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					CAPACITY-BUILDING FOR
OFFENDER REENTRY


National Prisoner Re-Entry Conference 2009
October 15 - 18, 2009
BWI Marriott Hotel

            Leon T. Geter. President/CEO
            The Leadership Compendium
          www.theleadershipcompendium.com
DO YOU AGREE WITH THIS VIEW?



      In a video interview with Keith Grint,
       asserted that “You can’t be a leader if
       you don’t have any followers. That is
       what followers do—make leaders.”




                                                 2
OVERVIEW
         ______________________________________________




  This presentation focuses on information and
  best practice tools that Faith-Based programs
  may leverage toward building organizational
   capacity to better engage offender reentry
             programs and resources
BACKGROUND
Despite the tough on crime discourse and federal dollars
spent, crime in American continues as a national phenomena

    700,000 people are released from U.S. prisons annually.
    9 million people are released from jail each year.
    95% of all state prisoners return to the community.
    2006 - Kansas probation and parole revocations – Cost $53m.
   1,498,800 children under 18 have parents in jails or prisons.
SECOND CHANCE GRANT SOLICITATION
   Awareness of funding opportunities helps build
             organizational capacity
Justice Department Starts Re-Entry Center, Awards $28 Million
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The U.S. Justice Department is giving out more than $28 million to states, local governments, and non-
profit organizations under the Second Chance Act, which aids inmate re-entry. The money, awarded
through five grant programs, will be used to support reentry through services such as mentoring, literacy
classes, job training, education programs, substance abuse, rehabilitation, and mental health programs for
adult and juvenile offenders.

House of Representatives Approves $108 Million for Reentry Programs for FY 2010
On Friday, July 24, 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives approved an appropriations bill for the
Departments of Labor and Health & Human Services that provides $108,493,000 for ex-offender
activities under the Second Chance Act and Workforce Investment Act. The bill also provides $1 billion
for mental health services programs administered by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration (SAMHSA), which is an increase of $39 million over FY2009, and $2.4 billion for
substance abuse prevention and treatment programs administered by SAMHSA, which is an increase of
$46 million over FY2009.
SVORI
The Serious Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI)
  is a comprehensive collaborative effort that focus on
 serious and violent juvenile and adult offenders, 2003

  Department of Justice (DOJ)
  Department of Education (DOE)

  Health and Human Services (DHHS)

  Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

  Department of Labor (DOL)
OFFENDER RE-ENTRY

“Re-entry is a critical strategy for . . . partner agencies’
efforts to prevent future crimes and victimizations”

   Reentry involves any program, initiative, or partnership that
    addresses offender issues in preparation for successfully
    transition and maintenance of a crime-free existence post-
    release.

   Community Safety Issue.

    Provides another way for to use preemptive prevention
    approaches.

                                            IACP, 2007; Schwarzfeld, 2008
OFFENDER RE-ENTRY
              Be a key partner in re-entry process

   Many community-based programs do not participate in re-
    entry initiatives, programs, and or activities.

   Faith-based programs/agencies are often included in re-
    entry as an afterthought.

   Faith-based programs are most often thought of and viewed
    as faith-center programs.



                                           IACP, 2007; Schwarzfeld, 2008
REENTRY PROGRAM ELEMENTS

        Structure and process must be consistent


    Planning Phase           • Team Management
    Multisystem Partners     • Continuum of Services
    Case Management          • Victim Involvement
    ID Target Population     • Family Involvement
    Assessment               • Integrated Information
    Reentry Plan             • Evaluation
COMMUNITY RE-ENTRY PROGRAMS

  St. Leonard’s Ministries
  As a transition center for formerly incarcerated individuals, St. Leonard’s Ministries
  provides housing and case management services. Services include addiction counseling,
  life skills and job counseling, employment referral services, and education services.
  Illinois

  Father to Child Programs
  Nearly 10,000 inmates from Washington, D.C. are serving their sentences in federal
  prisons across the United States. Hope House provides programming to help men who
  are incarcerated in prisons outside the Washington, D.C. area to stay connected to their
  families.
  District of Columbia
FAITH-BASE AND REENTRY (CONT)

 Thursday, February 5th, 2009 at 12:00 am
 Obama Announces White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships
 THE WHITE HOUSE
 Office of the Press Secretary
     _________________________________________________________________
 For Immediate Release

    February 5, 2009

    Obama Announces White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships
    Washington (February 5, 2009) – President Barack Obama today signed an executive order establishing
    the new White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. The White House Office
    of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships will work on behalf of Americans committed to
    improving their communities, no matter their religious or political beliefs.
FAITH-BASE AND REENTRY (CONT)

     The Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships will focus on four key priorities,
     to be carried out by working closely with the President’s Cabinet Secretaries and each of the
     eleven agency offices for faith-based and neighborhood partnerships:

    Make community groups an integral part of economic recovery,

    Speak with one voice - support women and children, address teenage pregnancy, and reduce
     the need for abortion.

    Support fathers who stand by their families.

    Work with the National Security Council to foster interfaith dialogue with leaders and
     scholars around the world.
FAITH-BASE AND REENTRY
     The Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships will include a new President’s Advisory Council on
    Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, composed of religious and secular leaders and scholars from different
    backgrounds. There will be 25 members of the Council, appointed to 1-year terms.

Selected Members of the Council include:

   Judith N. Vredenburgh, President and Chief Executive Officer, Big Brothers / Big Sisters of America
    Philadelphia, PA
   Rabbi David N. Saperstein, Director & Counsel, Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, and noted
    church/state expert
    Washington, DC
   Dr. Frank S. Page, President emeritus, Southern Baptist Convention
    Taylors, SC
   Father Larry J. Snyder, President, Catholic Charities USA
    Alexandria, VA
   Rev. Otis Moss, Jr., Pastor emeritus, Olivet Institutional Baptist Church
    Cleveland, OH
   Eboo S. Patel, Founder & Executive Director, Interfaith Youth Corps
    Chicago, IL
   Fred Davie, President, Public / Private Ventures, a secular non-profit intermediary
    New York, NY
   Dr. William J. Shaw, President, National Baptist Convention, USA
    Philadelphia, PA
REENTRY LEGISLATION

     Virginia House Bill 691
      Requires the Director of the Department of Corrections to provide each prisoner with
      the following documents upon discharge: (i) verification of the prisoner's work history
      while in custody; and (ii) verification of all educational and treatment programs
      completed by the prisoner while in custody. This bill was a recommendation of the Joint
      Subcommittee Studying the Commonwealth's Program for Prisoner Reentry to Society
      (2005).

     Oklahoma House Bill 2101
      This bill, also known as the Transformational Justice Act, encourages state prisons to
      partner with faith-based, community and voluntary organizations to help inmates rejoin
      society and reduce the rate of repeat offenders. The bill authorizes the Oklahoma
      Reintegration of Inmates Task Force to select a location for an inmate integration
      program and determine the projected costs of such a program. Inmates who are less
      than a year away from release would be eligible for the program.
ONGOING CHALLENGES

  Internal and external challenges to successful
                 offender re-entry

    Long-term commitment to Services
    Re-entry funding
    Intra-agency communication
    High staff turnover
    Agency regulations or policies
    Inadequate availability of community services for
     Offenders
    Leadership
LEADERSHIP

    “A great leader’s courage to fulfill his vision comes from
     passion, not position.”
                               – John Maxwell.
    Show me a country, a company, or an organization that is doing
     well and I’ll show you a good leader.
                              - Joseph E. Brooks.
    In the simplest terms, a leader is one who knows where he(she)
     wants to go, gets up, and goes.
                                - Lao-tzu.




                                                                 16
REASON AND BENEFITS OF
PARTICIPATION

  “They are coming home like it or not. Can we afford
                  not to participate”
    Offenders are not Anonymous
    A Decrease in Criminal Activity
    New or Stronger Partnerships
    A Reduction in Recidivism
    An Increase in Stable Families
    Public Safety.


                                       IACP, 2007
ISSUES OF IMPACT TO PARTICIPATION

        Politics, Personalities, & Priorities

     Community-based programs must change the way
      they do business.
     Incarceration/punishment alone does not reduce
      risk or recidivism
     Post-release reentry programs must include
      transitional services that are responsive to
      offender needs and require accountability.



                                        IACP, 2007
FUNDING AND RESOURCES

         Lack of funding to support faith-based
      participation in offender re-entry efforts is a
                    significant barrier

    Develop a proposed budget for building or
     participating in reentry activities.
    Rely on partner agencies to share program
     responsibilities.
    Take Advantage of Community Resources.


                                           IACP, 2007
TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGY

Many innovative reentry programs use information management
systems to track offender activities and compliance, to measure
program effectiveness, and communicate internally and
externally
    Data Link Project
     The Data Link Project allows Value Options, the Maricopa County
     Regional Behavioral Health Authority (RBHA), access to the Maricopa
     County Sheriff’s Office booking information in order to identify
     individuals who may be eligible for diversion from the criminal justice
     system.
     Arizona
BUILDING PARTNERSHIP

 “Partnership is an essential element in addressing
  offender reentry”

    Community Corrections
    Government and Community Social Service
     Agencies
    Health Care Services Agencies
    Federal, State, and Local Law Enforcement
    Educational Institutions
    Employment Agencies
    Community
    Empirical Research
                                       IACP, 2007
LEVERAGING HUMAN RESOURCES

     Faith-based programs must understand how to
                    use resources

    Generate and sustain program support
    Select and involve appropriate staff
    Involve both leadership and front-line support
    On-going training
    Target resource efforts
    Avoid staff burnout


                                               IACP, 2007
OUTCOME MEASURES

 Measures of success must be determined by
 the program’s mission, goals, and or objectives

    Marketing Impact
    Evaluate Success
    Anecdotal Success Stories
    What Does the Data Say
    Modify program as required
PURPOSE AND GOALS

 The key to any model program is delivering real
 measurable outcomes through leveraging effective
 partnerships

   To improve participants quality of life and self-sufficiency
    through employment, housing, family, and community
    involvement.
   To improve participants health by addressing substance use
    and physical and mental health.
   To reduce participants criminality through supervision and by
    monitoring noncompliance.
   To achieve systems change through multi-agency collaboration
    and case-management strategies.
                                      (Lattimore, et al., p. 91).
SUCCESS IN ACTION

     Traditionally, the measure of successful re-entry
                   was the recidivism rate

  Gainful Employment
  Paying Child Support
  Living independently/not a shelter
  Enrolled in school or training program
  Stability
LESSONS LEARNED

            Problems must have solutions

     Commitment will be critical
     Start small
     Consider offender perspective
     Programs must be tailored
     Leverage wraparound services
     Effective leadership



                                           IACP, 2007
12 POINT REENTRY STRATEGY (CONT.)

       Build organizational capacity through a
               comprehensive approach

 Viability
 Stakeholder Involvement

 Initiative’s Priority Population

 Mission, Goals, and Performance Measures

 Risk Management

 Initiative’s Terms and Participant Identification

                                   Schwarzfeld, 2008
12 POINT REENTRY STRATEGY


 Information Exchange and Systems
  Collaborations
 Transition Planning

 Enhanced Supervision

 Organizational Capacity

 Sustainability

 Leadership/Followership


                             Schwarzfeld, 2008
CAPACITY BUILDING RESOURCES
(CONT.)
     Build capacity through the use of proper tools and
                      related resources
     Prisoner Reentry Institute at John Jay College of Criminal Justice:
      http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/centersinstitutes/pri/x.asp

     Whitehouse Faith-Based Initiative
      ttp://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/ObamaAnnouncesWhiteHouseOfficeofFaith-
      basedandNeighborhoodPartnerships

     Urban Institute: http://www.urban.org

     IACP: http://www.theiacp.org

     Reentry Policy Council: http://www.reentrypolicy.org

     Public/Private Ventures: http://www.ppv.org/ppv/index.asp

     Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA): http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA
CAPACITY BUILDING RESOURCES

  Build capacity through the use of proper tools and
                   related resources

     Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS): http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs

     Police Executive Research Forum (PERF): http://www.policeforum.org

     Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS):
      http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/Default.asp?Item=34

     Justice Center, The Council of State Governments, Planning and Assessing a Law
      Enforcement Reentry Strategy Toolkit :
      http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/files/RIC/Publications/ReentryStrategies.txt

     The Leadership Compendium : http://theleadershipcompendium.com
CONCLUSION


    Leaders in areas as diverse as corrections,
   law enforcement, health, housing, workforce
   development, and faith-based organizations
   now claim re-entry as a top priority and have
   begun to transform state systems. Over the
   next decade, important opportunities will exist
   to reform re-entry practices at the local level as
   well.
Q&A

Thank you
  The Leadership Compendium
www.theleadershipcompendium.com
REFERENCES
Johnson, S. (2008). Turning lives around: Improving the odds for prisoner reentry. John
   Jay Magazine. 8 – 10.

International Association of Chiefs of Police. (2007). Building an offender reentry
    program: A guide for law enforcement. Bureau of Justice Assistance.

Schwarzfeld, M., Weiss, D. M., Plotkin, M., & Draper, L. (2008). Planning and assessing a
   law enforcement reentry strategy. A report prepared by the Council of State
   Governments Justice Center and the Police Executive Research Forum.

Winterfield, L., Lindquist, L., & Brumbaugh, S. (2007). Sustaining juvenile reentry
   programming after svori. The Multi-site Evaluation of the Serious and Violent
   Offender Reentry Initiative. Reentry Research in Action Findings from the Field.
   Urban Institute.

				
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