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THE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM - College of

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 69

									 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK




DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL
              ENGINEERING
        COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
        THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
       IOWA CITY, IOWA 52242-1527

                    Voice: 319-335-5668
                    FAX: 319-335-5669
         Email: mech_eng@engineering.uiowa.edu
       Website: http://www.mie.engineering.uiowa.edu


                        April 2008
                                    FOREWORD


The Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Handbook provides information to

prospective undergraduate students about the program, curriculum, academic regulations,

advising systems, professional societies, post graduation opportunities, and others. A

flow chart to help the reader locate items within the Handbook is provided on p. iv.

This Handbook is supplemental to The University of Iowa General Catalog and the

Schedule of Courses on ISIS (http://isis5.uiowa.edu/isis/courses/search.page), and should

be used together with those documents. The student should have read the Handbook

before consulting with her or his academic advisor.

During the course of the student’s studies, the mechanical engineering student may find it

necessary to visit the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Office in

3131 SC.     The student is encouraged to visit the office and seek assistance when

necessary.




                                            ii
                                Disclaimer

The Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Handbook is published for

informational purposes only. Information on regulations, policies, fees, curricula,

courses, and other matters is subject to change without notice.


         The University of Iowa Nondiscrimination Statement

The University of Iowa prohibits discrimination in employment and in its

educational programs and activities on the basis of race, national origin, color,

creed, religion, sex, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender

identify, or associational preference. The University also affirms its commitment

to providing equal opportunities and equal access to University facilities. For

additional information on nondiscrimination policies, contact the Coordinator of

Title IX, Section 504, and the ADA in the Office of Affirmative Action, (319)

335-0705 (voice) or (319) 335-0697 (text), 202 Jessup Hall, The University of

Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, 52242-1316.



The handbook was prepared by the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Undergraduate Committee.




                                     iii
                                                                    Mechanical Engineering Program
                                                                                                                                         Graduate Program
                                                                                                                                        See Graduate Handbook
                                                                          Undergraduate Programs (P. 4)                                       for details
                                                  Regular                     (P. 4)   Combined B.S./M.S. Degrees         (P. 7)
                                                  Honors                      (P. 5)   Minors                             (P. 7)
                                                  Cooperative Education       (P. 5)   Technological Entrepreneuship      (P. 8)
                                                  Two-Degree                  (P. 6)   Enhanced Design Experience         (P. 8)



         Curriculum (P. 9)           Academic Regulations (P. 16)            Advising System (P. 20)        Professional Societies (P. 23)      Post-Graduation (P. 25)
                                    Regular Student             (P. 16)       Advising         (P. 20)             ASME       (P. 23)           Job Placement     (P. 25)
     Core + ME            (P. 9)
                                     - Min GPA=2.0              (P. 17)       Student petition (P. 21)             SAE        (P. 23)           Graduate Studies (P. 25)
     Humanities/Soc. Sci.(P. 11)
                                     - 2nd Gr. Opt.             (P. 17)       Graduation       (P. 21)             AIAA       (P. 23)            - M.S.           (P. 25)
iv




     Elective Focus Areas(P. 12)
                                    Transfer student            (P. 17)                                            ASHRAE     (P. 23)            - Ph.D.          (P. 25)
     First-Year & Professional
                                    Transfer Credit Hours       (P. 17)                                            SWE        (P. 24)           See Graduate Handbook
     Seminars            (P. 15)
                                    Academic Misconduct         (P. 17)
                                    Complaints                  (P. 18)
                                    Students with Disability    (P. 18)
                                    Sexual Harassment           (P. 18)
                                    Computer Resources          (P. 19)
                                    Counseling Resources        (P. 19)




                                                                                 Appendix (P. 29)
                             A. Faculty                        (P. 27)    H. Student Complaints       (P. 47)   N. Application for a Degree            (P. 57)
                             B. Curriculum                     (P. 33)    I. Sexual Harassment        (P. 48)   O. Withdrawal Card                     (P. 58)
                             C. Elective Focus Areas           (P. 35)    J. Computer Resources       (P. 52)   P. Major and/or Curriculum Change      (P. 59)
                             D. Plan of Study Form             (P. 39)    K.Counseling Resources      (P. 54)   Q. Graduate Analysis                   (P. 61)
                             E. Pass/NonPass Form              (P. 44)    L. Add/Drop From            (P. 55)   R. Application for Combined Degree     (P. 62)
                             F. Second Grade Option            (P. 45)    M. Petition Form            (P. 56)   S. Withdrawal from Combined Degree     (P. 63)
                             G. Academic Misconduct            (P. 46)                                          T. Notes                               (P. 64)


                                                       Flowchart for Undergraduate Student Handbook
                                                                                       iv
                     TABLE OF CONTENTS
   I.   INTRODUCTION .................................................................................1
  II.   THE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM ...........................2
 III.   UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS .....................................................4
 IV.    THE CURRICULUM ............................................................................9
  V.    ELECTIVES IN THE CURRICULUM...............................................11
 VI.    FIRST-YEAR & PROFESSIONAL SEMINARS & ACTIVITIES....15
VII.    ACADEMIC REGULATIONS ...........................................................16
VIII.   THE ADVISING SYSTEM.................................................................20
 IX.    PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES ...........................................................23
  X.    POST GRADUATION OPPORTUNITIES ........................................25
        APPENDIX A. FACULTY .................................................................27
        APPENDIX B. CURRICULUM 2007-2008 .......................................33
        APPENDIX C. ELECTIVE FOCUS AREAS .....................................35
        APPENDIX D. PLAN OF STUDY FORM…………………………39
        APPENDIX E. PASS/NONPASS FORM ...........................................44
        APPENDIX F. SECOND-GRADE OPTION FORM .........................45
        APPENDIX G. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT ...................................46
        APPENDIX H. STUDENT COMPLAINTS .......................................47
        APPENDIX I. SEXUAL HARASSMENT..........................................48
        APPENDIX J. COMPUTER RESOURCES ......................................52
        APPENDIX K. COUNSELING RESOURCES ..................................54
        APPENDIX L. ADD/DROP FORM....................................................55
        APPENDIX M. PETITION FORM ....................................................56
        APPENDIX N. APPLICATION FOR A DEGREE FORM ................57
        APPENDIX O. WITHDRAWAL CARD ............................................58
        APPENDIX P. MAJOR and/or CURRICULUM CHANGE
                              REQUEST.................................................................59
        APPENDIX Q. GRADUATION ANALYSIS ....................................61
        APPENDIX R. APPLICATION FOR PARTICIPATION IN
                              COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAM........................62
        APPENDIX S. WITHDRAWAL FROM COMBINED DEGREE .....63
        APPENDIX T. NOTES .......................................................................64

                                               v
                                    I. INTRODUCTION

This Handbook is intended for students who are enrolled in the Mechanical Engineering Program

within the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at The University of Iowa and

working toward the Bachelor of Science Degree. It should also be helpful to those students

considering a transfer into the Program. Topics covered include general information on the field

of mechanical engineering, the availability of a complementary program, the curriculum,

guidelines for choosing social sciences, humanities, and technical elective courses, and advising

procedures.

This Handbook is supplemental to The University of Iowa General Catalog and the Schedule of

Courses, and should be used together with those documents. The student should have read the

Handbook before consulting with her or his academic advisor. For further information, the

student may contact the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Office at 3131

Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences (SC), College of Engineering, The

University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. 52242-1527 (telephone 319/335-5668). The Office of the

Dean, College of Engineering, is located in 3100 SC (telephone 319/335-5764).




                                               1
                  II. THE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM



Mechanical engineers conceive, plan, design, and direct the manufacture, distribution, and

operation of a wide variety of devices, machines, and systems for energy conversion,

environmental control, materials processing, transportation, materials handling, and other

purposes.

The mechanical engineering program at The University of Iowa comprises two broad fields,

thermal-fluids engineering and mechanical systems engineering.

       Thermal-Fluids Engineering: Thermal-fluid phenomena occur in many systems and

       devices such as aircraft, gas turbines, heat exchangers, heating and cooling systems,

       refrigerating systems, material processes, and biomedical systems. Work on these

       systems requires an interdisciplinary team of which the mechanical engineer is an

       important member.


       Mechanical Systems: Mechanical systems and machines are the foundations of our

       technology. Examples of such systems and devices are manufacturing equipment,

       automobiles, tractors, ships, home appliances, packaging machinery, and aircraft.


Mechanical engineers find employment opportunities in a wide variety of jobs, including

industrial and governmental employment as well as education. Mechanical engineers form an

integral part of most industries, including aerospace firms, energy generation utilities,

automobile manufacturers, materials processing industries, petroleum refineries, electronic and

computer manufacturers, heavy construction vehicle manufacturers, and farm implement firms,

to name a few. According to National Association of Colleges and Employers, the national



                                              2
average salary for mechanical engineering graduates of 2006-07          was $54,587. Further

information on careers and statistics for mechanical engineers can be obtained at the following

website:

http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/career-services




                                              3
                          III. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
The objective of the Mechanical Engineering Program is to provide the undergraduate student

with a sound preparation for a career in the field of mechanical engineering. A listing of

faculty associated with the Program is furnished in Appendix A. In addition to the specified

courses in the curriculum, there are social sciences, humanities, and technical elective courses

to be chosen by the student in accordance with program guidelines. Upper-level students are

required to work on team projects in a senior design course entitled 58:086 Mechanical

Engineering Design Project. Participation in established research projects also can often be

arranged by contacting individual faculty members.

The education of a mechanical engineer at The University of Iowa is based on four important

basic stems: mathematics; basic and engineering sciences; design; and humanities and social

sciences. Mathematics, physics, and chemistry are considered to be basic disciplines in which

a future mechanical engineer must build the maximum possible strength. Parallel to the basic

sciences are engineering sciences that every mechanical engineer must know. These are statics

and dynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics of deformable bodies, mechanics of fluids and

transfer processes, materials science, and electrical sciences.    An understanding of these

sciences enables a mechanical engineer to design parts of systems, to understand the total

system, to plan the production and utilization of energy, to plan and operate industrial

manufacturing facilities, as well as to design automatic control systems for machines and other

systems. In addition to the purely mechanical engineering areas, there are many complex

issues in our modern society that involve environmental, economic, managerial, and political

decision making. Therefore, any mechanical engineer must possess appreciation of social and




                                               4
humanistic issues relating to government, business, religion, history, language, as well as

international and global relations.


Honors Program

Qualified Mechanical Engineering undergraduate students are encouraged to join the honors

programs available at the university.      Honors students augment their normal engineering

coursework by participating in special honors courses and seminars, and by completing a

special honors project under the supervision of a faculty member. They graduate with a

Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree with honors.

Engineering honors projects are individually selected, and may involve (a) faculty-sponsored

research assistantships, (b) independent research projects arranged with an honors advisor, or

(c) pre-teaching internships that stress innovative engineering classroom instruction.

Qualified first-year students and sophomore Mechanical Engineering students are eligible to

join the university-wide honors program, which includes students from first year through

seniors from all disciplines. The College of Engineering's honors program accepts qualified

junior and senior applicants. Eligibility requirements are described in The University of Iowa

General    Catalog,    and   The      College   of   Engineering   Honors     Program    website

(http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/about/honors.php) They are also available from the

Shambaugh House Honors Center, and from the Mechanical Engineering Program Honors

Advisor.

Cooperative Education Program
An option available to qualified students is a program of alternating periods of study and work

in engineering-related jobs provided by industrial companies. The program furnishes the

student with insights gained through practical application of theory learned in the classroom, a

basis of work experience from which to choose elective courses and to begin career planning,

and aids in meeting college expenses. Participation in the co-op program extends the study


                                                5
period needed to earn the Bachelor of Science degree by approximately one calendar year.

Students who are interested in a cooperative program should inquire at Engineering

Professional Development in 3124 SC.


Two-Degree Programs
Students who desire to obtain a strong background in humanities, social sciences, and

languages may choose a combined degree program leading to both the Bachelor of Arts degree

in the College of Liberal Arts and the Bachelor of Science degree in the College of

Engineering. Through careful planning in consultation with advisors from the two colleges, the

student can complete the combined degree requirements in about five academic years.

Students may earn a second bachelor degree in engineering by completing at least 30 additional

credit hours beyond those required for the first program. The additional hours are generally at

the senior level. The student must file an application for admission to the second-degree

program in consultation with a faculty advisor from the second-degree program.

A Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program is available with the College of

Business Administration for undergraduate students who wish to begin their M.B.A. studies

while finishing their engineering degree. Carefully selected course work should enable such

students to complete an engineering bachelor degree in four years and the M.B.A. degree in the

fifth year. Students with interest and competence in the applied sciences and business

administration may enhance their managerial career opportunities through this program.

The student may wish to consider an advanced degree in mechanical engineering or another

engineering discipline as an alternate to two undergraduate degrees. The advanced degree may

be more attractive for preparing for an engineering career.




                                                6
Combined B.S./M.S. Degree Program

A special combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Science degree program for qualified

mechanical engineering undergraduate students is available to enable a student to complete a

Master of Science degree in two or three semesters after completion of the Bachelor of Science

degree. A student enters the program after the junior year and is allowed to take up to 12 s.h.

of courses for graduate credit prior to receiving the Bachelor of Science degree. Of these, 6 s.h.

of 100- or 200-level coursework may be counted towards both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. The

requirements for admission to the program are (a) completion of at least 80 semester hours of

credits, (b) a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.25 or higher, and (c) a letter of

application submitted to the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Chairperson. A student in the combined program receives a Bachelor of Science when all

requirements for that degree have been completed, and then becomes a regular Master of

Science level graduate student in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering.

Students in the program may begin working with a faculty member on a Master of Science

thesis research project during the senior year of undergraduate study.

Minors
Students pursuing a degree program in the College of Engineering may earn a minor in the

College of Business Administration or in the College of Liberal Arts. Those interested in this

option should consult the appropriate department for specific requirements.


Technological Entrepreneurship Program

The Colleges of Engineering and Business Administration offer a joint program leading to a

Technological Entrepreneurial Certificate, earned along with an engineering degree.           The

program enables students to study the entrepreneurial process as it relates to technology. It not

only serves students who intend to start and operate their own business, it also helps any

student interested in gaining a better understanding of the entrepreneurial process. The wide


                                                7
range of electives permits students to tailor business courses best suited for their individual

interests.     Interested Mechanical Engineering students should contact the College of

Engineering Student Development Center, 3124 SC, for more information.

Program for Enhanced Design Experience
The goal of the Program for Enhanced Design Experience (PEDE) is to enhance the design

experience of undergraduate engineering students in a multidisciplinary framework.           The

Program is a joint effort between the various academic engineering programs in the College of

Engineering and industrial firms. Students in the Program work closely with engineers from

the firms over a nine-month period on design projects of direct benefit to the firm and receive

six semester-hours of academic credit for their effort. The students, instructors, and practicing

engineers share in the learning experience and develop a better understanding of the critical

issues that need to be solved to effectively execute the design. The design projects are selected

to expose the students to all aspects of the engineering design process, including conceptual

designs, testing and evaluation, manufacturability, safety, and costs. Interested students should

contact the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Office for further

information.




                                               8
                                  IV. THE CURRICULUM
The Mechanical Engineering Curriculum requires a minimum of 128 semester hours of credit

to earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree. The curriculum is arranged so that the

mathematics, basic sciences, engineering sciences and design, humanities, and social sciences

courses are introduced in an effective sequence and with balanced emphasis.

The primary categories of the courses taken by an undergraduate student are:

Common Core Courses (61 SH total): These courses are generally taken by students in all

engineering programs. These courses include mathematics, chemistry, physics, engineering

sciences, and engineering design. This commonality of the programs is evidence of a common

base for and similarity among the various engineering curricula. This common core also has

the practical benefit of permitting the student to delay a final choice of program until as late as

the middle of the sophomore year with little penalty.

Program Core Courses (31 SH total): These courses are offered in the mechanical

engineering program and are required to be taken by undergraduates in mechanical

engineering. They cover the areas of thermal/fluids engineering and mechanical systems.

GEC – General Education Component (15 SH total). This category includes the Social

Science and Humanities courses selected in the Plan of Study to satisfy College of Engineering

requirements. See the online guide for a list of acceptable courses from Student Development

Center located at:

http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/%7Eengreg/ human_and_soc_temp.php

Among the GEC courses, at least 3 SH must be Social Science courses and another 3 SH must

be Humanities courses. At least 6 SH must be intermediate (100) level courses; of these 6 SH,



                                                9
at least one course must be a 100 level course in the same department as the lower level course

completed by the student.

EFA – Elective Focus Area (21 SH total). These are courses selected in the Plan of Study to

satisfy mechanical engineering program requirements. At least 3 SH of EFA courses must be a

mathematics/science elective. Standard Program EFA’s are listed in Appendix C. Students also

have the flexibility of developing an alternative EFA tailored to their individual career goals.

The curriculum is listed by semester on a computer-based form used by the Student

Development Center to maintain a record of each student's progress toward the Bachelor of

Science in Engineering degree. A current copy of the degree evaluation (DELI) for each

student is also maintained in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Office.

The curriculum is reviewed periodically by the faculty, and changes in the curriculum may

occur during a student's tenure in the College of Engineering. If such a change occurs, the

student may elect to continue with the curriculum in effect when he or she enrolled, or the

student may elect the revised curriculum. The course listing is in an order that automatically

satisfies course prerequisite requirements. Some students, particularly transfer students, may

not be able to follow the course sequence listed.            However, any course prerequisite

requirements must be satisfied. These requirements can be determined by consulting the

University General Catalog. Also, prerequisites are usually listed in the Schedule of Courses

on ISIS.




                                                10
                         V. ELECTIVES IN THE CURRICULUM
Humanities and Social Sciences Electives

The guidelines for selection of these electives were established by the faculty of the College of

Engineering and are stated in full in the College of Engineering section of the University

General Catalog. These guidelines divide the electives into two groups: Social Sciences and

Humanities courses. Among the GEC courses, at least 3 SH must be Social Science courses and

another 3 SH must be Humanities courses. At least 6 SH must be intermediate (100) level

courses; of these 6 SH at least one course must a 100 level course in the same department as the

lower level course completed by the student. A handout that lists examples, exclusions, and

exceptions, in accordance with college policy, is available from the Student Development

Center or at:

http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~engreg/human_and_soc_temp.php

Careful planning and early consultation with the student's academic advisor is strongly

recommended for choosing these electives.

Math/Science Elective

The math/science elective permits the student to develop a broader or a deeper understanding in

a selected field of basic science or mathematics. The math/science elective must satisfy ABET

2000 requirements of a basic science or mathematics course, and is required to possess

university-level basic science or mathematics pre- or co-requisites at the level of the College

Core courses or higher. The math/science elective is included as part of the EFA, and different

EFAs provide different options for this elective.




                                               11
Additionally, the student may petition for a course that is not included in the EFA listings, but

which still satisfies the general criteria of the math/science elective, as stated above.

Elective Focus Areas (EFAs)

The Elective Focus Area (EFA) is a set of 21 semester hours (sh) of elective courses taken

during the sophomore to senior years. These courses provide undergraduate students with a

unique opportunity to acquire advanced education in an area of their choice, including areas

outside of traditional Mechanical Engineering topics. EFAs are not only intended to spark the

interest of students in a specialty, but they can also make a student more attractive to future

employers.

An EFA must be rigorous, well focused, in-depth, and consistent with a student’s career plan.

A collection of lower level courses in a number of disparate areas will not satisfy this EFA

requirement. Consequently, approval of a student’s EFA by the department is generally

required. A Plan of Study form, described in greater detail below, facilitates the process of

choosing and obtaining approval for the EFA courses.

In order to maintain sufficient technical rigor and depth, EFAs must contain at least 9 sh of

100-level College of Engineering courses. However, this requirement may be waived if the

EFA consists of an in-depth program in mathematics, computer science, the physical and

natural sciences, or business/management

Due to program accreditation issues, at least 3 sh of courses must be mathematics or basic

sciences courses (as defined by ABET) in a different area or at a more advanced level than

those required in the regular curriculum (see description of math/science elective above).




                                                 12
An EFA does not need to consist entirely of technical courses. For example, part or all of the

UI Technological Entrepreneurship Certificate program can be completed as an EFA. If the

majority of EFA courses are from outside of the College of Engineering, an official UI Minor

or UI Certificate program should generally be completed.

Students are urged to integrate their EFA with internships or cooperative education experiences

they may be taking as part of their undergraduate studies. Furthermore, an EFA may be

complemented by courses taken as part of the General Education Component (GEC)

requirement. If a focus in the humanities or social sciences is desired in an EFA, up to 12 sh of

GEC courses should be used. The remaining balance of EFA courses may be used as technical

electives or toward a second focus area, consistent with the above EFA requirements.

There are two types of EFAs:

       Standard EFAs (S-EFA) are programs that are designed and pre-approved by the

       department. Currently offered S-EFAs in the mechanical engineering program are listed

       below; they are periodically reviewed by the department. Descriptions of each S-EFA

       can be obtained from the departmental web site or office. Each S-EFA has a faculty

       member as a coordinator who can advise a student in more detail.

       Tailored EFAs (T-EFA) are individualized and career-specific programs designed by

       the student and approved by the student's adviser and the department chair.

The Plan of Study facilitates the process of choosing and obtaining approval for the courses for

the EFA. During the first academic year on campus, all undergraduate students consult with

their advisor and begin to develop a tentative Plan of Study. The Plan of Study is finalized and

submitted to the department during the third semester, although changes to the Plan of Study at




                                               13
a later date are permissible. The Sophomore Seminar (third semester) is used to explain EFA

choices. The Plan of Study:

   •   identifies the career goal;

   •   identifies the courses to be taken as the 21 sh of EFA electives;

   •   presents the rationale for how the electives support the career goal; the student should

       provide any necessary supporting material;

   •   is signed by the student and the advisor; if a student is pursuing a T-EFA or deviating

       from the approved courses for an S-EFA, the Plan of Study must also be approved by

       the department chair;

   •   should be completed in advance of taking any EFA courses;

   •   is placed in the student’s official file;

   •   may be altered at any time during the undergraduate program; any changes must be

       approved by completing a new Plan of Study.



Standard Elective Focus Areas (S-EFAs) in the Mechanical Engineering Program

The following standard EFAs have been identified in the Mechanical Engineering Program:

   •   Energy and Environment

   •   Manufacturing and Materials Processing

   •   Design

A listing of possible courses under each EFA can be found in Appendix C.




                                                   14
        VI. FIRST-YEAR, SECOND-YEAR AND PROFESSIONAL SEMINARS

The Mechanical Engineering Curriculum requires first and second year students to

satisfactorily attend/participate in one semester of Mechanical Engineering First-Year (58:090)

and Second-Year seminars, respectively.

The Mechanical Engineering Curriculum also requires satisfactory completion of two semesters

of Professional Seminar (58:091). Professional Seminar is designed for junior and senior

students to engage in discussions, presentations, and activities related to Professional

Engineering practice under the supervision of a faculty member. The objective of this seminar

is to introduce students to industry, to the professional societies, to the graduate education, to

fellow students, to departmental faculty, and to promote professionalism, leadership, and

ethical conduct in Mechanical Engineering.         At least eight meetings are scheduled each

semester, and, although the course carries zero credit, each registered student is required to

attend/participate in at least seven of these meetings to receive a passing grade. Records of

participation are maintained and a passing or failing mark is recorded for the course. Students

customarily register for the course starting with the first semester of their junior year.




                                                 15
                             VII. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
A complete statement of academic regulations may be found in the University General Catalog.

A summary is presented here.

Regular Student

A GPA of at least 2.0 is a requirement (see the University General Catalog and ISIS for

additional requirements) for earning the Bachelor of Science degree in any engineering

program.    The Probation Committee in the Student Development Center reviews student

performance to determine whether satisfactory progress is being made.             In the event of

unsatisfactory progress, the student will be placed on probation. Those students on probation

who are not able to attain good standing during the following semester may be dismissed from

the college.   Students who are on probationary status should maintain contact with their

academic advisors during the semester so that any remedial actions available, such as tutoring

or reduction in course load, can be taken at the appropriate times.

A maximum of two courses in the humanities and social sciences may be taken on a

pass/nonpass basis (See Appendix E for application form).             No other courses within the

curriculum requirement may be taken on a pass/nonpass basis.

The second-grade-only option may be elected when a course is repeated. Under this option,

only the second grade is used to compute the grade point average. The first grade will remain

on the student's record. This option can only be exercised provided the repeated course is taken

prior to the time of completing a course for which the repeated course is a prerequisite.

Students electing this option should complete a form (See Appendix F) available from the

Student Development Center. This option can be exercised for a maximum of three courses,

and only one time per course.


                                               16
Transfer Student

Advanced standing for students transferring into the College of Engineering is determined by a

review of the student's record by the Student Development Center and by the Department of

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Chairperson. To apply toward the Bachelor of Science

degree, a course must have been taken at an accredited institution as determined by the

Registrar and the course must be a satisfactory replacement for a course in the curriculum.

Transfer students will receive an evaluation from the Records Analyst in the Student

Development Center. A minimum of the last 30 credit hours, 45 of the last 60, or a total of 90

credit hours must be taken at The University of Iowa in order to complete the Bachelor of

Science degree at The University of Iowa.

Transfer Credit Hours

It is usually possible to transfer course credits from another institution, but the student is

advised to consult with the Student Development Center or the academic advisor about the

specific course before enrolling in the course. Final approval of the transfer of credit hours lies

with the Student Development Center and the Department of Mechanical and Industrial

Engineering Chairperson.

Academic Misconduct

The College of Engineering policy dealing with academic misconduct is given in

Appendix G.

Complaints

Student complaints concerning faculty actions are handled by the procedure outlined in

Appendix H.



                                                17
Students with Disability

A student who has a disability that may require some modification of the seating, testing or

other class requirements due to a disability should register with the Office of Student Disability

Services and inform the instructor during the first week of classes so that appropriate

arrangements may be made.

Sexual Harassment

The University of Iowa prohibits sexual harassment of any kind and will not condone such

actions. Sexual harassment includes, but is not limited to, unwelcome advances, requests for

sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that affects a condition or

term of employment, part of the employment or educational decision-making process, or

creates an offensive educational or work environment.         Sexual harassment may occur in

relationships involving teacher/student, student/student, supervisor/subordinate, and between

persons with the same University status. Any student, staff or faculty member may bring a

sexual harassment complaint against any other member of the University community who is

believed to have violated the Policy on Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships.

Formal complaints must be filed with the Office of Affirmative Action, 202 Jessup Hall, 335-

0705. See Appendix I for a statement of the complete policy.




Computer Resources

The Computer Systems and Support (CSS) office located in the College of Engineering has a

document providing guidelines for use of computer resources. A copy of that document is




                                               18
given in Appendix J. The student is expected to adhere to those guidelines when using the

college computer facilities.

Counseling Resources

A listing depicting the various counseling services and resources in the College of Engineering

and at The University of Iowa is given in Appendix K. Students should not hesitate to take

advantage of these resources as needed.




                                              19
                              VIII. THE ADVISING SYSTEM

Advising

All new students (first year and transfer) are advised by the Academic Counselor who is

located in the Student Development Center during orientation and the early registration

process. New students who have declared Mechanical Engineering as their major at the time of

admission will be assigned a faculty advisor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial

Engineering during their first semester in the College (about mid-semester time, prior to early

registration for the next session.) Students who change their major to Mechanical Engineering

are assigned a faculty advisor at the time of the change. The assignments are made on the basis

of the student’s identification number but the advisee may also request a particular faculty

member as an advisor. Each faculty member normally has 40 or fewer advisees, which permits

time for planning of the student’s program and for consultation on other matters during the

academic year.

Normally, students participate in the preregistration process that is scheduled around mid-term

in the fall and spring semesters. The sign-up sheets for appointments with faculty advisers for

early registration advising are posted on the advisor’s office door. A current copy of the

student’s grade report, degree evaluation (DELI), and curriculum sheet are maintained in the

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Office and on ISIS. A current copy of

the DELI is available online to the advisors in each registration period.

To facilitate the student-advisor consultation, the student should bring their copy of the DELI

to the advising appointment along with a tentative schedule plan. Examination of the DELI is a

good way to verify progress toward the Bachelor of Science degree. The student must consult

her or his advisor to be advised and obtain an authorization for completing the registration


                                                20
process. . Registration is done through Iowa Student Information Services (ISIS) at any of the

Instructional Technology Centers on campus or at a personal computer that is connected to

WEEG Computing Center. Changes in registration can be done through ISIS prior to the first

day of classes for the semester. After that time, changes are handled by using an add/drop form

(see Appendix L) that requires signatures of the advisor, course instructor, and, if required, the

dean.


Student Petition
Special situations in regard to a student's program may be accommodated by a student-initiated

petition for a substitution. Such situations may arise for transfer students, for students who

have changed programs, and for students who desire a slightly modified program. Such

petitions are reviewed carefully on the basis of merit. Petitions for substitutions related to

major requirements must be approved by the advisor and the Department of Mechanical and

Industrial Engineering Chairperson. The Associate Dean of Engineering must approve

substitutions related to requirements for the core courses, social sciences, and humanities.

Petition forms (See Appendix M) are available in the Student Development Center. Any

grievance that a student may have related to the curriculum should be initiated by the student

by a petition either through the advisor or the Department Chairperson.


Graduation
Students who are planning to receive their Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree at the

completion of a term are required to apply (See Appendix N) for the degree early in that term

and prior to the published deadline date. A careful check should be made by the student and her

or his advisor at the time of the final registration to make sure that all requirements for

graduation have been fulfilled. In fact, such checks should be made at each junior and senior



                                               21
year registration to determine if any gaps exist in the program. Students are encouraged to

request a graduation analysis (see Appendix Q) from the Student Development Center early in

their senior year.




                                           22
                             IX. PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES
Professional engineering societies were established to provide engineers with opportunities to

further develop technical skills, to disseminate technical information, to meet with other

engineers with common interests, and to enhance the status and promote the welfare of the

engineering profession. For most of the societies, many of the activities are conducted by

members who volunteer to serve on technical committees. Some of these activities involve

planning and conducting seminars, workshops and conferences; establishing standards and

codes; publishing technical information; preparing ethics and codes of professional conduct;

and providing information about technical matters to governmental agencies and policy makers.

Students are encouraged to join and actively participate in the student chapters of the American

Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and

the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) available on-campus in the

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. Although a student chapters of the

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) is not

established on campus, student memberships are available. Names of faculty advisors for these

four groups are available in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Office.

Upon graduation, student members may upgrade to the next level of membership. Chapters

and sections of the societies are established in many cities and provide opportunities to be

active at the local level.

Some other professional societies available to practicing engineers in the mechanical

engineering area are the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), the American

Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), the American Society for Testing and Materials

(ASTM), the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), and the Society for


                                              23
Women Engineers (SWE). Seniors are encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering

(FE), examination as a step toward professional registration. Review sessions on several basic

courses are offered each semester for students taking the FE exam.




                                              24
                       X. POST GRADUATION OPPORTUNITIES

As the student finishes the junior year or begins the senior year, thought should be given to

planning for the time after graduation. Upon graduation, the student has several choices, such

as finding employment with a firm as a mechanical engineer or pursuing graduate studies to

obtain an advanced degree.      These opportunities are highlighted briefly in the following

discussion. In all situations, the student may find it beneficial to discuss their career goals and

opportunities with a faculty member or other colleagues.

Job Placement

To assist students and alumni with career planning and professional employment, the office of

Engineering Professional Development (EPD) in 3124 SC (telephone 319/335-5763) offers a

wide variety of resources and services. EPD provides information on job hunting strategies,

permanent and summer employment, cooperative education and resume and cover letter writing

assistance. Announcements of job openings and interview schedules are posted by EPD.

Graduating students register with EPD by attending a registration meeting and maintaining a

placement file with current copies of their resumes.        The student is encouraged to take

advantage of the assistance offered by EPD.

Graduate Studies

Advanced degrees in Mechanical Engineering are the Master of Science degree followed by the

Doctor of Philosophy degree. These degrees further prepare the student for rapid advancement

in engineering by providing a greater depth and breadth of knowledge in the various areas of

mechanical engineering. Many students have found that the available job opportunities are

more varied and challenging with an advanced degree. Students may wish to discuss graduate




                                                25
study options    with a faculty member or the Department of Mechanical and Industrial

Engineering Chairperson. Qualified students are encouraged to apply for the combined

B.S./M.S. Program in the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department. Students are

advised to begin preparing for graduate school in the second semester of their junior year and to

take the Graduate Record Examination in the first semester of their senior year. For qualified

students, financial assistance (for example, research assistantships, teaching assistantships,

fellowships, and tuition scholarships) is available from such sources as the Department of

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, and governmental agencies

(National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Environmental

Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Students should apply for

financial assistance during their senior year. Further information about the graduate program in

Mechanical Engineering can be found in the Graduate Handbook available from the

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Office. Additional information about the

graduate programs at The University of Iowa may be obtained at the Office of Admissions, 107

Calvin Hall (telephone 319/335-1525).




                                               26
                                APPENDIX A. FACULTY

                              Mechanical Engineering Faculty



Christoph Beckermann, Professor
       University of Iowa Foundation Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering
       Vordiplom University of Hannover, F.R.G., M.S.M.E. Purdue University,
       Ph.D. Purdue University
       Heat transfer, materials processing
       Telephone No.: (319) 335-5681
       E-mail address: becker@engineering.uiowa.edu
       Website: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~becker

P. Barry Butler, Professor and Dean
       B.S.A.A.E. University of Illinois, M.S.A.A.E. University of Illinois,
       Ph.D. University of Illinois
       Two-phase reactive flow modeling, solid propellant ignition modeling, detonation
       modeling, condensed-phased energetic materials
       Telephone No.: (319) 335-5672
       E-mail address: pbbutler@engineering.uiowa.edu

Pablo M. Carrica, Assistant Professor
       Ph.D., Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Instituto Balseiro, Argentina
       Thermal-fluids sciences. Computational fluid dynamics. Multiphase flows. Ship
       hydrodynamics
       Telephone No.: (319) 335-6381
       E-mail address: pablo-carrica@uiowa.edu

Lea-Der Chen, Professor
      DEO, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department
      B.S.M.E. National Taiwan University, M.S.M.E. The Pennsylvania State University,
      Ph.D. The Pennsylvania State University
      Microgravity combustion, fuel cell, driving simulator, airbag, microchannel flow and
      heat transfer
      Telephone No.: (319) 335-5674
      Fax No.: (319) 384-0576
      E-mail address: ldchen@engineering.uiowa.edu
      Website: http://www.comlab.ecn.uiowa.edu
K.K. Choi, Professor
      Carver Professor of Mechanical Engineering
      B.S. Yonsei University, M.S. University of Iowa, Ph.D. University of Iowa
      Mechanical system analysis, design sensitivity analysis, optimal design, applied
      mathematics, simulation-based concurrent engineering, CAE integration
      Telephone No.: (319) 335-5684
      E-mail address: kkchoi@engineering.uiowa.edu
      Website: http://www.ccad.uiowa.edu/people/kkchoi/index.html




                                             27
Ching-Long Lin, Professor
      B.S. National Taiwan University, M.S. Stanford University, Ph.D. Stanford University
      Fluid mechanics, large-eddy simulations, four-dimensional data assimilation,
      latticeBoltzmann method
      Telephone No.: (319) 335-5673
      E-mail address: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu
      Website: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~ching

Jia Lu, Associate Professor
        B.S. Beijing Institute of Aeronautics
        M.S. Tsinghua University
        Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley
        Biomechanics, Continuum Mechanics; Finite Elasticity; Computational Mechanics
        Telephone No.: (319)335-6405
        E-mail address: jia-lu@uiowa.edu
        Website: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~jialu
Sharif Rahman, Professor
       B.S. Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology, M.S. Purdue University,
       Ph.D. Cornell University
       Probabilistic and computational mechanics, fracture mechanics, stochastic finite
       element and meshless methods, and reliability-based design optimization.
       Telephone No.: (319) 335-5679
       E-mail address: rahman@engineering.uiowa.edu
       Website: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~rahman

Albert Ratner, Assistant Professor
       B.S. Eng. & Appl. Sci., California Institute of Technology, M.S. Aerospace Eng.,
       University of Michigan, M.S. Mathematics, University of Michigan, Ph.D. Aerospace
       Eng., University of Michigan
       Experimental combustion and fluid mechanics; laser diagnostics; reaction dynamics;
       gas turbine and liquid rocket instability behavior; mixing behavior; and non-Newtonian
       fluid dynamics.
       Telephone No.: (319) 384-0883
       E-mail address: albert-ratner@uiowa.edu
       Website: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/people/ratner.html

Ralph I. Stephens, Professor
       B.S. University of Illinois, M.S. University of Illinois, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin
       Fatigue, fracture mechanics, mechanical design, failure analysis, product liability
       Telephone No.: (319) 335-5682
       E-mail address: ralph-stephens@uiowa.edu
Fred Stern, Professor
       B.S.E. University of Michigan, M.S. University of Michigan, Ph.D. University of
       Michigan
       Computational and experimental fluid dynamics; ship hydrodynamics; viscous flow and
       waves; and propulsors and cavitation.
       Telephone No.: (319) 335-5215
       E-mail address: frederick-stern@uiowa.edu
       Website: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/people/staff/senior/Stern/index.html


                                               28
H. S. Udaykumar, Professor
       B. Tech. Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India
       M.S. University of Florida
       Ph.D. Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida
       Computational fluid dynamics, moving boundary problems, applications to materials
       processing, biofluid dynamics, multiphase flows and flow-structure interactions
       Telephone No.: (319) 384-0832
       E-mail address: ush@engineering.uiowa.edu

Shaoping Xiao, Associate Professor
      B.S.E. University of Science and Technology of China, M.S. University of Science and
      Technology of China, Ph.D. Northwestern University
      Solid mechanics, design optimization, computational mechanics and
      nano-mechanics, multiscale methods.
      Telephone No.: (319) 335-6009
      E-mail address: shaoping-xiao@uiowa.edu
      Website: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/~sxiao

Olesya I. Zhupanska, Assistant Professor
       Ph.D. Mechanics of Solids and Applied Mathematics, Kiev National Taras Shevchenko
       University, Ukraine, M.S. Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, Kiev National Taras
       Shevchenko University, Ukraine
       Mechanics of multifunctional composites and nanocomposites; electro-magneto-
       thermo-mechanical coupling in solids; contact problems with friction and adhesion;
       discrete element modeling.
       Telephone No.: (319) 335-5678
       E-mail address: olesya-zhupanska@uiowa.edu




                                            29
         Faculty Affiliations with Centers and Institutes


Center for Computer-Aided Design


K. K. Choi

Jia Lu
Sharif Rahman

Shaoping Xiao

Olesya I. Zhupanska


IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering

Pablo M. Carrica

Ching-Long Lin

Fred Stern

H. S. Udaykumar




                                              30
                                     Emeritus Professors

James G. Andrews, Emeritus Professor
      B.S.M.E. University of Iowa, M.S. University of Iowa
      Biomechanics, impact analysis, solid mechanics

Edward J. Haug, Emeritus Professor
      Carver Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering
      B.S. University of Missouri at Rolla, M.S. Kansas State University,
      Ph.D. Kansas State University
      Machine dynamics, applied mechanics, virtual prototyping

Robert G. Hering, Emeritus Professor
       University of Iowa Foundation Distinguished Professor of Engineering Education
       B.S. University of Illinois, M.S. University of S. California, Ph.D. Purdue University
       Heat transfer
George M. Lance, Emeritus Professor
      B.S. Case Western University, M.S. Case Western University
      Feedback control, modeling, simulation, mechanical systems
Enzo O. Macagno, Emeritus Professor
      Research Scientist (Institute of Hydraulic Research)
      Dr. Phy. Grenoble
      Biofluid mechanics, stratified flows, vortices, dimensional analysis and similitude,
      history of fluid mechanics
Donald H. Madsen, Emeritus Professor
      B.S. Iowa State University, M.S. Purdue University, Ph.D. Purdue University
      Heat transfer, thermodynamics

V.C. Patel, Professor
       University of Iowa Foundation Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering
       Director, IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering
       B.S. Hons., Aeron. Eng., London; Ph.D. University of Cambridge
       Boundary layer theory, turbulent shear flows, wind effects on structures, computational
       fluid dynamics and hydraulics
Theodore F. Smith, Emeritus Professor
      B.S.M.E. University of Illinois, M.S. University of Illinois, Ph.D. University of Illinois
      Radiative transfer, energy engineering, thermal systems


                                 Other Participating Faculty

K. Abdel-Malek (Biomedical Engineering)
J.S. Arora, Professor (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
T.D. Brown, Professor (Biomedical Engineering)
K.B. Chandran, Professor (Biomedical Engineering)
W.G. Darling, Associate Professor (Exercise Science)
J.B. Park, Professor (Biomedical Engineering)


                                                31
K. Rim, Professor (Biomedical Engineering)




                                             32
                                             APPENDIX B. CURRICULUM 2007-08
1st YEAR        Session    Course         Mechanical Engineering                                SH    Pre-Requisite or /Co-Requisite
                All       22M:031         Engineering Math I – Single Variable Calculus           4   P: H.S. Algebra & Trigonometry
    1st         F          059:005        Engineering Problem Solving I                           3
 Semester       All        004:011        Principles of Chemistry I                               4
                All        010:003        Accelerated Rhetoric (or 10:001 & 10:002)               4
                F          059:090        First-year Engineering Seminar                          1
                                                                                      Total      16
                All       22M:032         Engineering Math II – Multivariable Calculus            4   P: 22M:031
   2nd          S          059:006        Engineering Problem Solving II                          3   C: 22M:031
 Semester       F/S        029:081        Introductory Physics I                                  4   C: 22M:031
                All       22M:033         Engineering Math III – Matrix Algebra                   2   P: 22M:031; C:22M:032
                All                       General Education Component #1                          3
2nd YEAR                                                                              Total      16
                All       22M:034         Engineering Math IV – Differential Equations            3   P: 22M:033
    1st         F/S        029:082        Introductory Physics II (without lab)                   3   P: 029:081; C:22M:032
 Semester       All        059:007        Engineering Fundamentals I – Statics                    2   P: 22M:031; C: 029:081
                F/S        059:008        Engineering Fundamentals II – Electrical Circuits       3   C: 22M:034
                All        059:009        Engineering Fundamentals III - Thermodynamics           3   P: 22M:031, 004:011, 029:081
                All                       General Education Component #2                          3
                F          058:020        ME Sophomore Seminar                                    0   Sophomore Status
                                                                                      Total      17
                F/S        057:015        Materials Science                                       3   P: 004:011; C: 22M:031
   2nd          All        057:019        Mechanics of Deformable Bodies                          3   P: 059:007; C: 22M:034
 Semester       F/S        058:032    $   Design for Manufacturing                                3   C: 057:015
                All        057:010        Dynamics                                                3   P: 059:007, 22M:031
                All                       Elective Focus Area 1                                   3
3rd YEAR                                                                              Total      15
                F/S       22M:037         Engineering Math V – Vector Calculus                    3   P: 22M:034
    1st         F/S        057:020        Fluid Mechanics                                         4   P: 22M:032, 057:010; C: 059:009
 Semester       F/S        22S:039        Probability & Statistics for Engineers                  3   P: 22M:032
                All        057:018        Principles of Electronic Instrumentation                4   P: 059:008
                F/S        058:091    $   Professional Seminar: Mechanical Engineering            0   Junior Status
                All                       Elective Focus Area 2                                   3
                                                                                      Total      17
                S          058:040        Thermodynamics II                                       3   P: 22M:031, 059:009
   2nd          S          058:045        Heat Transfer                                           3   P: 057:020, 22M:037
 Semester       S          058:052        Mechanical Systems                                      3   P: 057:019; C:058:032, 057:015, 22S:039
                All                       Elective Focus Area 3                                   3
                All                       General Education Component #3                          3
4th YEAR                                                                              Total      15
                F          058:048        Energy Systems Design                                   4   P: 058:045, 058:040
    1st         F          058:055        Mechanical Systems Design                               4   P: 058:052
 Semester       All                       Elective Focus Area 4                                   3
                All                       Elective Focus Area 5                                   3
                All                       General Education Component #4                          3
                F/S        058:091    $   Professional Seminar: Mechanical Engineering            0   Junior status
                                                                                      Total      17
                F/S        058:086   $    Mechanical Engineering Design Project                   3   C: 058:048 or 058:055
   2nd          F/S        058:080   $    Experimental Engineering                                4   P: 057:018; C: 058:052, 058:045
 Semester       All                       Elective Focus Area 6                                   3
                All                       Elective Focus Area 7                                   3
                All                       General Education Component #5                          3
                                                                                      Total      16

            $     058:086/058:080 may be taken in Fall or Spring semester of the Senior year.




                                                                   33
FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT: Satisfactory completion of 2 years of one high school foreign
language or 1 year of one college-level foreign language is required for first year students graduating from high
school in 1990 and after; transfer students, 1991 and after.




                                                        34
                      APPENDIX C.

STANDARD ELECTIVE FOCUS AREAS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING




                          35
36
becker@engineering.uiowa.edu




                               37
38
                           APPENDIX D. PLAN OF STUDY


  Mechanical Engineering Plan of Study
              Return to the MIE Office in 3131 SC

                 Name:_______________________ Student
                       ID:___________________
  Career Goal:
  ______________________________________________________________________________________
  ______________________________________________________________________________________
  ______________________________________________________________________________________
  ______________________________________________________

             Mechanical Engineering EFA’s
       Design
       Energy and Environment
       Manufacturing and Materials Processing

       Year            Semester           Course #        Course Name           SH




                                                                                Date

Student Signature:
Advisor Approval:
                                            39
          Mechanical Engineering Plan of Study
             Tailored Elective Focus Area
                         Return to the MIE Office in 3131 SC


Name:                                                                       Student ID:

Career Goal: ________________________________________________




                            Minor or Certificate Programs
  Technological Entrepreneurship Certificate
  Management
  Math Minor
  Physics or Chemistry
  Other


  Year         Semester        Course #                     Course Name                          SH




                                          Total Semester 21 Hours minimum                   _______

        GEC COMPONENT (Complete Following Table ONLY IF GEC courses complement EFA)
  Year         Semester        Course #                      Course Name                         SH




                                          Total Semester 15 Hours minimum                   ______
                                                                                          Date


Student Signature:

Advisor Approval:

Dept. Chair Approval:

                                                40
41
42
43
APPENDIX E. PASS/NONPASS FORM




             44
APPENDIX F. SECOND-GRADE OPTION FORM




                 45
                        APPENDIX G. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT
                       Regulations Dealing with Academic Misconduct
                                              August 1980
The College of Engineering endorses the policies and rights of students as printed in the “Policies and
Regulations Affecting Students” of The University of Iowa. Under Section 1 in the Code of Student Life,
which appears in the above publication and has been adopted by The College of Engineering Faculty, the
College has the authority to handle acts of academic misconduct, which are defined in Section 1 as:
      “Academic dishonesty, including the acquisition of honors, awards, certification or
      professional endorsements, degrees, academic credits, or grades by means of cheating,
      plagiarism, or falsification with respect to any examination, paper, project, application,
      recommendation, transcript, or test or by any other dishonest means whatsoever, or aiding
      or abetting another student to do so.”
The following regulations provide a procedure for dealing with students who are alleged to have committed
an act of academic misconduct:
1.    Guidelines for Disciplinary Action by an Instructor
      a. Exams: In cases of cheating on hourly or final exams, it is recommended that the instructor
      reduce the student’s grade, including the assignment of the grade of “F” in the course. When a
      course grade has been reduced to an “F”, the student may not drop the course, nor use the Second
      Grade Option procedure to eliminate the failing grade from semester and cumulative GPA values
      that appear on the permanent record card (i.e., the grade transcript). It is recommended that cheating
      on quizzes be considered as serious a violation as on exams and that the penalty be similar. The
      instructor shall send a written report of any disciplinary action to the Office of the Dean and the
      report shall be placed in the student’s file.
      b. Homework, Lab Reports, etc: Each instructor shall announce at the beginning of each course
      the acceptable policies on student collaboration in each of the graded course requirements. When
      the policy is clearly violated, a zero shall be assigned for the total portion of the course grade
      allocated to the requirement in which the violation occurred (e.g., a zero for all homework
      assignments if cheating occurred on a homework assignment). A written report of this action shall
      be sent by the instructor to the Office of the Dean and placed in the student’s file.

2.    Student Appeal
      When a written report of disciplinary action by an instructor is received by the Office of the Dean,
      the student shall be notified in writing of the action. If the student feels that the finding of cheating
      is in error or the penalty is unjust, the student may request a hearing by notifying in writing the
      associate dean of the College, who will in turn appoint a committee to review the incident. If the
      student is not satisfied with the results of the hearing, the student may request a review by the Office
      of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
3.    Disciplinary Action by the Dean
      In cases of flagrant or a second offense, the dean of the College may impose the following or other
      penalties as the offense may warrant: cancellation of the student’s registration, disciplinary
      probation, suspension from the College, or recommendation of expulsion from the University by the
      President. If the student feels that the penalty imposed by the dean is unjust, the student may request
      a review by the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

4.    Record of Disciplinary Action
      Reports of academic misconduct received by the Office of the Dean shall be placed in the involved
      student’s file maintained in the Office of the Dean. The Office of the Dean shall notify the student
      of each report and the right of the student to request a hearing for review of the case. The reports
      shall be destroyed when the student graduates or within two years after the student leaves the
      University.
(These regulations are based on the recommendations of the Ad-Hoc Committee on Student Academic
Conduct which were approved by the Faculty on April 29, 1980.)
7/31/95 jam




                                                     46
                         APPENDIX H. STUDENT COMPLAINTS

                       College of Engineering Informal Procedure for
                      Student Complaints Concerning Faculty Actions

       In cases where complaints do not involve alleged student academic misconduct, students

with complaints against faculty should first attempt to resolve the issue with the faculty member

against whom there is a complaint. Lacking a satisfactory outcome, the student should discuss
the matter with the Chairperson of the faculty member's department.

       Students who are uncomfortable with dealing directly with a faculty member or a

Department Chairperson may seek assistance from the College of Engineering Faculty

Ombudsman when attempting to resolve a complaint. The College of Engineering Faculty

Ombudsman is a mediator appointed on behalf of all engineering students. If the student is not

satisfied with the outcome of this procedure, the student should discuss the complaint with the

Dean of the College of Engineering.




                                                  47
APPENDIX I. SEXUAL HARASSMENT




             48
49
50
                        APPENDIX J. COMPUTER RESOURCES
                          Acceptable Use Policy for Computing Resources
                                   The College of Engineering
                              Computer Systems and Support (CSS)

    The intent of this document is to provide guidelines for a fair and equitable distribution of
computing resources for users of the Engineering Computer Network (ECN) as administered by
CSS for the College of Engineering. The practices described here seek to allow for individual
flexibility, while not encroaching on the use of the facilities by others.
    The operation of Engineering Computer Network facilities shall be in accordance with the
University of Iowa's Policy on Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources. The full
text of the policy is available at http://www.uiowa.edu/homepage/policy/aup.html as part of
University’s Operations Manual. All account owners are responsible for knowing and abiding by
the guidelines and responsibilities set forth in this document.

Goals
    The goals of this organization are to support the curricular and research needs of the College,
ensure the best allocation of equipment and software resources, provide safeguards against
unauthorized access to the system, and promote a working environment that respects and values
the rights of all users.

Access to Computing Resources

    All College of Engineering students are given an Engineering computer account for the
duration of their enrollment in the College of Engineering. During any semester that the student is
not registered for classes, the account may be temporarily inactivated. Access to the computing
resource will be terminated one month after the start of the semester that follows graduation or
when a student leaves the College of Engineering for any reason.
    Any non–Engineering student taking an engineering course is eligible for an account for the
duration of the semester in which they take the course. The account is inactivated at the end of the
semester.
    All College of Engineering faculty and staff are eligible for an Engineering account for the
duration of their employment with the College of Engineering. Access to the computing resource
will be terminated immediately upon notification that an individual is no longer employed by the
College of Engineering.

CSS Responsibilities

    As a provider of computing services, CSS is responsible for delivering a reliable, effective,
and secure
computing environment. We pledge to provide the following:

    •   Reasonable safeguards against unauthorized access to your account.
    •   Data recovery in the case of equipment failure that results in a loss of information.
    •   Access to the computing resource twenty–four hours, seven days a week during the
        semester except during periodic maintenance, unexpected equipment failures, installation
        of critical operating system patches, loss of power, and any other crisis that may interrupt
        service.
    •   Regular upgrades of hardware and software to support the College's computing needs.
    •   User assistance and consulting support on use of the computing facilities.

Account Owner Responsibilities




                                                51
    All account holders are responsible for abiding by the University of Iowa's Policy on
Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources (see above). The following additional
responsibilities are in effect for anyone accessing the CSS facilities.
    •   Use the computing resources solely to pursue the educational mission of the College of
        Engineering and in an efficient, ethical, and legal manner. Contribute to a working
        environment that encourages effective study and work for all users. This includes, but is
        not limited to, an environment free from loud talking, the playing of loud music, sound
        from computer games, offensive graphics on computer screens, and graphic or vulgar
        language and gestures that demean individuals.
    •   Maintain the integrity and security of your account by keeping your password
        confidential. Report any suspected unauthorized access to your account and change your
        password immediately. Maintain the privacy of your account by not loaning it to anyone.
    •   Abide by the “Suggested Good Practices” described below in order to maintain equitable
        use of the resource for all users.
    •   Use College-provided commercial software to support the educational and research
        mission of the College of Engineering.

Philosophy of Use

    CSS will make every effort to evaluate individual user actions on a case-by-case basis. If a
particular program or process is unduly reducing the availability of network resources, or is
creating a disruption in the study climate of a facility, then this activity is subject to actions that
will restore service to the larger community. Specifically, steps will be taken to protect the files of
users and to maintain sufficient processing resources to allow persons to access and perform work
with their accounts. Actions taken will be determined by current system load on the network,
severity of the offense, previous misconduct history by an individual, and any extenuating
circumstances. Actions may include, but are not limited to, email notification of the situation,
requests for clarifying information, termination of processes, and account suspension.

Suggested Good Practices
The following guidelines are always in effect, whether you are working in a private office or
using a public
lab.
     • Make regular backups of your account for file recovery in case of accidental deletion.
     • Maintain a working environment that allows effective study and work for all users.
     • If you receive unsolicited email from within the College and prefer not to receive
         subsequent mailings, speak with the sender and ask that your name be removed from
         subsequent mailings.
     • If an account owner requests that s/he be removed from mass mailings, honor that
request.

   It is particularly important to adhere to these practices at peak network usage times, which are
generally between 9:00am and 10:00pm, Monday through Friday.
    •   Confine your computer access to two active sessions on the Engineering Computer
        Network. If you are seated at and logged into a Unix workstation or a Windows NT
        machine, that is one session; if you ssh or telnet to another machine, that is the second
        session. When coming into the ECN remotely (outside SC or CC) via telnet, the telnet to
        login.engineering.uiowa.edu is one active session; if you ssh or telnet to another machine,
        that is the second session. Use the hostname login.engineering.uiowa.edu for remote
        access to the ECN.
    •   Limit yourself to two concurrent background jobs. This means two jobs total for the
        entire network, not two jobs per machine. Good practice would be to start the two jobs on
        two different machines, in order to distribute the load. All background jobs on
        Engineering workstations must be set to run at a lower priority.
    •   Limit game playing to those times when a lab is not crowded. Use of the facilities for
        study always takes precedence over game playing.



                                                  52
    •   Refrain from running server programs. Execution of server programs is expressly
        prohibited when 1) the program continues to run after you log out; 2) the program is not
        related to the study of engineering; 3) the program duplicates services already provided
        on the network (e.g., a Web server). Please consult with CSS staff if this policy
        negatively impacts academic needs.

    While it is impossible to enumerate all situations that might require action, these suggested
good practices provide expectations and guidelines of conduct.
    If you have a situation that might require deviation from these practices, or you have a
question as to whether an activity may fall outside these guidelines, please consult CSS staff to
coordinate any special requirements. These may include relaxed background job priority, extra
process allowances, or extra disk space. Every effort will be made to coordinate with individual
users and to accommodate the bona fide needs of study and research.




                                               53
APPENDIX K. COUNSELING RESOURCES




               54
APPENDIX L. ADD/DROP FORM




           55
APPENDIX M. PETITION FORM




           56
APPENDIX N. APPLICATION FOR A DEGREE FORM




                   57
APPENDIX O. WITHDRAWAL CARD




            58
       APPENDIX P. MAJOR and/or CURRICULUM CHANGE REQUEST
                                 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
        ADVISOR / MAJOR / SUBTRACK CHANGE REQUEST
Name                                                                ID Number ______________

                           REQUEST FOR ADVISER CHANGE
The new adviser I'd like is (New Adviser)
      (or)
Second choice                  ________      OR      Any available New Adviser
_____

Please note: All advisors are not available during every semester

                             REQUEST TO CHANGE MAJOR

Change my current major to: (Please circle one)       BME (511)      CBE (512)   CEE (513)

                                                      ECE (515)       IE (516)    ME (518)

(Civil major only) select one:    General         Environmental

            SUBTRACK CHANGE (CIVIL ENGINEERING MAJORS Only!)

Current subtrack: _____________________ Change to New subtrack: General                         Environmental

          Student Signature _______________________________________ Date
                            ___________________________

                                 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
        ADVISOR / MAJOR / SUBTRACK CHANGE REQUEST
Name                                                                ID Number ______________

                           REQUEST FOR ADVISER CHANGE

The new adviser I'd like is (New Adviser)
      (or)
Second choice                  ________              OR             Any available New Adviser
_____

Please note: All advisors are not available during every semester

                             REQUEST TO CHANGE MAJOR

Change my current major to: (Please circle one)       BME (511)      CBE (512)   CEE (513)

                                                      ECE (515)       IE (516)    ME (518)



                                             59
 (Civil major only) select one: General Environmental
            SUBTRACK CHANGE (CIVIL ENGINEERING MAJORS Only!)

 Current subtrack: _____________________ Change to New subtrack: General                                 Environmental

            Student Signature _______________________________________ Date
                              ___________________________


                                  COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
                        CURRICULUM CHANGE REQUEST
 Name                                                                   ID Number_______________

                                    CHANGE IN CURRICULUM
If new requirements have been approved for your major, and you wish to be held to the NEW requirements

instead of your CURRENT requirements, check this box
                CURRENT CURRICULUM GUIDES ARE AVAILABLE AT THE FRONT DESK
      PLEASE SEE YOUR DEPARTMENTAL ADVISER BEFORE
                   MAKING THIS CHANGE

                                           Change to 200_

    Student Signature

                           Date

                                  COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
                        CURRICULUM CHANGE REQUEST
 Name                                                                   ID Number ______________

                                    CHANGE IN CURRICULUM
If new requirements have been approved for your major, and you wish to be held to the NEW requirements

instead of your CURRENT requirements, check this box
                CURRENT CURRICULUM GUIDES ARE AVAILABLE AT THE FRONT DESK
      PLEASE SEE YOUR DEPARTMENTAL ADVISER BEFORE
                   MAKING THIS CHANGE

                                           Change to 200_

    Student Signature

                           Date




                                                 60
APPENDIX Q. GRADUATION ANALYSIS




              61
APPENDIX R. APPLICATION FOR PARTICIPATION IN COMBINED

                  DEGREE PROGRAM




                         62
APPENDIX S. WITHDRAWAL FROM COMBINED DEGREE PROGRAM




                        63
APPENDIX T. NOTES




       64

								
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