Not all that glitters is gold by T4nRGwP

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 4

									Feb. 1, 2008 – Week 3
To: CNS Editors
From: Eric Freedman & Sheila Schimpf

MICHIGAN ASSOCIATION OF COUNTIES AHEAD: Your correspondents will
interview Michigan Association of Counties officials on Monday, Feb. 4. Likely topics
include the impact on local governments of the governor’s new State of the State
proposals and the effects of Michigan’s high unemployment and foreclosure rates on
counties and their public services.

CORRECTION: A Jan. 25 Capital News Service story, “Wetlands dispute pits state
against lawmaker,” should have said Rep. Kevin Elsenheimer, R-Bellaire, asked the
Department of Environmental Quality whether state permits are required for property in
Elk Rapids Township that is used for agricultural purposes.


STATE BAR AWARDS: There is a Feb. 15 deadline for the State Bar of Michigan's
annual Wade H. McCree Jr. Awards for the Advancement of Justice for articles published
in calendar 2007. The awards are for reporting that fosters public understanding of the
legal and judicial system, encourages efforts to update and modernize laws, courts and
law enforcement, and informs the public about the role of the legal profession and courts.
The application is available at
http://michbar.org/news/releases/archives07/McCree2007_w.pdf.


HERE’S YOUR FILE:


BOOTLEGBOOZE: Bootleg booze smuggled into Michigan from Indiana, Ohio and
Wisconsin is costing the state at least $14 million a year in lost taxes, a new Liquor
Control Commission report says. Even some Michigan retailers are driving out of state to
make purchases, avoiding the state’s taxes and container deposits. The Beer & Wine
Wholesalers Association is concerned, and lawmakers from Monroe, Three Oaks, Warren
and Saugatuck Township want legislation to make it tougher to return illegal containers.
The commission and State Police in Niles are teaming up for tougher enforcement. By
Andrew McGlashen. FOR SOUTH BEND, STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, MONROE,
GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, HOLLAND, MACOMB, MARQUETTE, LANSING &
ALL POINTS.


HORSES: Amid the failing auto industry and concerns about going green, a new survey
found that many state residents are returning to a simpler form of transportation—the
horse. Equine numbers have risen by more than 20 percent since 1996, in large part
because urbanites are moving to semi-rural subdivisions in Oakland and Livingston
counties. But higher feed costs and a moderate hay shortage raise worries about the
ability of owners to properly care for their horses, according to the state veterinarian and
a horse farm manager from Lowell. By Tim Wardle. FOR OAKLAND, ROYAL OAK,
LANSING, GREENVILLE & ALL POINTS.


ENTREPRENEURIALEDUCATION: As a freshman, Central Michigan student Drew
Donner launched an online book business to pay his college expenses—and in doing so,
showed the type of imagination and drive that’s fueling business entrepreneurship
programs at Central, Oakland, Northern, Ferris, Grand Valley and Eastern universities.
Another CMU student started successful rental and soup companies to cover his
education costs. The Small Business Association of Michigan says entrepreneurship
education is the direction the state’s troubled economy needs to head. For news and
business desks. By Whitney Lloyd. FOR OAKLAND, CLARE, GLADWIN,
HOLLAND, GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS, GREENVILLE, MARQUETTE, THREE
RIVERS, SOUTH BEND, STURGIS, LUDINGTON, CADILLAC, MICHIGAN
CITIZEN & ALL POINTS.


BUSINESSEDUCATION: Experts from Glen Oaks and Kalamazoo Valley community
colleges say entrepreneurial education is important for small business owners to succeed
in the state’s changing economy. As one put it, “People are trying to find new ways to
make money. I don’t think we’re going to have another GM plant in Michigan, so a lot of
small businesses are going to help the state survive.” For news and business desks. By
Diane Ivey. FOR STURGIS, THREE RIVERS, SOUTH BEND, GRAND RAPIDS
BUSINESS & ALL POINTS.


MERCURY: The Department of Environmental Quality has a new strategic plan to
eliminate the use and release of toxic mercury in the state. The problem? DEQ says it
doesn’t have enough money to carry out the plan. The Michigan Environmental Council
backs the new strategy. By Andrew McGlashen. FOR LANSING & ALL POINTS.


ENERGYSURVEY: A new survey finds Michigan residents are worried about rising
energy costs but many aren’t considering changes in their homes to reduce those bills.
Meanwhile, an East Lansing community group offers an “energy fitness” program to help
area residents save energy. By Harry Gillen. FOR LANSING, MICHIGAN CITIZEN &
ALL POINTS.


GREENGENERATION: Voluntary programs like Consumers Energy’s Green
Generation and DTE’s GreenCurrent offer electricity from renewable sources—but at a
higher price. The city of Grand Rapids is the largest Green Generation participant. Small
utilities in the Upper Peninsula and Onaway also offer green energy. An Eastpointe
legislator is pleased to see government agencies take the lead as purchasers of green
power. Meanwhile, the Legislature is considering whether to mandate that at least 10
percent of the state’s energy comes from renewable sources by 2015. By Matt Flint. FOR
MACOMB, MARQUETTE, ALPENA, GREENVILLE & ALL POINTS.


CHILDSUPPORT: In less than a year, almost 1,000 parents have claimed more than
$450,000 in child support that had been paid by non-custodial parents but never made it
to their children. The Department of Human Services and Michigan League for Human
Services say a computer database now makes it easier for custodial parents to track down
such funds. A Grand Rapids advocacy group urges parents to be aggressive in collecting
their child support. By Melanie Trusty. FOR MICHIGAN CITIZEN, OAKLAND,
MACOMB, ROMEO, ROYAL OAK, LANSING & ALL POINTS.
        w/ CHILDSUPPORTINFOGRAPHIC: Wayne, Genesee, Oakland, Kent and
Macomb counties lead the state in the number of children entitled to child support.
Source: Michigan League for Human Services.


WALMARTROAD: By Rob Dale. There’s no quick fix on the horizon for traffic
congestion along Telegraph Road near the site of a planned Wal-Mart Supercenter. The
Transportation Department doesn’t plan to widen the road, which is only two lanes in
some high-traffic areas, until 2011, while store construction is slated to start later this
year. By Rob Dale. FOR MONROE & ALL POINTS.


KIDSLEFTINCARS: Parents who leave their children in cars under dangerous conditions
could face up to 15 years in prison under House-passed legislation awaiting Senate
action. In one high-profile case, a Southfield mother was convicted of murder after her
two children died in a Southfield parking lot. The Eaton County prosecutor favors the
change. We also interview sponsors from Waterford and Farwell. By Clay Taylor. FOR
LANSING, OAKLAND, CLARE, GLADWIN, ROYAL OAK, MICHIGAN CITIZEN
& ALL POINTS.


COINSCAMS: Not all that glitters is gold, and not every shiny new coin is a wise
investment -- not even, say, a $5 Elvis Presley commemorative coin issued by the
Marshall Islands or a $5 “endless love” coin from the Northern Mariana Islands. A
Macomb County lawmaker wants to extend Michigan’s consumer protection law to
companies and foreign governments that misleadingly advertise coins as “legal tender.”
A Lansing coin dealer says unsophisticated consumers are often disappointed that their
“investments” in such pseudo-coins rarely pay off. By Eric Freedman. FOR MACOMB,
ROMEO, LANSING & ALL POINTS.

CNS

								
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