership
           preparation,       work         Knowledge        skills            skills        skills     reasoning skills    Knowledge     experience
           interviewing    experience                                                                                     beyond major
               skills,
           professional
             etiquette




                                                                               140
 7. Please rank in order (1 to 8) which of the following is most important when hiring new
    college graduates:
     _____       The college the student graduated from
     _____       The student’s internship or work experience
     _____       The student’s interviewing skills
     _____       The student’s major (program of study)
     _____       The student’s computer skills
     _____       The student’s personal appearance
     _____       The student’s GPA
     _____       Other (please specify)

7. Please rank in order (1-8) which of the following is most important when hiring new college graduates (% by
rank):

 Rank                                             1      2        3         4        5      6       7     8      NA
 The college the student graduated from           8      0        16        20       8      24      8     8       8
 The student's internship or work
 experience                                      52     24        16         0       4      0       0     0      4
 The Student's interviewing skills               16     24        8         20      12      4      4      0      12
 The student's major                             12     24        28        12      8       8      8     0       0
 The student's computer skills                   0      4         0         4       16      44     32    0       0
 The student's personal appearance               0      8         8         16      20      24     16    0       8
 The student's GPA                               0      4         0         20      24      16     24    8       4
 Other                                           0      4         8         0       0       4      0     24      60




                                                       141
8. Do you anticipate hiring a Department of Kinesiology undergraduate in the next 1 to 2
   years?
   ◊Yes__72%
   ◊ No__28%


         8. Do you anticipate hiring a Dept of Kines undergrad in the
                                next 1-2 years?

   80
   70
   60
   50
 % 40
   30
   20
   10
     0
                       yes                               no




                                               142
9. Please indicate the anticipated salary range for any new hires in the next 1 to 2 years.
   ◊ Less than $25,000 (8%)            ◊ $25,001-29,999 (32%)        ◊ $30,000-34,999 (28%)
   ◊ $35,000-39,999 (16%)              ◊ $40,000-44,999 (4%)         ◊ Above $45,000 (4%)
   Not available (8%)


           9. Anticipated salary range for any new hires in the next 1-2
                                       years

      35
      30
      25
      20
  %
      15
      10
      5
      0
           <$25,000    $25-      $30-     $35-      $40-  >$45,000         n/a
                      29,999    34,999   39,999    44,999



10. Other comments about the knowledge, skills and professional preparation of Temple students
for employment in your setting?

    (See Surveys)




                                                  143
                               Current Graduate Student Survey
                                    Results (as of 8/31/06)

Total Respondents: 25
   - 79.2% (19 of 24 responses) are full-time graduate students
   - 60.9% (14 of 23 total responses) are female
   - 87% (20 of 23 total responses) are confident that they will graduate
   - 47.8% (11 of 23 total responses) would definitely make the same decision to attend
       Temple University (when compared to the 26.1% who would possibly attend and the
       17.4% who are unsure)
   - 43.5% (10 of 23 responses) would definitely recommend Temple University to potential
       students (when compared to 47.8% who possibly would recommend)

   (Please note not all ‘categories’ have 25 respondents due to missing data)

Demographics:

Ethnicity                                 Response %               Response Total
Native American                                0                         0
Black/African American                        13                         3
Latino/Latina                                  0                         0
White/Caucasian                              73.9                       17
Other                                         8.7                        2
                                        TOTAL                           23


Field of Study                                      Response %       Response Total
Behavioral science- Curriculum & Instruction            8.7                2
Behavioral science- Exercise & Sport
Psychology                                             39.1                 9
Somatic science- Athletic Training                      13                   3
Somatic science- Exercise Physiology                   39.1                 9
                                                    TOTAL                   23




                                              144
         Importance of specific factors influencing the decision to attend Temple University

                                                           Somewhat                         Somewhat                      Response average
Factor                               Unimportant          unimportant          Neutral      important      Important          (out of 5)
Undergraduate advisor                      42 (10)              17 (4)          33 (8)         4 (1)          4 (1)                 2.13
Department
program/reputation                          4 (1)               4 (1)           4 (1)         63 (15)        25 (6)                  4
University reputation                       0 (0)               4 (1)           25 (6)        46 (11)        25 (6)                 3.92
Overall feel of the university              4 (1)               8 (2)           25 (6)        42 (10)        21 (5)                 3.67
Research focus/degree
preparation                                 0 (0)               0 (0)           12 (3)        42 (10)       46 (11)                 4.33
Other                                      29 (2)               0 (0)           14 (1)         14 (1)        43 (3)                 3.43
                                                                                                          TOTAL                     24

         Other factors included:
         1. Research interest of faculty/advisor
         2. My previous program went bankrupt (Allegheny University)
         3. closest research I university in the area
         4. teaching assistantship
         5. Graduate Extern Position


         Important factors for learning about Temple University:
                                                      Somewhat                           Somewhat                      Response average
  Factor                   Unimportant               unimportant          Neutral        important      Important          (out of 5)
  Recruitment fair           79 (19)                    0 (0)              21 (5)           0 (0)         0 (0)              1.42
  Advisor told me            63 (15)                    8 (2)              17 (4)          12 (3)         0 (0)              1.79
  Someone visited my
  school                         75 (18)                4 (1)              21 (5)          0 (0)           0 (0)             1.46
  Another current
  student                        50 (12)                0 (0)              25 (6)          12 (3)         12 (3)             2.38
  Other                           0 (0)                 0 (0)               8 (1)          31 (4)         62 (8)             4.54
                                                                                                        TOTAL                 24

         Other factors included:
         1. Came to NAASP conference
          2. Former students
          3. website and phone/interview were completely important
          4. I taught at Temple and knew of the program. I learned Dr. Libonati was coming to Temple
             and I was interested in his area of research and I appreciated his active research agenda
          5. I was already an employee
          6. Met with Michael Sachs
          7. website


                                                                         145
                8. internet search and department contact
                9. internet
               10. alumni of program
               11. educational counselor
               12. advertised graduate assistantships
               13. Sport Psych Handbook for Graduate Students
               14. Contact with faculty and staff.


               Important people in choosing Temple University:

                                              Somewhat                 Somewhat                 Response average
Factor                         Unimportant   unimportant    Neutral    important    Important       (out of 5)
Temple's faculty                   4 (1)         4 (1)        8 (2)      33 (8)      50 (12)          4.21
Faculty from home insitution      38 (9)        12 (3)       12 (3)      25 (6)       12 (3)          2.63
Friends at Temple                46 (11)         8 (2)        8 (2)      29 (7)        8 (2)          2.46
Friends at home                  54 (13)        4 (1)        17 (4)      21 (5)        4 (1)          2.17
Counselor at graduate fair       71 (17)         8 (2)       12 (3)       0 (0)        0 (0)           1.5
Other                             50 (2)        0 (0)        25 (1)       0 (0)       25 (1)           2.5
                                                                                    TOTAL              24



               Important aspects of the graduate training experience at Temple University:

                                              Somewhat                 Somewhat                 Response average
Factor                         Unimportant   unimportant    Neutral    important    Important       (out of 5)
Your Temple faculty mentor        4 (1)         4 (1)        0 (0)       33 (8)      71 (17)           4.5
Faculty members in the
department                        0 (0)         0 (0)       4 (1)       58 (14)       38 (9)          4.33
Specific research focus           4 (1)         0 (0)       17 (4)       33 (8)      46 (11)          4.17
Other graduate student            4 (1)         8 (2)       21 (5)      46 (11)       21 (5)          3.71
Classes you are taking            0 (0)         8 (2)       12 (3)       38 (9)      42 (10)          4.13
Other                             0 (0)         0 (0)       25 (1)       0 (0)        75 (3)           4.5
                                                                                    TOTAL              24




                                                             146
               Satisfaction with aspects of Temple University recruitment


                                                    Somewhat                        Somewhat                          Response average
         Factor                   Dissatisfied      dissatisfied      Neutral        satisfied         Satisfied          (out of 5)
         Visibility of Temple        0 (0)             0 (0)          63 (15)         25 (6)            57 (13)             4.22
         Usefulness of
         recruitment materials       0 (0)              4 (1)          67 (16)        21 (5)             8 (2)              3.33
         Knowledge of
         Temple’s reputation         0 (0)              4 (1)          38 (9)         46 (11)           12 (3)              3.67
         Follow-up                   0 (0)              0 (0)          38 (9)         17 (4)           46 (11)              4.08
         Answering questions         0 (0)              0 (0)          29 (7)         29 (7)           42 (10)              4.13
                                                                                                     TOTAL                   24

               Satisfaction with aspects of the graduate training experience at Temple University

                                                  Somewhat                       Somewhat                          Response average
Factor                           Dissatisfied     dissatisfied     Neutral        satisfied        Satisfied           (out of 5)
Your Temple faculty mentor          9 (2)            0 (0)          9 (2)          26 (6)           57 (13)              4.22
Faculty members in the
department                          0 (0)           9 (2)          4 (1)           70 (16)          17 (4)               3.96
Research topic                      4 (1)           0 (0)          26 (6)           39 (9)          30 (7)               3.91
Other graduate student              0 (0)           9 (2)          13 (3)          52 (12)          26 (6)               3.96
Classes you are taking              0 (0)           22 (5)         22 (5)           30 (7)          26 (6)               3.61
                                                                                                  TOTAL                   23

               Challenge of different aspects in adjusting to Temple University

                                    Not           Somewhat                        Somewhat                         Response average
Factor                           Challenging     unchallenging     Neutral       challenging      Challenging          (out of 5)
University climate                 33 (8)           12 (3)          21 (5)          29 (7)           4 (1)               2.58
Community climate                  25 (6)            4 (1)          21 (5)         46 (11)           4 (1)                 3
Classes                            17 (4)           29 (7)          21 (5)          29 (7)           4 (1)               2.75
Research                            0 (0)            4 (1)          30 (7)          30 (7)          35 (8)               3.96
Relationship with advisor          33 (8)           12 (3)          25 (6)          17 (4)          12 (3)               2.63
Working with mentor                32 (7)           23 (5)          27 (6)          9 (2)            9 (2)               2.41
                                                                                                  TOTAL                   24

               Degree of discriminatory behavior among groups

                                                                                                                   Response average
Group                             Not at all                                                    A great deal           (out of 5)
Faculty                            65 (15)           9 (2)         13 (3)         9 (2)            4 (1)                 1.78
Other students                     70 (16)          13 (3)         4 (1)          9 (2)            4 (1)                 1.65
Community members                  74 (17)           9 (2)         13 (3)         0 (0)            4 (1)                 1.52
Staff members                      70 (16)           9 (2)         13 (3)         4 (1)            4 (1)                 1.65
                                                                                               TOTAL                      23




                                                                    147
                Ratings of faculty mentor in various aspects

                                                   Below                  Above                   Response average
Factor                                 Poor       Average      Average   Average      Excellent       (out of 5)
Knowledge of the studied field         4 (1)        0 (0)       13 (3)    13 (3)       70 (16)          4.43
Does research relevant to interests    4 (1)       17 (4)       22 (5)    13 (3)       43 (10)          3.74
Cultural sensitivity/awareness         0 (0)        4 (1)       17 (4)    26 (6)       52 (12)          4.26
Awareness of useful resources          4 (1)        0 (0)       13 (3)    26 (6)       57 (13)           4.3
Teaches what needs to be known         4 (1)        4 (1)       13 (3)    35 (8)       43 (10)          4.09
                                                                                     TOTAL               23

                Confidence levels in future after degree

                                                  Somewhat               Somewhat                 Response average
Employment                       Not confident   unconfident   Neutral   confident   Confident        (out of 5)
Professor                             9 (2)         4 (1)       26 (6)     35 (8)      26 (6)           3.65
Business/industry                    14 (3)         18 (4)      41 (9)     14 (3)      14 (3)           2.95
Entrepreneurship                     30 (7)         9 (2)       35 (8)     22 (5)      4 (1)            2.61
Family business                     61 (14)          4 (1)      35 (8)      0 (0)       0 (0)           1.74
Unsure                               29 (6)         5 (1)      52 (11)     10 (2)      5 (1)            2.57
                                                                                     TOTAL               23




                                                                 148
                                  Graduate Student Exit Survey
                                    Results (as of 8/31/2006)

Total Responses: 36
   - All respondents graduated after May 2001
   - 90.3% (28 of 31 total responses) believed that the advising within the Kinesiology
       department was adequate and appropriate
   - 78.6% (22 of 28 total responses) would choose Temple University again
   - Respondents were employed in a wide variety of settings, from academia (Michigan State
       University, Indiana State University, SUNY Cortland, Lock Haven University,
       Quinnipiac University, Jersey City University, Towson University, West Chester
       University) to post-doctoral research fellow (University of Illinois at Chicago) to athletic
       trainer in a variety of settings (college/university, Cleveland Clinic, minor leagues), and
       other positions.

Reasons for choosing Temple University

Reason                                     Response %               Response Total
Alumni recommendation                          6.5                        2
Curriculum                                    58.1                       18
Geographical location                         64.5                       20
Received financial support                    35.5                       11
Other                                         22.6                        7
                                         TOTAL                           31



Feelings concerning the OVERALL training of Temple University for job preparedness

Perception                                 Response %                Response Total
Poor                                            0                          0
Below Average                                  6.5                         2
Average                                       22.6                         7
Above Average                                 51.6                        16
Excellent                                     19.4                         6
                                         TOTAL                            31




                                               149
Development of skill sets at Temple University (Response %, Number of actual responses)

                                Below                 Above                   Response Average
       Skill Set       Poor    Average   Average     Average     Excellent        (out of 5)
Problem-solving
skills                 0 (0)    3 (1)      26 (8)    52 (16)      19 (6)             3.87
Scientific inquiry     0 (0)    3 (1)      23 (7)    45 (14)      29 (9)               4
Teaching skill         0 (0)    7 (2)     37 (11)    43 (13)      13 (4)             3.63
Communication
skills                 0 (0)    0 (0)     29 (9)     58 (18)      13 (4)             3.84
Writing skills         0 (0)    0 (0)     26 (8)     55 (17)      19 (6)             3.94
Networking skills      0 (0)    6 (2)     45 (14)    35 (11)      13 (4)             3.55
Professional
involvement            0 (0)    16 (5)    39 (12)     23 (7)      23 (7)             3.52
Interpersonal skills   0 (0)     0 (0)    32 (10)    52 (16)      16 (5)             3.84
Cultural awareness     0 (0)     3 (1)    35 (11)     29 (9)      32 (10)             3.9
Ethics                 0 (0)    3 (1)     33 (10)    37 (11)      27 (8)             3.87




                                          150
                                Appendix G
               Funded Graduate Students and Sources of Funding


     Year       Student Name         Funding-Source              Amount
2001-2002   Gaylord, Jeff           Graduate Athletic    $156,786
            MacClaren, Brandie M.   Training Program
            Maieli, Brian S.        Sponsored by area
            Murata, Paul            High Schools,
            Smyth, Maureen          Colleges and Clinics
            Spigelman, Tracy
            Zuffelato, David C.
            Hamstra, Karrie         NATA Admin           $17,500
                                    Support Grant
                                    NATA Grant
            Huxel, Kellie                                $20,612
2002-2003   Maieli, Brian S.        Graduate Athletic    $152,082
            MacClaren, Brandie M.   Training Program
            Murata, Paul            Sponsored by area
            O’Donnell, Tim          High Schools,
            Rodenas, Chante         Colleges and Clinics
            Smyth, Maureen
            Wall, Kily
            Hamstra, Karrie         NATA Admin           18,500
                                    Support Grant
2003-2004   Bauer, Jennifer         Graduate Athletic    $225,335
            Driban, Jeffrey         Training Program
            Flynn, Katherine        Sponsored by area
            Lobb, Erin              High Schools,
            Murawski, Catherine     Colleges and Clinics
            Rodenas, Chante
            Svarczkopf, Greg
            Shultz, Sarah
            Thomas, Stephen
            Wall, Kily
2004-2005   Bauer, Jennifer         Graduate Athletic    $290,796
            Lydia Benjamin          Training Program
            Driban, Jeffrey         Sponsored by area
            Fath, Peter             High Schools,
            Lobb, Erin              Colleges and Clinics
            McHardy, Krista
            Murawski, Catherine
            Natale, Jason
            Rivera, Joshua
            Shultz, Sarah
            Svarczkopf, Greg
            Zuffelato, David



                                    151
2005-2006   Benjamin, Lydia    Graduate Athletic    $221,772
            Fath, Peter        Training Program
            Foulke, Kris       Sponsored by area
            Markis, Emily      High Schools,
            McHardy, Krista    Colleges and Clinics
            Natale, Jason
            Shultz, Sarah
            Svarczkopf, Greg
            Thomas, Steven     NATA Grant          $24,240




                               152
                                        Appendix H
                            Kinesiology Major Equipment Purchases
                                         2001-2002


                     Type                                    Cost
Moxus-T Modular Oxygen System                               $22,200
Force Plate                                                 $22,470
Force Plate Installation                                    $3,248
Peak Motus Video Acquisition Equipment                      $16,695
3D Inneractive Teaching Aid                                 $1,005
Ergometer                                                   $1,064
Stability Platform                                          $2,569
                  TOTAL                                     $69,251


                                         2002-2003
                     Type                                    Cost
Centrifuge                                                  $1,449
Conference Table/Chairs                                     $1,862
Stiffness Testing Dynameter                                 $15,546
Ergometer                                                   $11,790
Digital Blood Pressure                                       $600
                  TOTAL                                     $31,247


                                         2003-2004
                     Type                                    Cost
Environmental Chamber Repair                                $2,919
Exercise Bike                                               $3,137
Pohemus Liberty System                                      $24,190
Treadmill                                                   $2,810
Electro cardio Machine                                      $1,465
Reaction Torque System                                      $2,789
EKG Machine                                                 $14,770
                  TOTAL                                     $52,080



                                            153
                                2004-2005
                  Type                       Cost
BRL Lab Amplifier/Headphone                 $1,602
Defibulator                                 $1,474
Environmental Chamber Repairs               $2,919
Forceplate Motion Detector                  $39,240
Stress System                               $14,700
Q Stress System                             $23,563
Infusion Pump                               $2,532
Motion Testing System                       $7,175
                  TOTAL                     $93,205


                                2005-2006
                  Type                       Cost
Environmental Chamber Repairs               $17,505
Force Plate Platforms                       $1,697
Bertec System                               $7,960
Treadmills (2)                              $10,793
Temperature Monitor System                  $9,886
Cardio Check System                         $2,209
Elliptical Bike                             $5,134
                  TOTAL                     $55,184




                                  154
                                   Department of Kinesiology
                                   Major Equipment Inventory


                                      Research Equipment


Pearson Hall Room 2
Peak Motus with Accessories to Measure Muscles Working
Force Plate for Biomechanics - Measures in 3D The Force Exerted of A Person Jumping
Muscle Strength Testing Equipment
Muscle Tone Testing Equipment
Futek System – Evaluates the Body’s Ability to Detect Motion
Motion Tracking System
Motion Tracking System
Clinical EMG/EP Unit Series 4S
Exercise Machine – Duo Squat
Club Track Plus Hyperdrive Treadmill
Force Plate
Stability Platform
8 Channel Radio Frequency Telemetered Transmitter and Receiver
Ultrasound and Muscle Stimulator (2) Dynatron 950 and Dynatron 650
Choice Reaction Timer w/10 Keys
Balance System W/Data Stations


Biokinetics Research Lab Equipment
Rat Activity Wheel System
Open Treadmill for Rats with Shocker (2)
Thermodilution Cardiac Output Computer with F#1.5 Microprobe for Rats
Portable Exponets Exhibit System
Syringe Pump Infusion Only


Pearson Hall Room 11
Gamma Counting System




                                             155
Pearson Hall Room 21
Biopac System used for Biokenetic Research (3)
Plethysmograph




                                 Instructional Equipment
Pearson Hall Room 10
Modular Oxygen Uptake System
Treadmill with Related Research & Testing Equipment
Cardio Card Stress ECG System
Treadmill (2) TMX 425
Lung Volume Measuring System
Spectrophotometer Ultra-Violet Visible
Exercise Resting ECG with Battery CRT Cast Mount Mobile Configuration & Medtrak
ST55 Treadmill
Q Stress System w/Treadmill
Ergomedic Peak Bike
Automated Blood Pressure Measure Device
ECG System
Mobile Stress Test Monitor
Treadmill Q55-SER 90
Isolated Perfused Heart & Channel System


Anatomy & Physiology
Human Models (limbs, segments, and whole body




                                            156
                                      Appendix I
                       Department of Kinesiology Standing Committees




         Department Leadership                            2005-2006
Chair                                                   Michael Sitler
Undergraduate Coordinator                              William Oddou
Graduate Coordinator                                    Michael Sachs
BIP Coordinator                                          John Susko
BRL Coordinator                                             Open
HFWC Coordinator                                       William Oddou




         Department Committees                            2005-2006
Student Awards                                       Ryan Tierney, Chair
                                                      Zebulon Kendrick
                                                        Ricky Swalm
                                                       Michael Sachs
Personnel                                            Michael Sachs, Chair
                                                       Mayra Santiago
                                                        Ricky Swalm
                                                      Marcella Ridenour
                                                      Zebulon Kendrick




            CHP Committees                                2005-2006
Personnel                                              Michael Sachs
                                                      Zebulon Kendrick
Student Appeals                                         Ryan Tierney
Interdisciplinary                                      William Oddou
Student & Community Relations                           Jeffrey Gehris
Teaching & Learning                                     Ricky Swalm
Research & Study Leave                                 Joseph Libonati




                                           157
                             Appendix J
Data Form from Temple University Office of Policy Planning & Analysis




                                158

				
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