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									    Financial Literacy in CWS and SSH:
         An OHASSTA-OHHSSCA
           Collaborative Project



                                                                              Ontario History and Social Sciences Teachers'




                  Ontario History and Social Sciences Teachers' Association




                              Financial Literacy Lesson Plan CHV20



                     Funding from the Ontario Ministry of Education
                                         2011




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
                  Financial Literacy Lesson Plan – CHV20 Social, Ethical and Environmental
                     Implications of a City Budget and Connections to Active Citizenship


Connections to Financial Literacy
In this four day lesson, students will learn about how cities and towns (using the capital of Ontario, Toronto as an example) create budgets and
analyze the social, ethical and environmental implications of their financial decisions. Students will work individually, in pairs and in groups, using
various forms of media, to work toward a mock public consultation at City Hall to decide upon changes to the city budget. Students will also write a
letter to their City Councilor. This series of lessons will address the needs of different learners, as well as empower and encourage students to be
lifelong active citizens.

The financial literacy knowledge and skills which will be addressed and assessed in these lessons include

     social, ethical and environmental implications of financial decisions;
     active citizenship;
     understanding the economy;
     planning for the future.

                                                                                              Subject/Course
Days 1-4
                                                                                              Code/Title/Curriculum Policy
Curriculum Expectations                                                                       Learning Goals
Informed Citizenship – Overall                                                                At the end of these lessons, students will be able to:
    - demonstrate an understanding of the need for democratic decision making;                         understand the basic elements of a city/town
    -   explain the legal rights and responsibilities associated with Canadian                          budget,
       citizenship;                                                                                    write a letter to a politician;
                                                                                                       critically analyze two sides of an issue and
    - describe the main structures and functions of municipal, provincial, and federal                  articulate a conclusion in writing,
       governmentsin Canada;
                                                                                                       analyze the social, ethical and environmental
Informed Citizenship – Specific
                                                                                                        implications of a decision taking into account
    Democratic Decision Making
                                                                                                        the democratic principles that underlie that
     -   explain the causes of civic conflict and how decision-making processes and                     process;
         structures can avert or respond to such conflicts (e.g., by ensuring that
                                                                                                    and, be able to demonstrate their learning in
         individual and community needs are met, by developing strategies for
                                                                                                        a summative task to be evaluated by the
         adapting to change);
     Functions of the Three Levels of Government in Canada                                              teacher.
     - compare how laws, regulations, public policies, and decisions are made and
         enforced at the municipal, provincial and federal levels

Purposeful Citizenship - Overall
    -   demonstrate an understanding of the beliefs and values underlying
        democratic citizenship and explain how they guide citizens’ actions;
    -   analyse responses, at the local, national, and international levels, to civic
        issues that involve multiple perspectives and differing civic purposes.
Purposeful Citizenship - Specific
   Diversity of Beliefs and Values
    -    compare the varied beliefs, values, and points of view of Canadian citizens
        on issues of public interest (e.g., freedom of information, censorship, health
        care funding, pollution, water quality, nuclear power, taxation, casinos);

Active Citizenship - Overall
     -    apply appropriate inquiry skills to the research of questions and issues of civic
          importance;
     -     demonstrate an understanding of the various ways in which decisions are
          made and conflicts resolved in matters of civic importance, and the various
          ways in which individual citizen participate in these processes .
 Active Citizenship - Specific
    The Resolution of Public Issues and Citizenship Participation
     -    analyse important contemporary cases and issues that have been decided or
          resolved through the public process of policy formation and decision making
          (e.g., mandatory retirement, censorship, racial profiling), taking into account
          the democratic principles that underlie that process;
     -     demonstrate an understanding of their responsibilities as local, national, and
           global citizens by applying their knowledge of civics, and skills related to
           purposeful and active citizenship, to a project of personal interest and civic
           importance.
   All inquiry skills covered




                Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
Instructional Components and Context
Readiness                                            Materials
It would be beneficial to students to have           Lesson/day 1
learned the skills required for effective                    BLM 1 City of Toronto Budget.
cooperative learning such as mutual                          BLM 2 Public Consultation
interdependence, active listening, and division              BLM 3 Choices!Choices!Choices!
of labour.
                                                     Lesson/day 2
Students will also have to be familiar with the              Students need to have access to computers to conduct research
jurisdiction of the three levels of government, in           Alternatively, students can do the research at home for homework and/or the
particular the jurisdiction of the municipal                  teacher (working with the teacher-librarian) can bring in articles from local
government.                                                   newspapers (hard copy or online) outlining local issues.Toronto.ca is another
                                                              appropriate resource for this purpose
Furthermore, students should be familiar with                BLM 3 Choices! Choices! Choices!
leadership, political representation and decision
making processes at the municipal level (e.g.        Lesson/day 3
Mayor’s/Reeve’s role, responsibilities of the City           BLM 3 Choices!Choices!Choices!
Councilor, and how bylaws are passed).
                                                     Lesson/day 4
Terminology                                                  BLM 4 Write a Letter to Your City Councillor
Budget                                                       Basic white mailing envelopes for students who choose to mail their letters to
Municipal government                                          their City Councillor
User fees                                                    Lined paper for students who wish to handwrite their letters to their City
Operating budget                                              Councillor
Capital budget
Public consultation                                  Optional: Lesson/day 5
City Councilor, Mayor, Deputy Mayor                          BLM 4 Write a Letter to Your City Councillor




               Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
                 DAY/LESSON 1

Minds On – 15 minutes
                                                                                                           Assessment for learning
In this first lesson, the teacher will provide a hook to this series of lessons by presenting a personal
budgeting scenario to students and have them make a connection to budgeting at the municipal level.

Working and discussing in groups of 3-4, students will discuss the
situation below.

Description:

The teacher will ask students to imagine in their groups that one of the group
members needs to save up for a gaming system (WII, PSP, Xbox) valued at
$300.00 over the next four months.

The group will choose one member to apply this scenario and identify ways that
student could realistically earn extra money or cut expenses in other areas of
his/her life to afford this product.

The groups should brainstorm and write down their ideas quickly - only 5
minutes.

The teacher can ask two groups to volunteer their responses, and ask what
difficulties they may have had in their decision making. Most students will likely
have had difficulty in cutting expenses.

Then the teacher will introduce the series of lessons to follow and explain to
students that creating a municipal budget is complicated but involves the same
basic level of decision making they just experienced in their groups. Cities
cannot afford to go into debt and must make decisions every year to maintain
their revenue. City Councilors and Mayors work together to cut expenses or
raise taxes and/or user fees in order to maintain a responsible budget.




                 Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
Action! – 55 minutes
Students will review the City of Toronto’s most recent budget, discuss a                                  Assessment for learning
few areas of contention, and learn about the role of public consultations in
municipal decision making.                                                                              The visual component of
                                                                                                  this activity will appeal to this type
                                                                                                  of learner.
Whole class, pairs.

Description:

Distribute the budget for the City of Toronto (BLM 1) and explain the document
to the class. It is not necessary to get into great detail or speak to any technical
aspects of the budget. Students should generally be able to understand how the
city generates revenue, and the major areas of expenditure. (15 minutes)

Then distribute BLM 2, Public Consultations, and explain to students that
municipal decision makers do value public input and that public consultations are
an important part of the democratic decision making process. (3 minutes)
                                                                                                  Extension opportunity: the teacher could
Explain to students that in 2011, the City of Toronto must make/made significant                  bring in newspaper articles about these
adjustments to their budget as a result of cost-cutting campaign promises made                    issues; alternatively, students can bring in
by the Mayor. Some examples of proposed changes include:                                          articles. The teacher may also choose to
    - Closing public libraries                                                                    bring in materials pertaining to the
                                                                                                  outcome of previous public consultations
    - Raising public transit fares
                                                                                                  (perhaps liasing with the teacher-
    - Imposing user fees for use of public parks                                                  librarian).
    - Drastically reducing the number of police officers, and asking officers to
        patrol on their own instead of pairs during the day

Lead a class discussion on these proposals. (20 minutes)

Explain to students that their responses are much like those elicited at public
consultations where members of the public can express their own opinions on
such changes to the budget. (2 minutes)

Distribute BLM 3, Choices! Choices! Choices!, and have students work in pairs
to brainstorm for this activity. In case of odd numbers, students can work in
groups of 3. (15 minutes)




Consolidation – 5 minutes
Review the learning for the lesson and instruct students that the lesson will continue the next
day/class. The teacher might choose to collect the worksheets and return it to students the
following day, or allow the students to bring the worksheets back on their own.




               Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
                 DAY /LESSON 2


Minds On – 5 minutes
Review of previous learning

Introduction of the next part of the lesson


Students will continue to work in their pairs from the previous day/class.

Description:

Review the lesson from the previous day and instruct students to conduct
research. In the computer lab, this would include a search of local newspapers
(check the school library access to databases) and Toronto.ca.

Also, inform students that they must each use the postal code of their residence
to search for their City Councilor from their municipality’s website for another
related activity. They should write down the Councilor’s name, ward, email
address and postal code in their notes.

Action! – 60 minutes
Research, sharing of information, individual work - pair, group and individual work.              Assessment as learning


                                                                                                 The kinaesthetic and visual
                                                                                             component of this activity will
                                                                                             appeal to this type of learner.
Pair, group (4-5), and individual work.

In pairs, students will conduct research before completing the table in BLM 3. (40
minutes)

Snowball: Instruct students in pairs to form a group of 4 with another pair of
students. Students will follow instructions according to BLM 3 to compare tables
and complete exit slips individually. (20 minutes)




Consolidation – 10 minutes                                                                        Assessment as learning

.



Circulate as students are completing exit slips to ensure students understand the task and
are on task. Collect the exit slips for assessment.




                 Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
                 DAY /LESSON 3


Minds On - 10 minutes
Review of previous learning                                                                            Assessment for learning
Introduction of the next part of the lesson


Class and individual work.
Description:
Review the previous lessons and introduce the next part of the lesson.

Distribute BLM 4 and ask students what their goals for public consultation (next lesson)
will be as a class. Points for discussion should include:
      -   How will they select the Mayor and Deputy Mayor?
      -   How long will delegates be allowed to speak at the consultation? (modify times
          on BLM if there is consensus)
      -   What is the most ideal outcome in a democracy? In other words, how does the
          group make a decision that is in the interest of the greater good?

Explain to students that no marks are associated with the consultation simulation and that
they should enjoy the fun and interesting learning experience without the pressure! After
all, they will be evaluated on their report and letter. (This will also address the issue to
evaluating students who are absent during the consultation simulation)

Action! – 60
                                                                                                         Assessment of learning
Preparing for the public consultation

                                                                                                     Differentiation of product
                                                                                               based on readiness, interest, or
                                                                                               learning

Individual and group (3-4) work.

Instruct students to reconvene in their groups from the previous lesson.

Using BLM 4, students will complete one group report in class. The teacher will                Both of these activities can be completed
                                                                                               for homework if students require more
circulate to ensure that all students are contributing to the task. All students must
                                                                                               time.
write part of the report in their own handwriting. The teacher can assign specific
parts of the report to specific students based on their strengths.
The students will also choose one delegate to be the main speaker at the
consultation. The teacher can assist groups in choosing their representative or
select one at random (e.g. pick a number from 1 to 10). (30 minutes)

Note: One student will have to lead the discussion at the consultation meeting as
the Mayor. Another student will act as Deputy Mayor and keep the speaker’s list.
The teacher will decide how these leaders are chosen based on the nature of
students/class dynamics. These students should then be instructed to dress and
behave according to their roles.


Then, each student will write a letter to their City Councilor, using the format
outlined in BLM 4. (30 minutes)
Consolidation – 10 minutes
Review and preparation for next lesson.



Review the expectation for the public consultation at the next lesson.
                                                                                               If there is time or inclination, students
                                                                                               could create placards with name of
Instruct students to dress in role – business casual.                                          delegates.


                 Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
                 Day /Lesson 4

Minds On - 10 minutes
Review expectations for the public consultation.

Collect outstanding work.


Group and individual work.
                                                                                        Option: post the public
Review BLM 4 and expectations for the public consultation.                              consultation notice (see BLM 2)
                                                                                        on the door of the classroom and
Announce that reports and letters will be collected at the end of the class. Let        set up desks to look like City Hall
students know that they will either email or mail letters after they have been          (horseshoes).
evaluated. Option: students may peer edit letters at some point before collecting
letters (e.g. could be done the following day).

Allow students a few minutes to convene in groups to prepare for the activity.



Action! – 60
                                                                                               Assessment as learning
Public consultation activity.                                                                  Assessment of learning


                                                                                              Differentiation of product
                                                                                        based on readiness, interest, or
                                                                                        learning

Individual and group work.

Follow format outlined in BLM 4.2 for consultation simulation. Remind students
who are not speaking to complete the exit slips.
                                                                                        .




Consolidation – 5 minutes
Vote and exit slips.



Vote on a resolution and collect exit slips.

Debrief activity in next lesson (following day).

                 OPTION FOR EXTENSION OF LESSONS INTO DAY/LESSON 5 TO PROVIDE FOR MORE
                 ASSESSMENT AS LEARNING:
                    1. The teacher instructs students (with input from class) how to write a formal letter using
                       the letter template in the BLM. This could include a discussion around effective and
                       ineffective letter writing. If the teacher has access to technology such as a data projector
                       and computer, he/she can type up a collaborative class “exemplar” letter.
                    2. The teacher will guide students to peer edit letters to City Councilors using the teacher
                       rubric as a checklist. Students can then take home edited letters for final revision before
                       submitting them for evaluation.

                 Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 1 Page 1 of 4

                               BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF TORONTO

Source: City of Toronto: Our Toronto Publication.
http://www.toronto.ca/ourtoronto/spring2011/governmentaffairs/article02.utf8.htm. July 18,
2011.

Budget 2011

City Council has approved the 2011 tax supported and utility rate budgets totalling $13.326
billion. The budget achieves the Mayor’s budget directions and is balanced; does not require any
major service cuts; and does not include increases to either residential or non-residential property
tax rates.

In addition to approving the City’s tax supported Operating and Capital Budgets, separate capital
and operating budgets were approved for the City’s utilities – specifically Solid Waste
Management and Toronto Water.

Operating Budget
The approved 2011 tax supported Operating Budget is $9.383 billion and maintains the City’s
services at 2010 levels. The day-to-day operation of City services is paid for from the City’s
Operating Budget – the money dedicated to salaries and operating expenses such as rent, fuel,
electricity and equipment. The delivery of City services such as police, fire, emergency medical
services, TTC, waste collection and recycling, libraries, parks and recreation, child care and many
others are paid for through the City’s Operating Budget.

Capital Budget
The 2011 tax supported Capital Budget is $2.016 billion and is part of a 10 year 2011-2020
Capital Budget and Plan of $12.755 billion. The City’s Capital Budget pays for construction and
maintenance of roads, the purchase of transit vehicles, the building of major facilities, and the
purchase of major equipment. The budget funds the maintenance and construction of City assets
and infrastructure needed to support service to residents and businesses.

Toronto Water Budget
The rate-supported Toronto Water Operating Budget is $821 million, the Capital Budget is $560
million and the 2011-2020 Capital Plan is $8.628 billion. The 2011 water rate increase is nine per
cent for residential or $56 per year, and between 7.16 per cent and 7.57 per cent for industrial,
depending on consumption. The daily cost for all residential water, wastewater and stormwater
services is $1.85 per day. This is an increase of 16 cents per household per day for 2011.

Solid Waste Management Budget
The 2011 rate-supported Operating Budget for Solid Waste Management is $343 million with a
Capital Budget of $98 million and a 10 year Capital Plan of $469 million. The 2011 rate increase
for Solid Waste Management is 3 per cent, which represents an increase of $6 per household per
year.

Looking forward to 2012
In the longer term, Toronto’s operating funding shortfall will require the City to reduce spending
and increase revenues in order to eliminate the funding gap.

The starting financial pressure in 2012 is projected to be $530 million assuming a modest surplus
in 2011 and a property tax increase at the rate of inflation in 2012. Offsetting this pressure will
take a concerted effort over the coming months.




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 1 Page 2 of 4

In spite of the challenges, Toronto’s strength is that it has one of the highest possible credit
ratings, residential property tax rates are among lowest in Ontario and the revenue base is more
diversified than other municipalities in Ontario.

toronto.ca/budget2011




Where does the money come from (Operating Budget)?




*MLTT - Municipal Land Transfer Tax

*Other Revenues include:

        Municipal Land Transfer Tax
        Third Party Sign Tax
        Interest/Investment Earnings
        Other Corporate Revenues
        Gaming & Registry Revenues




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 1 Page 3 of 4

What will the City’s Capital Budget plan be spent on? [Assets and improvements - must
have future value]




Other Capital Programs include:

        Economic Development and Culture
        Toronto Public Library
        Long Term Care
        GO Transit
        Waterfront
        Toronto Employment & Social Services




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 1 Page 4 of 4

Where does the money go (Operating Budget)? [Cover expenses that may not have future
value]




Other Expenditures include:

        Tax Deficiencies/Write-offs
        Assessment Function (MPAC)
        Temporary Borrowing
        Funding of Employee Related Liabilities
        Programs Funded from Reserve Fund
        Other Corporate Expenditures
        Insurance Premiums & Claims
        Parking Tag Enforcement & Operation
        Vacancy Rebate Program
        Street & Expressway Lighting Services
        Pandemic Influenza
        Solid Waste Management Services Rebate




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 2 Page 1 of 2
                                     PUBLIC CONSULTATIONS
Source: City of Toronto: City Budget 2001 – Presentation and Assignments.
http://www.toronto.ca/budget2011/ads.htm. July 18, 2011.
Public Consultations

The City of Toronto holds public consultations as one way to engage residents in the life of their
city. Toronto thrives on your great ideas and actions. We invite you to get involved.

If you would like to get involved in other public consultations we encourage you to visit the
consultations website.

                              Discussion about Toronto’s 2011 Budget

The City of Toronto is now considering the 2011 Budget. You were invited to make a public
presentation to make your views known about the 2011 Budget on _____________________.
These meetings were held to enhance public participation in the City of Toronto’s budget process.

[Ps consultation dates and locations]
North York

Date: January 19, 2011
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: North York Civic Centre
Council Chamber
5100 Yonge St.
(Yonge St. five blocks north of Sheppard Ave. Public transit: subway to North York Centre station)

Scarborough

Date: January 20, 2011
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: Scarborough Civic Centre Council Chamber
150 Borough Dr.
(North-west corner of McCowan Rd. and Ellesmere Rd. Public transit:
subway to Kennedy, then LRT to Scarborough Town Centre)

East York and Toronto

Date: January 19, 2011
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: East York Civic Centre Council Chamber
850 Coxwell Ave.
(North-west corner of Coxwell Ave. and Mortimer Ave. Public transit: subway to Coxwell, then
O’Connor bus #70 north on Coxwell)


BLM 2 Page 2 of 2
Etobicoke-York

Date: January 20, 2011
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: York Civic Centre Council Chamber
2700 Eglinton Ave. W.
(1 block west of Keele St. north side. Public transit: subway to either Keele (Bloor line) and then
Keele bus #41 or Eglinton W. (University/Spadina line) and then Eglinton bus #32)



Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
If you wish to address the Budget Sub-Committees, please notify the City Clerk, Budget
Committee, by calling 416-392-1032 or 416-397-7768, or e-mail buc@toronto.ca no later than
12 p.m. on January 18, 2011, indicating your preferred date and location. There will be a 5
minute time limit for each presentation.

If you are unable to attend one of these four meetings, send a written presentation about the
2011 Budget, attention:

Merle MacDonald
City Clerk’s Office
100 Queen Street W.
Toronto City Hall
10th floor, West Tower
Toronto, ON M5H 2N2
or by email to buc@toronto.ca or fax 416-392-1879

You can also contact your local Councilor. For more information visit www.toronto.ca, email
311@toronto.ca or call 311.

Interpretation services may be arranged in advance of the meeting.

Information will be collected in accordance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and
Protection of Privacy Act. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become
part of the public record.




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 3 Page 1 of 3
                                     CHOICES! CHOICES! CHOICES!
Task: Step 1
In pairs, using the list below, identify three (3) areas in either the operating budget or capital
budget where the city of Toronto can make significant cuts or increase fees to reduce debt.
Choose from the list below. In the table, identify the cut or increase, your rationale or reason for
it, and the negative and or positive implications of your decisions.
          The social implications of your decisions include how individual and group behaviour
          would be affected. For example, if you introduced user fees for the use of public parks, it
          is likely that some people would use the better maintained parks more while others who
          could not afford the fees would use parks less. Other effects could include people being
          less active or an increase in tourism to some parks over others. So, there can be positive
          and negative outcomes.
          The ethical implications of your actions include whether you think the decision would be
          the right or fair thing to do. For example, if access to low-income housing (for those who
          can’t afford regular rent such as single parents or those with disabilities) were limited as a
          result of funding cuts, is this fair and/or the right thing to do? Think about the benefits and
          the consequences of this type of action.
          When making cuts or increases to user fees or taxes, the environment is always affected.
          For example, if public transit fares increase, more people might ride their bicycle, walk or
          drive their cars instead. What would more people choose? What impact will it have on
          the environment?
Below is a list of choices to get you started. You can refer to the capital and operating budget in
BLM1 for more ideas. Your imagination is your only limit. Remember that you will have do some
research on your issues and present them at the public consultation.
When looking at the list, consider which ones YOU believe should be addressed in order to save
money and avoid deficit.
      Fire services

        EMS

        Police services

        Parks and recreation

        Public transit (new buses, subways, staffing, fares, etc,,,)

        Property taxes

        User fees (parks, pools, recreation centre fees)




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 3 Page 2 of 3
Proposed cut or           Rationale (reason       Social Implications   Ethical Implications   Environmental
increase in fee           you have chosen         (positive and         (positive and          Implications
                          this cut or increase)   negative)             negative)              (positive and
                                                                                               negative)




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 3 Page 3 of 3

Task: Step 2
Snowball! Once you have completed your chart with your partner, find another pair and compare
and contrast your list.
Do you have any issues in common? Do you disagree on any of the issues? You will have 10
minutes to consult with the other pair and complete the Exit Slip.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Name: ______________________________
Group members: ______________________________________________________

Exit Slip
    1. Something our group had in common was:




    2. Something our group disagreed upon or discussed further was:




    3. The most important thing we discussed in our group was:




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 4.1 Page 1 of 2
             Summative Tasks for City Budget Public Consultation Meeting

Task A:
Your group will have to prepare a report for the Budget Public Consultation meeting.
As a delegation, your group will present your verbal proposal at the consultation. Each member
of your group must contribute to the consultation, but only one person will speak at the
consultation for 5 minutes. Other members will be taking notes. Everyone will be contributing in
some way to the consultation.
If you are the Mayor or the Mayor’s Deputy, be sure to speak to your teacher today about your
role in this meeting.
Use the table from BLM 3 Choices! Choices! Choices! and your online research to complete the
report.
Select one of the ideas from the first column that all members of your groups agree is the most
important.
Then, expand on the other four columns. Each member of the group is responsible for one
section. If you only have four members in your group, work on the first column together.
Here is the first row of the table you worked on in the previous lesson:
Proposed cut or           Rationale (reason     Social Implications      Ethical Implications  Environmental
increase in fee           you have chosen       (positive and            (positive and         Implications
                          this cut or increase) negative)                negative)             (positive and
                                                                                               negative)


Write out your report in paragraph form, one paragraph (6-8 sentences) per topic in the table
above. Be sure to give specific facts, examples and details.
See the attached rubric to ensure that you are meeting all expectations.




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
        BLM 4.1 Page 2 of 2
                           City Budget Public Consultation Meeting Report Rubric
        Adapted from: http://www.eworkshop.on.ca/edu/pdf/Mod24_diamante_rubric.pdf
   Student Name                     Level 1              Level 2               Level 3               Level 4
_________________
_________________
       Date
_________________

      Categories
Knowledge and
Understanding:              • demonstrates         • demonstrates        • demonstrates         • demonstrates
Subject-specific            limited                some                  considerable           thorough
content acquired;           understanding of       understanding of      understanding of       understanding of
comprehension of            implications of cut    implications of cut   implications of cut    implications of
meaning and                 or increase in fees    or increase in fees   or increase in fees    cut or increase in
significance                                                                                    fees
Thinking:
The use of critical and     • has explained        • has explained       • has explained        • has explained
creative thinking skills    rationale with         rationale with some   rationale with         rationale with a
and/or processes            limited                effectiveness         considerable           high degree of
                            effectiveness                                effectiveness          effectiveness


Communication:              • report explains      • report explains     • report explains      • report explains
The conveying of            topic using correct    topic using correct   topic using correct    topic using
meaning through             mechanics of           mechanics of          mechanics of           correct
various forms               writing with limited   writing with some     writing with           mechanics of
                            effectiveness          effectiveness         considerable           writing with a
                                                                         effectiveness          high degree of
                                                                                                effectiveness

Application:
The use of knowledge        • specific facts and   •specific facts and   • specific facts and   • specific facts
and skills to make          examples               examples              examples               and examples
connections within          connected to topic     connected to topic    connected to topic     connected to
and between various         with limited           with some             with considerable      topic with a high
contexts                    effectiveness          effectiveness         effectiveness          degree of
                                                                                                effectiveness


        Comments:




        Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 4. 2 Page 1 of 2
                                Consultation Meeting Instructions
All students will be dressed in role and prepared with group reports and seated by delegation with
placards on desks. The teacher will be the moderator.
One student will take on the role of Mayor, and another student will take on the role of the Deputy
Mayor. These students should also be dressed in role.
Use the attached exit slip to make notes during the class. You will be asked to write a brief
conclusion in only 5 minutes at the end of class.
Format:
     1. Mayor makes a brief introductory speech. (3 minutes)

    2. Each delegation presents their arguments (no more than 5 minutes) to which other
       groups may respond (no more than 2 minutes) in debate format. In order for other groups
       to contribute to the discussion, they must choose a member to be placed on the
       speaker’s list. No delegates will speak unless they have been placed on the speaker’s
       list by the Mayor’s assistant. The presenters may respond to the questions/criticisms in
       less than 2 minutes. Following this format, each group will have approximately 9 minutes
       to make their entire presentation. (4-5 groups = 45 minutes total)

    3. There will a short recess, during which the moderator and the Mayor will discuss the
       proposals and identify two areas of recommendations to implement. (5 minutes)

    4. The group will then debate these recommendations for 10 minutes with each member on
       the speaker’s list having 1-2 minutes each to speak. Then the class will vote on each
       proposal. (20 minutes)

    5. In the last five minutes, you will complete the exit slip and hand it in. If you need extra
       time, you may take it home for completion, and submit it tomorrow. Speakers/group
       leaders do not need to complete the exit slip.




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
   BLM 4.2 Page 2 of 2
   Name: __________________________________

                                      Exit slip for City Budget Public Consultation
   Listen carefully to the ideas presented by other groups. For each group, choose one issue and complete the chart below.
Issue                                 For (ideas presented by the delegate             Against (ideas presented by
                                      or your notes)                                   the delegate or your notes)




   Choose your favourite issue and answer the following. You can use the back of this sheet to
   expand on your ideas.
   1. I support the following idea because:
   2. I do not support the idea because:
   3. One connection I made between our lesson today and my current/future financial life and
   decisions is:




   Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
BLM 4.3 Page 1 of 2
                                   Writing A Letter to Your City Councillor
City Councillor:
Ward:
Address:
Phone Number:

     1. Choose an issue that is important to you in your ward. You can use the ideas you have
        been discussing for the public consultation. Find out who your City Councillor is and
        write a letter explaining your issue to the Councillor and making a suggestion or call to
        action for him or her.

     2. Follow the letter template below and type or write your letter accordingly.

     3. Ensure that you have proofread your letter and attach the good copy to the letter rubric.

     4. Your teacher will evaluate your letter based on the criteria in the rubric and return it to
        your with feedback. You may then edit your letter and mail it to your Councillor.

     5. You are now officially an active citizen! Congratulations!


Letter Template
Your Name
Your Street Name
Your City, Your Province
Your Postal Code

City Councillor’s Street Address
City Councillor’s City, Province
Postal Code

Date Month, Year

Dear Mr./Mrs.________________,

I am writing because: (explain in specific details why you are writing) ___________. Write one short paragraph.

I would like you to take the following actions: (explain what you want or your ideas in specific detail) ___________. Write
one short paragraph.

Thank you for taking my letter into consideration. I hope to have a response from you as soon as possible.

Sincerely,


Your Name




Financial Literacy Lesson Planning
        BLM 4.3 Page 2 of 2
                                      Letter to City Councilor Rubric
        Adapted from: http://www.eworkshop.on.ca/edu/pdf/Mod24_diamante_rubric.pdf
        Student Name __________________________________ Date _______________

                                    Level 1               Level 2              Level 3             Level 4
      Categories
Knowledge and
Understanding:              • demonstrates          • demonstrates       • demonstrates       • demonstrates
Subject-specific            limited                 some                 considerable         thorough
content acquired;           understanding of        understanding of     understanding of     understanding of
comprehension of            issue and purpose       issue and purpose    issue and purpose    issue and
meaning and                 of letter               of letter            of letter            purpose of letter
significance                                        .

Thinking:
The use of critical and     • has explained         • has explained      • has explained      • has explained
creative thinking skills    solution with limited   solution with some   solution with        solution with a
and/or processes            effectiveness           effectiveness        considerable         high degree of
                                                                         effectiveness        effectiveness


Communication:              • letter format is      • letter format is   • letter format is   • letter format is
The conveying of            followed with limited   followed with some   followed with        followed with a
meaning using               effectiveness           effectiveness        considerable         high degree of
appropriate language,                                                    effectiveness        effectiveness
and features of a
letter


Application:
The use of knowledge        • one or two            •two or three        • at least three     • three or
and skills to make          specific facts and      specific facts and   specific facts and   more specific
connections within          examples                examples             examples             facts and
and between various         connected to topic      connected to topic   connected to topic   examples
contexts using              with limited            with some            with considerable    connected to
examples to support         effectiveness           effectiveness        effectiveness        topic with a high
point of view                                                                                 degree of
                                                                                              effectiveness

        Comments:




        Financial Literacy Lesson Planning

								
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