Docstoc

Alias-Wavefront MAYA

Document Sample
Alias-Wavefront MAYA Powered By Docstoc
					Alias-Wavefront MAYA
       An introductory overview




 Mastering Maya - by John Kundert-Gibbs, Peter Lee,
 and Perry (2006)
                                                      1
Outline
   What is MAYA?
   History
   Honors
   MAYA in movies
   Modeling methods
   Different MAYA releases
   Components of MAYA
   Pros and Cons



                              2
Introduction
   Maya (from Alias|Wavefront, owned by Silicon
    Graphics Inc.) is the current king-of-the-hill in high-
    end 3D animation software, and over the past few
    years has become the leading package for
    sophisticated character animation in feature films.
   It is based on OpenGL.
   It has a respected and versatile modeler, powerful
    character animation and visual effects capabilities,
    and is an extremely deep and extensible package
    with strong associativity.
   Has an extensive documentation system (installs a
    document server on your system)

                                                              3
History
   Before Maya, Alias Research was making
    software configurations called Alias Studio
    and Alias Power Animator.
   Maya was launched in 1999 putting together
    the best features out of all their products.




                                                   4
Honors
   2002 Oscar for Technical
    Achievement.
   Be used in many award-
    winning movies, cartoons,
    games, etc.
   Award winning for the
    NURBS technology.
   Award winning for
    dependency graph
    architecture


                                5
MAYA in movies
   Ice Age
   Lord of the Rings The Fellowship of the Ring
    Lord of the Rings The Two Towers
    Lord of the Rings The Return of the KingSquare
   Final Fantasy The Spirits Within
   Shrek
   Star Wars Episode 1 The Phantom Menace / Episode 2
    Attack of the Clones
   The Mummy
   Signs
   Artificial Intelligence


                                                         6
MAYA in movies (continued)
   Perfect Storm
   Monsters Inc
   Stuart Little / Stuart Little 2
   Spider-Man
   Hollow Man
   Blade / Blade 2
   Cats and Dogs
   Scooby-Doo
   Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire



                                               7
MAYA in movies (continued)
   Disneys Dinosaur
   Disney Secret Lab Reign of Fire
   Black Hawk
   Gladiator
   Road to Perdition
   Solaris
   Windtalkers
   James Bond Another Day
   Sleepy Hollow
   Chicken Run


                                      8
MAYA in movies (continued)
   Spy Kids 2
   Delgo
   The Living Forest
   In Paris
   Matrix / Matrix 2
   Iron Giant
   James Bond Trailers Goldeneye, Tomorrow
    Never Dies and Die Another Day
   And even more…!

                                              9
MAYA Releases
   MAYA is available for Windows®; NT, Windows®
    2000/XP Professional, IRIX™, Linux and Mac OS.
   MAYA personal (is used for students, beginners,
    etc.)
   MAYA complete – for budget-conscious, boutique-
    size facilities (Price: US $1999)
   MAYA unlimited - for high-end film and video
    industry (Price: US $6999, is also available at
    computer stores in Iran!)
   The latest version is MAYA 5.0

                                                      10
Components of MAYA
   Surface modeling
   Lights and illumination
   Animation
   Character setup
   Materials
   Rendering
   Dynamics
   Painting
   Expressions
   MEL
   Development
   MAYA-unlimited special components
                                        11
User Interface
   Unmatched productivity
    through a combination of
    performance and
    workflow features.
       Marking menus
       3D manipulators
       Selective display
       Unlimited levels of undo




                                   12
User Interface (continued)




   Context-sensitive dynamic menus
   Handy toolbar

                                      13
User Interface (continued)




   Shelf: A collection of tools and other commands that you can customize
    for your specific needs.
   Command line: Your pipeline to MEL command language.




                                                                             14
User Interface (continued)




   Tear-off menus: You can display menus as separate windows. This
    is helpful when you use a menu repeatedly.

                                                                  15
    User Interface (continued)
   Hot box: A way
    to quickly
    navigate the
    Maya menus
    without using
    the menu bar.
    It pops up
    when you
    press and hold
    Spacebar.

                                 16
Three surface-modeling approaches
1.   Polygonal surfaces
        Polygonal modeling is useful for creating virtually any type of
         surface shape. It excels for surfaces that include hard edges
         or facets, for instance, a gemstone, jagged mountain, or
         hammer.
2.   NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline)
        NURBS is useful for creating surfaces that stays perfectly
         smooth as you alter its shape. (We have studied the theory
         before.)
3.   Subdivisions
        Modeling with subdivision surfaces is an easy way to create
         intricate objects such as human hands. It offers the best
         techniques of NURBS and polygonal modeling, and includes
         several unparalleled features.


                                                                      17
Surface modeling
   Unlike other software packages, Maya lays
    bare its underlying programming structure.
    The building blocks are nodes, which are
    groups of related attributes.




                                                 18
     Lights and illumination
   MAYA supports six kinds of light:
      Ambient light
         Indirect light caused by the environment.
      Directed light
         Casts parallel rays in the light direction. The origin is infinitely
          far away.
      Point light
         Simple point light emitting light uniformly in all directions.
      Spot light
         Similar to the point light, except that it also supports angle
          attenuation based on the light direction.
      Area light
         two-dimensional rectangular light sources. Used to simulate
          the rectangular reflections of windows on surfaces.
      Volume light
         Used to illuminate within a given space. (e.g. a candle or lamp)

                                                                          19
Materials
 A material describes what an object looks
  like when it is rendered.
 Basically, it is a collection of attributes that
  control how a surface appears, including
  such attributes as color and shininess.




                                                 20
Animation
 To bring action to the objects in your 3D
  scene.
 Several techniques
     Key framing
     Graph editor
     Path animation
     and more…


                                              21
Rendering
   Rendering refers to the process of creating bitmap
    images of your scene based on the various shading,
    lighting, and camera attributes that you set.
   Once you render a sequence of images, you can then
    play them back in sequence, producing an animation.
   Components involved:
       Shading materials and textures.
       Lighting and shadows.
       Cameras and animation.
       Rendering method.
       Visual effects.
   Rendering is a very complicated process and can be
    very time-consuming.
                                                          22
Rendering (continued)
   Possible mechanisms
       Software-based
            MAYA software (produces the best results)
            Mental ray
            Vector render
       MAYA hardware
   MAYA also supports:
       Parallel rendering via multiprocessor.
       Distributed rendering through a network. (Universal Rendering)
       A combination of the two.
   Rendering can be done either in user interface (easier)
    or in command prompt (more flexible and efficient).

                                                                         23
Rendering (continued)
   IPR (Interactive Photorealistic Rendering) -
    When you render a scene using this powerful
    feature, you can interactively update portions
    or all of the scene and get immediate
    feedback.
   Running render diagnostics after tuning
    surfaces and before performing the final
    render provides valuable information about
    how the performance can be improved.

                                                 24
Dynamics
   Dynamics is a branch of physics that describes
    how objects move using physical rules to
    simulate the natural forces that act upon them.
   Dynamic simulations are difficult to achieve with
    traditional keyframe animation techniques.
   MAYA offers several facilities for dynamic
    simulation.



                                                        25
Dynamics (continued)
   Particles
       Points that can have attributes applied to them so they animate
        and render to simulate natural phenomena.
   Emitters
       Particles are hard to be created clicking positions in the scene
        view; instead, an emitter can shoot particles into view.
       Fields
       To animate particles, you typically apply fields such as gravity or
        wind.
   Rigid Bodies and Constraints
       Rigid bodies collide rather than pass through each
       are used for creating dynamic simulations


                                                                          26
Painting
   Have very wide applications.
   Artisan Brush Tools
        Highly intuitive, pressure-sensitive brush interface for digital sculpting
         and attribute painting.
        Example: sculpt a simple face from a sphere.
   Paint Effects tools
      allows the user to create natural and fantastic effects either on a 2D
       canvas or as actual 3D objects in the scene.
      Unique paint technology for easily creating 3D scenes or 2D canvases
       of unparalleled complexity, detail and realism.
   3D Paint
      paint and modify textures directly onto 3D surfaces using both the
       Artisan and Paint Effects tools.
      Combining the power of MAYA Artisan and MAYA Paint Effects,
       MAYA’s integrated 3D Paint allows the painting of color, bump,
       transparency and other textures directly onto objects.


                                                                                      27
MEL (Maya Embedded Language)

 Is a powerful command and scripting
  language that gives you direct control over
  Maya's features, processes, and workflow.
 Not all things can be done using MAYA’s
  graphical user interface.
 Maya's user interface is built using MEL
  scripts and procedures. (User interface

                                            28
Development
   MAYA is highly flexible because it is an open
    product!
   Two ways to modify Maya
     MEL
     API (Application Programmer Interface)
        Provides better performance than MEL.

        Executes approximately ten times faster than MEL.

        Is a C++ library.

        Can be used to add new features, communicate with MAYA
         facilities, translate games, etc.


                                                                  29
Conclusion
 Cover the surface with a skin of almost
  any material you can think of, set up lights,
  and take a picture. This is essentially how
  Maya works. The surface can be shaped
  and refined in real time using four views.
 Pros and Cons…




                                              30
Conclusion (Pros)
   A powerful 3D modeling, rendering and animation software.
   Highly customizable interface
   Flexible settings and preferences with hotkeys, hotboxes,
    sets and partitions
   Highly powerful texture features and atmospheric effects
    like fog and waves.
   High-end rendering IPR (Interactive Photo Realistic
    Rendering) and movie outputs.
   Elaborate manuals and help features
   Supported on many platforms – Windows, IRIX, Mac


                                                            31
Conclusion (Cons)
   The cost of the software is high
   It is not suitable for architectural or technical
    drawings which require accurate
    measurements.
   It is too complex for beginners.




                                                        32
The future of this program in
saudi arabia

 The abilities of this program is much more
  better than its opponents (3D MAX ,,,,,etc).
 The expensive price is a solved problem
  in saudi arabia “it cost only the price of
  the CD” .
 It will take some time before other program
  users shift to it.
                                             33
Useful resources
   http://www.sgi.com (Silicon graphics)
   http://www.aliaswavefront.com (Alias/Wavefront)
   http://www.highend3d.com/boards/
   http://www.3dlinks.com/
   http://www.zoorender.com/_html/tutorials.htm
   http://www.3dluvr.com/pixho/
   http://www.3dluvr.com/lightengine3d/index2.html
   http://www.jackals-forge.com

                                                      34
Useful resources (continued)

   Mastering Maya - by John Kundert-Gibbs,
    Peter Lee, and Perry
   The Art of Maya, published by
    Alias|Wavefront
   Alias Wavefront instructional video




                                              35
    Appendix A: A design process




   EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) file import.
                                                 36
Appendix A (continued)




                         37
Appendix A (continued)




                         38
Appendix A (continued)




                         39
Appendix A (continued)




                         40
Appendix A (continued)




                         41
Appendix A (continued)




                         42
Appendix A (continued)




                         43
Appendix A (continued)




                         44
Appendix A (continued)




                         45
Appendix A (continued)




                         46
Appendix A (continued)




                         47
Appendix A (continued)




                         48
Appendix A (continued)




                         49
Appendix A (continued)




                         50
Appendix A (continued)




                         51
Appendix A (continued)




                         52
Appendix A (continued)
   Aerial
    view




                         53
Appendix A (continued)
   Front
    facade




                         54
Appendix A (continued)
   Perspective
    view




                         55
Appendix A (continued)




                         56
Appendix A (continued)




                         57
Appendix A (continued)




                         58
Appendix A (continued)




                         59
Appendix B: Slide Show…




                          60
Appendix B (continued)




                         61
Appendix B (continued)




                         62
Appendix B (continued)




                         63
Appendix B (continued)




                         64
Appendix B (continued)




                         65
Appendix B (continued)




                         66
Appendix B (continued)




                         67
Appendix B (continued)




                         68
Appendix B (continued)




                         69
Appendix B (continued)




                         70
Appendix B (continued)




                         71
Appendix B (continued)




                         72
Appendix B (continued)




                         73
Appendix B (continued)




                         74
Appendix B (continued)




                         75
Appendix B (continued)




                         76
Appendix B (continued)




                         77
Appendix B (continued)




                         78
Appendix B (continued)




                         79
Appendix B (continued)




                         80
Appendix B (continued)




                         81
Appendix B (continued)




                         82
Appendix B (continued)




                         83
Appendix B (continued)




                         84
Appendix B (continued)




                         85
Appendix B (continued)




                         86
Appendix B (continued)




                         87
Appendix B (continued)




                         88
Appendix B (continued)




                         89
Appendix B (continued)




                         90
Appendix B (continued)




                         91
Appendix B (continued)




                         92
Appendix B (continued)




                         93
Appendix B (continued)




                         94
Appendix B (continued)




                         95
Appendix B (continued)




                         96
Appendix B (continued)




                         97
Appendix B (continued)




                         98
Appendix B (continued)




                         99

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:123
posted:9/20/2012
language:Unknown
pages:99