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					Antiflatulent
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An antiflatulent agent is a drug used for the alleviation or prevention of excessive intestinal gas, i.e., flatulence.

                  Contents
 1 Mechanisms of action
     1.1 Preventing gas
     1.2 Relieving gas
 2 Members
     2.1 Antifoaming agents
     2.2 Enzyme-based dietary supplements
     2.3 Herbal antiflatulents
 3 See also
 4 References


Mechanisms of action

Preventing gas
   Enzymes – Enzyme-based dietary supplements break down indigestible substances and prevent these substances from
   reaching the large intestine intact – where anaerobic bacteria produce gas. Substances indigestible by humans are usually
   present in foods associated with flatulence, like beans. When these substances reach the large intestine intact, they may
   be fermented by intestinal bacteria, thereby causing gas production. These supplements are usually taken with foods
   associated with flatulence. It is important to take the appropriate enzyme with the appropriate food. When consuming
   beans and other vegetables high in complex carbohydrates, it may be helpful to take a product that contains alpha-
   galactosidase, such as Beano. Additionally, for individuals with lactose intolerance, taking a lactase-containing product
   with lactose-containing foodstuffs may reduce flatulence.
   Herbal inhibitors – Many herbal substances have been observed since antiquity for reducing flatulence, particularly gas
   from eating legumes. Cloves, cinnamon, and garlic are potent in reducing gas. The potency of garlic increases when
   heated, whereas the potency of cinnamon decreases. Other spices have a smaller effect in reducing gas, including
   turmeric, black pepper, asafoetida and ginger. Other common Indian spices, cumin, aniseed, ajowan, and cardamom do
   not inhibit gas production. [1]

Relieving gas
For the alleviation of flatulence, an antifoaming agent such as simethicone may be taken orally. This agent will coalesce the
smaller gas bubbles into larger bubbles, thereby easing the release of gas within the gastrointestinal tract via burping or
flatulence.

Members

Antifoaming agents
   Simethicone

Enzyme-based dietary supplements
   Beano
   Lactase (brand Lactaid)

Herbal antiflatulents
   Epazote is claimed to have antiflatulent properties. [citation needed]
   Asafoetida reduces the growth of indigenous microflora in the gut, reducing flatulence. [2]

See also
   Carminative

References
  1. ^ A. Savitri, T. N. Bhavanishankar and H. S. R. Desikachar. Effect of spices on in vitro gas production by Clostridium perfringens
     Food Microbiology, 1986, 3, 195-199
  2. ^ S. K. GARG, A. C. BANERJEA, J. VERMA. and M. J. ABRAHAM, EFFECT OF VARIOUS TREATMENTS OF PULSES ON IN
     VITRO GAS PRODUCTION BY SELECTED INTESTINAL CLOSTRIDIA. Journal of Food Science, Volume 45, Issue 6 (p 1601-
     1602).



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posted:9/20/2012
language:English
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