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                          SAFETY & HEALTH
                   POLICY AND PROCEDURES MANUAL
I.


                                                  Revision #23
                                        Revised Date: December 17, 2010

                                       Daniel J. Patton
                              Safety and Loss Control Manager
                                     101 North Court St.
                                 Frederick, Maryland 21701

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    (301) 600-2546




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                                              TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 1 - GOVERNMENT REQUIRED POLICY AND PROCEDURES ............................................. 7

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 01-95 ............................................................................................... 8
      Title:        Smoking Prohibition (Enclosed Workplace) .............................................................................. 8

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 02-95 ............................................................................................... 9
      Title:        Mandatory Seat Belt/Shoulder Harness Use Safety and Health Procedures .......................... 9

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 04-96 ............................................................................................. 10
      Title:  City of Frederick Permit Required Confined Space Policy/ Procedures ............................... 10
        Appendix A - Frederick City Confined Space Entry Permit .................................................................... 23
        Appendix B - Hot Work Permit ................................................................................................................ 25
        Appendix C - Confined Space Performance Evaluation........................................................................... 27
        Appendix D - Downgrading a Permit Required Confined Space (SOP) .................................................. 29
        Appendix E - Lifeline Exemption ............................................................................................................. 30
        Appendix F - Personal Monitoring Instrument ......................................................................................... 30

Safety and Health Policy and Procedure, 08-96 ............................................................................................... 31
      Title:    City of Frederick Personal Protective Equipment Policy/ Procedures .................................. 31
        Appendix A - Safety Shoe Policy ............................................................................................................. 39
           Safety Shoe Certification ...................................................................................................................... 41
        Appendix B - PPE Selection Chart ........................................................................................................... 42

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 09-97 ............................................................................................. 46
      Title:   City of Frederick Hazard Communication Policy (Right To Know) ..................................... 46
           Chemical Information List .................................................................................................................... 52

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 11-99 ............................................................................................. 53
      Title:     The City of Frederick Generic Emergency Evacuation Plan Implementation Guidelines .. 53
           The City of Frederick Emergency Evacuation Plan ............................................................................. 55
        Appendix I - Emergency Evacuation Plan Responsibilities List .............................................................. 62
           Personnel Assigned To Critical Operations Responsibilities ............................................................... 63
           Department Employee List ................................................................................................................... 64
           Utilities Emergency Maintenance ......................................................................................................... 65
           The City of Frederick Training Attendance Record ............................................................................. 66
        Appendix II - In this Appendix, the Emergency Coordinator is to insert Site Specific: .......................... 68
        Appendix III - Area Evacuation Plan........................................................................................................ 69
           Check list of Responsibilities for the Safety Monitor:.......................................................................... 70
        Appendix IV - Tip For Assisting Persons with Disabilities ..................................................................... 71
        Appendix V - OSHA Regulations............................................................................................................. 74

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 13-99 ............................................................................................. 76
      Title:                          The City of Frederick Respiratory Protection Program .................................... 76

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Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 14-99 ............................................................................................. 94
      Title:  CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY “ZERO ENERGY STATE”............................... 94
        Addendum A ........................................................................................................................................... 101
        Addendum B ........................................................................................................................................... 102

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 19-02 ........................................................................................... 103
      Title:        The City of Frederick Drug-Free Workplace Policy ............................................................. 103

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures ....................................................................................................... 104
      Title:        Random Testing (RT) Summary of Standard Operating Procedures ................................. 104

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures ....................................................................................................... 109
      Title:   Reasonable Suspicion Testing (RST) Summary of Operating Procedures ......................... 109
           The City of Frederick Reasonable Suspicion Observation Checklist ................................................. 115

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 15-03 ........................................................................................... 118
      Title:    The City of Frederick Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Program ........................ 118
        Appendix A - Job Classifications ........................................................................................................... 128
        Appendix B - Positions of Occupational Exposure ................................................................................ 129
        Appendix C - Declination Statement ...................................................................................................... 130
        Appendix D - Proper Hand and Eye Washing Procedures ..................................................................... 131
        Appendix E - Decontamination Procedures ............................................................................................ 132
           Attachment - Bio Hazard Clean-up..................................................................................................... 133
        Appendix F - Hepatitis B Vaccine: What You Need to Know ............................................................... 134

Safety and Health Policy and Procedure, 20-2005 ......................................................................................... 138
      Title:    The City of Frederick Excavation and Trenching Policy/ Procedures ................................ 138
           A Excavation Checklist....................................................................................................................... 143
           Soils Analysis Checklist ..................................................................................................................... 147
           Daily Trenching Log ........................................................................................................................... 148

SECTION 2 ELECTIVE POLICY & PROCEDURES ................................................................................ 150

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 03-96 ........................................................................................... 151
      Title:        Multiple Accident/Incident Review Program ......................................................................... 151

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 05-96 ........................................................................................... 153
      Title:        Accident/Incident Notification and Reporting ....................................................................... 153

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 06-96 ........................................................................................... 155
      Title:   Modified Duty Return to Work Program ............................................................................... 155
        Appendix A - Modified Duty Return to Work Program Sample Light/ Limited Duty Jobs. ................ 157
           The City of Frederick WSR ................................................................................................................ 158

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 10-99 ........................................................................................... 161


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       Title:  The City of Frederick Bomb Threat Policy and Procedures ................................................ 161
         Appendix A - “Bomb Threats” Reception and Response Procedures Checklist .................................... 165
         Appendix B - Emergency Evacuation Plan ............................................................................................ 166

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 12-99 ........................................................................................... 167
       Title:  Emergency Notification and Functional Response Procedures ............................................ 167
         Appendix A - Functional Response Duties ............................................................................................. 168
            Emergency Notification Form ............................................................................................................ 170

Safety And Health Policy and Procedures, 18-02 .......................................................................................... 172
       Title:         The City of Frederick, Computer Workstation Policy and Procedures .............................. 172

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 21-05 ........................................................................................... 175
       Title:         Vehicle Operator Policy and Procedures ................................................................................ 175

SECTION 3 GOVERNMENT REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE POLICIES & PROCEDURES ............. 177

UNDER DEVELOPEMENT ........................................................................................................................... 177

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 17 ................................................................................................. 178
       Title:         The City of Frederick Prescription Drug Program ............................................................... 178

Safety and Health Policy and Procedures, 16 ................................................................................................. 180
       Title:         The City of Frederick Violence Prevention Program ............................................................ 180

SECTION 4 SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES ..................................................................................... 181

Accident and Incident Response ...................................................................................................................... 182
           Employee First Report ............................................................................................................................ 185

ARC Welding .................................................................................................................................................... 186

Backhoe and Loader ......................................................................................................................................... 187

Chain Saw .......................................................................................................................................................... 188

Commercial Vehicle Examination Road Test ................................................................................................ 189

Dump Truck ...................................................................................................................................................... 190

General Electrical ............................................................................................................................................. 191
       Electrical Installation/Repairs ................................................................................................................. 191
       Traffic Signal Installation/Maintenance and Inspection ....................................................................... 192
       Aerial Device Truck Class Code 0206, 0205, 1809, 1810 ....................................................................... 193

Hurricane (Facility Safety)............................................................................................................................... 194



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In-Body Salt Spreader ...................................................................................................................................... 195

Ladder ................................................................................................................................................................ 196

Mercury Spill Cleanup (Small) ........................................................................................................................ 198

Snow Plow Operation ....................................................................................................................................... 200

Tailgate Spreader .............................................................................................................................................. 201

Excavation, Trenching and Shoring ................................................................................................................ 202

Fork Lift & Heavy Equipment Safety ............................................................................................................. 203
           Forklift Inspection Check List ................................................................................................................ 204

Gas Pump ........................................................................................................................................................... 205

Hand Removal of Vegetation ........................................................................................................................... 206

Lifting Practices ................................................................................................................................................ 207

Jump Starting .................................................................................................................................................... 208

Mower Tractor .................................................................................................................................................. 209

Outdoor safety ................................................................................................................................................... 210
       Heat Index SOP ......................................................................................................................................... 210
       Cold Weather Safety ................................................................................................................................. 214
       Sun Exposure............................................................................................................................................. 215
       Flagging Traffic......................................................................................................................................... 216
       Working Near Overhead High-Voltage Lines........................................................................................ 217
       Fire Safety .................................................................................................................................................. 219
       Poisonous Snakes, Insects and Plants ..................................................................................................... 220
       Domestic and Wild Animals ..................................................................................................................... 224
       First Aid ..................................................................................................................................................... 226
       Exposure to Blood or Bodily Fluids ........................................................................................................ 227

Oxy – Acetylene Cutting and Welding ............................................................................................................ 228

Herbicide and Other Spraying ........................................................................................................................ 229

Seeding – Mulching and Top Dressing Activities and Inspection ................................................................ 230

Vehicles - General ............................................................................................................................................. 231

Tree Felling ........................................................................................................................................................ 233

Work Zone Safety ............................................................................................................................................. 234

SECTION 5 CHARTERS ............................................................................................................................... 235

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The City of Frederick Management Safety Committee Charter .................................................................. 236

The City of Frederick Employee Safety Committee Charter ....................................................................... 237

SECTION 6 RECORD OF REVISIONS ........................................................................................................ 238




SECTION 1 - GOVERNMENT REQUIRED POLICY AND PROCEDURES




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SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 01-95
Government Requirement
Prepared By:      Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared:    April 19, 1995
Revised #:        4
Date Revised:     December 8, 2003

Title:                 Smoking Prohibition (Enclosed Workplace)
PURPOSE
To protect employees from exposure to the harmful effects of second hand smoke.
SCOPE
This regulation covers employee exposure to second hand tobacco smoke while in an enclosed workplace.
“Enclosed Workplace” means an indoor place of employment and includes, and indoor work area, a vehicle
when an employee uses it in the course of employment and it is occupied by more than one employee; an
employee lounge or restroom; a classroom; a cafeteria; a hallway; and any assembly room.
APPLICATION
The City of Frederick recognizes and accepts it’s responsibility pursuant to the workplace regulation (Comar
09.12.23) to protect it’s employees from the harmful effects of second hand tobacco smoke, therefore, The City
of Frederick prohibits the smoking of any tobacco products in any enclosed workplace.
The City of Frederick further prohibits the smoking of tobacco products while operating or being a passenger in
a motor vehicle, when there are two or more employees in the vehicle and the vehicle is being used for the
purpose of employment.
A sign stating, that “Smoking Is Not Permitted” shall be posted at each entrance to all City of Frederick
facilities.
RESPONSIBILITIES
It will be the responsibility of each department head to periodically audit or evaluate his/ her Department to
ensure compliance with this regulation.
ENFORCEMENT
Violations of this regulation will be handled through normal Departmental disciplinary procedures.




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SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 02-95
Government Required
Prepared By:      Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared:    November 1, 1995
Revised #:        4
Revised Date:     December 8, 2003

Title:                Mandatory Seat Belt/Shoulder Harness Use Safety and Health Procedures
PURPOSE
To protect employees from the potential hazards of being unrestrained in the event of a collision.
SCOPE
This safety procedure covers all drivers or passengers of any City vehicle equipped with either a lap belt and/ or
shoulder harness while in a moving vehicle owned by the City of Frederick.
APPLICATION
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration states that, “In a collision, lap/ shoulder belts worn
properly reduce the chance of being killed or seriously injured by more than 50 percent.” Based on this
statistic, this administration’s effort to recognize and control employee safety and health hazards on the job and
the applicable laws, specifically, the Annotated Code of Maryland, Transportation Article, Section 22-412.3, the
Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986, and The Department of Transportation Regulations, Section
392.16, all City of Frederick employees, while either operating or riding in/ on a motorized City vehicle, shall
utilize the lap/ shoulder seat belt if the vehicle is so equipped.
RESPONSIBILITY
It will be the responsibility of each Department Head to audit or evaluate his/ her Department periodically to
ensure compliance with this procedure.
ENFORCEMENT
Violations of this procedure will be handled through normal Departmental disciplinary procedures.




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 SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 04-96
 Government Requirement
 Prepared By:       Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
 Date:              July 17, 1996
 Revision #:        13
 Revised Date:      November 9, 2010

 Title:                City of Frederick Permit Required Confined Space Policy/ Procedures

I. PURPOSE

 It is the intent of the Mayor, through the adoption and implementation of the following Permit Required
 Confined Space Policy and Procedures to meet and comply with 29 CFR 1910.146. The following Policy and
 Procedures will, when followed, protect the City of Frederick employees with job classifications that require
 entry into Permit Required Confined Spaces in the performance of their duties.


II. SCOPE and APPLICATION

 All City of Frederick employees who have been designated as Authorized Entrants, Attendants, Entrant
 Supervisors and any other affected personnel, i.e., Contractors, Service Representatives, etc. shall comply with
 this program.

 Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) regulations and Federal Occupational Safety and Health
 Act (OSHA) have promulgated standards that require every employer provide a safe and healthful work
 environment for all employees. These standards include regulations that insure the safety and health of
 workers, if required to perform activities in a confined/permit required confined space. Many tasks performed
 by Department of Public Works employees, Contractors and Service Representatives, must be performed within
 confined spaces. Both MOSH and OSHA have promulgated regulations, which address requirements that must
 be met by employers having confined spaces in their work area, and the workers required to enter these
 confined spaces. This regulation can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910.146.

 This document is intended to give specific guidance to confined/permit confined space regulations. All City of
 Frederick personnel shall adhere to the requirements set forth in this program.

 SAFETY FIRST! DON’T “EXPIRE” BEFORE YOU “RETIRE”




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  The following areas are addressed in this program:

        1.     Responsibilities, of both the employee and the employer.

        2.     Definitions and terms.

        3.     General requirements.

        4.     Policies and procedures specific.

        5.     Specific duties and requirements for Entry Supervisors, Authorized Entrants, and Attendants.

        6.     Rescue and rescue protocol.

        7.     Training required by this program.

        8.     Record keeping and procedures for documentation.

        9.     Enforcement and Disciplinary action.

        10.    Appendix A Permit Required Confined Space Entry Permit.

        11.    Appendix B Hot Work Permit


III. RESPONSIBILITIES

  Each applicable Department Head shall be responsible for:

        a.     Providing all equipment necessary for monitoring, testing, lighting, and ventilating relative to
               confined space entry. This includes but is not limited to necessary Personal Protective
               Equipment (PPE), barriers, shields, ladders and all other necessary equipment;
        b.     Providing all appropriate training, including but not limited to the training of authorized entry
               supervisors, authorized entrants, and authorized attendants on a no less than annual basis.
               NOTE: Each applicable Department Head or their designee shall on a no less than annual basis
               visually evaluate, “on site” all employees designated as an entry supervisor, attendant and/or
               entrants under their charge for competency. Additionally, the supervisor will document through
               written verification and forward it to the Safety Department.




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The Mayor or his/her designee shall be responsible for the following:

       a.     Implementation and the overall administration of this program;
       b.     The specification of job classifications, as necessary, which may require entry into confined
              spaces. This may include changes in certain job descriptions and/or the duties as currently listed
              in the job description;
       c.     Appointment of the Confined Spaces Development Committee, which shall carry out the
              responsibilities and requirements of this program.

The Confined Spaces Program Committee, consisting of The City of Frederick Safety and Loss Control
Manager, Director of Public Works, and the following Department Superintendents or their
representatives, Water and Sewer, Waste Water Treatment, Water Treatment, Light and Signal and
Water /Sewer Facilities Maintenance shall be responsible for the following:

       a.     Development, modification and review of this Confined Spaces Program;
       b.     Review of all records relating to confined space entry including but not limited to monitoring,
              inspection data, permits, and other records and data as necessary for the administration of this
              program;
       c.     Maintenance of a master file containing monitoring and permit data regarding confined spaces
              for each applicable department;
       d.     Implementation of an ongoing confined spaces training program, including the appropriate
              classroom and practical training for entrants, attendant, and entry supervisors. Training shall
              include initial comprehensive training in this program and City policy and procedures, and
              annual refresher practice and training update. Annual training shall include but is not limited to;
              CPR, and entry procedures/policies, monitoring and other appropriate instrumentation, PPE and
              any future programs or policies that may be determined to be applicable.

Supervisory Personnel or their designee shall be responsible for the following:

       a.     Insure that all employees are trained at the appropriate level prior to a job or duty assignment.
              This includes the scheduling of training sessions when necessary;
       b.     Assist in employee training as necessary;
       c.     Insure that appropriate confined spaces equipment is available to all employees as needed;
       d.     Insure that employee’s use appropriate confined spaces equipment required by this program,
              including but not limited to monitoring, PPE and ventilating equipment;
       e.     Insure that all confined spaces entries are supervised and carried out in accordance with the
              requirements of this policy;
       f.     Insure that documentation and record keeping is conducted as required on all confined space
              entry evolutions, including the documentation of monitoring results on the permit as needed;
       g.     Sign monitoring data records and entry permits as necessary.



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  Each employee shall be responsible for the following:

         a.     Proper and appropriate use and maintenance of all confined space equipment and/or PPE
                assigned, including proper cleaning/disinfecting, inspection and the reporting of any equipment
                malfunction to supervisory personnel;
         b.     Proper execution of job assignments including but not limited to duties as authorized entrant,
                attendant, and entry supervisor;
         c.     Reporting to supervisory personnel, any poor health conditions that may preclude safe confined
                spaces entry operations.

IV. DEFINITIONS

  The following abbreviations and acronyms, whenever and wherever used within this document, shall have the
  following designated meanings, except when the context clearly requires otherwise.

         ACCEPTABLE ENTRY CONDITIONS: The minimum conditions that must exist within the
         confined space prior to entry and work. See also Hazardous atmosphere.
         ATTENDANT: The individual stationed outside the confined spaces and whose duty it is to monitor all
         authorized entrant(s) and performs all of attendants’ duties as assigned and specified within the program.
         AUTHORIZED ENTRANT: The individual who is authorized to enter into Confined Spaces. This
         person shall meet all the requirements for authorized entrants as specified within the program.
         CONFINED SPACE: A space that:
         a.     Is large enough for an employee to enter and perform assigned work;
         b.     Has a limited or restricted means of entry and exit; and
         c.     Is not designated for continuous employee occupancy.
         EMERGENCY:          Any occurrence, including but not limited to the failure of hazard controls or
         monitoring equipment or event either internal or external that could endanger the entrant(s) of the
         confined space.
         ENGULFMENT: The surrounding and effective capture of a person by a liquid or finely divided (flow
         able) solid substance that can be aspirated to cause death by filling or plugging the respiratory system or
         that can exert enough force on the body to cause death by strangulation, constriction, or crushing.
         ENTRY: Any action by which a person passes through an opening into a permit required confined
         space. This includes any act in which the body breaks the plane of the opening.
         ENTRY PERMIT: The written or printed document provided by the applicable department that
         allows and controls entry and ensuing work activities in a permit required confined space. Permits shall
         contain the information found on the example in Appendix A of this program.
         ENTRY SUPERVISOR: The person who is responsible for determining if acceptable entry
         conditions are present at a confined space where entry is planned. The entry supervisor is the person
         who signs the entry permit authorizing entry if acceptable conditions exist and also oversees and
         terminates entry operations as required by this program and regulations.


  13
     HAZARDOUS ATMOSPHERE: An atmosphere that may expose the employee to the risk of death,
     incapacitation, impairment of the worker’s ability to perform self rescue, injury or acute illness from one
     or more of the following:
     a.     Flammable gas, vapor or mist greater than 10% LEL, (Lower Explosive Limit);
     b.     Airborne combustible dust at a concentration that meets or exceeds it’s LFL (Lower Flammable
            Limit). This may be approximated as a condition in which the dust obscures vision at a distance
            of 5 feet or less;
     c.     Atmospheric oxygen concentration below 19.5 % or above 23.5%;
     d.     Atmospheric concentration of any substance for which a dose or a permissible exposure limit has
            been established and could result in employee exposure in excess of the dose or permissible
            exposure limit;
     e.     Any other atmospheric condition that is immediately dangerous to life or health.
     HOT WORK PERMIT: A written authorization to perform operations such as, riveting, welding,
     cutting, burning, and heating capable of providing a source of ignition.(See Appendix B)
     NOTE: WTP & WWTP see PSM 16
     IMMEDIATELY DANGEROUS TO LIFE OR HEALTH                              (IDLH): Any condition that poses
     an immediate or delayed threat to life or that would cause irreversible adverse health effects that would
     interfere with an individual’s ability to escape unaided from a permit space.
     ISOLATION/LOCK OUT/ TAG OUT: Process by which a permit space is completely protected from
     hazardous energy being released into the space by such means as, blanking or blinding, lockout-tagout
     of all sources of energy, (mechanical or electrical equipment).
     NON-PERMIT CONFINED SPACE: A confined space that does not contain, or with respect to
     atmospheric hazards, have the potential to contain any hazard capable of causing physical harm to
     employees.
     OXYGEN DEFICIENT ATMOSPHERE: An atmosphere containing less than 19.5% oxygen.
     OXYGEN ENRICHED ATMOSPHERE: An atmosphere containing greater than 23.5% oxygen.
     PERMIT REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE: A confined space having one or more                        of the
     following:
     a.     Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere.
     b.     Contains a material that has the potential for engulfment of the entrant.
     c.     Has an internal configuration such that the entrant could become trapped.
     d.     Contains any recognized serious safety or health hazard.
     PROHIBITIVE CONDITION: Any condition in a permit space that is not allowed by the permit
     during the period when entry is authorized.
     RETRIEVAL SYSTEM: The equipment (retrieval lines, chest or full body harness and a lifting device
     or anchor) used for non-entry rescue of persons from permit spaces.
     RESCUE SERVICE: The personnel designated to rescue employees from permit spaces




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        TESTING (MONITORING): The process by which the hazards that may confront entrants of a
        permit space are identified and evaluated. Testing includes specifying the tests that are to be performed
        in the permit space.



V. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
 All City of Frederick Confined Spaces shall be identified and evaluated to determine permit necessity and
 monitoring and equipment requirements. This program sets forth the measures used by City of Frederick
 Employees to prevent the entry of unauthorized employees into these confined spaces and, the means by which
 the confined spaces shall be evaluated prior to employee entrance and the training of these procedures and
 practices.
 All permitted Confined Spaces owned by the City of Frederick shall be identified, listed and will be on file in
 the office of the responsible department. A confined space identification list shall be maintained and made
 available to all city and contracted employees. The applicable department head is responsible to make their
 employees and contractors aware of all confined spaces within their department’s control. This information
 process may be accomplished by posting danger signs where appropriate and also by training all affected
 employees to identify permit required confined spaces.
 Should any confined space be altered or its use changed in such a way that an increase in the actual or potential
 hazards to entrants either occurs or may occur, the applicable department head or their designee shall reevaluate
 and, if necessary, reclassify the confined space as permit required. Furthermore any confined space classified
 as a permit-required confined space may be reclassified as a non permit-required space, providing that all
 applicable regulations regarding such are followed. See Appendix D.
 An annual review of this program shall be conducted including, but not limited to a review of all permits, data
 and records. Revisions will be completed as necessary to insure that all applicable employees are protected
 from the hazards of confined spaces.
 Any extenuating circumstances, conditions or operating procedures not covered within this program shall be
 evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Contractors, vendors and all other persons not employed by the City of
 Frederick shall comply with the minimum State and Federal regulations regarding confined space entry. This
 includes proper training and authorization of entry, attendant and rescue personnel. The City of Frederick
 reserves the right to verify certification and training records if necessary.
 Should the City of Frederick need to contract outside employers or contractors, all applicable regulations shall
 be followed. Contractors shall be informed that the workplace contains permit required confined spaces and
 that entry into these spaces is allowed only through compliance with a permit required confined space program.

 The City of Frederick, specifically Permits and Inspections, Engineering and/or the applicable department
 head(s), hereafter referred to as City designee, shall apprise contractors of any hazards identified and data and
 experiences that make spaces in question permit required. Contractors will additionally be apprised of any
 applicable precautions and procedures. The City (designee) shall coordinate any entry procedures with the
 contractor and debrief the contractor at the conclusion of the entry operations regarding hazards created or
 encountered during the entry operations. In addition, the contractor shall obtain any available information
 regarding permit hazards and entry operations, coordinate entry procedures with the City (designee) when both
 City and Contractor employees will be working in or near the confined space, inform the City (designee) of the
 permit space program that the contractor will be following and inform the City (designee) during debriefing
 process of any hazards created or encountered during the entry operations.


 15
VI. POLICY AND PROCEDURES - SPECIFIC

  1. All of the following conditions shall be met prior to entering the PERMIT required confined space:

        a.     Identify and evaluate the hazards of the permit space to be entered. This includes determining
               the type of work to be done.
        b.     All permit confined space entries shall be conducted in accordance with the confined space entry
               permit system. The confined space entry permit is an authorization and approval in writing that
               specifies the location and type of work to be done and certifies that all existing hazards have
               been evaluated by an entry supervisor and that necessary protective measures have been taken to
               ensure the safety of each worker. (See appendix A for permit form).
               The entry permit shall be completed and approved (signed) by the entry supervisor prior to entry
               into a permit required confined space. In no case shall an entry permit be valid for more than
               eight hours (one work day shift). Re-permitting will be required if the confined space is vacated
               for more than one half hour at any given time. After a permit has expired or the confined space
               operations have been suspended because of a detection of a hazard or the entry permit is
               canceled by an authorized person, the permit confined space shall be reevaluated and a new
               permit shall be issued. An entry permit may be canceled at any time by the entry supervisor who
               issued the permit. During the permit confined space entry session, the entry permit shall be kept
               immediately adjacent to the space and maintained by the attendant identified on the permit.
        c.     Assemble all equipment necessary as per the permit space evaluation and hazard identification.
               Obtain all necessary permits including, but not limited to, a confined space entry permit, and or a
               hot work permit.
        d.     Isolate the space from any known or suspected hazards. Isolation may be accomplished through
               setting up all appropriate work/traffic control patterns and precautions. Remove any existing
               unsafe conditions that are in the area of the confined space, including any conditions that may
               make it unsafe to remove the entrance cover of the confined space. Also look for any potential
               hazards around the immediate area of the entrance to the confined space that may evolve while
               an entry is in progress, such as,
               1.     Potential for discharge of fumes or exhaust near the entrance;
               2.     Fire potential in the area of the entrance;
               3.     Sudden flow of water or liquid into or through the confined space;
               4.     Any other physical hazard, which could adversely affect the safety of the persons
                      entering the confined space.
        e.     Before a manhole cover is removed, atmospheric testing for oxygen deficiency and explositivity
               shall be performed by the entry supervisor and/or the attendant through a hole in the cover when
               possible. Appropriate atmospheric monitoring conducted by the entry supervisor outside the
               permit confined space shall insure that the atmosphere is safe for entry. Specific procedures for
               atmospheric testing shall be followed as listed:
               1.     Permit Confined spaces will be tested at four locations;
                      a.      Before cover is pulled
                      b.      Top
                      c.      Middle


  16
                      d.      Bottom
       IMPORTANT: Testing protocol=A minimum of 1 minute for each 10’ of sampling hose.
              2.      In permit-confined spaces where changes in atmospheric conditions are anticipated,
                      atmospheric monitoring shall be continuous;
              3.      Allowable limits for oxygen, LEL, hydrogen sulfide are as follows:
                      a.      Oxygen: minimum 19.5%, maximum 23.5%
                      b.      Flammable gases: <10% LEL
                      c.      Hydrogen sulfide: <10ppm
       f.     Once entrance covers are removed, the opening shall be promptly guarded at a reasonable
       distance (3 feet) to prevent accidental falls through the opening and to prevent tools and other items
       from being inadvertently dropped/kicked into the opening of the confined space.

IMPORTANT: To prevent spark or arc, covers are to be removed with a non-metallic tool or the tool shall be
so designed that the working surface is coated to prevent the potential for spark or arc.

       g.     Persons involved in the permit confined space entry operation shall familiarize themselves
              with the physical characteristics of the space prior to entry. The space shall also be visually
       inspected as much as possible before entry. Visible hazards to consider will include:
              1.      Electrical wiring or equipment
              2.      Drop-offs, holes, or slippery/uneven surfaces
              3.      Moving or fixed mechanical apparatus
              4.      Toxic, flammable, or otherwise dangerous substance, which may adversely affect the
                      safety of employees.
       NOTE: Heaters shall not be used in confined spaces without special written permission from the
       applicable department head and entry supervisor. Smoking in or around confined spaces is
       PROHIBITED.
              5.      Any other City of Frederick policies, plans, and programs that are applicable to
                      implementing a safe entry into a confined space shall be determined and implemented
                      prior to entry. (Personal Protective Equipment, Hazard Communication/Right to Know,
                      etc.)
              6.      A minimum of two qualified people is required for all confined space entry operations.
                      See duties of specific personnel.
              7.      All persons entering confined spaces shall be equipped with a minimum of an,
                      a.      Approved body harness, secured and properly in place;
                      b.      Approved safety line attached to the full body harness, and secured at the other
                              end. Exceptions see Appendix E.
                      c.      Hardhat, safety glasses, foot protection and appropriate hand protection.
                      d.      A personal monitoring device shall be on and with the entrant when the area the
                              entrant will be accessing is outside the attendant/entry supervisors’ ability to
                              monitor, such as, horizontal space entries.



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              8.     Frederick County Emergency Communications Center (Notification of a confined space
                     entry)
                     a.     Whenever a known hazardous condition exists.
                            Entry Supervisors Duty:
                            1.     Ensures the elimination or control of hazards prior to entry
                                   (See appendix A, entry permit, i.e. Special Requirements For Entry);
                            2.     Log location, type of space and known hazards (See appendix A, entry
                                   permit, i.e. General Information);
                            3.     Maintain alert status
                                   (No FCECC notification required unless the entry is expected to last
                                   for more than 15 minutes or once entered it becomes evident that the
                                   entry will last longer than 15 minutes ).
                     b.     Entries made for brief periods of time. (Less than 15 minutes)
              NOTE: Example: Taking reading, general inspection, housekeeping, etc.)
              Same as a. above - No FCECC notification required!
                     c.     Entries made for, other than, brief periods of time
                            Entry Supervisors Duty:
                            1.     Contact Frederick County Emergency Communications Center. Multi-
                                   agency or Ext: 11603, advise FCECC that a Confined Space Entry is in
                                   progress and that this contact is for notification purposes only. Provide
                                   FCECC with location, type of space, hazards/potential hazards that may be
                                   confronted; Indicate that, “No response is needed at this time” See
                                   Appendix A Frederick City Confined Space Entry Permit for
                                   Notification template when contacting FCECC.
                            2.     Log location, type of space and known hazards on Entry Permit (See
                                   appendix A, entry permit, i.e. General Information);
                            3.     Ensure the elimination or control of hazards prior to entry (See appendix
                                   A, entry permit, i.e. Special Requirements For Entry);
                            4.     Maintain alert status;
                            5.     When entry is complete, notify FCECC that the space has been vacated
                                   and standby is not longer needed.

              9.     The confined space may then be entered.
             NOTE: Indicate time FCECC was notified of entry completion and provide signature of entry
              supervisor as indicated on Entry Permit!


2. If only atmospheric hazards exist, the following procedures will be followed:

       a.     Continuous forced air ventilation shall be used to eliminate atmospheric hazards;
       b.     Where possible, open additional manholes to increase air circulation;
       c.     A minimum of 10 minutes of forced air ventilation shall be done prior to employee entrance;
       d.     Employees shall not be allowed to enter the confined space until the hazardous atmosphere has
              been eliminated;


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          e.      Ventilation shall continue throughout the confined space entry until all employees have left the
                  confined space;
          f.      The air supply for forced air must be from a clean source and must not increase any hazards in
                  the confined space;
          g.      The donning of any necessary PPE shall be done prior to entry;
          h.      Insure a means of communication between the entrant and attendant at all times;
          i.      Entry supervisor endorses the permit;
          j.      The confined space may then be entered.


   3. If engulfment, internal configuration or any other potential hazard exists, the following additional
   procedures must be followed:

          a.      Isolate space against accidental release or infiltration of toxins or material;
          b.      As necessary, purge, flush or ventilate the space. Once ventilation is started, it is to continue for
                  the duration of the operation.
          c.      Insure a means of entrance into and exit from the confined space;
          d.      Assure the presence of all necessary personnel, entrant, attendant, and entry supervisor.
          e.      Assemble any additional equipment needed with regards to the hazard.
          f.      Insure a means of communication between entrant and attendant throughout the entire operation;
          g.      Entry supervisor endorses the permit;
          h.      The donning of any necessary PPE shall be completed;
          i.      The confined space may then be entered.

VII. DUTIES OF SPECIFIC PERSONNEL

   Confined space entry evolutions require the designation of specific personnel to conduct certain designated
   tasks prior, during and after entry into permit required confined spaces. The following personnel have very
   specific responsibilities and are required to be trained in those tasks before being allowed to function in the
   capacity of the designated person during a confined space evolution.

   AUTHORIZED ENTRY SUPERVISOR

   A person who has received instructional and practical training in confined space entry and rescue protocol.
   The entry supervisor is responsible for determining if acceptable entry conditions are present at a permit space
   where entry is planned and has the authority to authorize entry or terminate entry as appropriate. Duties are as
   follows:

                  1.      Must know the hazards that may be faced during entry, including information on the
                          mode, signs and symptoms and consequences of the exposure;
                  2.      Verifies, by checking, that the appropriate entries have been made on the permit, that all
                          tests specified by the permit have been conducted and that all procedures and equipment
                          specified by the permit are in place before endorsing the permit and allowing entry to
                          begin; See Appendix F.
                  3.      Terminates the entry and cancels the permit if conditions of the permit are not
                          satisfactory;
                  4.      Verifies that rescue services are available and that the means for summoning them are
                          operable;


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              5.      Removes unauthorized individuals who enter or who attempt to enter the permit space
                      during entry operations; and
              6.      Determines, whenever responsibility for a permit space entry operation is transferred and
                      at intervals dictated by the hazards and operations performed within the space that entry
                      operations remain consistent with terms of the entry permit and that acceptable entry
                      conditions are maintained.




AUTHORIZED ENTRANTS

A person, who, under the requirements set forth by this policy, is adequately trained to enter confined spaces.
Adequately trained means the person has received both instructional and practical confined space entry training.
The entrant must demonstrate proficiency in the duties listed:

              1.      Knows the hazards that may be faced during entry into a confined space;
              2.      Properly uses all equipment;
              3.      Communicates with attendant/supervisor as necessary to enable the attendant to monitor
                      entrant’s status and to enable the attendant to alert entrant’s of the need to evacuate the
                      space as required;
              4.      And shall exit the space whenever;
                      a.      An order to evacuate is given by the attendant or entry supervisor;
                      b.      Entrant recognizes any warning sign or symptom of exposure to a hazardous
                              situation;
                      c.      Entrant detects a prohibited condition, or
                      d.      Monitor alarms. (See Appendix F)

AUTHORIZED ATTENDANT

A person adequately trained for confined space operations, capable of appropriately initiating emergency rescue
protocol from outside the confined space if necessary. The duties of the attendant are as follows:

              1.      Know the hazards that potentially exist during entry into confined spaces. This includes
                      information on the mode, signs or symptoms and, consequences of the exposure;
              2.      Is aware of possible behavioral effects of hazard exposure in the authorized entrants;
              3.      Continuously maintain an accurate count of all authorized entrants in the permit space
                      and ensures that the means to identify authorized entrants within the space;
              4.      Remains outside the space during entry operations until relieved by another attendant;
              5.      Communicates with authorized entrants as necessary to monitor entrant status and to alert
                      all entrants of the need to evacuate the space;
              6.      Monitors activities inside and outside the space to determine if it is safe and to alert
                      entrants of the need to evacuate the space if any of the following conditions are found:
                      a.      If the attendant detects a prohibited condition;
                      b.      If the attendant detects behavioral effects of hazard exposure in a authorized
                              entrant;



20
                         c.      If the attendant detects a situation outside the space that could endanger the
                                 authorized entrants;
                         d.      If the attendant cannot effectively and safely perform all the duties as required.
                                 See Appendix F
                  7.     Summon rescue and other emergency services as soon as the entrants may be in need of
                         assistance to escape the space and/or hazards;
                  8.     Takes the following action when unauthorized persons approach or enter a permit space
                         while entry is underway:
                         a.      Warn the unauthorized persons that they must stay away from the permit space;
                         b.      Advise the unauthorized persons that they must immediately exit the area;
                         c.      Inform the entrant and entry supervisor if unauthorized persons entered the space.
                  9.     Performs non-entry rescues if possible; and
                  10.    Performs no duties that might interfere with the attendant’s primary duty to monitor and
                         protect the authorized entrants.
VIII. RESCUE
   The City of Frederick has chosen the Frederick County Fire and Rescue service to perform any permit-required
   confined space rescues. Our intent in using the Frederick County Fire and Rescue service is to provide for City
   of Frederick employees a timely, competent, professional response in the event of an incident requiring a
   confined space rescue.

          RESCUE PROTOCOL

   If an attendant, entry supervisor determines that a rescue must be made; the following protocol shall be
   followed:

                  1.     Attendant, entry supervisor shall notify Frederick County Fire and Rescue Service
                         immediately (911 or Multi-Agency radio) of the need for a confined space rescue
                         operation. The attendant shall be prepared to give the location, symptoms and any other
                         pertinent information requested by FCFRS communications;

   NOTE: At no time shall the attendant or any other non-rescue personnel enter the confined space. They may
   however attempt rescue from outside the confined space prior to the arrival of rescue personnel. Once rescue
   personnel are on site and assume control the attendant and or entry supervisor shall notify DPW
   communications of the incident and status. Communications will then contact the Safety and Loss Control
   Manager or their designee.

 IX. TRAINING
   The City of Frederick shall provide training to all employees who work in or around confined spaces. The
   training shall include, at a minimum, the hazards of confined space, isolation and Lockout procedures, entry
   procedures, and rescue protocol. Training shall not be considered complete until the Department Head or his
   designated representative through a practical evaluation (See Confined Spaces Performance Evaluation,
   Appendix C) judges that the employee has attained an acceptable level of proficiency for working in confined
   spaces. The trainee’s judgment of the adequacy of his/her training shall be properly considered.




   21
  All training shall be documented, including the date, employee’s name and the signature of the trainer and kept
  in the employee’s training file and shall be available for inspection by the employee and the employee’s
  authorized representative.

  Initial training shall be conducted with refresher training offered on an annual basis or whenever the City of
  Frederick designee has reason to believe that either deviations or inadequacies in the present program have
  occurred.

X. RECORD KEEPING

  Records generated as a result of this program shall be maintained for a minimum of 36 months. This period
  shall be extended in the event where occurrences require. This requirement includes all monitoring data and
  confined spaces permits.


XI. ENFORCEMENT AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION

  Should the policies and procedures as outlined within this program not be followed the safety and health of the
  employee, as well as other City of Frederick employees can be jeopardized. Disregard for the policies and
  procedures within this program will therefore not be tolerated.

  Violations to the policies and procedures within this program shall be immediately brought to the attention of
  the employee’s supervisor. The supervisor shall review the violation and its circumstances immediately.

  Disciplinary action will be handled through normal departmental disciplinary procedures.




  22
Appendix A - Frederick City Confined Space Entry Permit
GENERAL INFORMATION
Beginning Date/Time ______________________________________________________AM/PM
Dept:__________________________________________________________________________
Location/Description______________________________________________________________
Purpose of Entry:_________________________________________________________________
 Brief Period of Time 15min <       Other Than Brief Period of Time         Hazardous Conditions        Special Consideration – When lifeline
 No FCECC Notification              15 Min >                                Exist No FCECC              introduces a hazard, i.e. entanglement,
 Required                           FCECC Notification Required             Notification Required       entrapment, etc. See Appendix E
                                                                                                        Supervisor Signature Required
                                                                                                        _________________________________
Authorized Personnel
Entry Supervisor:__________________________________________________________________
Entrant:__________________________________________________________________________
Attendant:________________________________________________________________________
MONITOR
Instrument Name and Number: _________________________Calibration Date:________________
Name of Person Monitoring:_________________________________________________________
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ENTRY
                     List all known or expected hazards in the confined space:
                          Physical Hazards                                                           Atmospheric Hazards
         Mechanical                                                                 Oxygen deficiency
         Electrical                                                                 Combustible Gas
         Heat                                                                       Toxic
         Arc, Spark, Flame                                                          Noise
         Weather                                                                    Chemical/Biological
         Other (Traffic, Falls, etc.)_____________________                          Other___________________________

         List all measures, which will be used to control or eliminate all HAZARDS or EXPECTED
                                                 HAZARDS!
         Ventilation                                     Fire Ext.                                   Traffic Control
         Lockout/Tagout                                  Tri-pod                                     Hot Work Permit
         PPE (Check List below)                          Pump                                        Secure Area (Barricades, Tape Etc.
         Fall Protection                                 Personal Monitor
                                                               Personal Protective Equipment List
         Coveralls                                       Leather Gloves                              Welding gloves
         Tyvek Suit                                      Chemical Resistant gloves                   Welding Hood
         Eye Protection                                  Hearing Protection                          Safety Boots
         Harness/life line                               Eye Protection                              Traffic Vests
         Hardhat                                         Dust Mask                                   Other_________________
                 List the Methods of communication between entrant/attendant/entry supervisor:
         Voice                                           Phone                                     Rope Signals
         Radio                                           Visual                                    Other_____________
Atmospheric Testing – Test Cover – Top – Middle – Bottom
         Tests            Acceptable Entry Conditions           15Min      30Min     45Min      60Min      75Min      90Min     105Min       120Min
 Oxygen                                 19.5-23.5 %
 Combustible Gas                        <10% LEL
 Carbon Monoxide                        0-25 ppm
 Hydrogen Sulfide                       <10 ppm
                    Initials of Tester
                                           APPROVALS
Entry Supervisor (Print)______________________Signature:______________________________
I assume the responsibility of Entry Supervisor on (date) ____________at (time) _______________
Confined Space Evolution End Time:__________________________________________________
       FCECC has been notified that the Confined Space evolution is complete – No standby needed!
Comments:


23
FCECC Notification Statement Template and contact #’s.

Dept Radio: Channel Multi-agency
Landline/cell: 301-600-1603
Landline Internal: 11603

This is the City of Fredrick___(Dept. Name) to Frederick County Emergency Services Dispatch !

Once dispatch acknowledges, provide the following information:

Frederick City ____(Dept.) is preparing to make a Permit Required Confined Space Entry and this contact is
for notification purposes only, I repeat this contact is for notification purposes only, no response is needed at
this time!
The location of the space is as follows: (Provide Street Address, Cross Street, Confined Space location within
which building,
The type of space is (                                   ) such as manhole, water vault, etc.
The following potential hazardous or hazardous conditions exist        ( List hazards)   but have been eliminated
for the entry by ( what method was used to eliminate the hazard). Such as, general ventilation, mechanical
ventilation etc.
Please Stand By, we will notify you when the Confined Space Evolution has ended.

When the evolution has ended, contact FCECC again and indicate the following:

The City of Frederick’s (Dept. Name)       Confined Space evolution located at (Provide Street Address) has
ended. The confined space has been vacated, Standby is no longer requested.

This is the City of Frederick , do you copy?




24
CITY OF FREDERICK
Appendix B - Hot Work Permit

Facility:
Location:
Date:
Prepared By                   Title                         Signature

Description of Hot Work       Include description of the equipment to be used, any
                              uncommon hazards associated with the work, and
                              additional precautions to be taken
                              Equipment        Hazards           Precautions
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Type of Work:
    Gas Welding/burning                            Brazing
    Soldering                                      Drilling
    Electric welding/grinding                      Grinding
    Powdered Gun                                   Other________________________

Please review the following questions and indicate by v where appropriate:

                                                                             Yes   No
Are portable ABC fire extinguishers on site charged and ready to use?
Have combustible materials been removed from the area of ignition
source?
Have non-movable combustible materials been protected by fire blankets,
etc.?
Have all flammable liquids been removed from the area of ignition
source?
Have all openings, cracks and holes been identified and shielded?
Have all flammable gases been shut off and isolated (Locked Out)?
Should a fire watch be present for this particular hot work procedure and
if so, is he/she on site?
Is your selected PPE adequate for the work? (See Appendix A)
Are personnel performing this hot work suitably trained in the hazards of
the project and the safe use of the equipment needed for this particular
project?
Has the atmosphere been tested for flammable/combustible vapors?


25
Has the necessary steps been taken to eliminate those hazards?
Appendix B - Additional Considerations

1.      Sparks and molten metal must be confined to the work area and kept from falling into or entering other
areas.
2.      When using hand tools for drilling or chipping in hazardous areas, i.e. flammable/combustible
atmospheres, spark proof tools must be used.
3.      When using air or electric drills in hazardous areas, i.e. flammable/combustible atmospheres, water or
oil must be used at the point of operation to reduce risk of spark.
4.      When cutting or chipping concrete floors, walls etc., concrete must be kept wet at point of operation to
reduce spark.
5.      The person performing the hot work is responsible for ensuring there is no danger of fire as a result of
the work before leaving the area.
6.      The hot work permit becomes void if the hot work is delayed for two hours or more, an emergency
alarm (evacuation), or a fire occurs in the area.
7.      When the hot work project is complete, the employee must assure that any fixed fire protection system
such as sprinklers, alarms, smoke detectors, or any other devices that were turned off are now returned to
operating condition.
8.      Any extinguishers that have been used during the course of hot work must be replaced at the completion
of the hot work project. (NOTE: Extinguishers may be exchanged through the DPW Purchasing Dept.)
9.      If there is a fire as a result of a hot work project, it must be reported as an incident in accordance with
the City of Frederick “accident/incident” reporting procedures.

STAY ALERT, A FELLOW EMPLOYEE IS DEPENDING ON YOU!




26
 Appendix C - Confined Space Performance Evaluation

 This form is to be used by those supervisors when evaluating an employee’s practical knowledge base
 immediately after an employee completes the standard Confined Space Class and at least annually thereafter as
 indicated in the City of Frederick’s Confined Space Policy and Procedures, # 04-96.
 Important: It is the Supervisors responsibility to categorize the employees “authorization”, i.e. attendant,
 entrant and or entry supervisor, based upon the results of the knowledge based practical performance
 evaluation.
 NO employee shall perform in any Confined Space capacity until the completion of the City of Frederick’s
 classroom training.

I. Attendant
        Does the attendant;
            Know the hazards that potentially exist during entry into confined spaces? ____
            Maintain an accurate count of all authorized entrants in the permit space? ____
            Ensure a means to identify authorized entrants within the space? ____
            Know to remain outside the space during entry operations or until relieved by another attendant?
               ____
            Maintain communication with authorized entrants as necessary to monitor the entrants’ status?
               ____
            Monitor activities outside and inside the space to determine if it is safe and to alert entrants of the
               need to evacuate the space if any of the following conditions are found:
                   o A prohibitive condition is detected, (inside or outside) the space, i.e. smoking in or
                       around the space, barriers removed, etc.
                   o Odd or unusual behavior/signs and symptoms indicating a hazardous exposure to the
                       entrant, i.e. slurred speech, lack of response when requested, dizzy, etc.
                   o If the attendant cannot effectively and safely perform all the duties as required.
            Know to summon rescue and other emergency services as soon as the entrants may be in need of
               assistance? ____
            Know to take the following action when unauthorized persons approach or enter a permit space
               while an entry is in progress;
                   o Warn the unauthorized person to stay away from the permit space.
                   o Advise the unauthorized person to exit the area immediately.
                   o Inform the entrant and entry supervisor if an unauthorized person entered the space.
            Know how to perform non-entry rescue? ____
            Know to focus on only the duties of the attendant during an entry? ____
  Authorized entrant
        Does the authorized entrants;
            Know the hazards that may be faced during entry into a confined space? ____
            Know how to properly use all equipment? ____
                   o Harness
                   o Head, hand, foot and eye protection.
                   o Rescue/tag line.
            Maintain communications with the attendant/entry supervisor as necessary? ____
            Immediately evacuate the space when;
                   o Directed to do so by the attendant/entry supervisor,
                   o When warning signs or symptoms of a hazardous condition are recognized.



 27
                 o A prohibitive condition is detected, (inside or outside), i.e. water in or around electrical
                   transformer/distribution panels, unauthorized persons enter the space etc.
                 o An evacuation alarm/alert is activated
Entry Supervisor
      Does the Entry Supervisor, before an entry is made,
          Know the hazards that may be faced during entry, including information on the mode, signs and
             symptoms and consequences of exposure? ____
          Use the “Is it Safe to Enter” Flowchart to assist
          Ensure the accuracy of the monitoring equipment? ____
          Verify, by checking, that the appropriate entries have been made on the permit? ____
          Ensure that all tests specified by the permit have been completed? ____
                 o Before, Top, Middle, and Bottom
          Ensure that all procedures and equipment specified by the permit are in place an active? ____
          Verifies that rescue services are available (if appropriate) and that a means for summoning them
             are operable? ____
          Ensure all unauthorized persons are kept clear of the space? ____
          Maintains acceptable entry conditions throughout the duration of the entrance? ____


IV.    Administrative Review:
          Confined Space Policy
          Confined Space Procedures




Date of Practical Evaluation:                                            Time:
Evaluator Signature:
Employee Signature:
Qualified As: Attendant ____ Entrant____Entry Supervisor____

Return completed form to the Safety and Health Department ASAP.




28
Appendix D - Downgrading a Permit Required Confined Space (SOP)

       The Supervisor must submit a written request/justification to the Safety and Health Department for
        review and consideration.
            o Justification Elements
                    Space evaluation/monitoring for all four potential hazards must be completed and
                       documented to show no hazards present for a minimum of 30 days and the tests must be
                       taken at a minimum of three times each of the 30 days.
                    What types of tasks are generally performed within the space, how long the employee is
                       generally expected to be in the space.
                    Any extenuating situations/circumstances for the request.
      Upon receipt of the written request/justification, the Safety and Health Department shall:
            o Attain a minimum of three persons from the Confined Space Committee to accompany him to
               the space to perform an on-site visual examination and final monitor ring.
      The committee will send a written response to the requesting supervisor as soon after the final site
        evaluation is completed.
            o If the space is approved for downgrading, the space will be deemed a non-permitted space for no
               more than 1 year and another request will have to be submitted by original requester or another
               supervisor for the space to remain non-permitted for an additional year.
      NOTE: A downgraded space must still be assessed for hazards prior to entry, a downgraded space just
                               relinquishes the entrant from completing the permit.




29
Appendix E - Lifeline Exemption

      When the use of a lifeline introduces the hazard of entanglement, entrapment, or delayed exit
      from a confined space due to the arrangement of objects or obstacles within the space, an
      Entrant is permitted to enter the space without a lifeline provided the following conditions are
      met –

            A supervisor shall assist in the evaluation of the confined space and related work
             assignments to determine if an exception regarding the use of lifelines is justified.
            A full body harness shall be worn at all times while entering confined spaces.

Appendix F - Personal Monitoring Instrument

       When confined spaces are configured such that the Entry Supervisor or Attendant is not able
       to effectively sample and monitor the atmosphere of the immediate working space of the
       Entrant, the entrant shall use an atmospheric monitoring instrument, on their person, before
       entering the confined space

       The Department Head, Entry Supervisor, or Attendant may, at their discretion, require the
       Entrant to use an atmospheric monitoring instrument, on their person, before entering the
       confined space.




30
 SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURE, 08-96
 Government Requirement
 Prepared By:       Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
 Date:              December 16, 1996
 Revision #:        6
 Revised Date:      March, 11, 2008
 Title:                City of Frederick Personal Protective Equipment Policy/ Procedures
I. PURPOSE
 It is the intent of the Mayor through the adoption and implementation of the following Personal Protective
 Equipment Policy to meet and comply with 29 CFR 1910.132, 133, 135, 136 and any other policy, procedure
 standard or regulation as specified herein. The following Policy will, when followed, assist in protecting City
 of Frederick employees against eye, face, head, foot, hand and other potential bodily injury hazards confronted
 in the performance of their duties. Additionally, this policy addresses respiratory, fall, electrical, vehicle
 restraint, traffic control, ear, and bodily clothing protection.
II. SCOPE and APPLICATION
 All City of Frederick employees, who through the performance of their job duties, have a potential to be
 confronted by an environmental hazard(s), chemical hazard(s), or a mechanical hazards(s) capable of causing
 injury or impairment in the function of any part of the body through absorption, inhalation or physical contact
 shall comply with this policy.
 Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) regulations and Federal Occupational Safety and Health
 Act (OSHA) have promulgated standards that require every employer to provide a safe and healthful work
 environment for all employees. These standards include regulations that insure the safety and health of workers
 when confronted by the above-mentioned hazards. Many tasks performed by City of Frederick employees have
 the potential to cause physical and/or health related injuries or death. The use of Personal Protective Equipment
 (PPE) in the performance of certain jobs in which hazards have been identified or expected is, therefore,
 required.
 The following subject matter is addressed in this policy:
          1.    Responsibilities of both the employee and the employer.
          2.    Definitions and terms used in this policy.
          3.    General requirements.
          4.    Specific PPE Requirements.
          5.    PPE Storage and maintenance.
          6.    PPE Training for personnel.
          7.    Record keeping and training documentation.
          8.    Disciplinary action.
          9.    Hazard Determination.
          F.    PPE selection charts.




 31
III. RESPONSIBILITIES
  The Mayor and Board of Aldermen or their designee shall be responsible for the implementation and
  overall administration of this program.
  The City of Frederick Directors or their designee shall be responsible for:
         1.     Ensuring that compliance among all personnel is maintained.
         2.     Planning, budgeting and providing City issue PPE.
  Each applicable Department Head or their designee shall be responsible for:
         1.     Providing assistance in job hazard determinations as necessary (i.e. when new job tasks, tools,
                and/or hazards are introduced to the employee);
         2.     Performing frequent random inspections to assure that PPE is properly used and maintained,
                stored, and used in accordance with all protocols and procedures as adopted;
         3.     Providing all City issue PPE necessary for employee protection while in the performance of their
                work task;
         4.     Ensuring that all employees under their supervision receive the required training in the proper
                use, storage, sanitation, maintenance and application of PPE;
         5.     Ensuring that all employees under their supervision use PPE in accordance with the approved
                procedures within this policy;
         6.     Ensuring that all employees under their supervision are instructed in procedures for acquiring
                general-use PPE;
         7.     Ensuring that all employees under their supervision are instructed in procedures for acquiring
                replacement PPE when equipment is lost, damaged or out-dated.
         8.     Maintaining training documentation.
         9.     Enforcement of this policy and procedures.
         Employees shall be responsible for:
         1.     Knowing and identifying the expected hazards of their jobs and being familiar with the
                appropriate PPE necessary for the performance of these jobs;
         2.     Proper use and care of all PPE required for their job task;
         3.     Reporting, to their supervisor any health conditions, which may preclude the safe and/or
                effective use of any required PPE; (i.e. the employees’ inability to wear safety shoes due to
                surgery.)
                NOTE: Employee confidentiality is of uttermost importance
         i.     Reporting any faulty PPE, found to their supervisor.
         ii.    Reporting all violations of this policy to their supervisor.

IV. DEFINITIONS
  The following abbreviations and acronyms, whenever and wherever used within this document, shall have the
  following designated meanings, except when the context clearly requires otherwise.
  ANSI: American National Standards Institute: An organization that tests and makes recommendations for
  standards and regulations to OSHA and other regulatory agencies.
  PE:    PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT:
         a.     Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):         This includes, but is not limited to, the following:
                goggles and other eye and face protection; respirators, including but not limited to dust and mist
                respirators, and Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA); gloves (latex, leather and other);

  32
               hard hats; safety shoes; coveralls; lab coats; vehicular restraint (seat belts) and fall protection
               equipment, (type I, fall arrest/type II, fall restraint).
       b.      Protective Clothing: This includes, but is not limited to the following: Highly visible/reflective
               and or retro-reflective clothing (flagger vest), Flame retardant/resistant clothing.
       c.      Traffic Control Protection: This includes, but is not limited to the following:              Signs,
               barricades, cones, paddles, arrow boards.
ISSUED PPE:           PPE that is issued specifically to the employee for their own personal use in the
performance of their job task. Issued PPE shall be inspected, maintained and cleaned by the employee to whom
it is issued.
GENERAL USE PPE:             PPE that is NOT ISSUED to a specific employee and is maintained for general
use by all employees (e.g. SCBAs, air supplied respirators, and air monitors). Employees using general use
PPE shall be expected to properly clean, inspect, and return to service any general use PPE they have utilized.
EYE PROTECTION:               Any device, such as goggles, spectacles, or shields, that offer, splash, impact,
vapor, or optical radiation protection for the eyes. The device MUST provide adequate protection against the
EXPECTED hazard and meet the ANSI Z 87.1-1989, standard for Occupational eye and face protection.
NOTE: Eye protection devices do not provide face protection, and face shields do not provide adequate eye
protection.
FACE PROTECTION:              Any device that protects the face from splashes, impact, heat and optical radiation
hazards. The device MUST provide adequate protection against the hazard EXPECTED to be encountered and
meet ANSI standards for Occupational face protection. Face shields are to be worn in conjunction with eye
protection. (See note following eye protection definition).
HAND PROTECTION:          Gloves and other hand protection devices MUST provide adequate protection
against the EXPECTED hazard. (See specifics below)
        CHEMICAL GLOVES (Neoprene, Nittrile, Butyl, etc.) These gloves are generally rated for the
       type of chemicals to which they are resistant. Consult supervisory staff, Material Safety Data Sheets
       (MSDS) and/or product label for recommendations as to the type of glove necessary for the chemical
       hazard.
        DISPOSABLE GLOVES (Latex, plastic, etc.) One-time, single-use gloves not intended to be
       reused.
        WORK GLOVES (Cotton, jersey, leather, leather palm etc.) Reusable gloves used for protection
       against general cuts, abrasions, heat/cold etc.


FALL PROTECTION:
       a.      Type I-Fall Arrest: a personal fall arrest system that is used to arrest a wearer’s fall from a
               work level. It consists of an anchorage, hardware (connector), body harness, lanyard, and may
               include a deceleration device.
       b.      Type II-Fall Restraint:        a personal fall restraint system that is used to keep a wearer at the
               work level or limit any free fall to a maximum of two (2) feet from the work level. This system
               consists of a body belt or a body harness, lanyard and anchor.
       c.      Rope Grab: a deceleration device, which travels on a lifeline and automatically, by friction,
               engages the lifeline and locks so as to arrest the fall of an employee.


33
 HEAD PROTECTION: A rigid device (Hard Hat/Safety Helmet) that is worn to provide protection for the
 head, or portions thereof, against impact, flying particles, or electric shock, or any combination thereof, and
 which is held in place by a suitable suspension. Head protection shall meet ANSI Z89.1-1969 safety standards
 for industrial head protection. Head protection for electrical workers must meet ANSI Z89.2-1971 standards.
 (NOTE: Bump caps do not provide the required impact protection)
 FOOT PROTECTION:              Safety-toe footwear meeting ANSI Z41-1991, standards. See Appendix A.
 HEARING PROTECTION:                   PPE used to lower the decibel level of sound reaching an employee’s ears
 to acceptable levels. Hearing protection can be the earmuff or ear plug type.
 RESPIRATORS:           Any device designed to protect an employee’s lungs from respiratory hazards. (Supplied
 air/air purifying)(See City of Frederick Respirator Policy)


V. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

 Engineering controls, administrative procedures and recognized sound work practices MUST be used in
 conjunction with PPE. Personal Protective Equipment and devices shall not be relied on as the primary means
 of protection against work place hazards. A hazard assessment has been completed and shall be reviewed as
 necessary, including but not limited to those times when new tasks, tools, equipment, machinery or procedures
 are to be introduced to employees. The hazard assessment identifies sources of hazards to workers and co-
 workers. The following hazard categories were used to conduct the hazard assessment; impact, penetration,
 compression, chemical hazards, heat, dust, and light (optical) radiation. An annual review of the hazard
 assessment shall be conducted. This review shall include a review of accident records, workers compensation
 reports, the suitability of previously selected PPE, manufacturers recommendations, MSDS sheets and a job
 site/facility inspection.
 Employees are required to use PPE during the performance of any job, when by reason of the hazard
 assessment, environmental, biological, chemical, optical radiation or mechanical hazards can reasonably be
 expected, which are capable of causing death or, injury and/or impairment to any body part or process, through
 absorption, inhalation, ingestion, or physical contact. Protective equipment, protective clothing, traffic control
 protection devices, fall protection shall be provided by each applicable department. (NOTE: See Appendix A
 for Foot Protection)
 Care should be taken to recognize the possibility of multiple and simultaneous exposures to a variety of hazards.
 In all such cases adequate protection against the highest level of each possible hazard will be provided and
 MUST be used.
 Once trained, employees shall be responsible for proper cleaning, sanitization, and all routine maintenance of
 PPE issued to them. Regulations hold employers responsible for the adequacy of PPE used by employees,
 therefore NO PRIVATE PPE shall be used by an employee without the prior approval of the City of
 Frederick Safety and Loss Control Manager.
 An inventory of City of Frederick issue PPE shall be maintained by the purchasing department for replacement
 or initial issue. General use PPE inventory, such as; SCBA shall be maintained by the applicable department.
 (NOTE: Safety shoe footwear will not be a stock item. See Appendix A.)


 TASKS REQUIRING THE USE OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT/CLOTHING/FALL
 PROTECTION/ VEHICLE RESTRAINT/TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES


 34
          All City of Frederick employees performing tasks, operating equipment, or assisting in any capacity in
  the vicinity of any of the operations listed below are required to wear appropriate PPE in accordance with the
  PPE Selection Chart. See Appendix B. In general this shall include but not be limited to the following:
         (1)     The operation of ALL stationary power tools including but not limited to, bench saws, drill
                 presses, radial arm saws, bench/pedestal grinders, jig saws etc.;
         (2)     The operation of ALL portable power tools including but not limited to, drills, circular saws,
                 saber saws, routers etc.;
         (3)     The operation of ALL miscellaneous powered equipment including but not limited to chain
                 saws, weed whackers, tree/brush chipper, mowers, jackhammers etc.;
         (4)     Non-Powered manual operations including but not limited to the following tasks, shoveling dirt,
                 sand, mulch etc., clearing brush using hand tools, scraping, brushing or otherwise abrading a
                 surface, cleaning tanks and other vessels, mixing, transferring or otherwise using chemicals,
                 welding, heating metal objects, soldering/brazing pipe etc., bending metal objects, hammering,
                 grinding, chiseling, working around UV lights or other potentially hazardous optical radiation
                 such as sunlight.
         (5)     The operation of ALL motor vehicles, whether industrial/non-industrial including the use of
                 private vehicles when operated in the performance of your job task.
         (6)     Working from elevations, whether above ground level, or below ground level.
         (7)     Working in or near vehicular traffic.
         (8)     Electrical workers working on or near electrical equipment, machinery or apparatus.
         (9)     Working in an area where heavy industrial equipment is operating (e.g. backhoe)
         (10)    Working in a Confined Space.
         (11)    Working over or near water.


VI. SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

  EYE AND FACE PROTECTION
  When an eye and or face hazard is evident or can reasonably be expected, the use of appropriate eye/face
  protection is required. This shall include but not be limited to potential injuries resulting from the handling or
  use of chemical or biological material splashes, flying objects, molten metal, dust and/or other solid particles,
  chemical and toxic vapors and gases, glare, optical radiation (including UV) or any combination of hazards.
  Eye protection with side protection shall be used where there is an expected or reasonably anticipated hazard
  from flying objects. Affected employees shall use filtered lenses that have a shade number appropriate for the
  work being performed for protection from injurious light radiation.
  Employees requiring vision correction shall be provided with either goggles or spectacles that can fit over the
  employee’s prescription glasses without disturbing the fit, or the corrected sight of the employee.
  All eye and face protection shall be marked to facilitate the identification of the manufacturer. Appendix B
  provides general guidance for the proper selection of eye and face protection to protect against hazards
  associated with the listed hazards “source” operation. Appendix B.
  Protective eye and face devices shall meet ANSI Z87.1 1989.


  35
BODY AND CLOTHING PROTECTION
Coveralls, rain suits and outer body protection will be provided if there is a reasonable probability that an
employee could experience an occupational exposure to chemical, environmental elements, biological agents or
other health and/or physical hazards.
Employees working in or within close proximity to vehicular traffic shall be provided with a highly visible
outer garment (vest) to be worn during daylight hours. During nighttime hours or times of poor visibility, rain,
fog etc., employees working in or near vehicular traffic shall be issued a highly visible reflective and/or retro
reflective outer garment.
Employees who are exposed to flames or electric arcs shall not wear clothing that, when exposed to flames or
arcs, could increase the extent of injury that would be sustained by the employee. Clothing made from the
following fabrics, either alone or in blends, is prohibited, unless the fabric has been treated to withstand the
conditions or that the clothing is worn in such a manner as to eliminate the hazard involved: acetate, nylon,
polyester, rayon.


ELECTRICAL PROTECTIVE DEVICES for work on energized equipment
CFR 1926.416 (a)(4)
Only qualified persons may work on electrical circuit parts or equipment that have not been de-energized,
locked and tagged out in accordance with CFR 1926.417(d) or 1910.147. Such employees must be capable of
working safely on all energized circuits and must be familiar with the proper use of special precautionary
techniques, personal protective equipment, insulating and shielding materials, and insulating tools. Those
employees shall be provided with and required to use rubber protective devices to include but not be limited to;
rubber insulating gloves, rubber matting for use around electric apparatus, rubber insulating blankets, rubber
insulating line hoses, rubber insulating hoods, and rubber insulating sleeves. See head protection for required
helmet use. These devices shall conform to the requirements established in the American National Standards
Institute Standards.
EAR PROTECTION
If employees are required to perform their job tasks around a high noise environment, ear protection shall be
made available. The noise level reduction must be sufficient to allow the employee to safely work in the
environment. (29 CFR 1910.95)
HEAD PROTECTION
When and where there is an expected or reasonably anticipated impact and/or penetration hazard from above,
head protection designed to provide such protection must be used. All such head protection shall meet ANSI
standard Z89.1-1969 for industrial head protection. (NOTE: Bump caps do not meet this requirement.) Bump
caps may be used in low hazard areas where the above-mentioned hazards are not present to protect employees
against bruises and abrasions from bumping/scraping. When employees are required to work around high
voltage ANSI Z89.2-1971 protective head ware Class B is required to provide the appropriate insulation
resistance.
FOOT PROTECTION
Any employee, who by the nature of their departmental PPE hazard assessment is required to wear safety shoes
shall don their protective footwear prior to the commencement of their workday. Protective footwear must
comply with ANSI Z41-1991 specifications.


36
                                                (See Appendix A)
Over the shoe protection impervious to water, sewage, and sludge processing chemicals shall also be provided
when necessary.
BACK SUPPORT DEVICES
Back support devices shall not be used in place of safe lifting practices. Back support devices shall not be
issued without prior training in safe lifting practices.
HAND PROTECTION
The City of Frederick shall supply, and employees are required to use, hand protection as depicted in the
departmental hazard assessment. This includes but is not limited to the performance of tasks in which cuts,
abrasion, burns, and skin contact with chemicals and biological agents are expected and/or reasonably
anticipated.
Employees are reminded, however, that no glove provides protection against all potential hand hazards and only
limited protection from many chemicals. It is therefore important that the employee select the most appropriate
glove for a particular application, in many instances it is important to know the performance characteristics of
the glove relative to the specific hazard anticipated. These characteristics include whether or not the glove
provides protection against the particular hazard, how long it can be worn before chemical penetration, and
whether it can be or should be reused. (See your departmental PPE hazard assessment, and corresponding glove
selection chart for the most appropriate glove for the hazards anticipated.)


RESTRAINT DEVICES:
VEHICULAR RETRAINT
All City of Frederick employees whether operating or a passenger in a non-industrial/industrial vehicle and or a
private vehicle used during the course of your job task shall wear the appropriate restraint devices (seat belts) if
so equipped. See the City of Frederick Mandatory Seat Belt/Shoulder Harness Use Safety and Health
Procedures.
FALL Protection Devices-All employees required to work from elevations of six (6) feet or more, above or
below ground level, and whereas the employee is not protected by a guardrail system or other fall prevention
method, one of the following (ANSI) American National Standard A10.14-1991 protective systems shall be
used:
Type II-Fall Restraint:       Used to keep employee at the work level or limit any free fall to a maximum of
two (2) feet from the work level. This system consists of a body belt or a body harness and anchor. Fall
restraint devices shall be rigged such that an employee cannot free fall more than two (2) feet and shall be
secured to an anchorage capable of supporting twice the potential impact load of an employee’s fall or 3,000
pounds, whichever is greater.
Type I-Fall Arrest: Used to arrest a worker’s fall in progress from a work level. It consists of an anchorage,
hardware (connector), body harness, lanyard and may include a deceleration device.
Rope Grab: A device used primarily for climbing and lowering oneself by way of a lifeline and mechanical
mechanism which when a fall occurs, automatically by friction, engages and locks by inertia so as to arrest a
fall.




37
VII. PPE STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE

   All employees shall be responsible for the proper use, maintenance, storage, and sanitization of the specific PPE
   issued to them. Should issued PPE become inadequate or broken it shall be the employee’s responsibility to
   return it so that a replacement can be reissued. PPE should be inspected, cleaned and maintained at regular
   intervals so that the PPE provides the required level of protection. It shall be the responsibility of the employee
   using general use PPE to properly inspect, sanitize, and store the device after its use.

VIII. PPE TRAINING

   All employees required to wear and/or use PPE shall receive training in the following: When PPE is to be used,
   What PPE is necessary; How to properly don, doff, adjust and wear PPE; the limitation of selected PPE; and the
   proper care and maintenance of PPE. Upon completion of the training the employee shall demonstrate an
   understanding of the aforementioned training and his/her ability to select and use PPE before undertaking tasks
   requiring PPE. Should at any time the employee demonstrate that he/she does not have the understanding or
   possess the necessary skills as stated above, the employee shall be retrained. Retraining may also be required in
   the following: changes in the workplace task which would render the previous training obsolete or ineffective;
   a change in the type of PPE to be used; noted inadequacies in the employees knowledge or use of assigned PPE.

 IX. RECORDKEEPING & TRAINING DOCUMENTATION

   Training documentation for all City of Frederick employees shall be maintained at the department level. A
   written certification that indicates the name of the employee, date of training, the type of PPE and the name of
   the trainer shall be kept on file.

  X. ENFORCEMENT AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION

   Should the policies and procedures as outlined within this Policy not be followed the safety and health of the
   employee can be jeopardized. Disregard for the policies and procedures within this Policy will, therefore, not
   be tolerated.
   Violations of the policies and procedures within this Policy shall be immediately brought to the attention of the
   employee’s supervisor. The supervisor shall review the violation and its circumstances immediately.
   Disciplinary action will be handled through normal departmental procedures.

 XI. HAZARD DETERMINATION

   A hazard determination has been completed (see departmental hazard assessments). City of Frederick facilities
   and work sites were evaluated for chemical splash hazards, impact/compression hazards, dust hazards, thermal
   hazards, and optical radiation (light and glare) hazards.
   The following PPE selection charts are for general guidance only. Individual departments should review their
   specific hazards assessment, MSDS sheets and departmental standard operating procedures (SOP’s) that address
   site-specific hazards.
   Should a job task require non-routine procedures, tools or materials the supervisor shall review and evaluate all
   available data regarding the task. This review shall include but not be limited to: MSDS sheets, tools required,
   available PPE and the employees training and ability.


   38
Appendix A - Safety Shoe Policy

Safety and Health Policy and Procedure, 07-96
Government Requirement
Prepared By:          Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared:        September 3, 1996
Revision #:           6
Revised Date:         March 12, 2008
Title:                The City of Frederick Safety Shoe Policy
___________________________________

Purpose:        To protect City employees from the hazards of working in areas where there is a danger of foot
injuries due to falling and rolling objects; or objects piercing the sole, and where such employee’s feet are
exposed to electrical hazards.

Scope:         City employee’s who perform construction, maintenance, repair or spend the majority of their
work tasks in other hazardous environments or who by means of the departmental hazard assessment shall be
included under this instruction.


General Requirements:

               A.      The safety shoe program is mandatory for all field and supervisory personnel in the field
who fall within the scope (see above) of this policy.

                B.      All full-time employees who are required to wear protective footwear under the
provisions of this instruction shall be entitled to a minimum of one annual protective footwear credit to be
redeemed by a pre-selected vendor. A second credit may be approved by the employees department head upon
verification of need. All probationary employees shall receive a credit once his/her probationary period has
elapsed. This credit to employees is set annually based on available funds. All part-time/seasonal employees
shall provide their own approved protective footwear.

               C.     Protective footwear services (shoe mobile) shall be contracted through the normal and
customary purchasing rules and regulations. (See Section IV C of the City of Frederick Purchasing Rules and
Regulations.) Vendor selection shall be based upon the following Cost per shoe + variety of selection +
warranty + service + employee input = Award. The awarded vendor will display, fit and provide only
protective footwear approved by ANSI Z41 Class 75 as prescribed by OSHA (regulation 29 CFR Part
1910.136). Shoes selected must meet or exceed the following minimum specification:

                    i. Heavy duty, minimum 6” work boot, brown or black, water resistant, oil resistant, slip
                      resistant, with an industrial sole and approved safety toe insert.

The employee will pay amounts over the allowance maximum at the time of selection.

Employees who choose to purchase their safety shoes from a vendor other than the awarded vendor shall submit
the attached form for completion to the vendor who certifies that the purchased protective footwear meet the



39
above standard. Once completed the employee shall return the completed form to the Safety and Loss Control
Manager “prior to” the initial use of the shoes.
NOTE: Employees choosing vendors other than the awarded vendor shall forfeit their allocated shoe credit.

               D.     Warranty issues will be addressed by contacting the Safety and Loss Control Manager.

                E.     Employees who are required to but not wearing approved safety shoes at the beginning of
their workday, or during the work period while performing routine work functions, are considered to be in
violation of safe work practices and this instruction. Violators will not be allowed to work and will not be paid
until such time as they report back to work with safety shoes on. Furthermore, violators are subject to
additional disciplinary action. Disciplinary action will be handled through normal departmental procedures.

F.     Exceptions to this instruction may be granted due to medical reasons when accompanied by a qualified
       physician’s written recommendation. Other exceptions may be granted on a case-by-case basis when
       approved by the department head and the Safety and Loss Control Manager. Request for exceptions
       should be forwarded in writing.




40
Safety Shoe Certification

The City of Frederick requires employees to wear safety shoes marked by the ANSI Z41 Class 75 approval, as
prescribed by OSHA (regulation 29 CFR 1910.136).

Vendors are required to certify safety shoe approval under this standard.

I certify that the safety shoes sold to City Employee _______________________meet the above standard.
employee name

Printed Name:____________________________

Signature:    ____________________________

Vendor Name: ___________________________

Address:       ___________________________

                ___________________________

Phone Number:____________________________




41
Appendix B - PPE Selection Chart
        SOURCE                   ASSESSMENT OF                                          PROTECTION
                                    HAZARD
DUST-Woodworking, buffing,              Nuisance dust                           Work uniform consisting of City
general dusty conditions.                                                       issued pants, shirt, and safety toe
                                                                                shoes. Coveralls may be necessary
General housekeeping procedures                                                 in certain applications. Hand and
and general ventilation will greatly                                            eye protection appropriate for the
assist in the abatement of dust                                                 expected or anticipated hazard as
hazards, and therefore lower the                                                necessary. Head protection if
level of PPE required for the                                                   overhead hazard is expected or
performance of assigned tasks.                                                  reasonably anticipated. Respiratory
                                                                                protection as necessary. Disposable
                                                                                dust/mist respirators may be all that
                                                                                is necessary. Other than disposable
                                                                                respirators, employees must be
                                                                                trained and fit tested prior to first
                                                                                use and annually thereafter.
IMPACT-Chipping, grinding,              Flying fragments, objects, large        Work uniform consisting of City
masonry work, woodworking,              chips, particles, sand, dirt, mulch,    issued pants shirt, and safety toe
sawing, drilling, chiseling, powered    etc.                                    shoes. Hand protection appropriate
fastening, riveting, sanding, using                                             for the expected or anticipated
pneumatic equipment, grounds                                                    hazard as necessary. Head
keeping (weedwacking, use of side                                               protection if overhead hazard is
discharge mowers, blowers),                                                     expected or reasonably anticipated.
shipping and receiving stocker, pipe                                            Spectacles with side protection or
installation, working below ground                                              goggles according to the particle
level, working in the vicinity of                                               size. For severe exposure use face
overhead equipment, or any other                                                shield over goggles or spectacles.
activity that may generate or sustain
an impact hazard
COMPRESSION-Rollover by                 Rollover                                Work uniform consisting of City
vehicles, industrial/non-industrial,                                            issued pants, shirts. Hand, eye and
mobile lawn equipment, (graders,                                                face protection appropriate for the
riding lawnmowers), material                                                    expected or anticipated hazard.
handling equipment, (pallet jacks,                                              Safety toe shoes.
forklifts, etc). Heavy pipe, poles,
etc.
CHEMICALS-Acid and corrosive            Ingestion, absorption, inhalation       Work uniform consisting of City
chemical handling, degreasing,                                                  issued pants, shirts, and safety toe
painting, masonry work.                                                         shoes. Chemical splash coveralls or
                                                                                aprons as appropriate. Hand, wrist,
                                                                                and arm protection as appropriate
                                                                                for the expected or anticipated
                                                                                hazard (Acid/Corrosive) Head
                                                                                protection if overhead hazard is
                                                                                expected and or reasonably
                                                                                anticipated. Goggles. Face shields
                                                                                should be worn during severe
                                                                                exposure in addition to primary eye
                                                                                protection. Respiratory protection
                                                                                should be appropriate to the
                                                                                expected or anticipated hazard.
LIGHT and/or RADIATION-                 Optical radiation, inhalation, burns.   Work uniform consisting of City
Welding, electric arc.                                                          issued pants and shirt. Safety toe
                                                                                shoes. Hand protection appropriate


42
                                                                     for the expected or anticipated
                                                                     hazard, e.g. welding gloves. Head
                                                                     protection for overhead/electrical
                                                                     hazards. Spectacles with side
                                                                     protection or goggles as required.
                                                                     Filter lenses must meet the
                                                                     requirements for shade designations
                                                                     in 1910.133 (a)(5). Welding
                                                                     helmets or face shield are only to be
                                                                     used over primary eye protection.
                                                                     Typical shades of 10-14.
                                                                     Respiratory protection should
                                                                     include local ventilation, fume filter
                                                                     cartridges for air purifying
                                                                     respirators or air supplied devices
                                                                     appropriate for the task.
CUTTING, TORCH BRAZING,           Optical radiation, burns           Work uniform consisting of City
TORCH SOLDERING                                                      issued pants and shirt. Hand
                                                                     protection appropriate for the
                                                                     expected or anticipated hazard.
                                                                     Head protection if overhead hazard
                                                                     is expected or reasonably
                                                                     anticipated. Filter lenses must meet
                                                                     the requirements for shade
                                                                     designations in 1910.133 (a)(5).
                                                                     Spectacles or welding face shield.
                                                                     Typical shades 1.5.3. Respiratory
                                                                     protection should include local
                                                                     ventilation, fume cartridges for
                                                                     respirators or air supplied devices
                                                                     appropriate for the task.
GLARE AND UV RADIATION            Burns to the eye and poor vision   Work uniform consisting of County
                                                                     issued pants and shirt, safety toe
                                                                     shoes if appropriate. Hand
                                                                     protection appropriate for the
                                                                     expected or anticipated hazard.
                                                                     Head protection if overhead hazard
                                                                     is expected or reasonably
                                                                     anticipated. Filter lenses must meet
                                                                     the requirements for shade
                                                                     designations in 1910.133 (a) (5).
                                                                     Spectacles w/shaded or special
                                                                     purpose lenses as suitable.
HEAT-Welding, abrasive cutting,   Hot sparks, Flash                  Work uniform consisting of City
electrical work                                                      issued pants, shirt, and safety toe
                                                                     shoes. Hand protection appropriate
                                                                     for the expected or reasonably
                                                                     anticipated hazard. Head protection
                                                                     if overhead hazard is expected.
                                                                     Spectacles with side protection or
                                                                     goggles as required by the standard.
                                                                     Filter lenses must meet the
                                                                     requirements for shade designations
                                                                     in 1910.133 (a)(5). Welding
                                                                     helmets or face shields are only to
                                                                     be used over primary eye
                                                                     protection. Respiratory protection



43
                                                         should include local ventilation,
                                                         fume filters for respirators, or air
                                                         supplied devices appropriate for the
                                                         task.
Soldering              Splash from molten metals         Work uniform consisting of City
                                                         issued pants, shirt and safety toe
                                                         shoes as appropriate. Hand
                                                         protection appropriate for the
                                                         expected or anticipated hazard.
                                                         Head protection if overhead hazard
                                                         is expected or reasonably
                                                         anticipated. Face shield worn over
                                                         goggles. Respiratory protection
                                                         should be addressed by local
                                                         ventilation.
FALL PROTECTION-Fall   Climbing, positioning device      Work uniform consisting of City
Restraint                                                issued pants, shirts and safety toe
                                                         shoes as appropriate. Hand
                                                         protection appropriate to the
                                                         expected or anticipated hazard.
                                                         Head protection if overhead hazard
                                                         is expected or reasonably
                                                         anticipated. Spectacles/goggles as
                                                         appropriate. Utility/climbing belt
                                                         used in conjunction with
                                                         appropriate anchorage (when used
                                                         as a positioning device), or
                                                         rope/cable grab when used as a
                                                         climbing device. Lanyards can be
                                                         no longer than two (2) foot.
Fall arrest.           Falling                           Work uniform consisting of City
                                                         issued pants, shirts and safety toe
                                                         shoes if appropriate. Hand
                                                         protection appropriate for the
                                                         expected or anticipated hazard.
                                                         Head protection if overhead hazard
                                                         is expected or reasonably
                                                         anticipated. Spectacles/goggles as
                                                         appropriate. Harness used in
                                                         conjunction with appropriate
                                                         anchorage and lanyard. Lanyard
                                                         can be no longer than six (6) foot in
                                                         length.
VEHICLE RESTRAINT      Propelled through windshield or   Work uniform consisting of City
                       from vehicle.                     issued pants and shirt. Lap belt
                                                         with shoulder strap if so equipped
                                                         and buckled whenever the vehicle
                                                         is in motion. See City of Frederick
                                                         Seat Belt Policy.
ELECTRICAL             Contact with/by and/or arc.       Work uniform consisting of City
                                                         issued pants, shirts and safety toe
                                                         shoes. Head protection, Class B is
                                                         required to provide adequate
                                                         insulation resistance. Hand
                                                         protection, (rubber insulating if
                                                         appropriate for the expected
                                                         hazard). Sleeves, blankets, hoods,



44
                                                 matting and line hose if appropriate.
                                                 Spectacles (non-metallic) with the
                                                 proper shade designation if
                                                 appropriate. Note: When work is
                                                 performed within reaching distance
                                                 of exposed energized parts of
                                                 equipment, employees must remove
                                                 or render non-conductive all
                                                 exposed conductive articles, such as
                                                 key or watch chains, rings, wrist
                                                 watches, and/or metal frame
                                                 spectacles.
TRAFFIC CONTROL              vehicular traffic   Work uniform consisting of City
                                                 issued pants, shirt and safety toe
                                                 shoes. Hand protection for the
                                                 environmental condition (cold) if
                                                 appropriate. Head protection if
                                                 overhead hazard is expected or
                                                 reasonably anticipated. Highly
                                                 visible, reflectorized vest, with
                                                 reflective traffic control devices, if
                                                 appropriate, I.e. Paddle (Flag may
                                                 only be used during emergency),
                                                 cones, arrow board etc.
Working over or near water   Drowning            Where the danger of drowning
                                                 exists, employees shall be provided
                                                 with U.S. Coast Guard-approved
                                                 life jacket or buoyant work vest.




45
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 09-97
Government Requirement
Prepared By:       Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date:              December 16, 1997
Revision #:        5
Revised Date:      May 30, 2007
Title:                City of Frederick Hazard Communication Policy (Right To Know)


I.       PURPOSE

It is the intent of the Mayor, through the adoption and implementation of the following, Hazard Communication
Policy to comply with the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.1200, and as required by the Maryland Access to
Information about Hazardous and Toxic Substances Law, and COMAR 09.12.33. The following Policy will,
when followed, provide City of Frederick employees with the right to know information needed to identify
hazardous and/or toxic substances, the hazards as well as the measures they can take, to include the appropriate
work practices, emergency procedures and the personal protective equipment needed to protect themselves
while performing tasks within the workplace. The desired result should produce a significant reduction of
personal risk of employees having an adverse health or physical effect connected with their employment.

II.      SCOPE AND APPLICATION

This policy will apply to all City of Frederick employees and contractor employees who through the
performance of their job tasks may be exposed to hazardous or toxic substances within the workplace while in
the course of performing their job tasks.

III.     BASIC REQUIREMENTS

The CFR’s Hazard Communication Standard, Maryland’s Access to Information about Hazardous and Toxic
Substances Law, and COMAR 09.12.33. establishes the following vehicles for accomplishing its purpose of
transmitting chemical safety and health information to employees:

        Chemical Information Lists
        Material Safety Data Sheets
        Container Labeling
        Written Hazard Communication Policy
        Formal Employee Training


IV.      DEFINITIONS AND TERMS

Chemical
“Chemical” means any element, chemical compound or mixture of elements and/or compounds.

Hazardous Chemical
“Hazardous chemical” means any chemical which is a physical hazard or a health hazard.



46
Chemical Name
“Chemical name” means the scientific designation of a chemical in accordance with the nomenclature system
developed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) or the Chemical Abstracts
Service (CAS) rules of nomenclature, or a name which will clearly identify the chemical for the purpose of
conducting a hazard evaluation.

Common Name
“Common name” means any designation or identification such as code name, code number, trade name, brand
name or generic name used to identify a chemical other than by its chemical name.

Employee
“Employee” means a worker who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals under normal operating conditions or
in a foreseeable emergencies.

Contract Manager
“Contract Manager” means the City of Frederick representative responsible for the management of the contract
while contractors are onsite.

 Exposure or exposed
 “Exposure or exposed” means that an employee may be subject in the course of employment to a chemical that
is a physical or health hazard, and includes potential (e.g. accidental or possible) exposure. “Subject” in terms of
health hazards includes any route of entry (e.g. inhalation, ingestion, skin contact or absorption.)

Material Safety Data Sheet
“Material safety data sheet (MSDS)” means written or printed material concerning a hazardous chemical which
is prepared in accordance with paragraph (g) of the CFR 1910.1200.

Chemical Information Lists
“Chemical information list” means a list of hazardous chemicals that are either stored, used or was used or
stored in the workplace within the last forty (40) years.

        a.      Active List    “Active chemical information list” means those hazardous chemicals, which are
                presently being used or stored in the workplace.

        b.      Inactive List “Inactive list” means those hazardous chemicals that have been used or stored in
                the workplace within the last forty (40) years.

V.      MSDS RECEIPT AND WORKPLACE CHEMICAL INFORMATION LISTS

MSDS RECEIPT
All initial inventory of hazardous chemicals received shall be accompanied with an MSDS. Manufacturers,
importers, and distributors shall provide the City of Frederick with an MSDS prior to or at the time of the initial
shipment.

LISTS




47
       a.      Active:A list of all hazardous chemicals located within each City of Frederick department or
               work areas whether stored or in use, and corresponding MSDS’s shall be maintained in a master
               file specific to each department.

       b.      Inactive:      A hazardous chemical information list that relate to those chemicals that at one
               time were active but have since been disposed of or used up in process will be maintained in the
               Safety Department.

VI.    MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT NOTIFICATION

The MDE shall receive a revised copy of the City of Frederick’s active hazardous chemical information list
every two years.

VII.   CONTAINER LABELING

All containers of hazardous materials within each City of Frederick facility must be identified by a label, tag, or
marking identifying the material and appropriate hazard warnings. Chemical manufacturers, importers, and
distributors are required to ensure that every container of hazardous chemicals they ship is appropriately labeled
with such information and with the name and address of the producer or other responsible party. If the material
is transferred from a labeled container to another container, the new container must be marked with the
appropriate information. Portable containers are exempt from labeling requirements when the hazardous
chemical being transferred into the portable container is intended to be used only for the immediate use of the
employee who performs the transfer.

VIII. CONTRACTOR NOTIFICATION

When employees of contractors are required to perform maintenance, construction, etc. for the City of
Frederick, the City’s Contract Manager (see definition) will hold a pre construction meeting at which time the
Contract Manager will ensure that the contract employer is apprised of the hazardous chemicals for which the
contract employers employees may be exposed prior to the start of service. Additionally, the contract employer
shall be provided access to the applicable chemical information list and MSDS sheets upon request. The
primary responsibility for the training of the contractor’s employees or a subcontractor rest with the contractor.

IX.    RESPONSIBILITIES

The Mayor or his/her designee shall be responsible for the implementation and overall administration of
this program.

The City of Frederick Directors or their designee shall be responsible for:

       1.      Retaining a current City of Frederick written Hazard Communication Policy on file;
       2.      Ensuring compliance within their respective departments;
       3.      Informing employees of the location of the written Hazard Communication Policy to include
               MSDS sheets and the Chemical Information Lists making them available to employees upon
               request; and
       4.      The overall responsibility for the implementation and enforcement of this policy.

Each applicable Department Head or their designee shall be responsible for:


48
     1.    Compiling a comprehensive inventory of potential hazardous chemicals used or stored in the
           workplace;
     2.    Ensuring an MSDS has been received for each hazardous chemical;
     3.    Ensuring employees do not use chemicals for which you have not received an MSDS;
     4.    Compiling a final Chemical Information List of hazardous chemicals according to,

           a.     The common name,
           b.     The chemical name,
           c.     Identification of the work area in which the hazardous chemical is found, and
           d.     The date the chemical was added to the Chemical Information List.
                  (See appendix A)

     5.    Maintaining the active chemical information list.

           Active list shall be arranged in
           a.     Alphabetical order according to Brand Name,
           b.     Revised, re-alphabetized and submitted to the Safety and Loss Control Manager every
                  two years,
           c.     Ensure any new hazardous chemical introduced into the workplace is added to the
                  chemical information list within thirty (30) days - Note: It need not be placed on the list
                  in alphabetical order until the next two (2) year revision of the chemical list, and
           d.     Submit to the Safety and Loss Control Manager every two years a list of all inactive
                  chemicals.

     6.    Submitting upon request, the chemical information list and corresponding MSDS’s to;
           a.    To fire suppression,
           b.    Fire inspection,
           c.    Rescue squad,
           d.    Ambulance squad/EMT’s within our jurisdiction.

     7.    Review MSDS upon receipt of the material, and ensure that those items necessary for employee
           protection as provided on the MSDS, are available for use at the time the material is used in the
           workplace, i.e., protective clothing and equipment, spill/clean-up materials, etc.;

     8.    Apprise employees of any new hazardous chemicals and the safety related information prior to
           the chemical being introduced into the work place;

     9.    Apprising the employee of the hazards associated with any non-routine task and the
           corresponding protective measures required;

     10.   Ensure material safety data sheets are made readily accessible for employees to review during
           their scheduled work shifts;

     11.   Provide at the employee’s request, a copy of the chemical information list or any material safety
           data sheet within five (5) days after the request;

     12.   Ensure that all containers are properly labeled upon receipt;


49
       13.     Ensuring that all portable containers are properly labeled;

       14.     Providing employee with annual review training;

       15.     Providing new employees with the a program overview;

       16.     Maintaining employee training records; and

       17.     Reporting deficiencies in this program to the Safety Department immediately.

Employees shall be responsible for:

       1.      Knowing and identifying the hazardous chemical exposures inherent to the performance of their
               job tasks and being familiar with the appropriate personal protective measures needed for
               employee safety;
       2.      Reporting to their supervisor any health conditions which may preclude them from working
               safely with a chemical(s);
       3.      Ensuring that all containers are properly labeled prior to use; and
       4.      Immediately reporting deficiencies in this program to their supervisor.

Safety and Loss Control Manager Responsibilities:

       1.      Develop and maintain a written Hazard Communication Program;
       2.      Submit the Hazardous chemical information lists to the MDE every two (2) years;
       3.      Providing initial Hazard Communication “train the trainer” training to all Department Heads
               and/or their representatives;
       4.      Provide initial program implementation training to all applicable employees;
       5.      Assist in annual training as requested;
       6.      Review the policy annually and revise as necessary;
       7.      Maintain initial program implementation training records;
       8.      Maintain inactive chemical information list as submitted every two years by each applicable
               department; and
       9.      React to and mediate any reports of deficiencies in this program.

X.     EMPLOYEE TRAINING

All employees tasked with responsibilities as stipulated in this Policy shall receive appropriate Hazard
Communication Training. Training will be conducted in accordance with the Hazard Communication Standard
and Maryland Laws. Training will be provided for new hires and transfers prior to their assignment where
hazardous chemical exposure may exist. Additional training will also be provided each time a new hazard is
introduced into the workplace or when an employee is to perform a non-routine task. Records of all training
shall be kept, documenting the date, the employee trained, the hazards and chemicals covered, and the person
providing the training. Records of training shall be maintained within the respective department, with a copy
sent to Safety Department, and shall be made a permanent part of the employee’s departmental personnel file.

Employee training will consist of but not be limited to the following:



50
       1.     Information on the requirements and intent of the OSHA Standard,
       2.     Definitions
       3.     Physical & Health Hazards
       4.     Routes of Entry
       5.     Material Safety Data Sheets
       6.     Warning Labels
       7.     Employee’s Rights
       8.     Common Household Hazardous Chemicals
       9.     Specific Work area exposures
       10.    Non-routine tasks

XI.    ENFORCEMENT AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION

The safety of employees is of primary concern to the City of Frederick, especially when employees are exposed
to known hazardous chemicals. Therefore, any disregard for this policy shall be immediately brought to the
attention of the employee’s supervisor. The supervisor shall review the circumstances immediately and direct
appropriate disciplinary action according to the City of Frederick Personnel Rules and Regulations.




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                                                  Chemical Information List

COMPANY NAME: _________________________ WORKPLACE ADDRESS:
                                                                 (IF DIFFERENT FROM BUSINESS ADDRESS)
BUSINESS ADDRESS: _______________________ _________________________________
________________________________ ________________________
CONTACT PERSON: _______________________________ TELEPHONE: (                                          )     -

DATE OF PREPARATION
OR REVISION: ___/___/___ TITLE: _______________________________________________

 COMMON NAME (1)                CHEMICAL NAME (1)                 WORK AREA(S) (2)              DATE ADDED
                                                                                                  TO LIST




(1) Either the chemical name or the common name must be the identity of the chemical which is found on the label and the MSDS.
More than one Common Name for a particular substance may be listed in the “Common Name” column.
(2) If symbols, letters or numbers are used to identify work areas, the employer should also provide a key, map, or other descriptive
identification.




52
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 11-99
Government Requirement
Prepared By:      Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date:             December 15, 2003
Revised #:
Revised Date:

Title:                 The City of Frederick Generic Emergency Evacuation Plan Implementation
                       Guidelines
  The City of Frederick's Emergency Evacuation Plan has been designed to assist facility/department
heads in the creation of a system for protection of life and property in the event of a fire, explosion, spill
or other emergency requiring building evacuation. This plan is designed as a template for customization
            by City of Frederick facility/department heads, and is required by Federal law.

                Note that the bracketed bold parts of the plan need to be modified for your facility.

                                            Getting Started Guidelines:

        {Designate an Emergency Coordinator and Alternate Emergency Coordinator} for the facility.
        {Designate Safety Monitors and Alternate Safety Monitors} for specific work areas in the facility.
        {Obtain and post floor plans with evacuation routes} and other information as specified in the plan.
         Insert this information into the appropriate appendices of the plan and include as an Appendix of the
         plan. Ensure that copies of each facility Evacuation Plan are posted.
        {Establish Designated Meeting Sites} at a safe location outside your building. Note 300’ for Bomb
         Threats and a minimum of 100’ for all other evacuations, such as fire.
        {Review your operations to determine which critical operating systems may require continuing
         attention or shutdown during an evacuation or other emergency condition.} (Such as Water &
         Wastewater Treatment Operations) Develop a procedure to ensure that essential actions are taken during
         an emergency. Ensure that you have designated personnel to address these issues, provided them with
         the procedure, and trained them in its use.
        {Train the Evacuation Coordinator and all Safety Monitors} on their responsibilities to implement
         the plan and to assist in the safe and orderly emergency evacuation of building occupants.
        Ensure that you have a procedure in place for communication and evacuation of disabled persons.
        {Customize the text and appendices of the plan to your facility.} Designate a responsible person for
         plan custody, storage and annual review and update.
        Develop employee responsibilities lists as designated in the plan appendices. Ensure that affected
         personnel are familiar with individual and group responsibilities.
        Develop a training program outline for distribution and review by employees.




53
        Conduct training in plan requirements with all building occupants. Ensure that occupants are aware
         of evacuation procedures in the event of an emergency. Forward a copy of your evacuation plan training
         records the Department of Occupational Safety and Health for retention.
        Conduct periodic evacuation drills and critique the drills. Enlist the support of the Department of
         Occupational Safety and Health for technical assistance.

         Contact Dan Patton at 22546 or via e-mail at dpatton@cityoffrederick.com if you have any questions
         concerning the plan or if you need a review of the plan upon completion to verify regulatory
         compliance.




54
The City of Frederick Emergency Evacuation Plan
Department Name: ___________________________________
                    Building Name: ______________________________________
                    Building Address: ____________________________________
                    Emergency Coordinator: _______________________________
                   Emergency Coordinator Phone Number: ___________________
                   Designated Meeting Site(s) for Building are: _________________
                     __________________________________________________
                     __________________________________________________

                    Plan Prepared By: ____________________________________
                                     Date: _____/_____/_____

EMERGENCY NUMBERS
                                        (Please keep posted)
                                              Fire 911
                                            Medical 911
                                          City Police 911

                           Department of Occupational Safety and Health
                                       111 Airport Dr. East
                                   Frederick, Maryland 21701
                                          301-600-2546




55
Table of Contents
   1. Purpose and Objectives
   2. General Guidelines
   3. Responsibilities of Emergency Coordinator and Safety Monitors
   4. Alerting or Signaling Building Occupants in Case of Fire/Emergency
   5. Evacuation Procedures for Building Occupants
   6. Disabled Occupants
   7. Critical Operations Shutdown
   8. Accountability Procedures for Emergency Evacuation
   9. Rescue and Medical Duties
   10. Resource and Responsibilities Lists
   11. Training and Communications

APPENDICES

                                             Appendix I:

                                      Emergency Evacuation
                                     Plan Responsibilities Lists

                                            Appendix II:

                                    Site Specific Information
                                       Building Floor Plans
                       Primary and Secondary Emergency Evacuation Routes
                                    Designated Meeting Sites
                                              Exits
                                    Fire Alarm Box Locations

                                            Appendix III:

                                       Area Evacuation Plan

                                        Appendix IV:

                             Tips for Assisting Persons with Disabilities




56
                                                  Appendix V:

                                    OSHA Regulation 29 CFR 1910.38
                           Employee Emergency Plans and Fire Prevention Plans

     1. Purpose and Objectives

Potential emergencies at the [building name and address] ___________________________, such as fire,
explosion, spill, chemical releases and all other emergencies require employees to evacuate the building.
An Emergency Evacuation Plan (EEP) and adequate occupant familiarity with a building minimize
threats to life and property. In addition, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
Emergency Action Plan standard, found at 29 CFR 1910.38(a), requires that [building name]
__________________________ have a written Emergency Evacuation Plan (EEP). This plan applies to all
emergencies where employees may need to evacuate for personal safety.
This EEP is intended to communicate the policies and procedures for employees to follow in an
emergency situation. This written plan should be made available, upon request, to employees and their
designated representatives by the Emergency Coordinator for the building.
Under this plan, employees will be informed of:

        The plan's purpose,
        Preferred means of reporting fires and other emergencies,
        Emergency escape procedures and route assignments,
        Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to control critical plant operations before they
         evacuate,
        Procedures to account for all employees after emergency evacuation has been completed,
        Rescue and medical duties for those employees who perform them,
        The alarm system.

 [Name/title] ______________________________ is the Emergency Coordinator for this facility and has
                overall responsibility for the preparation and implementation of this plan.
       [Name/title] ______________________________ is the Alternate Emergency Coordinator.
  The Emergency Coordinator will review and update the plan as necessary. Copies of this plan will be
                   maintained in the [specify locations where the plan will be maintained]
                               _____________________________________.

     2. General Guidelines

                                  The following guidelines apply to this EEP:

     1. All personnel must be trained in safe evacuation procedures. Refresher training is required whenever the
        employee's responsibilities or designated actions under the plan change, and whenever the plan itself is
        changed.
     2. The training may include use of floor plans and workplace maps, which clearly show the emergency,
        escape routes included in the EEP. Color-coding aids employees in determining their route assignments.
        Floor plans and maps should be posted at all times in main areas (i.e., stairwells, lobbies, elevator



57
        lobbies, exit corridors) of [building name] __________________________ to provide guidance in an
        emergency.
     3. Stairwells are the primary means for evacuation. Elevators are to be used only when authorized by a fire
        or police officer.
     4. No employee is permitted to re-enter the building until advised by the Fire Department.

   This EEP will be a coordinated effort in connected buildings, such as, Permits, Code Enforcement,
Safety, PD-Citizen Services and PD- Professional Standards Unit. Mutually beneficial agreements can be
     reached regarding Designated Meeting Sites and shelter in the event of inclement weather. The
        Occupational Safety and Health Department is available for consultation to assist with the
                                     implementation of joint EEPs.


     3. Responsibilities of Emergency Coordinator and Safety Monitors

                                The Emergency Coordinator is responsible for:

     1. Obtaining and posting floor plans and route evacuation maps.
     2. Overseeing the development, communication, implementation and maintenance of the overall facilities
        EEP.
     3. Ensuring the training of building occupants, Safety Monitors, and Critical Operations Personnel, and
        notifying all personnel of changes to the plan.
     4. Maintaining up to date lists of building occupants, critical operations personnel, and any other personnel
        with assigned duties under this plan. Lists are included in Appendix I.
     5. In the event of a fire or other emergency, relaying applicable information to emergency personnel,
        occupants and Safety Monitors.
     6. Establishing Designated Meeting Sites for evacuees.

                                    The Safety Monitors are responsible for:

     1. Familiarizing personnel with emergency procedures.
     2. Acting as liaison between management and their work area.
     3. Ensuring that occupants have vacated the premise in the event of an evacuation, and for checking
        assigned areas.
     4. Knowing where their Designated Meeting Site is and for communicating this information to occupants.
     5. Having a list of personnel in their area of coverage, so a head count can be made at their Designated
        Meeting Site.
     6. Ensuring that disabled persons and visitors are assisted in evacuating the building.
     7. Evaluating and reporting problems to the Emergency Coordinator after an emergency event.
     8. Posting the "Area Evacuation Plan" (Appendix III) in their work areas, communicating plan to
        occupants, and updating the plan annually.




58
     4. Alerting or Signaling Building Occupants in Case of Fire or Other Emergency

     1. In case of a fire, employees should activate the nearest fire alarm box and/or make a telephone call to the
        local Fire Department at 911. The locations of the fire alarm boxes are noted on the evacuation floor
        plans in Appendix II. The [designate the type of audible alarm in use] ______________________
        alarm alerts building occupants of the need for evacuation.
     2. It may be necessary to audibly shout an alarm, if people are still in the building and the alarm has
        stopped sounding, or if the alarm does not sound. This can be done while exiting.
     3. Persons discovering a fire, smoky condition, or explosion should pull the fire alarm box. Any pertinent
        fire or rescue information should be conveyed to the Fire Department. All emergency telephone
        numbers are listed at the beginning of this EEP.

     5. Evacuation Procedures for Building Occupants

     1. When the fire alarm sounds, all personnel should ensure that nearby personnel are aware of the
        emergency, quickly shutdown operating equipment (e.g., compressed gas cylinders), close doors and
        exit the building using stairwells.
     2. All occupants should proceed to their Designated Meeting Site and await further instructions from their
        Safety Monitor.
     3. All personnel should know where primary and alternate exits are located, and be familiar with the
        various evacuation routes available. Floor plans with escape routes, alternate escape routes; exit
        locations and Designated Meeting Sites are located in Appendix II and are posted in the building.
     4. Building occupants must NOT use elevators as an escape route in the event of a fire.

                                                  Notes and Precautions:

        Small fires can be extinguished only if you are trained to use a fire extinguisher and if a second
         person is there to assist. However, an immediate readiness to evacuate is essential.
        All fires, even those that have been extinguished, must be reported to 911 and 22546 immediately.
        Never enter a room that is smoke filled.
        Never enter a room if the door is warm to touch.

                                                       Fire:

        R - Rescue: When you discover a fire, rescue people in immediate danger if you can do so without
         endangering yourself. Exit via safe fire exit. Never use elevators. Close doors to room with fire.
        A - Alarm: Sound the alarm by pulling a fire box and call 911and 22546, from a safe distance, to notify
         fire department and safety of the precise location of fire.
        C - Confine: Close all doors, windows and other openings.
        E - Evacuate: Evacuate the building.

     6. Disabled Occupants
If a disabled occupant is unable to exit the building unassisted, the Safety Monitor must notify the emergency
response personnel of the person's location. Transporting of disabled individuals up or down stairwells should
be avoided until emergency response personnel have arrived. Unless imminent life-threatening conditions exist
in the immediate area occupied by a non-ambulatory or disabled person, relocation rather than evacuation


59
should be first attempted to a safe area on the same floor, in close proximity to an evacuation stairwell. In any
case should a safe re-location not be available, the Safety Monitor should solicit the assistant of other facility
personnel and follow the Tips for Assisting Persons with disabilities. See Appendix IV.

     7. Critical Operations Shutdown

Critical Operation Shutdown: Critical operations, including equipment that must be shut off and persons
designated to complete these actions are identified in Appendix I of this EEP. Procedures for rapid
shutdown should be predetermined for life safety and loss control purposes, as well as ensuring complete
evacuations in a timely manner.
The Critical Operations Shutdown procedures to be followed by those employees who have been assigned
to care for essential building operations include:

Operation                                 Responsibility
1. _______________________________ _______________________________________
2. _______________________________ _______________________________________
3. _______________________________ _______________________________________
4. _______________________________ _______________________________________
5. _______________________________ _______________________________________
  Persons involved in the Critical Operations Shutdown listed above shall be notified by management of
 this responsibility in advance, identified in the EEP, and will be appropriately trained for the particular
        situation. Personnel assigned to critical operations responsibilities are listed in Appendix I.

    8. Accountability Procedures for Emergency Evacuation
Designated Meeting Sites: Groups working together on or in the same area should meet outside the
building in the prearranged Designated Meeting Site. A list of the primary and alternate Designated
Meeting Sites are listed on the floor plans in Appendix II.
Department Organization List: A roster of personnel to ensure that everyone has evacuated has been
developed by the Emergency Coordinator. The list will be updated whenever there is a personnel change.
Safety Monitors are designated by the Emergency Coordinator and will conduct head counts once
evacuation has been completed. There is at least one Safety Monitor per floor or per twenty occupants to
provide adequate guidance and instruction at the time of an emergency.
The employees selected as Safety Monitors are to be trained in the complete workplace layout and the
various primary and alternate escape routes from the workplace. All trained personnel are made aware
of employees with disabilities that may need extra assistance, and of hazardous areas to be avoided
during emergencies. Before leaving, the Safety Monitors are to check rooms and other enclosed spaces in
the workplace for other employees who may be trapped or otherwise unable to evacuate the area, and
convey this information to emergency personnel. A list of Safety Monitors and Alternate Safety Monitors
for [building name] ___________________________________ appears in Appendix I.
Once each evacuated group of employees have reached their Designated Meeting Site, each Safety
Monitor:

     1.   Assembles his/her group in the Designated Meeting Site.
     2.   Takes head count of his or her group.
     3.   Assumes role of department contact to answer questions.
     4.   Instructs personnel to remain in area until further notice.
     5.   Reports status to Emergency Coordinator or Incident Commander.

60
     6. Instructs personnel to remain at Designated Meeting Site until further notice.



      9. Rescue and Medical Duties

        The Fire Department will conduct all rescue duties.
        Trained City of Frederick First Aid (F/A) responders will respond to interim F/A/CPR needs until
         Fire/Rescue arrives on site.
        Do not move injured personnel. Keep the person lying down, covered and warm.

     10. Resource and Responsibilities Lists

EEP Organization: The lists in Appendix I include the names of employees, managers, staff or other
personnel and their job titles, job positions and relative EEP collateral duties. The purposes served by the
lists are:

     1. To tell employees who to see for additional information on the EEP.
     2. To provide emergency response personnel with a list of department personnel which may be needed in
        order to provide additional information about the fire, a chemical, a hazardous waste location, a
        shipment of chemicals, etc.
     3. The lists should be updated by the Emergency Coordinator on an as-needed basis.
     11. Training and Communications

Each occupant shall know when evacuation is necessary and what his/her role is in carrying out the plan.
Employees should also know what is expected of them during an emergency to assure their safety. Training on
the EEPs content is also required by OSHA 29 CFR 1910.38(a).
A method of training building occupants in the requirements of the emergency evacuation plan is to give
all employees a thorough briefing and demonstration. The department will have all managers and
supervisors present this plan to their staffs in staff meetings. Annual practice drills are to be
implemented and documented by the Emergency Coordinator. The Occupational Safety and Health
Department can assist with training, drills and demonstrations.
A Training Attendance Record Sheet is included in Appendix I. This record should be maintained by the
Occupational Safety and Health Department for a period of five (5) years.




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Appendix I - Emergency Evacuation Plan Responsibilities List

        Department Name _______________________________________

        Building Name __________________________________________

        Address _______________________________________________

        Title __________________________________________________
        Name _________________________________________________

        Location _______________________________________________

        Room number ___________________________________________

        Telephone ______________________________________________


Title                Name                     Location         Rm #   Telephone

Emergency
Coordinator          ______________________ ________________ _______ ____________

Alternate Emergency
Coordinator         ______________________ ________________ _______ ____________

Safety Monitors      ______________________ ________________ _______ ____________

Alternate Safety
Monitors             ______________________ ________________ _______ ____________

Other
management/staff
with related EEP
duties               ______________________ ________________ _______ ____________

Total Number of Employees _________




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Personnel Assigned To Critical Operations Responsibilities

     Critical Operation   Required Shutdown       Name       Job Position   Work Area


____________________ _________________ ________________ ____________ ____________

____________________ _________________ ________________ ____________ ____________

____________________ _________________ ________________ ____________ ____________

____________________ _________________ ________________ ____________ ____________

____________________ _________________ ________________ ____________ ____________




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Department Employee List
(An attached computer list is acceptable)
             Name                          Job Title / Shift             Workplace
1. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
2. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
3. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
4. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
5. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
6. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
7. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
8. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
9. _______________________         ________________________    ________________________
10. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
11. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
12. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
13. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
14. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
15. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
16. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
17. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
18. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
19. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________
20. ______________________         ________________________    ________________________




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Utilities Emergency Maintenance
                      PERSONNEL TO CONTACT IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY

            Utility               Name/Job Title           Location         Telephone


                                 Safety Manager        101 N. Court Street 22546
                                       911
Any Emergency                 Department Supervision
Electricity
Water
Gas
Sprinkler Mech/Sprinkler
Shutdown (procedure)
Heat & Vent
Plumbing
AC and Refrigeration
Fire Suppression or Alarm
Devices Shutdown
(procedure)
Custodian
Other
For further information
contact




65
The City of Frederick Training Attendance Record

COURSE TITLE:_Emergency Evacuation Procedures COURSE HRS:________TIME: _____DATE:____________
                                                                       START/STOP

COURSE GIVEN FOR___________________________________TRAINING FACILITY:_______________________

FACILITY CONDITION:__________________________START:_____END:_____OUTSIDE_____INSIDE____
                           DEPARTMENT NAME

REPAIRS NEEDED:___________________________________________________________________________

INSTRUCTOR_____________________________SUPPORT INSTRUCTOR_____________________________

TOTAL # OF STUDENTS REGISTERED______TOTAL#STARTED_______TOTAL #COMPLETED________

TRAINING REQUIRED BY: MOSH_x___DEPT_____DOT_____CONTINUING ED._x___OTHER__________

AVERAGE GRADE=%__________LOW_______HIGH_______PRE-REQUISITE:____N/A_________________

INSTRUCTOR CHECKLIST


ROOM ARRANGEMENT                                                       FIRST AID KIT
SET UP - TEST ALL EQUIPMENT                                            TELEPHONES
EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURES                                        SMOKING AREAS
ELECTRICAL OUTLETS                                                     BREAK ROOMS
LOCATION OF:                                                           VENDING MACHINES
LIGHT SWITCHES                                                         FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
REST ROOMS                                                             ENTRANCES/EXITS
WATER FOUNTAINS                                                        TEMP CONTROLS


                                             MATERIALS/EQUIPMENT LIST

     A/V   LIST      HANDOUTS   LIST        VEHICLES   LIST    OTHER       LIST       REFRESHMENTS
 VIDEO            HAND OUT                                    FIRE                  COFFEE/JUICE
                                                              EXTINGUISHERS
                                                              FLARES
                                                              QUESTION SHT.
                                                              PENCILS

                                                              INSTR. BINDER

                                                 COURSE PARTICIPANTS
              NAME PRINT               SIGN-IN                 SIGNATURE
                                        TIME




66
67
Appendix II - In this Appendix, the Emergency Coordinator is to insert Site Specific:

        Building Floor Plan
        Primary and Secondary Emergency Evacuation Routes
        Designated Meeting Sites
        Exits
        Fire Alarm Box Locations




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Appendix III - Area Evacuation Plan
                                         (post and update annually)

                                 Department/Area:
 Date: ______________________________ Completed By: ____________________________


(1.) Each work area should establish, in advance, a primary and a secondary evacuation route (in case the
  primary route is blocked) in the event of fire, flood, blackout, earthquake, etc. Do not use elevators to
                               evacuate. Do not block open stairwell doors.

                                         Primary Evacuation Route:



                                        Secondary Evacuation Route:



 (2.) Establish an outdoor meeting place where evacuees, out of harms way, can account for all staff and
                         visitors. Minimum 100’ for fires, 300’ for bomb threats.

                                          Designated Meeting Site:



     (3.) Designate a position/alternate who will take charge in the event of fire or another emergency.

                                              Safety Monitor:



                                          Alternate Safety Monitor:



                                  Emergency Coordinator for the building:




69
Check list of Responsibilities for the Safety Monitor:

     1. Ensure that R.A.C.E. is followed if smoke or flame are discovered in your work area:
            o Rescue,
            o Alarm,
            o Close all doors,
            o Evacuate.
            o (If time and distance permit, call 22546)
     2. "Sweep" every room in your area to make sure that everyone has evacuated.
     3. Ensure that people follow the appropriate evacuation route, and that they are directed to a safe, post-
        evacuation meeting place.
     4. Account for all staff and visitors at the Designated Meeting Site.
     5. Identify yourself as the Safety Monitor for your work area to the Emergency Coordinator and
        emergency responders.
     6. Notify Emergency Coordinator and emergency responders of any personnel who remain trapped in
        the building, or who are performing critical operations shutdown, or are unaccounted for.

                                                  Special Needs

        Be aware of impaired staff and visitors who may need to be alerted or assisted, such as hearing or vision
         impairment. See attached, Tips for Assisting Persons with disabilities.

                                             Water Services Personnel

        Prepare to shut off piped gases and compressed gas cylinders at the valve, which may feed a fire.




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Appendix IV - Tip For Assisting Persons with Disabilities

       BEFORE AN EMERGENCY:
        1.   Make sure all exits are clearly marked and not obstructed in any manner.
        2.   If possible, the Safety Monitor should orient persons with disabilities to the building
             evacuation procedure through printed material or some other means.
        3.   The Safety Monitor should be familiar with persons with disabilities who routinely use the
             building.


       DURING AN EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURE:
        1.   Communicate the nature of the emergency to the person.
        2.   Ask the person how they would like to be assisted.
        3.   When you evacuate the person, make sure you bring along their mobility aids if possible, for
             example, cane, walker, etc.


       PERSONS WITH VISUAL DISABILITIES:
       Tell the person the nature of the emergency and offer to guide them to the nearest exit. Have them
       take your elbow and help them avoid obstacles. Even if they have a guide dog, it is wise to offer to
       physically guide them. When you reach safety, tell the person where they are and help them to get
       oriented to the location.

       DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING PERSONS:
       Communicate the emergency to them in whatever manner is comfortable to you, utilizing hand
       gestures or a quick note.

       PERSONS USING CANES, WALKERS OR CRUTCHES:
       Ask the person what assistance they need. If they are unable to use the stairs, follow directions for
       persons using wheelchairs (below).

       PERSONS USING WHEELCHAIRS:
       Ask the person what assistance they need. In general, however, persons using wheelchairs should be
       moved to a fire safe exit (stairwell landing). If possible, have someone stay with him/her until
       additional assistance has arrived. In an emergency, DO NOT USE THE ELEVATORS. IF a
       person with a disability is located above the first floor, they should be moved to an exit/stairwell
       corridor out of the flow of foot traffic. (Rescue personnel are trained to check these areas for
       persons who may be trapped.) You should inform rescue personnel when you exit the building of the
       location of where you placed the person using the wheelchair. Only in imminent danger situations
       should you attempt a wheelchair evacuation!




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     Carry Techniques
     One-Person Carry Technique

     The CRADLE LIFT is the preferred method when the person to be carried has little or no arm
          strength. It is safer if the person being carried weighs less than the carrier's weight.

                           Two-Person Carry Technique--The Swing or Chair Carry

                                               To use this technique:

              Carriers stand on opposite sides of the individual.
              Take the arm on your side and wrap it around your shoulder.
              Grasp your carry partner's forearm behind the person in the small of the back.
              Reach under the person's knees to grasp the wrist of your carry partner's other hand.
              Both carry partners should then lean in, close to the person, and lift on the count of three.
              Continue pressing into the person being carried for additional support in the carry.


     The advantage of this carry is that the partners can support (with practice and coordination) a
                 person whose weight is same or even greater than their own weight.
        The disadvantage is increased awkwardness in vertical travel (stair descent) due to the
     increased complexity of the two person carry. Three persons abreast may exceed the effective
                                          width of the stairway.


                                  To Assist in Moving a Wheelchair Downstairs

        When descending stairs, stand behind the chair grasping the pushing grips. Tilt the chair
       backwards until a balance is achieved. Descend frontward. Stand one step above the chair,
     keeping your center of gravity low and let the back wheels gradually lower to the next step. Be
       careful to keep the chair tilted back. If possible, have another person assist by holding the
     frame of the wheelchair and pushing in from the front. But do not lift the chair, as this places
                                  more weight on the individual behind.


     Important: Remember that many persons using wheelchairs may be very fragile. They may be
     unable to move independently and may have a wheelchair that includes medical devices they are
     dependent upon. They may also use a power wheelchair that includes a heavy battery. Trying to lift
     the wheelchair down stairs with the person in it could result in injuries to both the person with the
     disability and the person(s) attempting to assist them.

     PURPOSE OF STAIRWELLS:
     1.       Stairwells are the required means of egress in an emergency.
     2.       They are designed as a safe environment free of all products of combustion.

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          3.   It is imperative that the stairwell doors be kept closed when not being used. This is a design
               feature that prevents the stairwells from filling up with smoke due to a door on the fire floor
               being wedged or held open. In addition, these tight fitting doors prevent the spread of smoke
               and fire up the stairwell to any other floor.

          Elevators are a convenience and NOT to be used as an egress route in the event of a fire.
          Elevators can become unreliable and can actually take trapped occupants directly to the fire floor!



     For more information, please call: 22546




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Appendix V - OSHA Regulations


                OSHA 29 CFR 1910.38 - Employee emergency plans and fire prevention plans

                             (a) Emergency action plan -- (1) Scope and application.

          This paragraph (a) applies to all emergency action plans required by a particular OSHA
           standard. The emergency action plan shall be in writing (except as provided in the last
          sentence of paragraph (a)(5)(iii) of this section) and shall cover those designated actions
             employers and employees must take to ensure employee safety from fire and other
                                                 emergencies.

            (a)(2) Elements. The following elements, at a minimum, shall be included in the plan:

        (a)(2)(i) Emergency escape procedures and emergency escape route assignments;
        (a)(2)(ii) Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before
         they evacuate;
        (a)(2)(iii) Procedures to account for all employees after emergency evacuation has been completed;
        (a)(2)(iv) Rescue and medical duties for those employees who are to perform them;
        (a)(2)(v) The preferred means of reporting fires and other emergencies; and
        (a)(2)(vi) Names or regular job titles of persons or departments who can be contacted for further
         information or explanation of duties under the plan.

                                               (a)(3) Alarm system.

        (a)(3)(i) The employer shall establish an employee alarm system which complies with 1910.165.
        (a)(3)(ii) If the employee alarm system is used for alerting fire brigade members, or for other purposes, a
         distinctive signal for each purpose shall be used.

(a)(4) Evacuation. The employer shall establish in the emergency action plan the types of evacuation to be
                                  used in emergency circumstances.
                                             (a)(5) Training.

        (a)(5)(i) Before implementing the emergency action plan, the employer shall designate and train a
         sufficient number of persons to assist in the safe and orderly emergency evacuation of employees.
        (a)(5)(ii) The employer shall review the plan with each employee covered by the plan at the following
         times:
             o (a)(5)(ii)(A) Initially when the plan is developed,
             o (a)(5)(ii)(B) Whenever the employee's responsibilities or designated actions under the plan
                 change, and
             o (a)(5)(ii)(C) Whenever the plan is changed.
        (a)(5)(iii) The employer shall review with each employee upon initial assignment those parts of the plan
         which the employee must know to protect the employee in the event of an emergency. The written plan
         shall be kept at the workplace and made available for employee review. For those employers with 10 or
         fewer employees the plan may be communicated orally to employees and the employer need not
         maintain a written plan.



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                               (b) Fire prevention plan -- (1) Scope and application.

            This paragraph (b) applies to all fire prevention plans required by a particular OSHA
             standard. The fire prevention plan shall be in writing, except as provided in the last
                                sentence of paragraph (b)(4)(ii) of this section.

     (b)(2) Elements. The following elements, at a minimum, shall be included in the fire prevention plan:

        (b)(2)(i) A list of the major workplace fire hazards and their proper handling and storage procedures,
         potential ignition sources (such as welding, smoking and others) and their control procedures, and the
         type of fire protection equipment or systems which can control a fire involving them;
        (b)(2)(ii) Names or regular job titles of those personnel responsible for maintenance of equipment and
         systems installed to prevent or control ignitions or fires; and
        (b)(2)(iii) Names or regular job titles of those personnel responsible for control of fuel source hazards.

 (b)(3) Housekeeping. The employer shall control accumulations of flammable and combustible waste
materials and residues so that they do not contribute to a fire emergency. The housekeeping procedures
                          shall be included in the written fire prevention plan.
                                             (b)(4) Training.

        (b)(4)(i) The employer shall apprise employees of the fire hazards of the materials and processes to
         which they are exposed.
        (b)(4)(ii) The employer shall review with each employee upon initial assignment those parts of the fire
         prevention plan which the employee must know to protect the employee in the event of an emergency.
         The written plan shall be kept in the workplace and made available for employee review. For those
         employers with 10 or fewer employees, the plan may be communicated orally to employees and the
         employer need not maintain a written plan.

   (b)(5) Maintenance. The employer shall regularly and properly maintain, according to established
procedures, equipment and systems installed on heat producing equipment to prevent accidental ignition
 of combustible materials. The maintenance procedures shall be included in the written fire prevention
                                                plan.




75
 SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 13-99
 Government Required
 Prepared By:        Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
 Date:               September 15, 1999
 Revision #:         7
 Revised Date:       August 15, 2009
 Title:                The City of Frederick Respiratory Protection Program


I. PURPOSE

 This program is instituted to ensure that, where there are known as well as potential respiratory hazards,
 employees of the City of Frederick can be assured that the atmosphere that they will breathe is safe to perform
 the task as required.

II. GENERAL INFORMATION

 While most air is safe to breathe, certain operations, tasks, procedures and locations have a characteristic
 atmosphere, which may contain contaminants in air. The primary objective of this program is to prevent or
 control those occupational illnesses and or diseases that are caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful
 dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays or vapors. Engineering control measures such as general and
 local ventilation, confinement of the operation and substitution will be used as the primary method for
 controlling atmospheric contamination. When such controls are not feasible, or while they are being
 implemented, constructed, modified, and maintained or repaired, applicable City of Frederick workers may be
 required to wear approved respiratory protection as provided by the City.

 Both the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) and Federal Occupational Safety and Health Act
 (OSHA) have promulgated regulatory standards that require every employer provide a safe and healthful work
 environment for all employees. These standards include the following respiratory protection regulations are as
 follows:

  29 CFR Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment 1910.34 (Respiratory Protection)
  29 CFR Subpart Z - Toxic and Hazardous Substances 1910.1000 Air contaminants (Tables Z-1, Z-2, Z-3)
  29 CFR 1910.1200 Hazard Communication.

 The City of Frederick has instituted this “Respiratory Protection Program” to comply with Federal and State
 respiratory protection regulations. When necessary, respiratory protection shall be supplied to employees by the
 City. This “Program” will also, when followed, do all that is possible to protect those employees whose job
 assignment or task requires respirator use. All applicable City of Frederick Departments must adhere to the
 requirements set forth in this program. Furthermore, this program shall be used with other applicable safety and
 health programs and policies as adopted by the City of Frederick. This program shall be evaluated for it’s
 effectiveness on an annual basis and modified as necessary. This program is subject to change as improvements
 and new technology emerges. All personnel will be trained when such changes occur.




 76
III. ORGANIZATION

  This program covers the following areas:

         1.     Responsibilities of the employees and the employer (The City)

         2.     Definitions and terms used in this program;

         3.     Hazard determination and types of respirators used in this program.

         4.     Procedures for medical surveillance;

         5.     Procedures for respirator fit testing;

         6.     Respirator decision Logic - Respirator Selection Algorithm;

         7.     Procedures for training personnel in the use of respirators;

         8.     Procedures for the inspection and maintenance of respirators;

         9.     Record keeping and training documentation.

IV. RESPONSIBILITIES

  The Mayor or his/her designee will be responsible for the following:
  The implementation and the over all administration of this program;
  The Safety and Loss Control Manager will be responsible:
         1.     For the development and modification of this Respiratory Program;
         2.     For the scheduling and maintenance of medical surveillance, spirometric and fit testing for all
                employees;
         3.     For overseeing the annual review of this program.
         4.     For maintaining a master list of job tasks, which may require use of respiratory protection for
                The City of Frederick;
         5.     For implementation of an ongoing respirator-training program;
         6.     For the performance of initial employee respirator fit testing;
         7.     For providing technical assistance in determining the need for respirators and in the selection of
                appropriate types of respirators;
         8.     For maintaining all training, and other appropriate records;
         9.     For conducting an annual review of this program as required.




  77
        10.    For performing frequent random inspection to assure that respirators are properly selected, used,
               cleaned and maintained.
 Applicable Department Heads or their designee will be responsible for:
        11.    For insuring that each job classification that requires the use of a respirator is appropriately
               indicated in the employee’s job description;
        12.    For insuring that respirators are available to all employees as needed;
        13.    For insuring that employees wear appropriate respirators as required by this program;
        14.    For insuring that inspection of air purifying respirators, Self Contained Breathing Apparatus
               (SCBA’s) is conducted as required by this program or the manufacturer’s instructions.
               Department Heads must also insure records of respirator inspections are maintained;
        15.    For assisting in employee fit test training when necessary;
        16.    For frequent periodic observation of the work area conditions including, but not limited to, the
               degree of employee exposure to hazards, and when necessary take appropriate intervention
               action as required.
 Employees will be responsible:
        17.    For the proper selection and of respirators in accordance with this program.
        18.    For the proper cleaning, disinfection, and inspection of respirators as required;
        19.    For the performance of self fit test prior to each use and to insure that manageable physical
               obstructions included but not limited to insuring that facial hair and beards are properly
               maintained and groomed to enable a proper respirator fit;
        20.    For reporting respirator malfunctions to supervisor and conduct and “After Use” inspection of all
               SCBA type respirators. Employees shall also guard against damage due to improper use or
               storage of the respirator;
        21.    For reporting any poor health conditions that may preclude safe respirator usage to supervisory
               personnel or to the Safety and Loss Control Manager
V. DEFINITIONS
 The following terms, abbreviations and acronyms, whenever and wherever used within this document, shall
 have the following designated meanings, except when the context clearly indicates otherwise.
 AEROSOL: A suspension of solid particles or liquid droplets in a gaseous medium.
 AIR LINE RESPIRATOR: A respirator in which ambient air is passed through a purifying cartridge, filter or
 element that removes contaminant (s) by means of breathing action or a blower.
 ATMOSPHERE - SUPPLYING RESPIRATOR: A respirator that supplies respirable atmosphere
 independent of the workplace atmosphere usually through a pump or compressor. (SCBA)
 BANANA OIL: Also known as Isoamyl Acetate (IAA) is a liquid with a strong smell of bananas and is used to
 check for general sealing of a respirator during a fit test.
 BEATRIX: (Denaatonium Benzoate) the taste aversion agent routinely used in household liquids now
 accepted by OSHA as a respirator-testing agent.
 BLASTING ABRASIVE: Blasting abrasives are chemical contaminants composed of silica, silicates,
 carbonates, lead, cadmium, or zinc. These abrasives are generally classified as dust.


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BREATHING RESISTANCE: The resistance that can build up in a chemical respirator cartridge that
becomes clogged by particulates thereby rendering the respirator ineffective.
CARTRIDGE (FILTER): A container with a filter, absorbent, catalyst, or a combination of these items which
removes specific contaminants, solids, liquid aerosols, and gases form the air passed through the container.
Cartridges are both color coded and marked with name of the contaminant that they are rated for.
CHEMICAL HAZARD: Any chemical that has the capacity to produce injury or illness when through
inhalation, absorption and or ingestion.
CLEANING RESPIRATORS: The act of cleansing respirators with a mild detergent / anti bacterial agent and
rinsing with potable water. This procedure shall be conducted as specified within this document or according to
the manufactures directions.
DEMAND RESPIRATOR: An atmosphere-supplying respirator that admits breathing air into the face piece
only when a negative pressure is created inside the face piece by inhalation.
DISPOSABLE RESPIRATOR: A respirator for which maintenance is not intended and that is designed to be
discarded after excessive resistance, absorbent exhaustion, physical damage, or at the end of service life.
DUST: Airborne particulate matter typically produced by grinding or crushing operations.
EMERGENCY SITUATION: Any occurrence such as, but not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of
containers, or failure of control equipment that may or does result in an uncontrolled significant release of an
airborne contaminant.
EMPLOYEE EXPOSURE: An exposure to a concentration of an airborne contaminant that would occur if
the employee were not using respiratory protection.
END OF SERVICE LIFE INDICATOR: (ESLI) A system that warns the respirator user of the approach of
the end of adequate respiratory protection, for example, that the sorbent is approaching saturation or is no
longer effective.
ESCAPE ONLY RESPIRATOR: A respirator intended only for use during an emergency egress from
hazardous atmospheres.
FIT-TEST: Evaluation of the ability of a respiratory device to interface with the wearer in such a manner as to
prevent the workplace atmosphere from entering a worker’s respiratory system. Fit tests use specific protocols
to qualitatively or quantitatively evaluate the fit of a respirator on an individual. [See also Qualitative fit test
(QLFT) and Quantitative fit test (QNFT)]
FUME: Solid particles that are generated by the condensation of substances from the gaseous state
GAS: A substance which is in the gaseous state at ambient temperatures and pressures.
HAZARDOUS ATMOSPHERE: An atmosphere that contains a contaminant (s) in excess of exposure limits
or is oxygen deficient.
HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTER: A filter that is at least 99.97% efficient in
removing monodisperse particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter. The equivalent NIOSH 42 CFR 82 particulate
filters are the N100, R100 and P100 filters.
IMMEDIATELY DANGEROUS TO LIFE OR HEALTH (IDLH): This is any atmospheric condition that
poses an immediate threat to life, or a condition which could cause an irreversible health condition.
LOOSE-FITTING FACEPIECE: A respiratory inlet covering that is designed to form a partial seal with the
face.


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MIST: The dispersion of liquid particulates in air or some other gas.
NEGATIVE PRESSURE RESPIRATORY (tight fitting): A respirator in which the air pressure inside the
face piece is negative during inhalation with respect to the ambient air pressure outside the respirator.
OXYGEN DEFICIENT ATMOSPHERE: An atmosphere with an oxygen concentration below 19.5% by
volume.
PARTICULATES: Any dust, mist or fume contained in breathing air.
PEL: Permissible Exposure Limit. This is the maximum time weighted average concentration of a substance,
in air, that a person can be exposed to during an eight (8) hour work shift.
PAPR: Powered Air Purifying Respirator: An air purifying respiratory that uses a blower to force the ambient air
through air-purifying elements to the inlet covering.
PHLCP: (Physician or other licensed health care professional) An individual whose legally permitted scope of
practice (I.E. license, registration, or certification) allows him or her to independently provide, or be delegated
to responsibility to provide, some or all of the health care services provided under 29 CFR 1910.134 (e).
POSITIVE PRESSURE RESPIRATOR: A respirator in which the pressure inside the respiratory inlet
covering exceeds the ambient air pressure outside the respirator.
POSITIVE PRESSURE DEMAND RESPIRATOR: A positive pressure demand atmospheric supplying
respirator that admits breathing air into the face piece when the positive pressure inside is reduced inside the
face piece by inhalation
QUALITATIVE FIT TEST (QLFT): A pass/fail test to assess the adequacy of respirator fit that relies on the
individual’s response to the test agent.
QUANTITATIVE FIT TEST (QNFT): An assessment of the adequacy of respirator fit by numerically
measuring the amount of leakage into the respirator.
RESPIRATORY INLET COVERING: That portion of a respirator that forms the protective barrier between
the user’s respiratory tract and an air-purifying device or breathing air source, or both. It may be a face piece,
helmet, hood, suit or a mouthpiece respirator with nose clamp.
RESPIRATOR: A device worn to protect the worker from a hazardous work place atmospheric environment.
This device may be classified as full-face piece or a half-face piece, air purifying or atmospheric supplying.
These devices filter out harmful gases and particles from the atmosphere or supply the user with a clean air
supply.
RESPIRATORY HAZARD:                   Any hazard that enters the human body by inhalation.
SCBA: Self Contained Breathing Apparatus. A type of a respirator that uses positive pressure demand to
supply air to the user during work activities ( see positive pressure demand respirator).
SMOKE: The particles that result from incomplete combustion.
SPIROMETRIC EVALUATION: Also known as Pulmonary Function Test. This test measures pulmonary
function. A measurement of less than 70% may require further evaluation by a physician or other licensed
health care professional (see PLHCP).
SUPPLIED-AIR RESPIRATOR (AIR LINE RESPIRATOR): An atmospheric-supplying respirator for
which the source of breathing air is not designed to be carried by the user.
TIGHT-FITTING FACEPIECE: A respiratory inlet covering that forms a complete seal with the face.
VAPOR: The gaseous state of a substance which is liquid or solid at ambient temperatures and pressures.

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VI. SELECTION OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
  Respirator selection shall be conducted in accordance with American National Standards Institute (ANSI)
  Z88.2-1992. Respirators shall be provided by The City of Frederick when atmospheric monitoring, hazard
  evaluation, or other atmospheric and task evaluation indicate that such equipment is necessary to protect the
  health of the employee during a job assignment. The City of Frederick shall also provide all additional
  applicable protection needed for the tasks as assigned. Minor maintenance and inspection of any such devices
  shall be conducted by The City of Frederick in accordance with this program and all applicable protocols.
  The City of Frederick shall keep on hand a selection of respirators based upon the reasonably expected hazards
  found within the City of Frederick work areas. After fit testing and training employees shall be issued
  respirators and cartridges based upon work area and hazard evaluation.
  Should the employee need additional respiratory protection and cartridge types based upon work area hazards or
  other circumstances (I.E. change in task) additional cartridges or other respiratory protection shall be provided
  as necessary based upon the specific hazard, known or expected.
  When an employee is required to perform a task while wearing respiratory protection in potentially IDLH
  atmospheres, standby personnel with appropriate equipment including, but not limited to, auxiliary respiratory
  protection shall be available. This includes planning for those emergency situations when an employee may be
  overcome by a toxic or oxygen deficient atmospheres. The City of Frederick shall maintain NIOSH certified
  full-face piece pressure demand SCBA’s with a minimum service life of 45 minutes for use in the event of a
  potential or known IDLH atmosphere. Note: Gauge reading should not be below 22.5.
                                         DETERMINATION OF HAZARD
  The City of Frederick shall provide ventilation as necessary in an attempt to eliminate or control respiratory
  hazards, where the possibility of such exists, when ever and where ever possible and practical. However, the
  fact remains that there will be times when respiratory protection will be necessary to protect an employee’s
  health and safety. The City of Frederick shall maintain in stock, N95 general duty disposable respirators.
  Respirators required for specific protection shall be procured and stocked by the using department, such as non-
  tight fitting disposable respirators for oils, mists, vapors etc. Additionally, those specific use respirators should
  be supplied with exhalation valves to reduce fogging of lenses, etc. Supervisory staff shall aid employees in the
  selection of all respiratory protection. Choosing the proper respiratory equipment involves several steps. The
  following steps must be followed if proper respiratory protection is to be afforded the employee:
         1.      A determination of the hazard that is to be encountered and its extent of atmospheric
                 contamination must be done. This determination shall include the following:
                 An evaluation of the chemical and physical properties of the anticipated contaminant, including
                 but not limited to; the concentration of any hazardous material, the oxygen content, eye irritation
                 potential. Odor threshold data, if applicable, as well as any recommended exposure limits should
                 also be considered. IDLH atmospheres must be identified, including but not limited to those
                 atmospheres that have Oxygen contents below 19.5% which can not be eliminated with
                 continuous ventilation. Any service life restrictions for respirator cartridges or other information
                 that may be available must be evaluated. Also the hazard of the work shall be considered, the
                 work rate, the area in which the work will be conducted and the mobility of the employee to
                 meet the requirements under which the task is to be completed. Any limitations of the employee
                 and the limitations and characteristics of the available respirators must also be considered.
                 Cartridge replacement in specific areas may be at more frequent intervals than in “routine tasks”.
                 Should conflicting or inadequate data be found, experts shall be consulted before decisions are


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               made regarding proper use and/or selection of respiratory protection. In the event that the City of
               Frederick can not identify or reasonably estimate an employee’s exposure the atmosphere shall
               be considered to be IDLH.
       2.      Equipment selection shall be from respirators that are certified for the function, task or
               atmosphere as planned or expected.
               The City of Frederick’s policy is to require employees to wear eye and/or face protection when
               using respirators.
               Only “approved” respirators shall be used. Respirators are evaluated and listed as approved by
               the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Mine Safety and Health
               Administration (MSHA), or the Bureau of Mines.
               Respirator selection shall also take into account the time needed to perform the given task; this
               shall include any time necessary to enter or leave the area. Respirators that only provide
               protection for a short, or set period of time may not be acceptable for certain tasks. The total
               concentration of the atmospheric contamination is below the PEL and Oxygen content is at or
               above 19.5%, purifying respirators may provide adequate protection for long enough periods.
               However, should the concentration of any given contaminate be higher or possibly exceed the
               acceptable level, and/or the Oxygen content of the atmosphere be below 19.5%, atmospheric
               supplying respirators or SCBA’s will be necessary. Air purifying respirators present minimal
               interference with the user’s movements, however the user must overcome filter resistance when
               inhaling. The user’s work rate must also be taken into account, the service life of some
               respirators under moderate working conditions may be significantly less under heavy work rates.
                                   SPECIFIC RESPIRATOR SELECTION
IDLH ATMOSPHERES
Every effort shall be made to maintain Oxygen levels at acceptable levels between (19.5% to 23.5%). Once
initiated forced air ventilation shall continue until the task is completed. Continuous atmospheric monitoring
shall be conducted to provide advance notice in the event of Oxygen deficiency. With the exception of those
employees that are responding to chlorine or sulfur dioxide changes or emergency chemical releases, no
employee shall knowingly be placed in an IDLH atmosphere.
When an employee is performing a chlorine or sulfur dioxide change or responding to an emergency chemical
release the City of Frederick shall ensure the following.
       1.      A NIOSH certified, full face piece pressure demand SCBA’s having a service life applicable for
               the task shall be provided and used.
       2.      One employee or, when necessary, more than one employee is located outside the IDLH or
               potential IDLH atmosphere. Employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmosphere shall be equipped
               (donned) with a SCBA;
               NOTE: Chlorine or sulfur dioxide Changes - For Standby person only: SCBA shall be donned
               while full-face mask is hung around the neck at the ready. The SCBA need not be activated.
       3.      Visual, voice, and/or signal line communications is maintained between the employee(s) in the
               IDLH atmosphere and the employee(s) located on the outside of the IDLH atmosphere;
       4.      The employee(s) on standby outside the IDLH or potential IDLH atmosphere must notify
               Emergency Services by the most expeditious means, i.e. by using a portable radio with multi



83
               agency capability, informing them that assistance is needed prior to them rendering assistance or
               performing a rescue
       5.      City of Frederick employees shall not perform fire suppression beyond the incipient stage (see
               also the applicable facilities Emergency Evacuation and Fire Prevention Plan );1



RESPIRATORS FOR NON-IDLH ATMOSPHERES
Respiratory protection shall be used in all cases where there is the potential for chemical exposure or Oxygen
deficiency no matter how slight, including but not limited to the changing of Chlorine and Sulfur Dioxide
containers or Chlorine Cylinders.. Employees needing respiratory protection in non IDLH atmosphere work
environments shall be provided with respiratory protection that is adequate to protect the health of the employee
and ensure compliance with all other regulatory and statutory requirements, under routine and reasonable
foreseeable emergency situations.
GASES AND VAPORS ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINATES
Respirators selected shall be appropriate for the chemical state and physical form of the contaminant.
Atmosphere-supplying respirator or an air-purifying respirator shall be provided when a City of Frederick
employee needs protection against gases and vapors. Respirators shall be equipped with an end-of-service-life
indicator (ESLI) certified by NIOSH for the contaminant. If there is no ESLI for the specific work place
atmosphere The City of Frederick will implement a change schedule for canisters and cartridges are changed
before their end of service life.
PARTICULATE ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINATES
When particulate atmospheric contaminates are known or suspected The City of Frederick shall provide
atmosphere-supplying respirators or an air-purifying respirators equipped with filters certified by NIOSH under
30 CFR part 11 as a HEPA filter, or and air purifying respirators with filters certified for particulates by NIOSH
under 42 CFR part 84.
TYPES OF RESPIRATORS MAINTAINED BY THE CITY OF FREDERICK
AIR PURIFYING RESPIRATORS
       6.      Air-Purifying respirators are respirators that use filters or absorbents to remove harmful
               substances or particles from the air. They range from simple disposable masks to sophisticated
               powered air purifying respirators. Air purifying respirators do not supply oxygen and shall not be
               used in oxygen deficient atmospheres or in atmospheres that are immediately dangerous to life or
               health (IDLH)
               a.      Dust / Mist / Nuisance Level Respirators:
                       The City of Frederick shall attempt to control respiratory hazards with engineering
                       methods where appropriate. Dust/Mist/Nuisance respirators shall be supplied as
                       necessary to employees desiring such protection. An inventory of N95 disposable
                       respirators shall be kept in inventory. If the hazard evaluation indicates that other
                       respirators and/or cartridges are required they shall be ordered prior to scheduling the
                       task.
               b.      Purifying Respirators (Chemical Cartridge Respirators) for particulates and vapors:



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                         Chemical cartridge and particulate respirators are considered to be low capacity
                         respirators. These respirators may be either full or half face piece. These respirators shall
                         NOT be worn in atmospheres that are classified or found to be ILDH, or atmospheres
                         deficient in oxygen (<19.5%). A face piece fits over the nose and mouth or the face of the
                                 wearer and a small replaceable chemical filter cartridge is attached directly to the
                         face piece. This type of respiratory protection may be used where there is an exposure to
                         solvent vapors, dust or particulate matter not exceeding maximum use concentrations or
                         pollutants established by regulations; such activities may include sandblasting, spray
                         coating, or degreasing.
  SITUATIONS IN WHICH CHEMICAL EXPOSURE IS POTENTIALLY ABOVE THE
  RECOMMENDED PEL
  If at any time the employee is in a situation where (1) a chemical release occurs, (2) some other established
  atmospheric emergency occurs and the PEL for the respiratory hazard is exceeded or unknown employees are to
  immediately evacuate the area and consider the cartridge expended.
  ATMOSPHERE SUPPLYING RESPIRATOR
  Atmosphere supplying respirators are designed to provide breathable air from a clean source other than the
  surrounding contaminated work atmosphere. Air supplied respirators range from respirators with hoods or
  masks, self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), to complete air suits.
  The City of Frederick maintains the following type of Atmosphere Supplying Respirator:
  SCBA (Self Contained Breathing Apparatus)
  This type of respirator provides breathing air to the worker from compressed air cylinders. The City of
  Frederick has positive pressure demand SCBAs that are worn on the back of the worker. This equipment has the
  capacity to supply air to the worker for period of approximately 45 minutes. (Remember the actual time is
  dependent upon the wearer’s demand for air and it could be much lower than 45 minutes)
  Positive pressure demand SCBAs are the only respiratory protection that is acceptable in IDLH atmospheres.
  Prior to use, the worker must have training in its use in emergency situations.
  When compressed air cylinders are used, breathing air shall meet the requirement of Grade D breathing air
  specified by the Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification G-7.1-1989. Cylinders shall be tested
  and maintained as prescribed in Department of Transportation Regulations (49 CFR Part 178), and marked in
  accordance with ANSI standards. Air line couplings shall be incompatible with outlets for other gases to prevent
  inadvertent servicing of air line respirators with non-respiratable gases or oxygen. SCBA cylinders are to be
  maintained in a fully charged state and shall be recharged when the pressure falls below the manufactures
  recommended pressure level.
VII. MEDICAL MONITORING
  A medical evaluation, shall be provided by the City of Frederick, to determine the employee’s ability to use a
  respirator. The City of Frederick’s appointed physician or other licensed health care professional (PLHCP) shall
  conduct an initial medical evaluation to determine the employee’s ability to use a respirator. This evaluation
  shall be conducted before the employee is fit tested for a respirator and/or is required to use a respirator in the
  work place.
  The City of Frederick’s PLHCP may use a medical questionnaire and/or medical examination that obtains the
  same information as requested in Sections 1 and 2 of part A in appendix C of 29 CFR 1910.134. Follow-up
  medical evaluations shall be provided for any employee who gives a positive response to questions 1-8 in
  Section 2, part A in appendix C of 29 CFR 1910,134 or whose initial medical examination demonstrates the

  85
need for a follow up medical examination. All follow-up examinations shall include any medical tests,
consultations, or diagnostic procedures that the PLHCP deems necessary to make a final determination.
All medical questionnaires and examinations shall be administered confidentially during the employee’s normal
working hours or at a time and place convenient to the employee. The medical questionnaire shall be
administered in a manner that ensures that the employee understands its content. Employees shall be provided
an opportunity to discuss the questionnaire and examination results with the PLHCP.
The City of Frederick shall provide the following information to the PLHCP before he/she is required to make
any recommendations concerning the employee’s ability to use a respirator:
     The type and weight of the respirator to be used by the employee;
     The duration and the frequency of respirator use (including respirators used for escape and rescue);
     The expected physical work effort;
     Temperature and humidity extremes that may be encountered
Any of the above supplemental information need not be provided for subsequent medical evaluations if the
information remains the same.
The PLHCP shall also be provided a copy of the City of Frederick’s respirator protection policy with and any
subsequent updates.
In the event that the City of Frederick should replace the PLHCP all of the above information shall be provided
to the new PLHCP. The new PLHCP shall be provided with a copy of the City of Frederick’s respiratory
protection policy as specified above.
After review of all data, information and applicable test results, the PLHCP shall make a medical determination
regarding the employees ability to use a respirator. This medical determination shall be in writing and shall
include the following information:
       1.      Any limitation on respirator use related to the medical condition of the employee, or relating to
               workplace conditions in which the respirator will be used, including whether or not the employee
               is medically able to use the respirator;
       2.      The need, if any, for follow-up medical evaluations; and
       3.      A statement that the PLHCP has provided the employee with a copy of the PHLCP’s written
               recommendation.
In the event that the employee is to use a negative pressure respirator and the PLHCP finds a medical condition
that may place the employee’s health at increased risk if the respirator used, the City of Frederick shall provide
a PAPR if the PLHCP’s medical evaluation finds that the employee can use such a respirator. The City of
Frederick may choose to reassign the employee to a job area where the use of negative pressure respirator use is
not required. In any event if subsequent medical; evaluation find that the employee is medically able to use a
negative pressure respirator, then the City of Frederick is no longer required to provide a PAPR. No employee
shall be assigned to a job should medical and/or spirometric evaluation be less that satisfactory.
Additional medical evaluations shall be provided if:
       1.      An employee reports medical signs or symptoms that are related to the use of a respirator;
       2.      A PLHCP or supervisor informs the City of Frederick that an employee needs to be reevaluated;
               or




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     3.   If a change occurs in the work place conditions (I.E. physical work effort, protective clothing,
          temperature) that may result in a substantial increase in the physiological burden placed on the
          employee.




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VIII. FIT TESTING
   No one respirator type or size will fit all employees. Full-face piece and half face piece respirators, even when
   manufactured by the same company, have different fit characteristics. Each employee required to wear any
   respirator with a negative or positive pressure demand tight-fitting face piece, shall be fit tested with the same
   make, model, style, and size of respirator that will be used. All new employees and those employees who have
   been reassigned from an area where respiratory protection was not required shall be fit tested prior to use of the
   respirator. Fit testing shall be conducted annually thereafter. Fit testing shall be conducted while the employee
   is wearing protective equipment such as glasses, goggles, face shield, or welding helmet. Respirator
   configuration during fit testing shall be such that it mirrors the use that will occur under work conditions. The
   City of Frederick shall conduct additional fit testing whenever the employee reports, or the PLHCP, or a
   supervisor makes visual observations of changes in the employee’s physical condition that could affect the
   respirator fit. Such conditions may include but are not limited to, a significant change in weight, significant
   facial scarring, dental changes reconstructive surgery or any other such condition. All employees required to
   wear respirators shall be given medical evaluations prior to fit testing.
   Employees shall not wear a respirator if they have any condition that interferes with the face-to-face piece seal
   or valve function including but not limited to facial hair that comes between the sealing surface of the face piece
   and the face or that interferes with valve function. If the employee wears corrective glasses, goggles or other
   personal protective equipment the City of Frederick shall ensure that the equipment is worn in a manner that
   does not interfere with the seal of the face piece of the employee.
   QNFT shall be administered by the City of Frederick’s PLHCP using acceptable protocols. The City of
   Frederick may conduct QLFT as a screening for size and type of respirator.
   Positive respiratory protection for individuals who must wear corrective lenses is a recognized concern. Proper
   face seals may not be established if temple bars of eyeglasses extend through the sealing edge of the face piece.
   The City of Frederick will provide to those employees face piece mounted frames for prescription lenses.
   PRE-USE SELF FIT TESTING
   All employees who wear tight-fitting respirators shall perform the user seal check procedure (both positive and
   negative seals) prior to each use of the respirator.




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IX. TRAINING
  All City of Frederick employees, including supervisors, required to don a respirator, shall attend annual
  respiratory training. This training shall be conducted by a competent person and shall be comprehensive and
  understandable for the employee.
  Upon completion of training the employee shall demonstrate knowledge of at least the following:
         1.      Respiratory hazard identification, including but not limited to atmospheric testing and the effects
                 of respiratory hazards on the wearer if the respirator is not used properly.
         2.      Why respiratory protection and respirators are necessary, and how improper fit, usage or
                 maintenance can compromise the protective effect of the respirator.
         3.      Recognition of medical signs and symptoms that may limit or prevent effective use of
                 respirators.
         4.      The engineering and administrative controls being used and the need for respirators to provide
                 protection.
         5.      The reason for selecting a particular type of respirator and respirator functions, capabilities and
                 limitations of the respirator chosen.
         6.      The correct way to wear the respirator, including the correct method of donning and doffing the
                 respirator and checking its function and operation.
         7.      Correct maintenance, inspection and storage of the respirator.
         8.      Any applicable governmental regulations for specific substances that may be encountered.
         9.      Review of written protocols for the use of specific types of respirators used by the City of
                 Frederick.
X. RESPIRATOR INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, CLEANING & STORAGE
  To retain effectiveness, respirators must be periodically inspected, cleaned, maintained and properly stored. All
  maintenance shall be carried out according to the manufactured instructions and on a schedule that ensures that
  each respirator is provided with a respirator that is clean, sanitary and in good working condition. Respirators
  shall be stored in a convenient, clean and sanitary location.
  Respirators issued to individual employees shall be cleaned and sanitized regularly. Supervisory staff may
  conduct “spot” inspections to ensure that respirators are in acceptable condition. Respirators worn by different
  individuals shall be cleaned and sanitized after every use. SCBAs and Respirators used for emergencies shall be
  cleaned and sanitized after each use also.
  The following procedures are to be used in the cleaning of all respirators:
         1.      Filters, and cartridges are to be removed before washing. Cartridges and filters are replaced as
                 Recommended or needed.
         2.      The face pieces of all respirators are washed with a mild detergent solution, or pre-moistened
                 towels specified for that purpose.
         3.      Once cleaned and dried, all respirators shall be appropriately stored. Appropriate storage is to
                 include placement in plastic bags and the employee’s locker or PPE bag.




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              Respirators shall be stored so as to protect them from damage, contamination, dust, sunlight,
              extreme temperatures, excessive moisture and damaging chemicals. Storage of respirators shall
              also be such that deformation of the face piece and exhalation shall be prevented. Emergency
              respirators shall be stored in accessible areas. Storage areas or containers shall be clearly marked
              as containing emergency respirators.
              Respirators used for routine tasks and situations shall be inspected immediately prior to use and
              during cleaning to ensure that it is in proper working condition by the employee. After cleaning
              and sanitizing, each respirator shall be inspected to determine if it needs replacement of parts or
              repairs, or if it should be discarded. Respirators/SCBAs stored for emergency or rescue use shall
              be inspected at least monthly.
Each applicable department shall maintain inspection records as follows:
       1.     In accordance with the manufactures recommendations the respirator function is to be tested;
       2.     Inspection tightness of connections of various parts including but not limited to the face piece,
              head straps, valves, connecting tube and cartridges or filters;
       3.     Inspection of all elastomeric parts for pliability and signs of deterioration;
       4.     Air cylinders for SCBAs should be maintained in the fully charged state and shall be recharged
              when the pressure falls below the manufactured recommended pressure. The regulator and the
              warning devices shall also be checked.
       5.     Inspections of SCBA’s shall be certified by documenting respirator inspections on PM work
              orders. All work orders shall be dated and signed by the person conducting the inspection. The
              work order shall also include the findings of the inspection, and required remedial action and the
              serial number or other means of identifying the inspected respirator. Inspection records shall be
              maintained by the applicable department.
              Repairs to respirators shall be limited to the changing of cartridges, cylinders, filters, head strap
              and those items recommended by the manufactured. NO attempt shall be made to replace
              components, or make repairs adjustments or modifications beyond the manufacturer’s
              recommendations. Replacement parts shall be only those designated for the specific respirator
              repair. Reducing or admission valves, regulators and alarms shall be adjusted or repaired only by
              the manufacturer or a technician trained by the manufacturer. Those respirators not passing
              inspection shall immediately be placed out of service and replaced.




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XI. RESPIRATOR SELECTION ALGORITHM
  Respirator types are selected with the help of the supervisors, and shall be selected on the basis of the hazard
  that the employee is expected to encounter. The following algorithm is to provide guidelines for this selection
  process. This algorithm assumes the following:
  Ventilation has been conducted and the hazardous atmosphere still exists.
  Supplied air respirators have escape cylinders in place.

       Atmospheric Contaminants__________                  Color of Cartridge_____________________

       Acid Gas----------------------------------------   White

       Hydrocyanic Acid Gas------------------------       White with ½” Green Stripe

       Chlorine Gas------------------------------------   White

       Organic Gas-------------------------------------   Black

       Ammonia Gas ---------------------------------      Green

       Acid Gas & Ammonia Gas--------------------         Green with ½” White Stripe

       Acid Gases & Organic Vapors---------------- Yellow

       Carbon Monoxide------------------------------      Blue

       Acid Gases, Organic Vapors & Ammonia
       Gas-----                                    --     Brown
       Asbestos, Radioactive Materials, Tritium &
       Noble Gases                                        Purple (Magenta)
       Particulates (Dust, Fumes, Mists, Fogs or
       Smoke) in Combination w/any of the Above
       Listed Gas or Vapor.---------------------------    ½” Gray Stripe Around the Canister with
                                                           Appropriate Color

       All of the Above Listed Contaminants------         Red with ½” Gray Stripe




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XII. RESPIRATOR FIT TESTING PROTOCOLS
   GENERAL:
   Prior to respirator fit testing the employee shall have completed the classroom portion of the City of Frederick’s
   Respiratory Training.
   PRE FIT TEST STANDARD REQUIREMENTS
   The following requirements shall be met prior to an employee being given any qualitative respirator fit test:
          1.      Medical monitoring must indicate that the employee is medically capable of using a respiratory
                  protection device.
          2.      The test conductor shall fully explain, in detail, the chosen test protocol to the test subject.
          3.      The test subject shall properly select and don the respirator type that is to be tested, and shall
                  perform both the positive and negative pressure fit checks. Failure of either the positive or
                  negative fit checks shall be cause to select and try an alternate respirator.
          4.      The test subject shall wear the respirator for at least 10 minutes before starting the fit test.
   The following positive and negative fit check procedure shall be used when donning air purifying, air supplying
   respirators, and SCBAs with tight fitting face pieces.
          1.      A positive fit check is done by closing off the exhalation valve of the respirator and exhaling
                  gently. The fit is considered satisfactory if a slight positive pressure can be built up inside the
                  face piece without any evidence of outward leakage of air at the face to mask seal. In some
                  devices this check may require the removal of the exhalation valve cover.
          2.      A negative fit check is done covering the inlet opening of the respirator or pinching the inlet hose
                  of an air supplied respirator, and inhaling gently so that the face piece collapses slightly. This
                  breath is then held for ten (10) seconds. If the face piece remains in the collapsed condition and
                  no inward leakage of air is noted the tightness of the respirator is considered to be satisfactory.
   Should either of the above tests indicate a leakage, the following procedures shall be followed in an attempt to
   correct the failure.
          1.      Insure that the respirator mask is clean. ( A dirty or deteriorated mask will not seal properly, nor
                  will a mask that has been stored in a distorted position. Proper cleaning and storage is, therefore
                  a must.)
          2.      Adjust the head straps to insure snug, uniform tension and fit on the mask. If only extreme
                  tension on the straps will seal the respirator to the face, report this to the supervisor.
          3.      Make sure the correct size respirator face mask is being used.
          4.      Make sure there is no facial hair, eye glass, etc interference between the face and seal of the
                  respirator mask..
XIII. PROGRAM EVALUATION
   On a periodic basis the City of Frederick shall routinely evaluate this program. This evaluation shall include
   evaluation of the work place to ensure that this written respiratory program is being properly implemented.
   Program evaluation shall include but not be limited to review of hazard determination information and all work
   areas to ensure compliance and effectiveness of this program. The City of Frederick shall also consult


   92
   employees required to use respirators to assess the employees’ view on program effectiveness and to identify
   potential problems. Factors to be assessed shall include but not be limited to:
    Respirator fit;
    Appropriate respirator selection for the hazards to which the employee is exposed;
    Proper respirator use under work place conditions;
    Proper respirator maintenance
XIV. RECORD KEEPING
   This program requires the establishment and retention of specific written information regarding medical
   evaluations, fit testing and the general respirator program. The following records shall be maintained by the
   Office of Occupational Safety and Health.
          1.      Medical evaluation records shall be retained and made available in accordance with 29.CFE
                  1910.1020;
          2.      Respirator fit testing records shall include:
                   Type of fit test (qualitative and quantitative) administered to the employee
                   Employee identification
                   Specific make, model and size of the respirator used
                   Date of test
                   The pass/fail results for the QLFT or the fit factor and the strip chart recording or other
                  recording for the QNFT Fit test records shall be retained until the employee’s next fit test is
                  administered.
          3.      A written copy of this program shall be maintained.
XV. ENFORCEMENT AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION
   Should the policies and procedures outlined within this program not be followed the health and
   safety of the employee, their family, as well as other City employee’s could be jeopardized. Disregard for the
   policies and procedures within this program will, therefore, not be tolerated.
   Violations to the policies and procedures within this program shall be immediately brought to the attention of
   the employee’s supervisor. The supervisor shall review the violation and its circumstances and follow the City
   of Frederick’s Personnel Rules and Regulations.




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SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 14-99
Government Requirement
Prepared By:       Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared:     3/3/99
Revision #:        7
Revised Date:      May 30, 2007
Title:                CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY “ZERO ENERGY STATE”

Used by:              All Employees at The City of Frederick


I.       GENERAL

The City of Frederick recognizes lockout as the preferred method of isolating machines and equipment from
their energy source to prevent injury to employees from the unexpected start-up or release of energy to
equipment/machinery and associated parts. Tagout will only be used if an energy source is not capable of being
locked out. See addendum A.

II.      PURPOSE

This procedure is established to PROTECT EMPLOYEES from the hazards involving the unexpected release of
hazardous energy during the setup, maintenance, servicing or jam clearing operations. It applies to any source
of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal or other energy; i.e., electrical sources,
hydraulic fluids under pressure, compressed air, energy stored in springs, suspended parts, etc.

Maintenance and servicing operations performed on any equipment or operation where there is a potential
source of energy must follow these procedures. These procedures are established to assure that the machine or
equipment is isolated, and inoperative BEFORE maintenance and servicing is performed. In some instances the
blocking and securing of machine parts or equipment is needed to control hazardous mechanical movement.

The sole purpose of these procedures is to get all energy sources to a “ZERO ENERGY STATE” (ZES), which
affords maximum protection against any unexpected hazardous energy. To achieve a ZES, the authorized
employee would not only lock out the primary source of electrical energy, but would additionally isolate, block,
support, retain or control kinetic and potential energy.




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III.   SCOPE

       A.   This policy/procedure shall apply to all employees, contractors, subcontractors, equipment
            manufacturer and service representatives while on the premises of the City of Frederick and
            while working on affected equipment or machinery.

       B.   This policy/procedure does not include:
            1.     Routine minor adjustments and maintenance during normal production operation;
            2.     Work on cord and plug, connect equipment when it is unplugged and the individual
                   working on the equipment has COMPLETE CONTROL over the plug; or
            3.     Operations where shutdown is impractical and documented, job specific practices and/or
                   procedures are followed to provide equally effective protection for employees.

       C.   The provisions of this policy/procedure are designed to comply with the mandatory requirements
            of the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration Regulations 29CFR 1910.147.

IV.    RESPONSIBILITIES

       A.   Supervisors shall assure compliance with referenced OSHA regulations, as appropriate, and the
            provisions of this policy/procedure.

       B.   Supervisors shall direct their employees in applicable precautions to achieve “ZES” during the
            installation, repair, removal, and maintenance of affected equipment and machinery.

       C.   All employees whose jobs may require repair, installation, removal or maintenance of affected
            equipment and machinery or whose jobs may require them to either operate or be in an affected
            area where such activities are in process are responsible for compliance with each aspect of this
            standard as it individually applies.

       D.   The Safety Department will devise a form and system for auditing the policy/procedure to ensure
            compliance.

V.     DEFINITIONS

       A.   AUTHORIZED EMPLOYEE - an employee who implements the “ZES” procedures to
            perform installation, repair, removal or maintenance on affected machinery or equipment.

       B.   AFFECTED EMPLOYEE - an employee whose job may require them to either operate or be in
            the affected areas where the installation, repair, removal or maintenance of affected equipment or
            machinery requires the implementation of the “ZES” procedure.

       C.   ENERGY ISOLATING DEVICE - a physical device which:
            1.  Prevents the release or transmission of energy by isolation, support, blocking, retention or
                control.
            2.  Visually indicates the position or control of an energy source.
                Examples:      Manually operated electrical circuit breaker
                               Line valve


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                                   Slip gate
                                   Mechanical block or stop

       D.   ENERGY SOURCE - Any source of kinetic or potential energy either as an external power
            source or stored within the components of the affected machinery and equipment that could be
            unexpectedly released.

            EXAMPLES:
            Electrical Power                       Pressurized Hydraulic Fluids
            Compressed Air                         Springs
            Suspended Parts                        Steam
            Chemical Tanks                         Flywheels

       E.   MULTIPLE LOCKOUT HASP - Device that allows more than one lockout to be used to retain
            an Energy Isolating Device.

       F.   LOCKOUT - Use of a device that uses a lock to hold an energy-isolating device in the safe
            position, preventing energization of affected machinery and equipment and prevents operation
            until its removal.

       G.   OUTSIDE CONTRACTOR - any non-employee of the City of Frederick.

       H.   TAGOUT - securing of a warning tag to indicate that the energy isolation device or controls of
            the affected equipment or machinery may not be operated until the authorized employee
            implementing tagout removes the tagout.

       I.   ZERO ENERGY STATE - state of affected machinery/equipment where all potential energy
            sources have been neutralized and all stored energy has been released with periodic checks or
            inspections to prevent reaccumulation.

       J.   AFFECTED AREA -distance whereas an employee could be injured. Electricians please see
            voltage/ current distances.

       K.   MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT- wherein “machinery and equipment” is                          stated
            throughout this document, associated parts, i.e. piping. fire hydrants etc. is to be included.

VI.    TRAINING

       A.   All supervisors, authorized and affected employees will receive instruction on this procedure and
            its application consistent with their assigned job duties.

       B.   All other employees working in areas where “ZES” procedures may be applied will receive
            familiarization level training of the Lockout/Tagout provisions of this procedure.

VII.   PROCEDURES

       A.   PREPARATION FOR “ZERO ENERGY STATE”



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          1.   The supervisor or their designee assigning duties to any employee (s) that involve the
               installation, repair, removal or maintenance of equipment or machinery shall make the
               determination that the uncontrolled release of energy could occur and the procedures of
               this policy are to be followed.

          2.   The supervisor shall notify the assigned employee (s) of the need for implementation of
               the procedures of this policy and of his/her designation as an “Authorized Employee”.

          3.   All personnel who will be affected by the implementation of these procedures shall be
               notified.

          4.   The authorized employee (s), with the assistance of his/her supervisor or their designee as
               required, shall identify all energy sources capable of uncontrolled or stored release and its
               associated energy isolating device method for control.

          5.   All personnel shall be cleared from any potential exposure to the uncontrolled release of
               stored energy or equipment/machinery actuation until “ZES” is achieved.

     B.   IMPLEMENTATION OF “ZES”

          1.   The affected machinery or equipment shall be turned off or “shut down” using normal
               operating procedures. (i.e., depress stop bottom, open toggle switch).
          2.   All energy isolating devices capable of being “LOCKED OUT” will have an unique lock
               or lock and chain or similar locking combination affixed to it by the authorized employee
               (s).

          3.   All other energy sources will have a mechanical device such as, but not limited to,
               mechanical stop or block, pipe blank, or similar devices applied to achieve ZES.

          4.   All stored energy sources will be released, removed, disconnected, restrained, blocked or
               reduced to atmospheric pressure.

               EXAMPLES:
               High capacitance elements             Flywheels
               Pressurized hoses                     Springs
               Valves/pistons                        Movable machinery
                                                     Parts

          5.   “TRY-OUT”: Before beginning any maintenance or servicing, “TRY-OUT” the
               equipment/machinery using normal operating controls to assure “ZES”.

          6.   Stored energy sources having the potential for reaccumulation of energy to a hazardous
               level will be checked during the maintenance/servicing activities to assure “ZES”.

          7.   Crew Lockout:

               When more than one authorized employee of the same craft is assigned activities on the
               same machinery/equipment or process segment, the supervisor or their designee shall, at


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           his/her discretion, either assign one authorized employee a multiple lockout hasp to apply
           to the energy-isolating device or he/she may apply the hasp himself. All other authorized
           employees will affix his/her own personal lockout device on the multiple lockout hasp.
           When each authorized employee completes their assigned duties on the
           machinery/equipment, they will remove their lockout device and inform all others
           working on the same machinery/equipment that they have completed their assigned
           duties and are leaving the area. The last person to remove their personal lockout device
           will be responsible for returning the machinery/equipment to operating condition and for
           returning the multiple lockout hasp to the originating department.

     8.    Multi-Craft Lockout:

           When more than one craft is assigned, activities on same machinery/equipment, the
           supervisor or their designee shall designate an employee from each craft as the authorized
           employee. The supervisor shall also, at his discretion, either assign one authorized
           employee a multiple lockout hasp to apply to the energy-isolating device or he may apply
           the hasp himself. All other authorized employees will affix his/her own personal lockout
           device on the multiple lockout hasp. When each craft employee completes their assigned
           duties on the machinery/equipment, they will remove their lockout device and inform all
           others working on the same machinery/equipment that they have completed their assigned
           duties and are leaving the area. The last person to remove their personal lockout device
           will be responsible for returning the machinery/equipment to operating condition and for
           returning the multiple lockout hasp to the originating department.


     9.    Where activities extend into a subsequent shift:

           a.     The supervisor or their designee shall notify the relieving employee (s) of their
                  designation as the authorized employee (s);

           b.     The authorized employee (s) being relieved will remove their personal lock in the
                  presence of the relieving authorized employee;

           c.     The relieving authorized employee (s) will affix his/her lock to the energy
                  isolating device (s).

           d.     The area supervisor or their designee and affected employees will be notified
                  consistent with section VII A3.


     10.   Where activities on the affected machinery/equipment are suspended prior to completion:

           a.     The authorized employee (s) shall remove their locks in the presence of their
                  supervisor or their designee.

           b.     The supervisor or their designee of the authorized employee (s) shall affix his/her
                  lock to all energy isolating devices capable of being locked out and attach a
                  signed tag on all other energy isolating devices.


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                 c.      With the resumption of activities, all authorized employees will affix their locks
                         to the energy isolating devices capable and affix a signed tag to all others prior to
                         the removal of the supervisor’s lock/tag.

                 d.      Steps 4 & 5 of this section will be executed prior to the initiation of any
                         subsequent activities.

          11.    Unauthorized Employee Lockout:

                 a.      When maintenance or servicing is performed on or around equipment/machinery
                         by an unauthorized employee, the supervisor shall designate himself ( if
                         authorized) or an authorized employee to Lockout the equipment/ machinery
                         using City of Frederick General Green Lock for the unauthorized employee. The
                         designated authorized employee will be responsible for the removal of The City
                         of Frederick General Green Lock

                         Example: Outside contractor (unauthorized)

          12.    Where there are interacting activities by employees and outside contractor personnel, the
                 employee (s) supervisor and a representative of the outside contractor shall be jointly
                 responsible for the implementation of these procedures with primary authority residing
                 with the City of Frederick supervisor.

          13.    Removal of Lockout by person other than the owner of the Lockout shall only be done in
                 accordance with Addendum B.

          14.    Where “ZES” cannot be achieved or is not feasible.

          The authorized employee (s) shall notify their supervisor or their designee prior to performing
          any additional activities.

          15.    Electrical test verification of de-energized circuits will be implemented when
                 maintenance or servicing is performed on electrical parts of equipment/machinery. A
                 qualified person shall use test equipment to test      the circuit elements and electrical
                 parts of equipment to which employees will be exposed and shall verify that the circuit
                 elements and equipment parts are energized. The test shall also determine if any
                 energized condition exists as a result of inadvertently induced voltage or unrelated
                 voltage backed even though specific parts of the circuit to be tested is over 600 volts,
                 nominal, the test equipment shall be checked for proper operation immediately before
                 and immediately after this test.

     C.   RETURN TO OPERATING CONDITION

          1.     All authorized and personnel affected by these procedures will be notified of the intent to
                 return the equipment/machinery to operating condition by the supervisor or their
                 designee.



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           2.     The authorized employee (s) will inspect the machine and/or equipment to assure that all
                  components are in proper operating condition, all tools and service equipment have been
                  removed, and any unnecessary materials, spare parts, debris or trash has been removed.

           3.     All guards or similar safety devices will be inspected an replaced or adjusted as needed.

           4.     All controls and operating devices will be verified to be in the “OFF” position or
                  equipment/machinery rendered similarly inoperable.

           5.     All employees will be removed from the machinery or equipment to a safe area.

           6.     All authorized employees will remove their lock, tag, and the energy isolation devices.

           7.     A final visual check will be performed to assure that no individuals are exposed to any
                  hazards of the equipment/machinery.

           8.     Energize the machinery/equipment:

                  a.     Proceed with any final adjustments or positioning as required.

                  b.     Only remove any guards or safety devices required for final adjustment or
                         positioning and replace prior to release of the equipment for normal operations.

VIII. LOCKOUT / TAGOUT DEVICES


      A.   Standardized, unique locks, multiple lockouts and tags will be provided to authorized employees
           by the City of Frederick.

      B.   The authorized employee shall utilize a tag with energy lockout device and legibly indicate
           his/her identity on every tag when used.




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Addendum A


                                                   TAGOUT

       In the event that an energy-isolating device cannot be locked out, Tagout program will be used.

       To use the Tagout program, the authorized employee must demonstrate that a level of safety is achieved
that would be equivalent to the level of safety obtained by using a lockout program.

        Authorized employee must first tag the energy isolating devices and shall be affixed in such a manner as
will clearly indicate that the operation or movement of energy isolating devices from the “safe” or “off”
position is prohibited. Tagout devices must warn against hazardous conditions if equipment is energized, such
as, DO NOT START, DO NOT OPEN, DO NOT OPERATE. Tagout devices must be made of materials,
which will withstand the environmental conditions encountered in the workplace.

       Additional safety measures will be implemented in using Tagout to provide equivalent level of
employee protection such as the removal of an isolating circuit element, blocking of a controlling switch,
opening of an extra disconnecting device, or the removal of a valve handle to reduce the likelihood of
unintentional energization.




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Addendum B

                                           LOCK OUT REMOVAL

        Any removal of an authorized employee (s)’ lockout or mechanical device used for energy isolation
other than by the authorized employee (s) can only be done by the authorized employee (s)’ supervisor or their
designee.

        1.    Verification by the supervisor that the authorized employee who applied the device is not on
duty.

       2.      Supervisor must make all reasonable efforts to contact the authorized employee to inform
him/her that their lockout device will be removed.

        3.    Supervisor will then refer to 12C (Return to operating condition).

       4.      Supervisor then can remove lockout device using duplicate key. If there isn’t a   duplicate, then
supervisor can have lockout cut off.

       5.      Supervisor will ensure that the authorized employee whose lockout device was removed be
informed prior to him/her resuming work at the plant.




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SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 19-02
Government Requirement
Prepared By:      Daniel J. Patton
Date:             July 31, 2002
Revision#
Revised Date:


Title:                The City of Frederick Drug-Free Workplace Policy

The City of Frederick values its employees and recognizes the need for a safe and healthy work environment.
Furthermore, employees abusing drugs and alcohol are less productive and are often a risk to the safety, security
and productivity of our City. The establishment of a Substance-Abuse Policy is consistent with the City’s
desired culture and is in the best interest of the City.

Note: Please refer to The City of Frederick Policies and Procedures Manual for the employees of The City of
Frederick, Section: Miscellaneous, Title: Drug Free Workplace Policy

Also refer to The City of Frederick’s Safety and Health Policy/Procedures Manual:
Titled: Drug and Alcohol Testing Summary of Operating Procedures




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SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES
Government Requirement
Prepared By:      Daniel J. Patton
Date:             July 26, 2000
Revision#         1
Revised Date:     December 8, 2003

Title:                 Random Testing (RT) Summary of Standard Operating Procedures

RANDOM TESTING POOLS

1.       The City of Frederick recognizes two categories of employees that are subject to random substance
         abuse testing:
         A.     Category 1: Employees that perform functions that are defined as “safety sensitive” by the
                Federal government.
                These are employees that perform functions that require a Commercial Drivers License (CDL).
         B.     Category 2: Employees that perform functions that are defined as “safety sensitive” by the
                City of Frederick.
                These are Non-CDL safety sensitive employees.

2.       The CDL drivers/operators (Category 1) are subject to two types of random testing - random urine
         testing for drugs and random breathe testing for alcohol. According to Federal authority.
         A.     Every calendar year the total number of random tests for drugs must equal 50% of the total
                number of CDL drivers/operators.
         B.     Every calendar year the total number of random tests for alcohol must equal 10% of the total
                number of CDL drivers/operators.

3.       The Non-CDL safety sensitive employees (Category 2) are also subject to two types of random testing -
         random urine testing for drugs and random breathe testing for alcohol. According to City authority.
         A.     Every calendar year the total number of random tests for drugs must equal 25% of the total
                number of Non-CDL safety sensitive employees.
         B.     Every calendar year the total number of random breath alcohol must equal 5% of the total
                number of Non-CDL safety sensitive employees.

4.       Therefore, there are two “random testing pools”
         A.     CDL drivers/operators (Category 1)
         B.     Non-CDL safety sensitive (Category 2)




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RANDOM SELECTION OF EMPLOYEES

The City of Frederick has chosen to utilize the Occupational Health Services (OHS) Random Drug Selection
Program. OHS program is a computer generated selection process whereas those CDL and Non-CDL safety
sensitive employees are entered and computer generated “picks” will be received in the safety department at the
beginning of each quarter. Employees will be notified at the discretion of the Safety and Loss Control Manager
(SAC) Substance Abuse Coordinator when, during the quarter, the employee will be subject to report to OHS
for testing.

RANDOM TESTING OF EMPLOYEES (By The Numbers)

1.     OHS submits computer generated “picks” from the appropriate testing pool at the beginning of each
       quarter to the SAC.
2.     The SAC contacts the appropriate supervisor (ATR) Administrative Technical Representative and
       provides:
       A.     The names of the employees to be tested.
       B.     The type of testing assigned to each employee.
       This communication between the SAC and the ATR may be conducted via phone or secure fax.
3.     The ATR verifies the availability of the employee who has been randomly selected for testing. If the
       employee is unavailable the ATR contacts the SAC immediately. Testing appointments should only be
       canceled in cases of employee absence (annual leave, etc.) or when emergencies absolutely require the
       employee's services.
       If the employee is available, the ATR officially notifies the employee that they have been selected by the
       OHS computer generated “pick” for a random test and to report immediately to the Safety Department.
       A.     The ATR confirms that the employee has an appropriate photo ID that will allow them to be
              identified at OHS.
       B.     The ATR confirms that the employee has appropriate transportation to the Safety Department,
              OHS and back.
              1.      If the employee does not have appropriate transportation (for example, if the employee
                      was dropped off at work or rode to work as part of a carpool) then the ATR must provide
                      appropriate transportation for the employee to the Safety Department, OHS and back.

       C.     The ATR provides the employee with a verbal alert that the employee must report directly to
              Safety Department.
              1.      If the employee has not reported to the Safety Department within 60 minutes from the
                      time the ATR was notified the employee would be subject to personnel action.
       D.     The ATR shall log the exact time the employee was notified.
       E.     The ATR is not required to accompany the employee(s) to OHS unless there is a problem with
              the Photo ID or transportation (as discussed above).




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4.    SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING RANDOM TESTING FOR ALCOHOL
      A.     Because alcohol is a substance that can be legally obtained and consumed off duty, regulations
             dictate that random testing for alcohol must be chronologically linked with the performance of a
             safety sensitive function.
      B.     Random breath alcohol testing should only be initiated during one of the following four
             situations:
             1.     Just before (within 4 hours) the employee performs a safety sensitive function.
             2.     When the employee is actually performing a safety sensitive function.
             3.     After (within 4 hours) the employee performs a safety sensitive function.
             4.     When the employee is On Call to perform a safety sensitive function.
5.    When the employee arrives at the Safety Department, the:
      A.     SCA will provide the employee with an official “Notification Letter”.
      B.     Direct the employee immediately to OHS.
      C.     Log the exact time the employee arrived and departed.
6.    At OHS, the site personnel will follow standard operating procedures for:
      A.     Collecting a urine specimen for drug testing AND/OR conducting a breath test for alcohol.
             1.     The urine specimen is then forwarded to a certified lab for analysis.
             2.     The breath alcohol test is conducted entirely on-site and the results are available at the
                    conclusion of the test.
7.    OHS will contact the SAC by phone for any of the following reasons:
      A.     The employee failed to report to OHS.
             1.     The SAC will then contact the ATR to determine if there is a valid reason why the
                    employee failed to report to OHS. If there is no valid reason, failure to report constitutes
                    “failure to appear for testing” and the employee is subject to appropriate personnel
                    action. (see City of Frederick, Policy and Procedures Manual.)
      B.     The employee reported to OHS later than the deadline time previously provided by the SAC.
             1.     As in A. above the SAC must determine if there is a valid reason for the employee’s
                    delay in reporting to OHS. If there is no valid reason, the employee is subject to
                    personnel action. However, OHS will still make every effort to insure the urine specimen
                    is collected or the breath alcohol test is performed.
      C.     The employee cannot be conclusively identified by their photo ID at OHS.
             1.     This problem should have been avoided earlier when the ATR confirmed that the
                    employee had an appropriate photo ID before sending them to the SAC.
                    a.      At this time, it may be necessary for the ATR to report to OHS and officially
                            confirm the identity of the employee.
      D.     The employee has failed to cooperate with OHS.



106
            1.     If OHS is unable to collect a suitable specimen or is unable to perform a valid breath
                   alcohol test, failure to cooperate constitutes “refusal to submit to testing” and the
                   employee is subject to appropriate personnel action.
      E.    The employee has failed to produce a suitable urine specimen for testing or has failed to produce
            a suitable breath specimen for testing.
            1.     If the employee is:
                   a.      unable to provide sufficient urine for testing without a valid medical explanation,
                   b.      is unable to provide sufficient breath for testing without a valid medical
                           explanation, or
                   c.      has attempted to adulterate the urine specimen - each of these constitutes a form
                           of “refusal to submit to testing” and the employee is subject to the appropriate
                           personnel action.
      F.    THE RESULTS OF ANY BREATH ALCOHOL TEST. If random testing included breath
            alcohol testing, the SAC will be contacted by OHS with the results of the test. In the event of a
            blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.02 or greater, OHS will not release the employee until
            the results have been communicated to the SAC by phone.
            1.     Since the urine specimen must be forwarded to a certified lab for analysis, OHS will not
                   have same day results for the urine drug test.
8.    BREATH ALCOHOL TEST RESULTS (BAC 0.02 TO 0.039): If the results of the employee’s breath
      alcohol test demonstrate a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.02 to 0.039:
      A.    The employee is forbidden to drive any vehicle. The SAC will contact the ATR who must
            provide a driver and a vehicle to transport the employee from OHS back to the worksite. If the
            employee has utilized their personal vehicle for transportation to OHS it should be locked and
            left at OHS.
      B.    See Policy and Procedures Manual for the appropriate employee personnel action.
      C.    If the employee is suspended or terminated, the ATR should make arrangements to have the
            employee driven home.
      D.    If the employee is not suspended or terminated, the employee may remain at the work site but the
            employee is forbidden from performing safety sensitive functions.
            Note: This determination is the responsibility of the ATR.
                   1.      Should the employee remain at the work site, the ATR shall, at the end of the
                           employee’s workday, make arrangements to have the employee driven home.
9.    BREATH ALCOHOL TEST RESULTS (BAC of 0.04 or greater): If the results of the employee’s
      breath alcohol test demonstrate a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.04 or greater:
      A.    The employee is forbidden to drive any vehicle. The SAC will contact the ATR who must
            provide a driver and vehicle to transport the employee from OHS back to the work site. If the
            employee has utilized their own vehicle for transportation to OHS, the ATR should insure that
            their vehicle is locked and left at OHS.
      B.    Back at the work site, the employee is notified by the ATR of the results of the breath alcohol
            and the appropriate personnel action is taken.


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       C.     The ATR shall make arrangements to have the employee driven home.
10.    POSITIVE DRUG TEST.
       A.     Since the urine specimen must be sent to a certified lab for analysis, the results of the urine test
              will not be available for several days.
       B.     If a urine drug test is verified as positive by OHS Medical Review Officer (MRO), the positive
              results will be forwarded to the SAC. The SAC will contact the ATR with the results and the
              ATR will initiate the appropriate personnel action.
NOTE: Refer to the City of Frederick Policy and Procedures Manual for all personnel action.




108
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES
Government Requirement
Prepared By:      Daniel J. Patton
Date:             September 1, 1998
Revision#         1
Revised Date:     December 8, 2003

Title:                Reasonable Suspicion Testing (RST) Summary of Operating Procedures


EMPLOYEES SUBJECT TO REASONABLE SUSPICION TESTING
        All City of Frederick employees are subject to reasonable suspicion testing which is initiated by a
trained observer.

WHAT IS REASONABLE SUSPICION TESTING?
        Simply stated, reasonable suspicion testing is the initiation of urine drug testing and/or breath alcohol
testing based on “reasonable” and specific grounds”. The term “reasonable suspicion” indicated that the ATR,
manager, or supervisor who initiates the testing has reasonable and specific grounds to believe that a drug or
alcohol test of an employee will producer evidence of illegal drug use or prohibited alcohol use.

WHAT ARE RESONABLE AND SPECIFIC GROUNDS?

1) Reasonable suspicion testing shall be based on “specific, contemporaneous, articulable observations
   concerning the employee’s breath/body odor, appearance, behavior, or speech”. This may also include
   direct observation of drug/alcohol use or drug alcohol possession by the employee. Therefore, reasonable
   suspicion is based on direct observations and facts.
   The subsequent sections will address the specific observations related to odors, appearance, behavior, and
   speech.
2) Reasonable suspicion could also be defined as a “common-sense conclusion about human behavior upon
   which practical people are entitled to rely”. When making the determination to initiate testing, remember
   this Rule of Thumb:
   Would another similarly trained and experienced manager/supervisor, being reasonable and prudent, and
   having noted the same observations, signs, and circumstances arrive at the same suspicion that I have?
3) There is not a requirement of “absolute certainty”. The standard of reasonable suspicion is less than “proof
   of wrong doing”. Although reasonable suspicion testing does not require absolute certainty, mere
   “hunches” are not sufficient. It is implicit in the above statements that the ATR, manager, or supervisor
   must carefully consider the combined weight of the observations and circumstances and be able to articulate
   a reasonable and specific basis for testing. In some cases the collective observations and circumstances will
   fall short of this goal, despite whatever “hunch” the ATR, manager, or supervisor has.
   Therefore, reasonable suspicion testing must always be approached on a case by case basis.




109
REASONABLE SUSPICION TESTING OF EMPLOYEES (By The Numbers)
1) REMEMBER THAT THE PRIMARY ISSUE IS SAFETY

           A. Employees that are believed to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol can be a hazard to
              themselves and others.

2) OBSERVATIONS: In an organized and specific manner, carefully observe the employee.

           A. You may be able to make some observations inconspicuously before you talk to the employee.

           B. Make as many specific observations as possible.


           C. Organize your observations into the following six categories:
                        1. Direct observation of drug or alcohol use.
                        2. Employee’s breath or body odors.
                        3. Employee’s appearance.
                        4. Employee’s behavior.
                        5. Employee’s speech.
                        6. Direct observation of drug or alcohol possession.

           D. Use the Observation Checklist For Reasonable Suspicion Testing to organize and record your
              observations.


3) When it becomes necessary to make close observations of the employee, speak with the employee in private
   (such as your office).
          A. Continue to observe the employee in an organized and specific manner.
          B. Continue to organize your observations into the six categories noted above and record them on
              the Observation Checklist For Reasonable Suspicion Testing.


4) Review your observations and findings on the Observation Checklist For Reasonable Suspicion Testing.
         A. Carefully consider the combined weight of your observations and the circumstances.
         B. Can you articulate a reasonable and specific basis for initiating testing?
         C. Apply the Rule of Thumb noted above.
         D. Do your observations support breath alcohol testing, urine drug testing, or both?

5) CORROBORATION: If you have concluded that you have reasonable and specific grounds for initiating
   testing or you are strongly leaning in that direction, it is advantageous to seek corroboration from a fellow
   trained observer (when one is readily available).
           A. IMPORTANT NOTE: Reasonable Suspicion Testing can be initiated by a single trained
               observer – ATR, manager, or supervisor.
           B. Corroboration is advantageous and it is encouraged, but it is not a necessity.
           C. Corroboration by a fellow trained observer can serve two functions:
                           1. It allows direct application of the Rule of Thumb.



110
                         2. Corroboration of observations by a fellow trained observer will reinforce the
                             validity of the grounds for initiating the testing.
           D. The fellow trained observer should fill out a separate Documentation Worksheet For Reasonable
              Suspicion Testing.
           E. Review the observations you have in common.
                         1. Consider the combined weight of your observations.
                         2. Can you articulate a reasonable and specific basis for initiating the testing?

6) POTENTIAL MEDICAL PROBLEM: If you have decided to initiate Reasonable Suspicion Testing, before
   you formally initiate the process you must address one more issue – the possibility that the employee is
   experiencing some type of medical problem. There are some medical conditions that can affect the
   employee’s appearance, behavior, and speech in a manner that might raise suspicions that the employee is
   “under the influence of something”. Therefore, you must pursue the following course of action before
   initiating Reasonable Suspicion Testing.
            A. Ask the employee if they are currently experiencing some type of medical problem and
               immediately volunteer to call 911 or personally drive the employee to the nearest CorpOHS
               medical network site. It is imperative that the trained observer immediately volunteer to call 911
               or personally drive the employee to the nearest CorpOHS medical network site.
                           1. If the employee is indeed sick, you are ready to assist and take action.
                           2. If the employee is “under the influence” and now attempts to camouflage this by
                               faking an illness, the employee is now forced to play out the game and end up at a
                               hospital or CorpOHS medical network site. Reasonable Suspicion Testing can be
                               pursued at the CorpOHS medical network site and there is a good chance that it
                               can also be pursued at the hospital.
                           3. If the employee denies that they are experiencing any medical problem, then the
                               circumstances further suggest a “reasonable suspicion “ case.
            B. Call 911 if the employee requests it. Don’t take chances – if you feel that you are facing a
               medical emergency, call 911 even if the employee does not request it.
                           1. This development does not necessarily preclude drug and/or alcohol testing. In
                               some circumstances, medical personnel may be able to perform the appropriate
                               testing as part of the employee’s medical evaluation (this will require the
                               assistance of the CorpOHS medical network personnel).
                           2. Contact the SAC and discuss the appropriate course of action.

7) If the employee denies that they are experiencing some type of medical problem, then ask the employee to
   explain the suspected behavior and the events that took place.
           A. A persuasive explanation from the employee should not deter or prevent you from pursuing a test
              if the combines weight of your observations and the circumstances constitutes “reasonable and
              specific grounds” for initiating the test.
           B. Denial of drug or alcohol use by the employee should be expected.




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8) INITIATION OF TESTING: If reasonable suspicion testing is to be initiated, complete the appropriate
   form. Document each and every observation and circumstance that contributed to initiation of the test.
         A. Observation Checklist For Reasonable Suspicion Testing
                      1. Testing cannot be initiated without completion of the Observation Checklist .
                      2. A separate Observation Checklist for each corroborating trained observer.

9) Inform the employee of your decision to initiate reasonable suspicion testing. Inform the employee that
   they are removed from duty until further notice.
           A. Failure of the employee to cooperate constitutes a form of “refusal to submit to testing” and the
              employee is subject to disciplinary action.
           B. Alert the SAC to the situation.

10) Transport the employee to the appropriate medical network site. An ATR, manager, or supervisor must
   accompany the employee to the medical network site and remain with them until completion of the urine
   collection and/or completion of the breath alcohol test.
           A. Although it is not mandatory, it is recommended that the ATR, manager, or supervisor call ahead
               to the medical network site and alert them to the pending test.

11) At the medical network site, the site personnel will follow standard operating procedure for:
           A. Collecting a urine specimen for drug testing AND/OR conducting a breath test for alcohol.
                         1. If it is collected, the urine specimen is forwarded to a certified lab for analysis and
                             the results will not be available for several days.
                         2. If it is performed, the breath alcohol test is conducted entirely on-site and the
                             results are available at the conclusion of the test.

12 URINE DRUG TESTING
         A. If the observations of the trained observer only support breath alcohol testing, then urine drug
            testing should not be included in the testing. Otherwise, urine drug testing should be included in
            the Reasonable suspicion Testing.
         B. Since the urine specimen must be forwarded to a certified lab for analysis, the results will not be
            available for several days.
                        1. This adds complexity to the equation because when urine drug testing is
                            performed as part of Reasonable Suspicion Testing, the employee is immediately
                            removed from further duty until the results of the drug test are available.
                        2. However, the results of any breath alcohol testing will be available at the
                            conclusion of the test.
                        3. Therefore, if breath alcohol testing was included as part of the Reasonable
                            Suspicion Testing and the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was 0.02 or greater,
                            the disciplinary response to the BAC itself may take precedence over the
                            immediate course of action in some cases.
         C. If urine drug testing was part of the Reasonable Suspicion Testing and breath alcohol testing was
            either not included or if alcohol testing was included and the blood alcohol concentration (BAC)
            was less than 0.02:
                        1. The employee is automatically removed from further duty until the results of the
                            urine drug test are available.
                        2. After the employee is transported back to the worksite to collect their belongings,
                            the ATR must make arrangements to have the employee driven home.


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                        3. The ATR shall alert the SAC to the situation.
                        4. The employee is placed on Administrative Leave for the remainder of the
                           workday. On subsequent days the employee must utilize their Annual Leave or
                           Personal Leave until the results of the urine drug test are available. If the
                           employee has no Leave available, the employee is placed on Leave Without Pay
                           for those days.
                               a. If the results of the urine drug test are negative, The City of Frederick will
                                   reimburse the employee’s leave that they utilized while waiting for the
                                   results OR reimburse the lost wages if the employee was on Leave
                                   Without Pay.


13) BREATH ALCOHOL TEST RESULTS (BAC 0.02 TO 0.039): If the results of the employee’s breath
alcohol test demonstrate a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.02 to 0.039:
            A. The employee should be transported from the medical network site back to the worksite.

                       1. If the employee is suspended, notify the employee and complete the appropriate
                           paperwork.
                               a. The ATR should make arrangements to have the employee driven home.
                       2. If the employee is not suspended and remains in the worksite, the employee is
                           forbidden from performing any safety sensitive functions for the remainder of
                           his/her workday.
                       3. Alert the SAC to the situation.
                       4. If the employee has remained in the worksite, at the end of the workday if the
                           ATR, manager, or supervisor feels that the employees ability to drive a motor
                           vehicle is impaired, arrangements should be made to have the employee driven
                           home.
          C. If BOTH a urine drug test and breath alcohol test were performed:
                       1. The employee is removed from further duty until the results of the urine drug test
                           are available (see above in Item 12).
                       2. See the City of Frederick Policy and Procedures Manual, Section: Rules of
                           Conduct for disciplinary action.
                               a. Due to the pending results of the urine drug test, questions may arise
                                   regarding the immediate course of action on the BAC. Consult with the
                                   SAC if you have questions.
                       3. If the employee is suspended due to the blood alcohol concentration (BAC),
                           notify the employee and complete the appropriate paperwork.
                               a. The ATR should make arrangements to have the employee driven home.
                       4. The ATR shall alert the SAC to the situation.

14) BREATH ALCOHOL TEST RESULTS (BAC 0.04 OR greater): If the results of the employee’s breath
alcohol test demonstrate a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.04 or greater:
            A. The employee is transported from the medical network site back to the worksite.
            B. See the City of Frederick Policy and Procedures Manual, Section: Rules of Conduct for
               disciplinary action.
            C. Notify the employee of the suspension and complete the appropriate paperwork.
            D. The ATR should make arrangements to have the employee driven home.
            E. The ATR shall alert the SAC to the situation.


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15) POSITIVE DRUG TEST
         A. Since the urine specimen must be sent to a certified lab for analysis, the results of the urine drug
            test will not be available for several days.
         B. If a urine drug test is verified as positive by the Medical Review Officer (MRO), the positive
            result will be forwarded to the Substance Abuse Coordinator (SAC) at The City of Frederick.
            The SAC will initiate the appropriate disciplinary steps. The ATR will probably conduct the
            disciplinary steps.
         C. See the City of Frederick Policy and Procedures Manual, Section: Rules of Conduct for
            disciplinary action.




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                   The City of Frederick Reasonable Suspicion Observation Checklist
                                       (STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL)


__________________________________________________                __________________________________
      EMPLOYEE:                                                     PERIOD OF EVALUATION

_______________________________________________________________________________________
      SUPERVISOR # 1

_______________________________________________________________________________________
      SUPERVISOR # 2

          I.     This checklist will assist the supervisor in referring a person for drug/alcohol testing.
          Has the associate exhibited any of the following?
      A. QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF WORK
                                                                              YES         NO
   1. Clear refusal to do assigned tasks                                      _____       _____
   2. Significant increase in errors                                          _____       _____
   3. Repeated errors in spite of increased guidance                          _____       _____
   4. Reduced quantity of work                                                _____       _____
   5. Inconsistent, “up and down” quantity or quality of work                 _____       _____
   6. Behavior that disrupts work flow                                        _____       _____
   7. Procrastination on significant decisions or tasks                       _____       _____
   8. More than usual supervision necessary                                   _____       _____
   9. Frequent, unsupported explanations for poor work performance            _____       _____
   10. Other (please specify) _________________________________________________________________

      B. INTERPERSONAL WORK RELATIONSHIPS
                                                                                           YES               NO
   1. Significant change in relations with co-workers, supervisors, others                 _____             _____
   2. Frequent or intense arguments                                                        _____             _____
   3. Verbal abusiveness                                                                   _____             _____
   4. Physical abusiveness                                                                 _____             _____
   5. Persistently withdrawn or less involved with people                                  _____             _____
   6. Intentional avoidance of supervisor                                                  _____             _____
   7. Change in frequency or nature of complaints                                          _____             _____
   8. Complaints by co-workers or subordinates                                             _____             _____
   9. Unusual sensitivity to advice or critique of work                                    _____             _____
   10. Unpredictable response to supervision                                               _____             _____




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      C. GENERAL JOB PERFORMANCE

                                                                                  YES     NO
   1.   Excessive absences (how many in last 12 months _____)                     _____   _____
   2.   Frequent Monday/Friday absences or other pattern                          _____   _____
   3.   Frequent unexplained disappearances                                       _____   _____
   4.   Excessive “extension” of breaks or lunch                                  _____   _____
   5.   Frequently leaves work early (number of days per week or month ______)    _____   _____
   6.   Experiences or causes job accidents                                       _____   _____
   7.   Interferes with or ignores established procedures                         _____   _____
   8.   Inability to follow through on job performance recommendations            _____   _____
      D. PERSONAL MATTERS

                                                                                  YES     NO
   1.  Changes in or unusual personal appearance (dress, hygiene)                 _____   _____
   2.  Changes in or unusual speech (incoherent, stuttering, loud)                _____   _____
   3.  Changes in or unusual physical mannerisms (gesture, posture)               _____   _____
   4.  Changes in or unusual level of activity; reduced _____or increased _____
       or high activity followed by low activity ______                           _____   _____
   5. Increasingly irritable or tearful                                           _____   _____
   6. Unpredictable or out –of-context displays of emotion                        _____   _____
   7. Makes unfounded accusations towards others – has feelings of persecution    _____   _____
   8. Memory problems (forgets instructions, data)                                _____   _____
   9. Alcohol on breath                                                           _____   _____
   10. Major change in physical health                                            _____   _____




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   II.    The following checklist is to be completed in the event of dramatic and sudden changes by the
          employee.

   Directions: Check pertinent items.

   1. Walking          ( ) Stumbling        ( ) Staggering       ( ) Falling             ( ) Unable to walk
                       ( ) Swaying          ( ) Unsteady         ( ) Holding on          ( ) Normal

   2. Standing         ( ) Swaying          ( ) Rigid            ( ) Unable to stand     ( ) Feet wide apart
                       ( ) Staggering       ( ) Sagging at knees ( ) Normal

   3. Speech           ( ) Shouting         ( ) Silent           ( ) Whispering          ( ) Slow
                       ( ) Rambling         ( ) Mute             ( ) Slurred             ( ) Slobbering
                       ( ) Incoherent       ( ) Normal

   4. Demeanor         ( ) Cooperative      ( ) Polite           ( ) Calm                ( ) Sleepy
                       ( ) Crying           ( ) Silent           ( ) Talkative           ( ) Excited
                       ( ) Sarcastic        ( ) Hostile          ( ) Normal

   5. Actions          ( ) Resisting communications              ( ) Fighting            ( ) Threatening
                       ( ) Calm                                  ( ) Drowsy              ( ) Hyperactive
                       ( ) Normal

   6. Eyes             ( ) Bloodshot        ( ) Watery           ( ) Dilated             ( ) Glassy
                       ( ) Droopy           ( ) Closed           ( ) Normal

   7. Breath           ( ) Alcoholic odor                        ( ) No alcoholic odor

   8. Other Observations
   _______________________________________________________________________________________
   _______________________________________________________________________________________
   _______________________________________________________________________________________

BASIC ON-SITE COORDINATION EXAMINATION

   1. Finger to Nose                        Right:               ( ) Sure                ( ) Uncertain
                                            Left:                ( ) Sure                ( ) Uncertain

   2. Awareness                             ( ) Confused         ( ) Bewildered
                                            ( ) Sleepy           ( ) Alert

   _______________________________________________________________________________________
   Signature of Supervisor # 1                                          Date

   _______________________________________________________________________________________
   Signature of Supervisor # 2                                          Date




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SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 15-03
Government Requirement
Prepared By:           Daniel J. Patton
Date:                  October 1, 2003
Revision#              4
Revised Date:          December 14, 2009
Title:                       The City of Frederick Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Program


    I. PURPOSE AND BACKGROUND
The City of Frederick is committed to protecting its staff from risks associated with exposure to Bloodborne
pathogens through the implementation of this exposure control plan. This exposure control plan was developed
in accordance with the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens standard, 29 CFR 1910.1030, to assist in the prevention
and spread of communicable diseases, i.e. Bloodborne pathogens and other infectious materials that may be
transmitted by bodily fluids, including blood, solid waste, wastewater and or airborne particulates, to City
employees which may be encountered during the performance of work tasks.

   II. GENERAL INFORMATION
OSHA regulations require that employers develop a written plan, which describes how they will manage
exposures to Bloodborne pathogens and other infectious materials for which there is evidence of harmful
effects.
The standard, set forth in 29 CFR 1910.1030 (Bloodborne Pathogens) requires employers to list by job
classifications where all employees may be expected to incur such occupational exposure, regardless of
frequency. See Appendix A
Additionally, OSHA requires a listing of job classifications where some employees may have occupational
exposure. In this category, tasks or procedures are indicated that would depict those employees as having
exposure. See Appendix B.
The program must include, methods of compliance, work practice controls, use of personal protective
equipment, housekeeping, vaccination, training, and medical record retention.

  III. SCOPE
This policy applies to all employees who through the performance of their job classification may be exposed to
Bloodborne pathogens or other infectious diseases.

  IV. DEFINITIONS
The following abbreviations and acronyms, whenever and wherever used within this document, shall have the
following designated meanings, except when the context clearly requires otherwise.
Assistant Secretary – means the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, or
designated representative.
Blood – means human blood, human blood components, and products made from human blood.
Bloodborne Pathogens – means pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause
disease in humans. The pathogens includes, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human
immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Clinical Laboratory – means a workplace where diagnostic or other screening procedures are performed on
blood or other potentially infectious materials.



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Contaminated - means the presence or the reasonably anticipated presence of blood or other potentially
infectious materials on an item or surface.
Contaminated Laundry – means laundry, which has been soiled with blood or other potentially infectious
materials or may contain sharps.
Contaminated Sharps – means any contaminated object that can penetrate the skin including, but not limited
to, needles, scalpels, broken glass, broken capillary tubes, and exposed ends of dental wires.
Decontamination – means the use of physical or chemicals means to remove, inactivate, or destroy bloodborne
pathogens on a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting infectious particles
and the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.
Director – means the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Services, or
designated representative.
Engineering Controls – means controls (e.g., sharps disposal containers, self sheathing needles) that isolate or
remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace.
Exposure Incident – means a specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or parenteral
contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that results from the performance of an employee’s
duties.
Handwashing Facilities – means a facility providing an adequate supply or running potable water, soap and
single use towels or hot air drying machines.
Licensed Health Care Professional – is a person whose legally permitted scope of practice allows him or her
to independently perform the activities required by section XIV Medical Services.
HBV – means hepatitis B virus.
HIV – means human immunodeficiency virus.
Occupational Exposure - means reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact
with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the performance of an employee’s
duties.
Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) means –
       1.      The following human body fluids: semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid,
               pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any
               body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where is
               difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids;
       2.      Any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead); and
       3.      HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV – or HBV-containing culture
               medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues form experimental animals
               infected with HIV or HBV.
Parenteral – means piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as needlesticks, human
bites, cuts, and abrasions.
Personal Protective Equipment – is specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for protection
against a hazard. General work clothes (e.g., uniforms, pants, shirts or blouses) not intended to function as
protections against a hazards are not considered to be personal protective equipment.




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Production Facility – means a facility engaged in industrial-scale, large-volume or high concentration
production of HIV or HBV.
Regulated Waste – means liquid or semi-liquid blood or other potentially infectious materials; contaminated
items that would release blood or other potentially infectious materials in a liquid or semi-liquid state if
compressed; items that are caked with dried blood or other potentially infectious materials and are capable of
releasing these materials during handling; contaminated sharps; and pathological and microbiological wastes
containing blood or other potentially infectious materials.
Research Laboratory – means a laboratory producing or using research-laboratory-scale amounts of HIV or
HBV. Research laboratories may produce high concentrations of HIV or HBV but not in the volume found in
production facilities.
Source Individual – means any individual, living or dead, whose blood or other potentially infectious materials
may be a source of occupational exposure to the employee. Examples include, but are not limited to, hospital
and clinic patients; clients in institutions for the developmentally disabled; trauma victims; clients of drug and
alcohol treatment facilities; residents of hospices and nursing homes; human remains; and individuals who
donate or sell blood or blood components.
Sterilize – means the use of a physical or chemical procedure to destroy all microbial life including highly
resistant bacterial endospores.
Universal Precautions – is an approach to infection control. According to the concept of Universal
Precautions, all human blood and certain human body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV,
HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens.
Work Practice Controls – means controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in
which a task is performed (e.g., prohibiting recapping of needles by a two-handed technique).


  V. RESPONSIBILITIES
The Mayor shall be responsible for the implementation and overall administration of this program.
The City of Frederick Directors or their designee shall be responsible for:
       1.      Retaining a current City of Frederick written Bloodborne Pathogens Program on file;
       2.      Ensuring compliance within their respective departments;
       3.      The overall responsibility for ensuring the enforcement of this program.
Each applicable Department Head or their designee shall be responsible for:
       1.      Insuring that Bloodborne Pathogens control equipment and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
               is available or ordered as needed.
       2.      Insuring that appropriate hand washing products are provided as needed.
       3.      Insuring that the applicable employees follow the policies and procedures as written
               within the Program.
       4.      Insure that all applicable employees are offered within 10 days of their initial assignment the
               Twinrix. (See Appendix A & B)
       5.      Insuring that post-exposure evaluations and follow-ups are provided for employees
               who have been exposed to an incident involving the release of blood or other potential infectious
               disease.
       6.      Insuring that employees declining the Twinrix vaccination sign a “Declination Statement”
               Appendix C
       7.      Forwarding all correspondence records, etc. to the Occupational Safety and Health

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               Department as necessary.
Safety and Health Manager will be responsible for:
       1.      Develop and initiate implementation of the Bloodborne Pathogens program.
       2.      Know and understand all elements of the Exposure Control Program.
       3.      Advise personnel at all levels of responsibility on all aspects of the standard.
       4.      Review and maintain all incidents reported regarding blood or other potentially
               infectious materials.
       5.      Offering and authorizing the Twinrix vaccination series to post exposure employees.
       6.      Oversee the Exposure Control Program and update the Program when necessary.
       7.      Act as a liaison between the City of Frederick and regulatory agencies concerning compliance
               with the Bloodborne Pathogens standard.
       8.      Conduct periodic inspections of departments to ensure compliance with the Exposure
               Control Plan.
Human Resources will be responsible for:
       1.      Offering and authorizing the Twinrix vaccination series to new employees who may have
               exposure due to their occupation.
       2.      Providing and requiring the employees signature on a declination form for all employees who
               decline the vaccination.
Employees will be responsible for:
       1.      The appropriate application and proper use of PPE, engineering controls, and work practice
               controls.
       2.      The proper use, inspection, care, cleaning, disinfection, of all personally assigned or used PPE.
       3.      The performance of self-hygiene as necessary and recommended to reduce the risk of exposure
               to Bloodborne Pathogens and other potentially Infectious Disease.

  VI. EXPOSURE DETERMINATION
The Management and Employee Safety and Health Committees reviewed Job Classifications for occupational
exposure to blood and other infectious material. Those job classifications in which all employees may have
occupational exposure are shown in Appendix A.

            Examples of some tasks which may involve exposure to blood or other infectious materials include:
              a.     Emergency first aid and /or CPR response.
              b.     Client care (CAA)
              c.     Sharps handling and disposal
              d.     Police, subduing suspect, intervention in an altercation.
              e.     Waste handling ( bodily waste)

If an employee feels that they received an occupational exposure but do not find their job classification on the
list, they should contact the Occupational Safety and Health Department for inclusion.

 VII. METHODS OF COMPLIANCE
Universal precautions shall be observed throughout all City of Frederick work areas where reasonably
anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious
material may result.



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All blood or other potentially infectious material will be considered infectious regardless of the perceived status
of the source individual. (Universal Precautions)
Engineering and work practice controls shall be utilized where practical to eliminate or minimize exposure to
the employees of the City of Frederick.
Where occupational exposure remains after institution of these controls, personal protective equipment shall
also be used.


VIII. ENGINEERING CONTROLS
Engineering and work practice controls shall be used to eliminate or minimize employee exposure, i.e. sharps
containers and waste containers. Where occupational exposure remains after institution of these controls,
personal protective equipment shall also be used. Engineering controls shall be examined at least weekly and
shall be serviced as necessary for proper operations. Each applicable Department Head or their designee shall
be responsible for inspections.
Each applicable department shall provide hand-washing facilities that are readily accessible to employees
receiving occupational exposure. Where this is not feasible, i.e. field operations, antiseptic hand cleanser and
paper towel or antiseptic towellettes shall be provided. If the latter method is used, hands should be washed
with soap and running water as soon as is practical.
Employees shall also immediately wash hands and any other potentially contaminated skin area with soap and
water as soon as is practical.
If any blood or other potentially infectious material does touch the skin or mucous membranes than those areas
shall be washed or flushed with water as appropriate as soon as practical following contact.
NOTE: See Appendix D for proper hand and eye washing procedures.


  IX. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
In addition to engineering and work controls, personal protective equipment (PPE) shall be used. All personal
protective equipment used within the City of Frederick will be provided without cost to the applicable
employees. Personal protective equipment must be chosen based on the anticipated exposure to blood or other
infectious materials. The protective equipment will be considered appropriate only if it does not permit blood
or other potentially infectious material to pass through or reach employees clothing, skin, eyes, mouth, or other
mucous membranes under normal conditions of use and for the duration of time which protective equipment
will be used.




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   In general:
   >Gloves: Non absorbent gloves shall be worn when it can be reasonably anticipated that the employee may
   have hand contact with blood, or other potentially infectious materials, i.e. mucous membranes, non-intact
   skin, human waste and or when handling or touching contaminated items or surfaces. Puncture/Cut resistant
   gloves shall be provided when appropriate, such as dislodging needles etc. from WWTP
   equipment/machinery.
   Each applicable department shall keep an ample supply of disposable gloves for employee use.
   Disposable gloves used shall not be reused, washed or decontaminated for re-use and are to be replaced as
   soon as practical when they become contaminated or as soon as practical if they are torn, punctured, or
   when their ability to function as a barrier is compromised. Utility gloves may be decontaminated for re-use
   provided that the integrity of the glove is not compromised. Utility gloves will be discarded if they are
   cracked, peeling, torn, punctured, or exhibit other signs of deterioration or when their ability to function as a
   barrier is compromised.
   NOTE: Hypoallergenic gloves, glove liners, powder less gloves, or other similar alternatives shall be
   readily accessible to those employees who are allergic to the gloves normally provided.
   >Masks: Masks in combination with eye protection devices, such as goggles or glasses with side shield, or
   chin length face shield, are required to be worn whenever splashes, spray, splatter, or droplets of blood or
   other potentially infectious material may be generated and eye, nose, or mouth contamination can
   reasonably be anticipated. I.e. employee cleaning a clogged toilet, CAA nurses performing suctioning,
   waste treatment workers performing grit chamber or bar screen cleaning.
   >Outer clothing protection: Outer non-absorbent clothing protection, such as lab coats, gowns, aprons,
   clinic jackets, disposable protective suits or other similar outer garments shall be worn appropriate for the
   anticipated exposure. I.e. employees entering manholes having a drop connection, snaking sewer
   connections (based on severity of blockage), waste treatment workers performing bar and grit screen
   cleaning, nurses or case managers performing procedures whereas exposure to a significant quantity of
   blood or other bodily fluids is anticipated.


   X. WORK AREA RESTRICTIONS
In work areas where there is a reasonable likelihood of exposure to blood or OPIM, personnel are not to eat,
drink, apply cosmetics or lip balm, smoke, or handle contact lenses.
Food and beverages are not to be kept in refrigerators, freezers, shelves, and cabinets or on countertops or bench
tops where blood or OPIM are present. Fridges shall be labeled “for food only” or “no food allowed” based on
their use.
Mouth pipetting, i.e. suctioning of OPIM is prohibited.
All procedures will be conducted in a manner which will minimize splashing, spraying, splattering, and
generation of droplets of blood or OPIM. Department heads shall evaluate and institute appropriate procedures,
i.e. guarding of wastewater splattering etc.


  XI. CONTAMINATED WASTE
       Sharps


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       Contaminated Sharps, i.e. needles, lab glass wear, crime evidence, i.e. knife, syringe etc. shall not be
       bent, recapped, removed, sheared or purposely broken.
       Contaminated Sharps shall be discarded immediately or as soon as practical in appropriate containers,
       see section XI below.
       During use, containers for contaminated sharps shall be accessible to personnel and located as close as
       practical to the immediate areas where sharps are used or can be reasonably anticipated to be found, i.e.
       police cruiser, CAA patient screening rooms, etc. The container must be maintained in an upright
       position throughout use, replaced routinely, and not be allowed to be overfilled.
       When moving containers of contaminated sharps from the area of use, the container must be closed
       immediately prior to removal or replacement to prevent spillage or protrusion of contents during
       handling, storage, transport, or shipping.
       If outside contamination of the primary container is likely or occurs, the primary container must be
       placed within a secondary container which will prevent leakage during the handling, processing, storage,
       transport, or shipping of the specimen.
       Sample Handling
       (Waste water)
       Sampling containers must be labeled. Samples of potentially infectious material including wastewater
       samples must be brought to the lab in containers which prevent leakage during collection, transport,
       handling, shipping and storage. Samples brought to the lab in leaking or otherwise inappropriate
       containers will not be accepted. If the exterior of a sample container is contaminated it must be placed
       inside a secondary container which prevents leakage, and appropriately labeled.
       Specimens
       Specimens of blood or OPIM, crime scene evidence, bodily fluid cleanup etc. will be placed in a
       container which prevents leakage during the collection, handling, processing, storage, and transport of
       the specimens.
       Containers
       Containers must be closable, puncture resistant (if potential exits), leak proof on the sides and bottom
       and labeled bio-hazardous or color-coded.
       Contaminated Equipment/machinery
       Equipment or machinery that has become contaminated with blood or OPIM must be decontaminated
       prior to servicing or performing repairs, shipped or prior to reuse
       See Appendix E for Decontamination Procedures.


 XII. WASTE DISPOSAL
Potentially infectious material (PIM) can be disposed of by contracting with an outside agency to pickup the
material for incineration in an EPA approved incinerator.
All departments must use the following storage requirements for regulated waste prior to treatment or transport
off-site:




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               a.      Regulated waste must be collected or secured at the end of each day by the generators of
                       the waste. If there is sufficient waste in the container at the end of the day, the container
                       should be removed to a storage area.
               b.      Waste must be stored in a manner and location that provides protection from water, rain,
                       and wind and maintained in a non decomposing state, using refrigeration when necessary.
               c.      Storage areas must be secured to prevent unauthorized access.
               d.      Waste must be stored in a manner that affords protection from animals and does not
                       provide a breeding place or a food source for insect and rodents.


XIII. MEDICAL SERVICES
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B is a type of viral hepatitis acquired from exposure to human blood and body fluids that result in liver
inflammation. While the use of universal precautions help in the protection from Hepatitis B, the Twinrix
vaccine is an additional protective measure offered at no cost to all employees who may have occupational
exposure.
Vaccination
Initial Employment Offer: The Hepatitis vaccination series will
be offered by a representative of the Department of Human Resources, and,
be offered at no cost to exposed employees, and
be administered during normal working hours, within the first ten days of employment, and
be administered in accordance with current U.S. Public Health Service guidelines through the Corporate
Occupational Health Solutions facilities located at 490-L Prospect Blvd. in the Weis Festival Plaza.
NOTE: New or transferred employees shall not be assigned to perform work in areas where the exposure risk is
considered, by the Safety and Health Department, to be
great, prior to the first twinrix immunization being administered, unless the immunization history is known,
such as those occupations whose primary responsibilities place the employee at significant risk for exposure,
sworn police officers, health care professionals (nurses, doctors).
Post-Exposure Incident: The hepatitis series will:
Be offered by the Office of Occupational Safety and Health upon notification of exposure, and
be offered at no cost to exposed employees, and
be administered during normal working hours, within the first ten days of employment, and
be administered in accordance with current U.S. Public Health Service guidelines through the Corporate
Occupational Health Solutions facilities located at 490-L Prospect Blvd. in the Weis Festival Plaza.
During Employment: If an employee initially declines vaccination, but at a later date, and during the course of
their employment decides to accept the vaccination, the vaccination series will be made available during normal
work hours and at no cost to the employee. To attain authorization and an appointment, please contact the
Office of Occupational Safety and Health, at ext. 22546.
Vaccination Titer


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The City of Frederick, at its discretion or as recommended by Corporate Health Solutions conduct a
prescreening program (to determine HBV titer) although participation in this program is not a prerequisite for
receiving the Hepatitis B vaccination. NOTE: The titer test may be advised for staff over 50 years of age. As
people age, their ability to develop antibodies may diminish somewhat. While not required, the titer test may
offer some assurance that the vaccination served its purpose.
Vaccination Declination
If an employee declines the vaccination, the employee shall so indicate on the declination form shown in
Appendix C.
Post Exposure Evaluation and Follow-up
In the event of an exposure incident, the exposed individual shall immediately do the following:
       1.      DO NOT PANIC
       2.      Stop all work tasks.
       3.      Remove all contaminated PPE and clothing as appropriate.
       4.      Wash, flush or shower as appropriate to remove exposure materials. See appendix D for proper
               hand and eye washing procedures.
       5.      If an injury has taken place the application of first aid measures appropriate to the extent of the
               injury may be conducted.
       6.      Following cleansing, first aid etc. follow The City of Frederick’s Accident/Incident Notification
               and Reporting Procedures, 05-96 as found within The City of Frederick’s Policy and Procedures
               Manual.
               Following the notification of an exposure incident, the Safety and Health Department shall make
               available to the exposed employee a confidential medical evaluation and follow up, including but
               not limited to the following:
               a.      Documentation of the routes of exposure and the circumstances under which the exposure
                       incident occurred.
               b.      Results of the source individual’s blood testing, if available and consent given shall be
                       made available to the exposed employee.
               c.      All medical records relevant to the appropriate treatment of the employee including
                       vaccination status.


The City of Frederick shall obtain and provide the employee with a copy of the evaluating healthcare
professional’s written opinion within 15 days of the completion of the evaluation.
The healthcare professional’s written opinion for post-exposure evaluation and follow-up shall be limited to
include only that the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation and that the employee has
been told about any medical conditions resulting from exposure to blood or other potentially infectious
materials which require further evaluation or treatment. All other findings or diagnoses shall remain
confidential and shall not be included in the written report.
Source Individual Testing
If the attending physician determines that source testing is warranted, the physician shall initiate contact with
the source individual. After consent is obtained, the source individual’s blood will be tested as soon as feasible

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in order to determine HBV and HIV infectivity. If consent is not obtained, The City shall establish that the
legally required consent cannot be obtained. When law does not require the source individual’s consent, the
source individual’s blood, if available, shall be tested and the results documented.
Exposed Employee Testing and Medical Follow-up
The exposed employee’s blood should be collected and tested as soon as possible after an exposure. If the
employee consents to a baseline blood collection, but does not give consent at that time for HIV serologic
testing, the sample shall be preserved for at least 90 days. If within 90 days of the exposure incident, the
employee elects to have the baseline sample tested, such testing shall be done as soon as feasible.
Responsibility for Medical Follow-up Costs for Employees
All costs relating to medical services associated with the exposure incident shall be processed as Worker’s
Compensation claims. Any services that are not covered by Worker’s Compensation, but are required by the
standard shall be the responsibility of the City of Frederick.


XIV. HAZARD COMMUNICATION
Warning labels shall be affixed to containers of regulated wastes, refrigerators, and freezers containing blood or
other potentially infectious material, and other containers used to store, transport or ship blood or OPIM.
Exception: Red bags or red containers may be substituted for labels.


 XV. INFORMATION AND TRAINING
Employees within job categories specified in Appendix A & B are to participate in The City of Frederick’s
initial and periodic training program for Blood-borne pathogens and other infectious diseases.
Training shall be provided at the time of initial assignment and at least annually thereafter. IMPORTANT:
New employees must be trained before being assigned any work involving exposure to Bloodborne pathogens.
The Safety Department will conduct the training in accordance with the requirements of CFR 1910.1030.


XVI. RECORD KEEPING
Medical Records:
All medical records required by 1910.1030 will be maintained for each employee by Corporate Occupational
Health Services, 516 Trail Ave, Suite D, Frederick, MD 21701.
Training Records:
Training records required by 1910-1030 will be maintained for each employee in the Office of Occupational
Safety and Health.




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                                      Appendix A - Job Classifications

Job Classifications in which all employees may be expected to incur occupational exposure, regardless of
frequency.

Community Action Agency Workers to include:
       Registered Nurses
       Outreach Workers
       Nurse practitioners/physician’s assistant
       Physician
       Case managers/case workers
       Center assistants/custodians
Sworn Officers to include:
       Facilities Maintenance Worker
       Crime Scene Technician
       Crime Scene Supervisor
Refuse Drivers
Refuse Collectors
Refuse Crew Leader
Waste Treatment Workers to include:
     Operator IV & II
       Pretreatment Coordinator
       Superintendent & Assistant Superintendent
Water and Sewer Facilities Maintenance
     Superintendent
       Maintenance Foreman
       Plant Maintenance
       Technician I
       Technician III
       Technician IV
Sewer Workers to include:
       Utility Maintenance Technician I
       Utility Maintenance Technician II
       Utility Maintenance Technician III
       Storm Water Management Coordinator
       Foreman III
       Superintendent
Inflow and Infiltration Workers to include:
     Inflow & Infiltration Technician III
     Foreman III
Water Quality Workers to include:
     Supervisor
     Lab Technicians III
Vehicle Maintenance Workers to include:
     Supervisor
     Mechanics I, II, & III
     Mechanics Welder
     Laborer


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                             Appendix B - Positions of Occupational Exposure

      Some employees in the following positions may have occupational exposure, regardless of frequency.

Community Action Agency Workers, to include:
      Program managers
      Transportation workers/assistants
      Clerical Workers
City of Frederick designated First Aid Responders

Tasks and procedures, which may expose employees, listed above to Bloodborne Pathogens or other infectious
disease may include:

Sharps Handling
Facility clean up and decontamination
Dealing with emergency situations: Performing Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation, Altercations.




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                                     Appendix C - Declination Statement

Offer Date: ____________________________________________________________
Employee Name: ________________________________________________________
Department: ____________________________________________________________
Dear: ______________________________________________

        The City of Frederick Safety and Health Department has completed an assessment of citywide job tasks
to determine health risks, if any, that our employees may be exposed to. It has been determined that during the
performance of your job tasks you may be at risk or exposed to various viruses from exposure to Bloodborne
pathogens and/or other infectious materials.
        The City of Frederick is offering and recommending you receive the pre-employment and or job-transfer
vaccination checked below. These vaccinations are offered at no cost to you.
NOTE: The vaccinations are not a requirement of your employment and or job transfer. You may decline them
with no penalty. Should you decline any or all of the recommended vaccinations at this time, but reconsider at
a future date, at your request, the desired vaccination will be scheduled during work hours at no cost to you.

Recommended Vaccinations:

Hepatitis B

Please check the box and sign as appropriate below.

I request the Hepatitis B vaccination.
Signature_____________________________________________Date_______________

Declination Statement

I decline the Hepatitis B vaccination.

I understand that due to my potential occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials I
may be at risk of acquiring an infection. I have been given the opportunity to be vaccinated for the potential
viruses as indicated above, at no charge to myself. However, I decline the indicated vaccinations at this time. I
understand that by declining this vaccine, I continue to be at risk of acquiring the indicated viruses, which could
result in a serious disease.
If in the future I continue to have occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials and I
want to be vaccinated, I can receive the vaccination at no charge to me.
Signature______________________________________________Date______________




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                          Appendix D - Proper Hand and Eye Washing Procedures


All exposed personnel will wash their hands using the following procedures after contact with potentially
contaminated materials, surfaces, and or after the removal of protective equipment including gloves.

       1.      Remove jewelry, such as bracelets, watches, rings.
       2.      Turn faucet on with a towel.
       3.      Dispose of towel as appropriate. See Section XIII.
       4.      Wash hands thoroughly, using circular motion with soap and water for at least 30 seconds.
       5.      Rinse well.
       6.      Turn faucet off with a towel.
       7.      Dispose of towel as appropriate. See Section XIII.


Note: In situations where running water is not available, alcohol foam hand decontaminating products or
antiseptic wipes will be used immediately following contact and proper hand washing performed as soon as
running water and soap is available.

                                           Proper Eye Wash Procedures

In the event that blood or other potentially infectious material is splashed into the eyes, the eyes should be
immediately flushed with copious amounts of running water using a designated eye wash system.




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                                 Appendix E - Decontamination Procedures

   1. Contaminated work surfaces will be decontaminated with an appropriate disinfectant immediately or as
      soon as feasible. An appropriate disinfectant is one that is registered with the EPA as HIV- and HBV-
      effective (i.e. a solution of 5.25% sodium hypo chlorite (household bleach) diluted between 1:10 and
      1:100 = 1 cup bleach per 2 gallons of water)
   2. A blood and body fluid spill kit should be retained at each facility for use in the case of a spill of blood
       or other potentially infectious material.
       NOTE: the person who spilled the fluid should clean up all blood and bodily fluids. When feasible the
       clean up of blood or other bodily fluids should be contracted out whenever possible.
        (see attachment for local biohazard clean-up vendor).
       The kit should contain: 1) a pair of vinyl or latex gloves, 2) absorbent material, such as a cloth, paper
       towels, 3) a small bucket or spray bottle, 4) two plastic “red” bio-hazard bags, 5) disinfectant.
   3. If floor or other surfaces has been contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious material, the
      employee should do the following:
      a. Put on gloves
      b. Lay out a bag in an open fashion
      c. Dampen first piece of absorbent material and mop up spill.
      d. Deposit material in bag. Avoid touching outside of bag.
      e. If outside of bag is contaminated, put contaminated bag into second bag.
      f. Dampen second piece of absorbent material and clean floor or surface. Deposit into bag.
      g. Tie bag snugly.
      h. Place bag in regulated waste container for proper disposal.
      i. Return bucket or spray bottle to storage area. Restock used items in spill kit.
      j. Wash hands after removing gloves.
   4. Regulated waste shall be placed in approved properly labeled containers and disposed according to
       established regulatory procedures.




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                                    Attachment - Bio Hazard Clean-up

   The preferred method of biohazard clean up is to utilize first the employee that spilled the blood or other
   bodily fluid when possible and appropriate. When this is not feasible contact a local vendor, such as,
   Service Master Unlimited Services,
   4507D Metropolitan Court, Frederick, Md. 21704,
   Phone # 301-662-5515.




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                         Appendix F - Hepatitis B Vaccine: What You Need to Know
1. Why get vaccinated? Hepatitis B is a serious disease.
The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause short-term (acute) illness
that leads to:
 - loss of appetite
 - diarrhea and vomiting
 - tiredness
 - jaundice (yellow skin or eyes)
 - pain in muscles, joints, and stomach
It can also cause long-term (chronic) illness that leads to:
 - liver damage (cirrhosis)
 - liver cancer
 - death
About 1.25 million people in the U.S. have chronic HBV infection.
Each year it is estimated that:
- 80,000 people, mostly young adults, get infected with HBV
- More than 11,000 people have to stay in the hospital because
  of hepatitis B
- 4,000 to 5,000 people die from chronic hepatitis B
Twinrix vaccine can prevent hepatitis B. It is the first anti-cancer vaccine because it can prevent a form of liver
cancer.
2. How is hepatitis B virus spread? Hepatitis B virus is spread through contact with the blood and body fluids
of an infected person. A person can get infected in several ways, such as:
- by having unprotected sex with an infected person
- by sharing needles when injecting illegal drugs
- by being stuck with a used needle on the job
- during birth when the virus passes from an infected mother to
  her baby
About one third of people who are infected with hepatitis B in
the United States don't know how they got it.
3. Who should get hepatitis B vaccine and when?
1) Everyone 18 years of age and younger
2) Adults over 18 who are at risk
Adults at risk for HBV infection include:
- people who have more than one sex partner in 6 months
- men who have sex with other men
- sex contacts of infected people
- people who inject illegal drugs
- health care workers and public safety workers who might be
  exposed to infected blood or body fluids
- household contacts of persons with chronic hepatitis B virus
  infection


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- hemodialysis patients
If you are not sure whether you are at risk, ask your doctor or nurse.
People should get 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine according to the
following schedule. If you miss a dose or get behind schedule,
get the next dose as soon as you can. There is no need to start
over.
For an infant whose mother is infected with HBV:
- First Dose: Within 12 hours of birth
- Second Dose: 1 to 2 months of age
- Third Dose: 6 months of age
For an infant whose mother is not infected with HBV:
- First Dose: Birth to 2 months of age
- Second Dose: 1 to 4 months of age (at least 1 month after
  the first dose)
- Third Dose: 6 to 18 months of age
For an older child, adolescent, or adult:
- First Dose: Any time
- Second Dose: 1 to 2 months after the first dose
- Third Dose: 4 to 6 months after the first dose
For anyone:
- The second dose must be given at least 1 month after the first
  dose.
- The third dose must be given at least 2 months after the
  second dose and at least 4 months after the first.
- The third dose should not be given to infants younger than 6
  months of age, because this could reduce long-term protection.
Adolescents 11 to 15 years of age may need only two doses of
hepatitis B vaccine, separated by 4 to 6 months. Ask your health
care provider for details.
Hepatitis B vaccine may be given at the same time as other
vaccines.
4. Some people should not get hepatitis B vaccine or should wait
People should not get hepatitis B vaccine if they have ever had a
life-threatening allergic reaction to baker's yeast (the kind
used for making bread) or to a previous dose of hepatitis B
vaccine.
People who are moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is
scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting
hepatitis B vaccine.

Ask your doctor or nurse for more information.
5. What are the risks from hepatitis B vaccine?



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A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious
problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of
hepatitis B vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely
small.
Getting hepatitis B vaccine is much safer than getting hepatitis
B disease.
Most people who get hepatitis B vaccine do not have any problems
with it.
Mild problems
- soreness where the shot was given, lasting a day or two (up to
  1 out of 11 children and adolescents, and about 1 out of 4
  adults)
- mild to moderate fever (up to 1 out of 14 children and
  adolescents and 1 out of 100 adults)
Severe problems
- serious allergic reaction (very rare)
6. What if there is a moderate or severe reaction?
What should I look for?
Any unusual condition, such as a serious allergic reaction, high
fever or unusual behavior. Serious allergic reactions are
extremely rare with any vaccine. If one were to occur, it would
be within a few minutes to a few hours after the shot. Signs can
include difficulty breathing, hoarseness or wheezing, hives,
paleness, weakness, a fast heart beat or dizziness.
What should I do?
- Call a doctor or get the person to a doctor right away.
- Tell your doctor what happened, the date and time it happened,
  and when the vaccination was given.
- Ask your doctor, nurse, or health department to file a Vaccine
  Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) form, or call VAERS
  yourself at 1-800-822-7967.
7. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program
In the rare event that you or your child has a serious reaction
to a vaccine, a federal program has been created to help you pay
for the care of those who have been harmed.
For details about the National Vaccine Injury Compensation
Program, call 1-800-338-2382 or visit the program's website at
http://www.hrsa.gov/bhpr/vicp




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8. How can I learn more?
Ask your doctor or nurse. They can give you the vaccine package
insert or suggest other sources of information.
Call your local or state health department's immunization
program.
Contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):
- Call 1-800-232-2522 or 1-888-443-7232 (English)
- Call 1-800-232-0233 (Espanol)
- Visit the National Immunization Program's website at
  http:/www.cdc.gov/nip or CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis
  website at http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Immunization Program
Vaccine Information Statement
Hepatitis B
7/11/01
42 U.S.C. Section 300aa-26




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SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURE, 20-2005
Government Requirement
Prepared By:       Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date:              9/22/05
Revision #:
Revised Date:

Title:                The City of Frederick Excavation and Trenching Policy/ Procedures

Purpose: To protect employees from the hazards associated with working on, in or around excavations.

Scope: All employees involved in working on, in or around an excavation are covered under this policy.
Excavations are defined to include trenches.

General Information: Excavating is recognized as one of the most hazardous construction operations. OSHA
recently revised Subpart P, Excavations, of 29 CFR 1926.650, .651, and .652 to make the standard easier to
understand, permit the use of performance criteria where possible, and provide construction employers with
options when classifying soil and selecting employee protection methods.

General Requirements: All excavations shall be made in accordance with the rules, regulations, requirements,
and guidelines set forth in 29CFR 1926.650, .651, and .652; of the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health
Administration’s standard on Excavations.

Responsibilities:

The Mayor and Board of Aldermen or their designee shall be responsible for the implementation and overall
administration of this program.

Each applicable Director or their designee shall be responsible for:
   a. Ensuring compliance within their respective departments;
   b. The overall implementation and enforcement of this program.

Each applicable Department Head or their designee shall be responsible for:
   a. Insuring that appropriate excavation equipment and PPE is available or ordered and used as needed;
   b. Insuring that the policy and procedures as written within are followed by the applicable employees;
   c. Insuring that all applicable employees receive training prior to working on, in or around an excavation;
   d. Ensuring that a competent person is placed in charge of all excavations
   e. Conduct periodic inspections to ensure compliance.

Employees will be responsible for:
  a. The appropriate application and use of excavation personal protective equipment;
  b. Adhering to the guidelines and procedures written within.

The Safety and Health Manager will be responsible for:
   a. Develop and initiate the implementation of the Excavation Program;
   b. Know and understand all elements of the Excavation Program,


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   c. Oversee the Excavation Program and update the Program when necessary,
   d. Conduct periodic inspections of departments to ensure compliance with the Excavation Program,
   e. Provide appropriate training for all applicable workers.



Trenching and Shoring General Guidelines
(Excavations)

      1. A trench is any excavation which is less then 15' across, and the depth exceeds the width.

      2. Shoring is needed any time a trench is five feet or more in depth, or if there is a possibility of cave in at
         a lesser depth, and personnel are going into the trench.

      3. At the start of each work day the competent person must check the integrity of the shoring, and the
         condition of the soil. Inspect more often as soil and weather conditions require.

      4. Excavated material must be kept a minimum 2' from the edge of the trench.

      5. An access ladder must be used for access and egress anytime an excavation is four feet or more in
         depth. The ladder must be within 25' of the worker at all times.

      6. Employees shall not work more than 8' ahead of the last shoring. This is only to be done during
         installation, and only when absolutely necessary. AVOID WORKING AHEAD OF SHORING
         WHENEVER POSSIBLE.

      7. A trench may be considered a confined space, if it is four feet or more deep.

      8. No employees shall enter a trench without permission of the competent person. The competent person
         must be on the job site at all times, when workers are in the trench.

      9. Never use shoring supports as a ladder. Never hang tools or material from the supports.

      10. In the event of an Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MOSHA) inspection,
          contact your supervisor immediately. Follow The City of Frederick Standard Operating Procedure For a
          MOSH Inspection

      11. The notified Supervisor must notify the Safety and Loss Control Manager immediately and additionally
          follow the City of Frederick Standard Operating Procedure For a MOSH Inspection.

../../SOP/MOSH Inspection.doc




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Excavation Procedures

         1. All Excavations:

                    Get Description/work order ticket/details ?

                    Lay out excavation area with white spray paint

                    Contact Miss Utility to have all utilities located within the proposed work area and verify
                     the status of the locate request, prior to performing work.

         2. Have locates completed before digging. Colors indicate:

                a. Red - electric

                b.   Orange - Communication Lines

                c. Blue – Water

                d. Green - Sewer/Storm Drains

                e. Yellow - Gas/Steam

         c. All utilities are supposed to be buried at a minimum of 18"deep, but NEVER depend on it.

         d. CAUTION: Gas, electric and water may be in plastic lines. Use pick or shovel gently to locate
            before exposing with backhoe. Maintain a minimum of 18” on either side of the locate when
            digging with a backhoe.

         e. Before Digging locate shut-offs for water, steam and gas. Have equipment necessary to perform
            emergency shutdown, i.e., keys, valve key, etc.

                       NOTE: On any excavation, if hazards are suspected, or if shoring will be
                     needed, see the supervisor to arrange a pre-excavation meeting. This must be
                                            done before excavation begins.

         f. Barricades

               a.      Use barricades and safety tape or fencing to form a continuous barrier around
               excavation. Fencing must be used in areas with a high volume of foot traffic or when an
               extreme hazard exists. Check at least once daily to ensure barricades are in place.

               b.        Provide access around the excavation site for wheelchairs and sight-impaired traffic.

               c.      When working on city streets or state highway, follow mandated traffic control
               requirements. See Supervisor.

         g. On soft dirt or grass use adequate plywood or steel plates for access path for vehicles.

         h. Required Safety Equipment:


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                 a. Clothing – Highly visible clothing and or a reflective Vest - when worker is working in or
                    near vehicular traffic

                 b. Protective Footwear - at all times.

                 c. Eye Protection – when using striking tools, e.g., mauls, sledge hammer, etc. Goggles
                    and/or a face shield must be used when operating a jackhammer or chipping gun.

                 d. Hearing Protection - when near backhoe, air tools, etc., or whenever the surrounding
                    noise level exceeds 85 db.

                 e. Hard Hat - when working around overhead hazards; ground personnel for backhoe when
                    out of vehicle and backhoe is operating, while working in a trench, or any time there is
                    the possibility of objects falling onto a person’s head.

                 f. Attentiveness - use your eyes and ears to stay alert for pedestrians, cars, trucks and heavy
                    equipment.

      i. HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS:
         IF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS EXIST, and you have not been trained and
         certified as a competent person for trenching and shoring: STOP WORK. See your supervisor to
         determine if it is OK to proceed. If you are working with a person who is certified as a competent
         person, that person can make the decision if it is safe to continue.

             a. Is there a potential for cave in?

             b. Is the excavation more than 3' deep, and the depth exceeds the width?

             c. Is the excavation 4' or more in depth?

             d. Is there a probability of hazardous material in the excavation?

             e. Is water running into the area?

      j. The Competent Person on the job has the Authority and Responsibility to Stop the Job at any time
         it appears unsafe.

         The Competent Person on the job is also responsible for the following:

            a.         Ensure all City of Frederick and MOSHA rules regarding excavations are followed.

            b.         Direct the installation of shoring.

            c.       Check the integrity of the shoring and soil conditions at the beginning of each shift,
                  more often as needed.

            d.         Ensure all necessary literature is on site including:

                       i. Subdivision P of the MOSHA regulations.


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                          ii. Tabulated data on the shoring used.

               e.         Maintain a record of inspections including

                         iii.   Time of inspection.

                         iv. Determination of soil type.

                          v. Integrity of shoring.

                         vi. Is there a confined space hazard?

                        vii. Are there any sings of hazardous material?

               f.         Inspection and storage of shoring at completion of job.



Pre-Excavation Meeting Guidelines

          1. Those present at the meeting shall consist of at least the competent person and the
             supervisor or his/her designee. Others may be present as necessary.

          2. The competent person shall bring an excavation plan to the meeting for review. The plan
             shall include the following:

                    a. A diagram or sketch of the area where the work is to be done, or preferably the
                       meeting will be held at the job site.

                    b. Projected time of completion.

                    c. Projected depth of the excavation.

                    d. Projected water table for the area.

                    e. Projected soil type.

                    f. Planned method of shoring.

                    g. What utilities will be encountered, and locations of shut offs.

                    h. Other anticipated problems, i.e., congestion, hazardous materials, etc. The plan
                       for dealing with these problems.




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A Excavation Checklist
Project: ____________          Weather: __________________________         Date: _________


Measurements of Trench: Depth: _____ Length: _____              Width: _____


Soil Type: ___ See attached "Soils Analysis Checklist"


Type of Protective System Used: _________________________________________


Miss Utility Ticket Number:_____________________________________Status Checked: Yes___No___

                                           General Inspection of the Job site
Yes       No        N/A
___       ___       ___        Excavations, adjacent areas, and Protective Systems inspected by the
                               Competent Person daily, prior to the start of work.
___       ___       ___        Competent Person has the authority to remove workers from the
                               excavation immediately.
___       ___       ___        Surface encumbrances supported or removed.
___       ___       ___        Employees protected from loose rock or soil that could possibly pose a
                               hazard by falling or rolling into the excavation.
___       ___       ___        Hard hats worn by all employees.
___       ___       ___        Spoils, materials, and equipment set back a minimum of 2' from the
                               edge of the excavation.
___       ___       ___        Barriers provided at all remote excavations, well, pits, shafts, etc.
                               Walkways and bridges, over excavations 4' or more in depth, must be
                               equipped with guardrails
___       ___       ___        Reflective vests, or other highly visible garments, provided and worn by
                               all employees exposed to public vehicular traffic.
___       ___       ___        Employees required to stand away from vehicles being loaded or
                               unloaded.
___       ___       ___        Employees prohibited from working or walking under suspended loads.
___       ___       ___        Employees prohibited from working on the faces of sloped or benched
                               excavations above other employees.
___       ___       ___        Warning system established and utilized when mobile equipment is
                               operating near the edge of an excavation, i.e., radio contact, hand signals, etc.

                                                          Utilities
___       ___       ___        Utility companies contacted and/or utilities located.
___       ___       ___        Exact location of utilities marked when approaching the utilities. (Hand dig if necessary)


143
___   ___   ___   Underground installations protected, supported, or removed when the
                  excavation is open.




144
                                Means of Access and Egress

___   ___   ___   Lateral travel distance to a means of egress does not exceed 25', for
                  excavations 4' or more in depth.
___   ___   ___   Ladders, when used, must extend 3' above the edge of the trench and be
                  secured.
___   ___   ___   Structural ramps used by employees must be designed by a Competent
                  Person.
___   ___   ___   Structural ramps used for equipment must be designed by a Registered
                  Professional Engineer (RPE).
___   ___   ___   Ramps must be constructed of materials of uniform thickness,
                  securely cleated together on the bottom, and have a non-slip surface.
___   ___   ___   Employees protected from cave-ins while entering, working in, or
                  exiting excavation.


                                        Wet Conditions

___   ___   ___   Precautions taken to protect employees from accumulation of water.
___   ___   ___   Water removal equipment monitored by a Competent Person.
___   ___   ___   Surface water controlled or diverted.
___   ___   ___   Inspection made after each rainstorm.


                                   Hazardous Atmosphere

___   ___   ___   Atmosphere tested when there is a reasonable possibility of oxygen
                  deficiency, or build up of other hazardous gases, that may expose an
                  employee to a hazard.
___   ___   ___   Oxygen content is between 19.5% and 21%.
___   ___   ___   Ventilation provided to prevent flammable gas from building up to 20%
                  of the lower explosive limit of the gas.
___   ___   ___   Testing conducted to ensure that atmosphere remains safe.
___   ___   ___   Emergency Response Equipment readily available where a hazardous
                  atmosphere could or does exist.
___   ___   ___   Employees trained on the use of Personal Protective and Emergency
                  Response Equipment.
___   ___   ___   Safety harness and life line must be individually attended when an
                  employee entering a deep confined excavation or bell bottom pier.




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                                          Protective Support Systems

___      ___      ___       Materials and/or equipment selected on soil analysis, expected loads,
                            and trench parameters.
___      ___      ___       Materials and equipment inspected and in good condition.
___      ___      ___       Materials and equipment not in good condition must be removed from
                            service and not returned until repaired, inspected, and approved by a
                            Registered Professional engineer.
___      ___      ___       Protective systems installed without exposing employees to hazards
                            of cave-ins, collapses, or from being struck by materials of equipment.
                            Install from the top, down, and from the bottom up.
___      ___      ___       Members of Protective Support System must be securely fastened.
___      ___      ___       Adjacent structures must be securely supported.
___      ___      ___       Excavations below the footing of base must be approved by a
                            Registered Professional Engineer.
___      ___      ___       The backfill process must progress with the removal of the support
                            system.
___      ___      ___       Material excavated to a level no greater than 2' from the bottom of the
                            Protective Support System, and only if system is designed to support
                            the calculated loads.
___      ___      ___       Shield system placed to prevent lateral movement.
___      ___      ___       Employee prohibited from remaining in a Trench Box
                            when being moved vertically.


___________________________________________                ______________________
Signature of Competent Person                              Date




146
Soils Analysis Checklist




The City of Frederick recognizes and determines all excavations to be pre-disturbed “Type C” soil. Please refer
to Appendix F of the standard for the appropriate protective system.

"Type C" means:
(i) Cohesive soil with an unconfined compressive strength of 0.5 tsf (48
kPa) or less; or
(ii) Granular soils including gravel, sand, and loamy sand; or
(iii) Submerged soil or soil from which water is freely seeping; or
(iv) Submerged rock that is not stable, or
(v) Material in a sloped, layered system where the layers dip into the
excavation or a slope of four horizontal to one vertical (4H:1V) or
steeper.
"Unconfined compressive strength" means the load per unit area at which
a soil will fail in compression. It can be determined by laboratory
testing, or estimated in the field using a pocket penetrometer, by thumb
penetration tests, and other methods.
"Wet soil" means soil that contains significantly more moisture than
moist soil, but in such a range of values that cohesive material will
slump or begin to flow when vibrated. Granular material that would exhibit
cohesive properties when moist will lose those cohesive properties when
wet




           ___Sloping or Benching (Appendix B)        Specify Angle _____
           ___Timber Shoring (Appendix C)
           ___Aluminum Hydraulic Shoring (Appendix D)


                             ___________________________________             ____________
                            Signature of Competent Person                            Date




147
Daily Trenching Log




Project:_______________________________________Weather:______________________________________
Protective System(s): ___Trench Shield (Box) ___Wood Shoring ___Sloping ___other
Measurements of Trench:          Depth_____           Length_____         Width_____
Purpose of Trench: Drainage___ Sewer___ Gas___ Water___ Other___: _________________________
Was a Visual Soil Test Made? Yes___        No___      If yes, what type? ______________________________
Was a Manual Soil Test Made?               Yes___     No___     If yes, what type? _____________________
Type of Soil? ____________________         Strength of Soil ______________________
Surface Encumbrances Present?              Yes___     No___     If yes, what type? _________
Water Conditions:    Wet___      Dry___    Submerged___         Surface Water ___
Potentially Hazardous Atmosphes Exist?                                               Yes___    No___
          (If yes, follow the city Confined Space Procedures)
Is Trenching or Excavation Exposed to Vehicular Traffic (exhaust)?                   Yes___    No___
          (If yes, follow the city Confined Space Procedures)
Are Employees Exposed to Public Vehicular Traffic?                                   Yes___    No___
          (If yes, are highly visible clothing worn/vests?)
Are Other Utilities Protected?                                                       Yes___    No___
          (Water, gas, sewer, or other structures)
Are Sewer or Natural Gas Lines Exposed?                                              Yes___    No___
          (If yes, follow the company Confined Space Procedures)
Are ladders within 25' of all workers?                                               Yes___    No___
Do ladders extend 3' above the top edge of the excavation?                           Yes___    No___
Is excavated material stored a minimum of 2' from the edge of the excavation?        Yes___    No___
Did Employees Receive Training in Trenching and Excavation?                          Yes___    No___
Date and Time of Last Periodic Inspection: ______________________________________________________
Comments and/or Notes:




___________________________________                   ____________
Signature of Competent Person                         Date




148
149
SECTION 2 ELECTIVE POLICY & PROCEDURES




150
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 03-96
Elective
Prepared by:   Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared: February 9, 1996
Revised #:     1
Revised Date:  December 7, 2003

Title:                Multiple Accident/Incident Review Program

Used by:          All Employees at The City of Frederick
_____________________________________________________________________________


I.       PURPOSE
To investigate to establish all causal factors of any accident/incident involving a City of Frederick employee
and to eliminate or control those factors so that future accidents/incidents may be averted. To alert the
employee to any trends or patterns that may be evident and to explore corrective actions. The Multiple
Accident/Incident Review Program is not intended to find fault.
II.      SCOPE
This procedure covers any employee who accrues three (3) or more accident/incidents in one (1) calendar
quarter.
III.     APPLICATION
         1.    Employee’s accident/incident reports will be monitored by the Safety Coordinator to determine
               the frequency, severity and seriousness of potential/actual property damage and or personal
               injury. The results shall prompt the following to occur;
               a.     accident/incidents that depict personal injury/property damage with low actual or
                      potential shall warrant an accident/incident review involving the following persons:
                      Employee
                      Employee’s Supervisor
                      Employee’s Department Head
                      Safety Coordinator
               b.     accident/incidents that depict personal injury/property damage with high actual or
                      potential will prompt an accident/incident review involving the following persons:
                      Employee
                      Employee’s Supervisor
                      Employee’s Department Head
                      Employee’s Department Director
                      Safety and Loss Control Manager

The scheduling of the review will be the responsibility of the supervisor of the department involved.




151
The review will involve the critique of each accident/incident report, the review of any causal factors, corrective
actions and a verification that corrective action was taken, open discussion, recommendations, etc.
       2.      Multiple Accident/Incident Reviews should be concluded by summarizing any
               conclusions/recommendations made during the review.
       3.      The Safety Coordinator shall follow up with a written report depicting the same.
       4.      Copies of the report should be sent to the Employee, Supervisor, Department Head, Director,
               Chairman of the Department Head Safety Committee and Personnel Director.




152
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 05-96
Elective
Prepared by:   Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared: August 20, 1996
Revision #:    6
Revised Date:  October 31, 2003

Title:                  Accident/Incident Notification and Reporting
                        (Near Miss, Property Damage and Personal Injury/Illnesses)

                        What to do when an accident/incident occurs.

Used by:          All City of Frederick Departments
                  Note: Frederick Police shall refer to the Frederick Police Department Policies, Rules,
                  Regulations and Procedures Manual.
________________________________________________________________________


       The employee shall notify and report any work related accident or incident occurring on the job, whether
near miss, property damage, personal injury and/or illness, as outlined below.

Notification Procedures

1.       Personal Injury/Illness

        a.       Emergency: If an employee feels his/her situation warrants immediate emergency medical
attention, or in the event the injured/ill employee is unable to respond but a coworker feels immediate
emergency medical attention is warranted, the injured/ill employee or co-worker shall contact 911 immediately
and by the most expeditious means.

In any case of emergency, the injured/ill employee or a co-worker shall report the incident to the employee’s
supervisor, the Division Chief/Department Head, and the Safety Department.

        b.      Non-emergency but other than minor first aid:       At the supervisor’s direction, the employee
shall report to or be transported to, Corporate Occupational Health Solutions,
490-L Prospect Blvd. The supervisor is responsible for notifying the Safety Department.

        c.      Minor first aid:         If an employee’s condition requires minor first aid only, and a coworker
trained in First Aid is present, first aid may be administered at the injured employee’s request and at the
coworker’s option. The injured employee shall notify their supervisor and the Safety Department.

2.       Property Damage Accidents:

       a.     Vehicular accident with no personal injury: If an employee is involved in a vehicular accident
wherein he/she strikes or is struck by a vehicle, or any other object, the vehicle driver shall notify the Police
immediately and shall report the incident to their supervisor and the Safety Department.



153
       b.      Vehicular accident with personal injury:     If an employee is involved in a vehicular accident
wherein he/she sustains any personal injury, the above procedure shall be initiated along with the appropriate
procedures under paragraph 1 for Personal Injury/Illness.

3.     Near Miss Incidents: If an employee is involved in an incident that did not, but could have resulted in
personal injury, illness or property damage, the incident shall be reported to his/her Supervisor and the Safety
Department.

Drug Testing

If required, the Supervisor shall direct employees in accordance with the City of Frederick Post Accident or
Reasonable Suspicion Drug Testing Policy.

First Report of Incident Statement

1.     When an accident/incident results in personal injury, illness and or property damage the employee is
required to report to the Safety Department to complete and sign the City of Frederick First Report of Incident
Statement. This should be done within one (1) working day of the accident/incident or one (1) working day after
being released from medical treatment.

2.     All “Near Miss” First Report of Incident Statements may be reported to the Safety Department by
telephone. Extension: 22546. No signature required.

Supervisor Incident Investigation Report

1.      The supervisor shall thoroughly investigate, complete and sign the City of Frederick Incident
Investigation Report within two (2) working days of the accident/incident regardless of the employee’s medical
disposition. Upon completion, the supervisor shall forward the report to his/her Division Chief/Department
Head for review and approval.

2.     The Division Chief/Department Head shall review and approve by signature within (4) working days.
Once approved the Division Chief/Department Head shall forward with any supporting documentation (Police
Report, Automobile Loss Report, Work Status Report, Pictures, etc.) to the Safety Department, Chairman of the
Management Safety Committee, and their Department Director.

Note: The entire routing/approval process should be completed within 7 working days. If at any time during
the process, the Report is revised or additional medical, police etc. reports are received, copies should be sent to
the Safety Department, and the Chairman of the Management Safety Committee.

3.     The Chairman of the Management Safety Committee will acknowledge receipt and report on all
accident/incident reports during the monthly Management Safety Committee Meeting.




154
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 06-96
Elective
Prepared by:   Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared: August 20, 1996
Revision #:    5
Revised Date:  December 8, 2003

Title:                 Modified Duty Return to Work Program

Used by:          All City of Frederick Departments
                  Note: Frederick Police shall refer to the Frederick Police Department
                         Policies, Rules, Regulations and Procedures Manual
______________________________________________________________________________

I.       PURPOSE
The purpose of the Modified Duty Return to Work Program is to provide employees who have sustained a
temporary disabling medical condition caused by an injury/illness on or off the job the opportunity to return to
useful work within prescribed medical guidelines that will benefit the employee and the City of Frederick.
II.      DEFINITIONS
Temporary Disabling Medical Condition
Any medical condition, which restricts an employee from performing the normal duties within their job
classification.
Temporary
Not permanent, measured in days or weeks.
Light Duty
An assignment of duties that does not aggravate or otherwise risk worsening a temporary disabling medical
condition.
Limited Duty
An assignment approved for an employee capable of performing his normal job duties but with a limited hourly
duration.
Work Status Report
Medical documentation completed by a physician that clearly states whether the employee can/cannot return to
duty, indicates the date, nature of the injury/illness, specific work restrictions and the expected date of return to
full duty status. (See appendix B for sample work status report)
III.     APPLICATION
Employees that are recovering from an injury or illness may be given a “light/limited duty” assignment as
recommended by their physician. (See Appendix A for sample light duty jobs) Such assignments shall be
based upon a work status report.
The “modified duty” program is intended to afford the employee the opportunity to return to work as quickly as
possible by assigning the employee work that he/she is physically capable of performing. It is not the intent of


155
the program for injured/ill employees to report to work but not actually work. The integrity of the modified
duty program will not be compromised.
The number of workdays that an employee will be on modified duty shall be limited to no more than thirty (30)
days at which time a reevaluation of work restrictions shall be completed by the attending physician and
reviewed by the department supervisor and safety and loss control manager.
In the event a limited number of modified duty job opportunities are available, employees who have restrictions
as a result of on-the-job injury or illness will receive first preference over the employees who were injured or
who became ill off-the-job.
Whenever possible employees with restrictions should be given duties within their regularly assigned
department.
Any department that has work assignments that meet the requirements of an employee with restrictions should
communicate the details of those assignments to the Safety and Loss Control Manager. This will assist in the
placement of individuals for the most productive work assignments available.
IV.    PROCEDURES
       1.      An employee recovering from a work-related injury/illness or an employee recovering from a
               non-work related injury or illness but who is requesting a light/limited duty assignment must
               provide a Work Status Report to his/her supervisor upon receipt or within one (1) working day
               after release from initial medical treatment.
       2.      As soon as the supervisor is made aware that an employee will lose time from work due to a
               work related injury/illness, or when an employee submits a request to return to a light/limited
               duty assignment for a non-work related injury/illness, he/she is responsible for notifying and
               forwarding the appropriate reports to the Safety and Loss Control Manager.
       3.      The Safety and Loss Control Manager or designated representative of the City of Frederick will
               review the work status report, and/or check with the appropriate physician about the possibility
               of releasing the employee to a modified duty status. The Safety and Loss Control Manager and
               the department supervisor will then review the employee’s work status report and a
               determination shall be made as to the availability of modified work.
       4.      The department head shall:
               a.     Be responsible for communicating to the employee whether modified duty is available or
                      not and if so, when and where to report, etc.,
               b.     Provide the Safety and Loss Control Manager on the first day of each month with an
                      accurate total of modified duty days worked by the employee; designate whether the
                      injury/illness was work/non work related, and the date the employee is released from
                      modified duty.
       5.      The department from which the employee originates shall remain responsible for payroll
               reporting, as well as providing corrective or disciplinary actions.




156
Appendix A - Modified Duty Return to Work Program Sample Light/ Limited Duty Jobs.

CLERICAL
     Filing
     Photocopying
     Typing
     Reorganizing files
     Mail delivery

Inventory

Housekeeping/janitorial
      Window cleaning
      Picking-up light debris (cigarette butts, etc.)
      Emptying small trash containers

Painting

Updating department manuals

Safety
         Completing Safe Job Analysis
         Updating MSDS files
         Implementing an inverse performance standards audit
         etc.




157
                                                                     The City of Frederick WSR

                                                                    Work Status Report


PHYSICAL CAPACITY CHECKLIST:                                        PATIENT:___________________________

Patient can perform: (Please check as appropriate):

        Return to Work Without Restriction

        No Work

        Return to Work with Restrictions:


              SEDENTARY WORK:                10 lbs. maximum lifting and/or carrying
                                              articles. Walking/Standing on occasion.

              LIGHT WORK:                    20 lbs. maximum lifting, carrying 10 lb. articles
                                              frequently. Most jobs involving sitting with a degree of pushing and pulling.

              MEDIUM WORK:                   50 lbs. maximum lifting with frequent lifting/
                                              carrying of up to 25 lbs. Frequent standing and walking.

              HEAVY WORK:                    100 lbs. maximum lifting with frequent lifting/
                                              carrying of up to 50 lbs. Frequent standing and walking.

In a day, Patient can: (circle full capacity for each)
Hours at a time

Sit               1        2        3         4          5          6     7        8
Stand             1        2        3         4          5          6     7        8
Walk              1        2        3         4          5          6     7        8

Patient can lift/carry: (Please check as appropriate)

                      0-10 lbs.         11-20 lbs.           21-50 lbs.       51-100 lbs.
Never                   ()                ()                    ()                ()
Occasionally            ()                ()                    ()                ()
Frequently              ()                ()                    ()                ()

Patient is able to: (Please check as appropriate)

                 Never              Occasionally         Frequently                No Restriction
Bend              ()                    ()                  ()                         ()
Climb             ()                    ()                  ()                         ()
Squat             ()                    ()                  ()                         ()
Reach             ()                    ()                  ()                         ()



158
Patient can use feet for repetitive operations (ie: foot controls):

Right ( ) No ( ) Yes                Left ( ) No ( ) Yes

Patient can use hand for repetitive: (Please check as appropriate)

             Simple Grasping              Fine Manipulation           Pushing/Pulling
Right        ( ) No ( ) Yes                 ( ) No ( ) Yes             ( ) No ( ) Yes
Left         ( ) No ( ) Yes                 ( ) No ( ) Yes             ( ) No ( ) Yes



Cont. next page.

Patient is able to drive: (Please check as appropriate)

                        Never             Occasionally     Frequently     No Restriction
Automatic                ()                   ()               ()             ()
Standard                 ()                   ()               ()             ()
Heavy Equipment          ()                   ()               ()             ()

Eliminate Exposure to the following conditions:

Temperatures              ( ) Over _______%                   ( ) Under______%

Skin Irritants:           ( )___________________________________

Respirator Use:           ( ) Yes           ( ) No

Other Restrictions:
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________

Restriction End Date:_______________________________



PHYSICIAN SIGNATURE:                                 __________________                 DATE: _____________

I have read and understand the above restrictions.

EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE:____________________________________                                 DATE:______________


Comments:




159
160
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 10-99
Elective
Prepared By:   Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date:          May 4, 1999
Revision #:    8
Revised Date:  November 10, 2003

Title:                 The City of Frederick Bomb Threat Policy and Procedures
NOTE: This Policy and Procedure should be incorporated as Addendum A to each
      Facilities Emergency Evacuation and Fire Prevention Plan.

      I. POLICY
When faced with incidents involving bomb threats or suspected explosive devices, the primary responsibility of
City employees involved will be the preservation of life. It is the policy of the City of Frederick to make every
reasonable effort to ensure the safety of all persons involved, and to effect the proper handling of all bomb
threats and suspected explosive devices through specific procedures and proper notifications.
    II. PURPOSE
It is the intent of the Mayor, through the adoption and implementation of the following Bomb Threat Policy and
Procedures to ensure the maximum margin of safety for all employees. The desired result is to provide a
thorough and efficient method of responding to the reception of bomb threats.
   III. SCOPE and APPLICATION
This policy and procedure will apply to all City of Frederick employees, contractors, visitors, etc. while in any
City of Frederick Facility.
IMPORTANT: This policy should be attached as an addendum to each facility’s Emergency Evacuation and
           Fire Prevention Plan.
Although most of the aspects of our Emergency Evacuation and Fire Prevention Plans remain viable in a bomb
threat, new problems must be addressed when a bomb threat is received.
For example: In the instance of a fire, effort is directed at evacuating the occupants in a quick and orderly
manner. In the case of a bomb threat, when evacuation is initiated, the evacuation exit routes and assembly
areas should be searched prior to vacating the premises. Remember the potential hazard remains when a
building is evacuated before a search has been made. Personnel cannot safely reoccupy a facility and resume
normal activities until a search has been conducted.
  IV. BASIC REQUIREMENTS
Although the majority of bomb threats handled are found to be false, any City employee who is faced with an
incident involving a bomb threat or a suspected explosive device, will treat the incident as real and bona fide,
until such time as it is proven otherwise. We must plan for all eventualities considering each threat is real. The
City of Frederick has established the following procedures for accomplishing its purpose as outlined above.
        1.     Threat Reception
        2.     Threat Evaluation
        3.     Search Procedures
        4.     Locating unidentified suspicious objects
        5.     Evacuation
   V. DEFINITION


161
      6.   Bomb Threat: A communication indicating the presence of a destructive device in a City of
           Frederick facility.
      7.   Threats: Kinds of Threats
           a.     Nonspecific
                  This is the most common type of threat, usually with little information given other than,
                  “There is a bomb in your building.”
           b.     Specific
                  This threat is given in more detail. Reference is often made to the exact location of the
                  device, or the time it will detonate. Specific threats should be considered more serious in
                  nature, requiring a more concerted effort in the response. The nonspecific threat however
                  cannot be ignored.
      8.   Threats: Two Forms
           a.     Written
                  If the threat is received in a written form, the written document is evidence, and should
                  not be handled at all once it is discovered to be a bomb threat. The Frederick Police
                  Department will be immediately notified, and they will take possession of the written
                  document.
           b.     Telephone
                  This is the most common type and hence the telephonist should follow the correct method
                  of communication and how to obtain maximum information.
           *During the telephone threat, note the # and record as indicated on the caller ID display.
      1.   THREAT RECEPTION
           Bomb threats are normally transmitted by phone. The person receiving the call should be
           prepared to obtain precise information, including:
           1.1    Time the call was received and on which telephone number or extension.
           1.2    The exact words of the person making the threat should be recorded (penned).
           1.3    Indicate whether it was male or female voice and approximate age.
           1.4    Note any accent or speech impediment or slurring of speech, which could indicate
                  intoxication or an unbalanced condition.
           1.5    Listen for the presence of any background noises such as traffic, music, or other voices.
           1.6    Decide if the voice is familiar.
           The person receiving the threatening call should be prepared to ask the caller certain questions if
           the information has not been volunteered.
           1.7    Where is the bomb?
           1.8    When is it going to explode?
           1.9    What does it look like?
           1.10   What kind of bomb is it?


162
              1.11   Why did you place the bomb?
              1.12   What is your name?
              The caller may provide specific information by answering these questions. Often the type of
              person making a threat of this nature becomes so involved that they will answer questions
              impulsively. Any additional information obtained will be helpful to police and explosive
              technicians.
NOTE: Please refer to “Reception and Response Procedures Checklist” attachment A.
       2.     THREAT RESPONSE
              Specific threat should be considered more serious in nature, requiring a more concerted effort in
              the response. The nonspecific threat, however, cannot be ignored. The following action should
              be taken regardless of the threat category!
              2.1    Record the phone number as indicated on the caller ID display.
              2.2    Notify the Police - call 22102
              2.3    Notify the Safety and Loss Control Manager – 22546
              2.4    Notify your immediate supervisor
              2.5    Initiate Search Procedure
       3.     SEARCH PROCEDURE
              3.1    Pre-Evacuation Search
                     Immediate Area
                     Because employees are most familiar with their workspace, when an announcement that a
                     bomb threat has been received every employee should begin to evaluate and make a
                     mental note of their work area to ascertain the presence of, “ANYTHING THAT
                     DOESN’T BELONG” or is out of the ordinary, or out of place. This search should take
                     no longer than 5 minutes. Employees should stay in their immediate area until directed
                     otherwise, i.e. office, floor, etc.
                     Evacuation Route
                     Because areas that the public may have access to are the very areas normally used for
                     evacuation, an immediate search of stairwells, corridors, elevators, and doorways,
                     (interior and exterior) must be completed prior to an evacuation. This search should be
                     completed simultaneously with the immediate area search and should take no longer than
                     10 minutes.
NOTE: Fire Captains as identified within your facilities Emergency Evacuation and Fire Prevention Plan or
solicitation of volunteers should be designated responsible to perform this search.
              3.2    Post-Evacuation Search
              The Police cannot conduct a proper search of the facilities alone. Cooperation of employees is
              essential. The police may solicit for volunteers to assist in a more formal post-evacuation search.
              Employees, Volunteers and Fire Captains should be prepared to provide the police any
              information (mental notes) regarding their pre-evacuation, immediate area or evacuation route
              search.



163
       4.     UNIDENTIFIED/SUSPICIOUS OBJECT or PACKAGE
              When a search results in finding an unidentified object or package, the finder must not attempt to
              move or handle it. Notify the Frederick City Police immediately. Give the following
              information:
              4.1    Location of object or package.
              4.2    Reason(s) suspected.
              4.3    Description of object.
              4.4    Other useful information.
       5.     EVACUATION PROCEDURE
              Once the pre-evacuation search(s) are completed, at the direction of City of Frederick Police,
              Safety and Loss Control Manager and or the Cabinet Officer responsible for the facility receiving
              the threat, a quiet and systematic evacuation from the facility may be conducted.
NOTE: Follow your facilities Emergency Evacuation and Fire Prevention Plan, for escape routes, refuge areas,
etc. IMPORTANT: Refuge areas during “Bomb Threats” should be no less than 300’ from the facility.
                                     REOCCUPYING the FACILITY
              Reoccupying the facility is a decision which is to made by the City of Frederick Police, Safety
              and Loss Control Manager and or the Cabinet Officer responsible for the facility receiving the
              threat. Under no circumstances once an evacuation has been made can the facility be reoccupied
              without a search.
                                    TRAINING
              Each applicable City of Frederick Officer or their designee shall be responsible for the review
              and dissemination of this Policy and Procedures to their employees.
              The Safety and Loss Control Manager and Police Department shall provide additional
              information or assist in the training as requested.




164
Appendix A - “Bomb Threats” Reception and Response Procedures Checklist

1.      The employee receiving the threat should record:

        1.1      Date and time the call was received and on which ext.:
        ________/________/_______ _____:____AM/PM EXT:__________
        1.1      Exact words of the threat:_________________________________________________________
        _____________________________________________________________________________________
        _____________________________________________________________________________________
        1.2      Indicate whether male/female: ___________M/F
        1.3      Indicate any speech impediment, voice and or manner descriptions:________________________
        calm              laughing          raspy            angry            sobbing        deep   excited                distinct
        cracking          slow              slurred          accent           rapid   nasal         disguised              soft
        stutter           loud              lisp             other
        Intoxicated____Y/N                  Unbalanced_____Y/N
        1.1      Background noises: ______________________________________________ (traffic, music, voices)
        1.2      Voice familiar___________Y/N        Who:____________________

2.      Questions to ask:
        Record response and record in sequence.

        1.1      Where is the bomb located? _______________________________________________________
        1.2      When is it going to explode? ______________________________________________________
        1.3      What does it look like? ___________________________________________________________
        1.4      What kind of bomb is it? __________________________________________________________
        1.5      Why did you place the bomb? ______________________________________________________
        1.6      What is your name? _____________________________________________________________

2.      Notification: Immediately after receipt of information the recipient of the threat shall:
        2.1      Record phone # as indicated on caller ID display.
        2.2      Notify Police – 22102
        2.3      Notify Safety and Loss Control Manager
        2.4      Notify your immediate supervisor

3.      The supervisor should initiate an immediate pre-evacuation search, i.e. immediate area and evacuation route.

4.      Police and Safety and Loss Control Manager their designee shall report immediately to the scene.
        Interviews and a search shall be completed prior to re-occupancy of the facility.

5.      Employees shall search their immediate area and evacuate to their predetermined refuge areas only when directed to do so
        and cooperate with police and safety during the post -evacuation investigation.

6.      When identified or suspicious object or package is found:
        !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!DO NOT TOUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
        Notify the Frederick City Police Department and provide:

        1.1      Location of the object:____________________________________________________________
        1.2      Reason(s) suspected:_____________________________________________________________
        1.3      Description of the object: _________________________________________________________
        1.4      Other useful info: _______________________________________________________________

Evacuate as directed.




165
Appendix B - Emergency Evacuation Plan


EMERGENCY EVACUATION AND FIRE PLAN NOTIFICATION PROTOCOL


INCIPIENT FIRE

1. Use an available fire extinguisher to put the fire out.
2. Contact supervisor to inform them of incident.
3. Contact the Safety and Loss Control Manager

OTHER EMERGENCY

1. Pull the nearest fire alarm pull station.
2. Inform Director of emergency.
3. Director contacts the City’s Safety and Loss Control Manager

BOMB THREAT

Follow Appendix A Procedures.




166
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 12-99
Elective
Prepared by:   Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared: September 1, 1999
Revision #:    3
Revised Date:  December 7, 2003

Title:                 Emergency Notification and Functional Response Procedures

Used by:          All City of Frederick Departments
                  Note: Frederick Police shall refer to their General Orders Manual.
____________________________________________________________________________

I.       PURPOSE

To provide a City response to incidents involving death or serious injury or illness that arise involving City of
Frederick employees during the course of their workday. Particular emphasis is placed on providing accurate
and expedient communication between departments concerning the emergency.

II.      PROCEDURE

Fatality and/or Serious Injury/Illness (Requiring In-patient Hospitalization)

If a City of Frederick employee dies or becomes hospitalized during working hours the following protocol shall
be followed:

         A.    Employee’s immediate Supervisor or their Designee shall contact:
               (See appendix A, Functional Response Duties)

               1.      Safety and Loss Control Manager
               2.      Department Head

         B.    Safety and Loss Control Manager or their Designee shall contact:
               (See appendix A, Functional Response Duties)

               1.      Md. Occupational Safety & Health (MOSH)
               2.      Mayor
               3.      Public Information Officer (PIO)
                       (See appendix A, Functional Response Duties)

         C.    Department Head or their Designee shall contact:
               (See appendix A, Functional Response Duties)

               1.      Employee Next of Kin




167
Appendix A - Functional Response Duties

Supervisor:

The deceased or hospitalized employee’s Supervisor or their Designee shall first contact the Safety and Loss
Control Manager followed by his/her Department Head immediately providing them with all pertinent
information regarding the incident, i.e., location of incident, time of incident, number and names of fatalities or
hospitalized employees, description of what happened, suspected reason, witnesses, etc. NOTE: If
appropriate, leave all conditions as they are at the time of the incident for examination, interview all witnesses,
using all information, and attempt to determine the cause.

Safety and Loss Control Manager:

A.     Occupational Death or In-patient Hospitalization

       1.       The Safety and Loss Control Manager or their Designee shall contact the Maryland Occupational
Safety and Loss Control Manager and Health Administration as required in the Code of Federal Regulation,
1904.08 first, followed by the Mayor and Public Information Officer, providing them both with the following
required and pertinent information: establishment name, location of incident, time of incident, number and
names of fatalities or hospitalized employees, contact person, phone number, and a brief description of the
incident. The Safety and Loss Control Manager will maintain contact with the Public Information Officer as
appropriate.

       2.      The Safety and Loss Control Manager or their Designee shall proceed to the scene and begin an
accident investigation.

       3.      As soon as is practical, a memorandum detailing the facts surrounding the incident should be
prepared by the Safety and Loss Control Manager and distributed to the following personnel:

               a.   Mayor
               b.   Chief Financial/Human Resources Officer
               c.   Public Information Officer
               d.   Chief Legal Affairs Officer

        4.      The Safety and Loss Control Manager shall complete the Major Incident Investigation Report
and distribute as (3) above.

B.     Non-occupational Death or In-patient Hospitalization

If it has been determined by the Safety and Loss Control Manager to be a non-occupational incident, the
Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Administration will not be contacted, although the same procedures
as above will be followed pertaining to the Mayor and Public Information Officer.

The Department Head or their Designee shall contact the deceased or hospitalized employee’s next of kin as
indicated on the Emergency Information form located in the employees personnel file. The following
guidelines shall be followed:



168
       1.      Notification of next of kin must be prompt, sensitive and considerate;
       2.      If possible, a fellow employee who knows the next of kin well should be
               consulted to assess possible reaction by the widow, widower, friend or significant
               other. The Department Head should utilize a city representative (designee) who
               relates most closely to the next of kin (if possible) to make the initial contact.
               NOTE: This is a traumatic moment. Notification should be made in person, if
               possible. If the health of the next of kin is in doubt, a physician should be in
               attendance.
       3.      Give information only to those persons indicated on the Emergency Information
       Form.
       4.    Provide only relevant information needed to convey the outcome of the incident.
       5.    Direct additional inquiries to the Public Information Officer.

The Public Information Officer or their Designee shall be responsible for the following:

       1.      Timely release of appropriate information to employees at the time of the incident.

       2.      Timely release of appropriate information to the media.

       3.      Scheduling an appropriate meeting with the family to discuss in detail the
               complete facts surrounding the incident. NOTE: This meeting should take place
               only after the Safety and Loss Control Manager has completed a written report of
               investigation and provided same to the Mayor, Chief Financial/Human Resources Officer, Public
               Information Officer, and Chief Legal Affairs Officer.




169
Emergency Notification Form




Date ______________________
Employee’s Name ___________________________________________
Department ________________________________________________


Home Address ______________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
  City           State         Zip Code
Home Phone No._________________________

Other Phone No. _________________________


*Supervisor or Employee Designee Contact: 1st
________________________________________________________
                                       2nd
________________________________________________________
                                       3rd
________________________________________________________

The following information is provided to The City of Frederick to be used for notification of family and/or friends in the event of an
emergency, such as a personal injury or death of an employee. The information will be kept strictly confidential and used only if necessary.
Note: Employee authorization signature below:

Please complete the information requested below for at least three persons who may be contacted in the event of
an emergency situation. If such a situation occurs your supervisor or your designated person *(see list above)
would call your first contact if unable to reach that person, your supervisor or your designated person would call
your second contact, and so forth. If you feel it is necessary to provide more
than three contact persons, please provide additional names on the reverse side. Be sure to include the area code with all telephone
numbers.

In the space provided for “Additional Information” please indicate any pertinent medical information which should be taken into
consideration to properly prepare the person for notification (i.e., “mother has prior history of heart attack”), any special work hour
information (i.e., “sister works 11 p.m. to 4 a.m.”), etc.

I ____________________________________________ authorize the above mentioned Supervisor or Employee Designee to contact one of the
below indicated Next of Kin/friend in the event of an emergency.




170
Name: ____________________________________ Relationship ________________________________________________
Home Address: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Work Address: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Home Phone No.:____________________ Work Phone No.: ___________________ Other Phone No.: ___________________

Additional Information:
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________



Name: ________________________________________ Relationship ____________________________________________

Home Address: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Work Address: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Home Phone No.:____________________ Work Phone No.: __________________ Other Phone No.: ____________________
Additional Information:
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________


Name: _________________________________________ Relationship __________________________________________
Home Address: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Work Address: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Home Phone No.:___________________ Work Phone No.: ____________________ Other Phone No.: ___________________

Additional Information:
______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Signature: ___________________________________________         Date: ______________________________




171
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 18-02
Elective
Prepared By:    Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date:          April 18, 2002
Revision #:    1
Revised Date:  December 8, 2003

Title:                  The City of Frederick, Computer Workstation Policy and Procedures
                               _______

    I. INTRODUCTION
       Individuals who use computers for extended periods of time may experience eye fatigue and pain or
       discomfort in the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck or back. This is usually caused by poor work
       habits, poor work station design or improper use of workstation components. In most cases, corrective
       measures are relatively simple and inexpensive.
   II. PURPOSE
       It is the intent of the Mayor, through the adoption and implementation of the following Computer
       Workstation Policy and Procedures to reduce the health risks associated with computer use.
  III. SCOPE AND APPLICATION
       While the guidelines described in this program can benefit anyone who uses a computer, they are
       primarily intended for departments with individuals using desktop computers. Most of the guidelines
       will not apply to laptop computers which are designed only for short-term use and cannot be sufficiently
       adjusted.
  IV. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
       Workstation Assessment
       A survey of actual computer use will help supervisors determine which workstations and individuals
       should be targeted for further evaluation. Highest priority should be given to those individuals who
       experience symptoms and spend more than 2 hours per day at a computer. The workstation evaluation
       should be completed with the individual at the workstation following the ergonomic guidelines below.
         Ergonomic Guidelines
         The following guidelines are intended to help supervisors understand and reduce health risks associated
         with computer workstations. Since no two bodies are identical, different styles, models, and sizes of
         furniture and accessories may be needed. Since a wide variety of products are available to suit individual
         and departmental needs, no specific product recommendations are made here. Consult with Purchasing
         for the latest product information. The best results are usually achieved when the employee is involved
         in the selection process.




172
                                                                     Guidelines
                                  The work surface should be of sufficient area to accommodate the computer
      and all associated materials. There should be adequate space beneath this surface for the operator's legs
      and feet.
      The keyboard and mouse should be directly in front of the operator at a height that favors a neutral
      posture (23 to 28 inches). When placed at standard desk height of 30 inches, they are too high for most
      people. Raising the chair solves this problem for some individuals. An adjustable keyboard holder with
      mouse deck is usually the best solution. The objective is a posture with upper arms relaxed and wrists
      straight in line with the forearm. Wrist rests may also help and are built into most keyboard holders. For
      some people alternative keyboard and mouse designs may need to be considered.
      The monitor should be positioned at a distance of approximately arm's length and directly in front of or
      slightly to one side of the operator. The top of the screen should be no higher than eye level. A monitor
      placed on top of the computer can easily be lowered by relocating the computer. Stackable monitor
      blocks can be used to achieve the desired height. Adjustable monitor arms enable easy height adjustment
      for workstations with multiple users.
      A well designed chair will favorably affect posture, circulation, the amount of effort required to
      maintain good posture, and the amount of strain on the back. An adjustable seat back is best for support
      in the lumbar region. The user should be able to adjust seat height and seat pan angle from a seated




     position. Armrests are optional.
     Additional accessories can improve operator comfort. Document holders can minimize eye, neck and
     shoulder strain by positioning the document close to the monitor. A footrest should be used where the
     feet cannot be placed firmly on the floor. Task lamps will illuminate source documents when room
     lighting is reduced.
     Glare should be eliminated through methods that include reduction of room lighting; shielding windows
     with shades, curtains or blinds; positioning the terminal at a right angle to windows; and tilting the
     monitor to avoid reflection from overhead lighting. Glare screens are not normally necessary.
  V. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
     Department

                    Survey the workplace to identify individuals at risk.
                    Plan ahead for workstation improvement expense in annual budgets.
                    Plan for all work station components before purchasing new or replacement computers.
                    Order needed workstation components from Purchasing.



173
      Supervisor

                      Coach computer operators on work station adjustment and proper posture.
                      Arrange workload to provide for alternative work breaks.
                      Be aware of and watch for signs and symptoms of injury.
                      Refer employees with injury symptoms to the Occupational Safety and Health
                       Department.

      Safety Department

                      Evaluate workstation ergonomics upon request and during scheduled and unscheduled
                       safety and health audits.
                      Provide group training upon request.

      Employee

                      Adjust work station components to maintain a neutral posture.
                      Use accessories as recommended in training and instruction.
                      Report work station and physical problems to supervisor promptly.

 VI. FOR MORE INFORMATION

                      Contact the Safety and Loss Control Manager at 301-600-2546
                      A Computer Workstation Self-Audit Checklist is available through the city common
                       drive: U:\safety\OrgAdmin\Forms.




174
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 21-05
Elective
Prepared by: Daniel J. Patton, Safety and Loss Control Manager
Date Prepared:       9/16/2005
Revision #:          1
Revised Date: 3/5/2009

Title:                Vehicle Operator Policy and Procedures
_____________________________________________________________

Purpose:               To establish standards for prospective and current vehicle operators in an effort to hire
and retain responsible, experienced and safe drivers with the intent of reducing or preventing vehicle accidents
which could result in property damage, injury and/or fatality.

Scope:              All City of Frederick prospective employees and those current employees and volunteers
who have been approved to operate a City of Frederick vehicle.

Application: Employees and Volunteers who operate City owned vehicles are subject to public scrutiny and
are held to a higher degree of professionalism, therefore:

Anyone who operates a vehicle owned by the City of Frederick must have a current and valid license for the
type of vehicle to be operated and have been pre-authorized by his or her Department Head, Director or his/her
designee. Persons with a suspended or revoked license status are not eligible to operate a City vehicle.

Anyone who receives pre-authorization from his/her Department Head, Director or designee shall be considered
a temporary privileged vehicle operator until such time as the employee successfully completes the City of
Frederick’s Driver Training Course.

   See the Periodic Occupational Safety and Health Training Calendar for course dates, times and locations.

1. All prospective and current employees required to operate a motor vehicle for the city of Frederick will
   undergo annual motor vehicle record checks.
2. Violations (gathered from MVRs) are categorized as follows:

   TYPE A VIOLATION: Includes, but is not limited to, DWI/DUI/OWI/OUI, refusing a drug/alcohol test,
     reckless driving, manslaughter, hit & run, eluding a police officer, any felony, drag racing, speeding in
     access of 30+ mph, license suspension, and driving while under license suspension. Any driver with
     these types of violations is a major concern and could be subject to removal of driving privileges and/or
     termination of employment.

   TYPE B VIOLATION: Includes all vehicle accidents that have been determined to be behaviorally related.

   TYPE C VIOLATION: Includes all moving violations not classified as Type A or B (i.e. speeding,
     improper lane change, failure to lead, running red lights or stop signs, etc.)
     Excluded from type C violations are non moving violations to include but not all inclusive, seat belt,
                             registration, insuraqnce card, tail light etc. violations.



175
3. The following disciplinary action may apply:
   Termination of Employment, Refusal to hire, or Reassignment to a non-driving position (if available):
        1 Type A violation in preceding 18 months
        2 Type B violations in preceding 18 months
        3 Type C violations in preceding 18 months
       _ 1 Type B violation and 2 Type C violations in preceding 18 months

   Letter of Notice ......................................................................................................................
       1 Type B violation in the preceding 18 months
       2 Type C violations in the preceding 18 months

Employees who receive either violation(s) as indicated above will receive a letter of notice alerting the
employee to the potential disciplinary action should an additional Type B or C violation be received within the
time frame indicated.

All drivers must regularly inspect, repair, and maintain their City vehicle. All vehicle parts and accessories
must be in a safe and proper working order at all times.

Commercial Vehicle Operators Driver Qualification Files

The City will maintain the appropriate qualification files for each regularly employed commercial licensed
driver (CDL).




176
SECTION 3 GOVERNMENT REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE POLICIES & PROCEDURES
UNDER DEVELOPEMENT




177
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 17
Elective
Prepared By:        Daniel J. Patton
Date: June 28, 2006
Revision#
Revised Date:

Title:                The City of Frederick Prescription Drug Program


Purpose: To reduce the associated risks to employees and the citizenry from the potential adverse effects of
Prescription and Over the Counter Medications.

Background: Prescribed and Over the Counter Medications have the potential to adversely affect an
employee’s physical and/or psychological judgment which may become a significant risk to the employee, the
employee’s co-workers and or the citizenry.

Prescription Drug Use:

Employees covered by this policy may use prescription drugs and “over the counter medication’s provided that:

Prescription Drugs:

1) The prescription drug(s) or their generic equivalents have been prescribed by an authorized medical
practitioner.
2) The prescription drug is being used in accordance with the medical practitioner’s direction, i.e. dosage,
duration, etc. (The employee does not consume prescribed drugs more often than prescribed by the medical
practitioner.)
3.) Any employee who is prescribed medication has a responsibility to consult with his medical practitioner at
the time the prescription is offered by asking the following question:

         Will the medication cause any physical or psychological /judgment impairments which may affect
his/her ability to function in his/her occupation safely?

If the medical practitioner indicates in the affirmative, and it is in his/her best judgment that the employee
should have limitations placed on him/her during the course of taking the medication, the employee shall
request the medical practitioner provide the employee with a “Work Status Report” indicating the potential
impairment and any recommended modified duty adjustments with a date that the modified duty adjustment(s)
will end.
The employee is required to provide the “Work Status Report” to his/her supervisor prior to performing any
work related tasks.

Should a modified duty adjustment be requested by the employee, the city will follow, the Safety and Health
Policy and Procedures, 06-96, Entitled: “Modified Duty Return to Work Program”.




178
Over The Counter Medications:

Employees who are taking “over the counter medications” have a responsibility to review the medications label
to determine if there is a potential for any physical or psychological /judgment impairments caused by the
medication which may effect his/her ability to function in his/her occupation safely.
If the label indicates in the affirmative, the employee must report the potential impairment to his/her supervisor
prior to performing any work related functions.
The City of Frederick reserves the right to modify an employees work tasks, i.e. Non Safety Sensitive work,
and/or to place an employee on leave, sick and/or administrative leave without pay if it is believed that the
medication is causing the employee any physical or psychological/judgment impairments and/or consult with
the employees medical practitioner (with the employee’s permission) or the city’s medical representatives to
determine if an alternate over the counter medication is available.

If shall be the employee’s responsibility to notify his/her supervisor if he/she feels/becomes impaired while
performing his/her assigned duties while on the job..




179
SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY AND PROCEDURES, 16
Elective
Prepared By:   Daniel J. Patton
Date:
Revision#
Revised Date:

Title:         The City of Frederick Violence Prevention Program
                           UNDER DEVELOPMENT




180
      SECTION 4 SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES




181
ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT RESPONSE
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES



All accident/Incidents, near miss, property damage, personal injury and/or illness must be
reported.

I. Near Miss: an incident resulting in neither an injury nor property damage but has the
potential to inflict injury, illness or property damage if not corrected.

Employee shall:
1-Report the incident immediately or within (1) working day of the incident to his/her
Supervisor.
2-Call Safety Department immediately after reporting to his/her supervisor and provide
incident Statement.

Safety Department shall:
1-Complete statement on the City of Frederick “First Report Incident Statement Form”.
2-Read back to employee his/her statement and request employee to acknowledge
accuracy. (No signature required)

II. Personal Injury and or Illness: Take appropriate action to prevent additional
injuries and/or accidents.

a-Emergency:
The welfare of the injured employee is primary; do not economize; use an ambulance if
necessary.

If the injury or illness warrants emergency treatment:

Employee Shall:
1-The injured employee or a co-worker shall contact DPW communications for a FCFRS
response..
NOTE: If a multi-band radio or other means of contacting FCFRS is available and would
provide a quicker response, it should be used while additionally contacting DPW
communications.
2-Within (1) working day of the incident or (1) one working day after being released from
initial medical treatment the employee shall report to the Safety Department to provide a
“First Report Statement” and signature on same.

DPW Communications Shall:
Contact the injured employee’s supervisor, Division Chief/Department Head and the
Safety Department.

Supervisor Shall:
1-Accompany the injured employee to the hospital when possible.
2-Assure the injured employee’s family or friend is notified as indicated on the


182
employee’s “Emergency Notification Form”.

b-Non-emergency but other than minor first aid:

Employee Shall:
1-Report to Corporate Health Solutions, 490-L Prospect Plaza at the supervisor’s
direction.
2-Within (1) working day of the incident employee shall report to the Safety Department
to provide a “First Report Statement” and signature on same

Supervisor Shall:
Notify the Safety Department immediately.

c-Minor first aid:

Employee Shall:
1-Administer or request a co-worker administer minor first aid.
2-Notify their supervisor immediately.
3-Within (1) working day of the incident employee shall report to the Safety Department
to provide a “First Report Statement” and signature on same.

III. Property Damage Accidents:

a-Vehicular accident without personal injury:

Employee Shall:
1-Notify DPW communications.
2-Be courteous, answer police questions, and give identifying information to other parties
involved. Do not assume responsibility.

DPW Communications Shall:
1-Contact City Police Department and ask for police response.
2-Contact employees immediate supervisor.
3-Contact the Safety Department.

b-Vehicular accident with personal injury:

Employee Shall:
1-Follow procedures for “personal injury and illness”.
For all Accident/Incidents The:

Safety Department shall:
1-Complete statement on the City of Frederick “First Report Incident Statement Form”.
2-Read back to employee his/her statement and request employee to acknowledge
accuracy.
3-Have employee acknowledge his/her statement by signature. (Signature not required
for near miss incidents)


183
Supervisor shall:
1-Investigate, complete and signs The City of Frederick Incident Investigation Report
Form. (Blue Form)
NOTE: The report must be complete within (2) working days of the accident incident.
2-Forward the report (Blue Form) his/her Division Chief/Department Head for review
and approval.
3-Assure corrective/preventative actions are taken.

Division Chief/Department Head shall:
1-Review and approve the report (Blue Form) by signature within (4) working days.
2-Forward with any supporting documentation (Police Report, Work Status Report,
Pictures, etc.) to the Safety Department, Chairman of the Safety Committee and their
Department Director.

The Safety Department shall:
1-Review and make comments to the report (Blue Form) upon receipt.
2-When changes are recommended:
  a. The Safety Department will contact the investigator to discuss the changes.
  b. When changes are agreed upon the safety department will acknowledge by initialing
      where changes were made and reference it in safety department comments section.
3-Forward a copy of completed report (Blue Form) to the investigator and the Chairman
of the Safety Committee.
4-File original.
5-Enter appropriate data in OSHA Log (Software) database tracking system.

NOTE: The entire routing process should be completed within (7) working days. If at
any time during the routing process, the report is revised or additional medical, police,
etc. reports are received, copies should be sent to the Safety Department, and the
Chairman of the Management Safety Committee.

Chairman of the Management Safety Committee shall:
Report on all accident/incidents during the monthly Management Safety Committee
Meeting.




184
                                 Employee First Report


      Employee Name:           Department:               Position



      OSHA Log     Date and Time of                  Location of
      #:           Accident/Incident:                Accident/Incident:




       Employee Statement:




      Employee Signature:                                           Date:




185
ARC WELDING
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Hazard Review
Ultraviolet Burns To Eyes and Skin             Fire                    Debris To Eyes and Exposed Skin
Slip, Trip and Fall                            Hot Metal Spatter       Overhead Loads
Cuts and Pinches                               Lifting                 Electrical Shock
1. Do not attempt to use welding equipment until properly trained.
2. Welding machine shall be equipped with a power disconnect switch which is conveniently located at or near
the machine.
3. Protect yourself and others from flying objects. Make sure your own eyes and eyes of others are protected
when chipping slag, etc.
4. Be sure the welding area has a good safe floor. Concrete or masonry is recommended. The floor should not
be wood, plastic tile or carpeted.
5. Keep combustible or flammable materials at a safe distance (at least 35 feet).
6. Do not use gloves or other clothing which contain oil and grease. Do wear appropriate gloves.
7. Always be sure your machine is properly grounded.
8. The polarity switch must never be changed while machine is under load. Wait until the machine is idling and
the circuit is open.
9. Protect others with a screen and yourself with a protective welding helmet. Flying sparks are a danger to your
eyes. Arc rays can also cause painful burns to yourself and onlookers.
10. Keep a fire extinguisher handy at all times.
11. Avoid damp areas and keep the hands and clothing dry at all times. Dampness on the body may cause an
electrical shock.
12. Never strike an arc on a compressed cylinder or tank, even if empty, that has contained combustible
material.
13. Suitable spark shield must be used around welding equipment in flash welding.
14. Keep the uninsulated portion of the electrode holder from touching the welding ground when the current is
on. This will cause a flash.
15. Keep welding cables dry and free from oil and grease and uncoil cable to remove loops and tangles.
16. Weld in open area. If welding is to be done in a confined area, provide an adequate exhaust fan system and
ventilation.
17. Dress properly with flame resistant clothing. Protect all areas of body from arc burns.
18. Be sure all power wiring is correctly installed and maintained. Don't overload the welding cables.
19. Do not operate power tools off generator/welder while it is being used for welding.
20. For additional information consult the following: AWS Specifications & Safe Practice Codes.




186
BACKHOE AND LOADER

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Hazard Review
Slip/Fall from elevation -               Struck Against -          Contact with -
Mounting/Dismounting                     Backing                   Underground/Overhead Lines
   1. Supervisors or their designee shall verify that drivers are capable and qualified on each type of
       equipment before allowing the equipment to be operated unsupervised.
   2. Drivers shall perform a pre-operational check of their equipment. Be familiar with operator's manual.
       Report all needed repairs promptly. Do not use any equipment that is unsafe.
   3. Operators shall wear seat belts and/or shoulder harnesses as provided.
   4. Keep windshield, windshield wipers, side windows and mirrors clean. Make sure that the mirrors
       provide a large as possible view of the rear.
   5. When mounting or dismounting equipment, use steps and handholds provided. Do not jump from
       vehicle.
   6. Plan ahead to minimize or eliminate the need for backing. Always check to the rear before backing and
       use an observer when available. Make sure back-up alarms are working properly.
   7. Choose safest location possible to park equipment. Avoid parking in other equipment's blind spots.
   8. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard.
   9. Be aware of fire extinguisher locations on your equipment and make sure they are properly charged.
   10. Operators should be aware of employees and others on foot in work zones and be sure area is clear of
       personnel before lowering stabilizers or moving the boom.
   11. Do not leave attachments in the raised position when equipment is not in use; always lower to the
       ground.
   12. When in operation, only the operator should be permitted on the machine.
   13. Be sure outriggers are properly set before operating backhoe.
   14. Never allow anyone to work under a raised bucket.
   15. Do not operate backhoe boom within 10 feet of energized overhead power line and beware of other
       overhead utility lines.
   16. Utilize trailer whenever possible to transport backhoe. Use swing and boom locking pins when
       transporting.
   17. Make sure equipment is properly secured prior to transporting.
   18. Before digging, review excavating, trenching and shoring guidelines, i.e. miss utility etc.
   19. When operating on slopes, use caution when swinging bucket in the downhill direction. Dump on the
       uphill side. Keep loader bucket low when moving.
   20. Select loading areas that are as level as possible.
   21. Do not leave equipment unattended with the engine running. Shut off engine and set the parking brake
       when equipment is not in use.
   22. If vehicle is equipped with A.C. engine heater, unplug heater before getting into vehicle.




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CHAIN SAW

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Hazard Review
Flying Objects                             Kickback                  Hidden Objects
Noise                                      Wind                      Poisonous Plants
1. Supervisors or their designee shall verify that operators are capable and qualified to operate a chain saw
before allowing the equipment to be operated unsupervised.
2. Operators shall perform a pre-operational check of equipment. Be familiar with operator's manual. Report all
needed repairs promptly and do not use any equipment that is unsafe.
3. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard. This should include eye
protection, face shield and hearing protection; gloves, chaps and hard hats when felling trees.
4. Do not wear loose jewelry and chains. Snug fitting clothing is recommended.
5. Always use the following precautions when handling fuel and refueling the chain saw:
a. Always store gasoline in an approved container.
b. Do not smoke while handling fuel.
c. Beware of static electricity and sparks between saw and fuel cans (metal and plastic).
d. Always stop the engine to refuel the tank.
e. Avoid spilling fuel or oil. Spilled fuel should always be cleaned up.
f. Do not remove fuel tank cap when engine is running.
g. Move the chain saw at least 10 feet from the fueling point before starting the engine.
h. Keep the handles dry, clean and free from oil or fuel mixtures.
6. Before you start the engine, make sure the chain is not contacting any object.
7. Never start the chain saw until you are at the location where you intend to use the saw.
8. Do not allow other persons to be within 10 feet of the chain saw when starting or cutting.
9. Never start cutting until you have a clear work area and secure footing.
10. Always hold the chain saw firmly with both hands when the engine is running. Use a firm grip with thumb
and fingers encircling the chain saw handles.
11. Keep all parts of body away from the saw chain when the engine is running.
12. Do not cut with the chain saw above your shoulders to guard against kickback and to help prevent back
injuries. Do not contact material with tip of chainsaw.
13. Always shut off the engine before putting down the saw.
14. Operate the chain saw only in well-ventilated areas.
15. When operating chain saw, be aware of the stress of the item being cut. Pinching may result on compression
side and sudden break may result on tension side.
16. During emergencies, look for downed utility lines before cutting with saw.
17. Always plan an escape route before cutting.




188
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE EXAMINATION ROAD TEST

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Hazard Review
Moving Traffic                    Inexperienced Driver                   Communications Barrier
Slip, Trip and Fall               Struck by Vehicle                      Backing Vehicles
Lifting
1. Ensure that employee can comprehend essential basic instructions or commands of the Examiner before
beginning the road test.
2. With engine off, perform pre-operational checks of equipment verifying that parking brake is set and gear
shift is in park position. Always conduct inspection in a safe, low traffic area. Never stand directly in front of or
the rear of the vehicle.
4. When looking under vehicles, crouch with one knee down rather than bending at waist.
5. Always use a 3-point mount and dismout when climbing on or off vehicles.
6. A seat belt is required to be worn by the Examiner in all vehicles. If the seat belt is malfunctioning, broken or
missing, the Examiner shall not conduct a road test in that vehicle.
7. Maintain a calm demeanor and issue simple, crisp instructions throughout the course of the road test.
8. Examiners should observe drivers gear selection and look to the rear while the client is performing backing
maneuvers. Note: Many road test accidents occur while parking or backing in the parking lot.
9. Observe the employee closely and constantly monitor traffic coniditions. Be alert for inattentive drivers.
During the course of the road test, if the examiner determines that the employee is inept/unsafe, the employee
should be instructed to pull to the side of the road and the test should be terminated.
10. If the examiner observes a employee action that could result in a vehicle accident, the Examiner should
immediatly warn the driver to take corrective action.
11. Use proper lifting techniques when moving objects such as cones, boxes or other objects.




189
DUMP TRUCK
 SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

Hazard Review
Struck Against -                  Caught in or between -                  Fall from elevation -
Backing                           Tailgates                               Mounting/Dismounting
Exposure -                        Struck by -
Inclement Weather                 Unsecured Loads
   1. All drivers shall be properly licensed.
   2. Supervisors or their designee shall verify that drivers are capable and qualified on each type of equipment
       before allowing the equipment to be operated unsupervised.
   3. Drivers shall perform a pre-operational check of their equipment. Be familiar with operator's manual.
       Report all needed repairs promptly. Do not use any equipment that is unsafe.
   4. Operators and passengers shall wear seat belts and or shoulder harnesses as provided.
   5. Keep windshield, windshield wipers, side windows and mirrors clean.
   6. When mounting or dismounting equipment, use steps and handholds provided. Do not jump from vehicle.
   7. No personnel shall be allowed to ride anywhere, except in the cab, when the vehicle is in motion, unless
       the vehicle is designed to accommodate an individual outside the cab.
   8. Plan ahead to minimize or eliminate the need for backing. Always check to the rear before backing and
       use an observer when available. Make sure back up alarms are working properly.
   9. Choose safest location possible to park equipment. Avoid parking in other equipment's blind spots.
       Always set parking brake and utilize chocks if appropriate.
   10. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard.
   11. Be aware of fire extinguisher locations on your equipment and make sure they are properly charged.
   12. Operators should be aware of employees and others on foot in work zones.
   13. Be aware of crushing and pinching hazards when installing, adjusting or removing tailgates. Get help or
       use machinery as necessary.
   14. Make sure cargo is properly loaded, secured and covered. Check for loose material on bed rails and
       chassis.
   15. Truck speed should be adjusted for load and weather. Tire chains should be utilized as dictated by
       weather conditions.
   16. Be aware of overhead utility lines when spreading material.
   17. When operating vehicle off of the roadway, be aware of hidden objects in the grass and unstable terrain.
   18. Never work under bed when raised without proper bracing in place.
   19. Make sure tailgate is unlatched prior to raising bed for dumping and avoid dumping on unleveled side hill
       terrain.
   20. If vehicle is equipped with A.C. engine heater, first switch current off and then unplug heater before
       getting into vehicle.
   21. All items in the cab areas of the vehicle should be removed or secured in toolboxes. Because of extreme
       vehicle temperature, items such as aerosol cans or any items whose contents are under pressure should
       not be carried inside the cab area of the vehicle.
   22. Follow all other Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations that are required.




190
GENERAL ELECTRICAL
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES
Electrical Installation/Repairs


Hazard Review
Electrical Shock                                        Overhead Loads                          Confined Space
Slip, Trip and Fall                              Poisonous Plants/Snakes/Insects                        Lifting
Crushing or Pinching Injuries                    Moving Traffic and Equipment


1. Do not attempt to make any electrical repairs unless qualified or properly supervised.
2. Review Safe Operating Procedures for job required.
3. Review plans to determine electrical hazards and ways to protect operators.
4. Locate all utilities in and near the work site.
5. Evaluate site and follow excavation and trenching guidelines.
6. Avoid walking and working under suspended loads.
7. Use proper lifting or pulling techniques. Get help or use equipment if necessary.
8. Be aware of crushing or pinching hazards in jointing pipe and conduit.
9. Rubber boots may be needed in wet ditches.
10. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard.
11. Employees must use extreme caution to stay clear of moving equipment.
12. Establish eye contact with operator before approaching equipment.
13. Use proper tools for the work required.
14. Be aware of loose material, excavation drop-off, tripping hazards, uneven ground and other obstructions.
15. Allow ample work space for each employee.
16. Park in areas that provide safe entrance and exit of work areas.
17. Locate and use all electrical lockout devices and tags properly.
18. Locate all fire extinguisher and first aid kits at each job site.




191
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES
Traffic Signal Installation/Maintenance and Inspection


Hazard Review
Moving Traffic                         Slip, Trip and Fall         Lifting Heavy Objects
Confined Space                         Sun Exposure                Hand-Operated Power Equipment
High Voltage Power Lines


1. Use established safety procedures when working around electrical lines and connections.
2. Perform no modification to lift equipment which may diminish hazard protection.
3. Wear safety harness when in elevated position in bucket truck.
4. Chock wheels and engage braking system before operating aerial lift device.
5. Review Safe Operating Procedures for applicable equipment and perform pre-operational checks.
6. Determine the traffic control needs from the Work Zone Safety Handbook.
7. Park in areas that: provide safe entrance and exit of the work area; do not create potential conflicts with other
vehicles/equipment operating in the work area; and provide maximum protection for workers getting in and out
of the vehicles.
8. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard.
9. Be aware of loose material, excavation drop-off, tripping hazards, uneven ground and other obstructions.
10. Avoid walking and working under suspended loads. Hard hats are required




192
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES
Aerial Device Truck Class Code 0206, 0205, 1809, 1810


Hazard Review
Backing                                 Inclement Weather                               Temperature Extremes
Unsecured Loads                               P.T.O.                                    Mounting/Dismounting
Hydraulic System

   1. All drivers shall be properly licensed.
   2. Supervisors shall verify that drivers are capable and qualified on each type of equipment before allowing
       the equipment to be operated unsupervised.
   3. Drivers shall perform a pre-operational check of their equipment. Be familiar with operator's manual.
       Report all needed repairs promptly. Do not use any equipment that is unsafe.
   4. Operators and passengers shall wear seat belts and/or shoulder harnesses as provided.
   5. Keep windshield, windshield wipers, side windows and mirrors clean.
   6. When mounting or dismounting equipment, use steps and handholds provided. Do not jump from
       vehicle.
   7. No personnel shall be allowed to ride anywhere, except in the cab, when the vehicle is in motion unless
       the vehicle is designed to accommodate an individual outside the cab. However, a traffic control
       technician is allowed to be in the bucket, with the bucket fully down, while the driver moves the vehicle
       from one signal head to another within the same intersection.
   8. Whenever, an individual is elevated in an aerial truck, there should be a second individual on the ground
       who has the ability to render aid and assistance if necessary. The second individual may be someone
       other than a NCDOT employee provided they have been trained in first aid and are instructed on the
       emergency operation of the aerial device.
   9. Plan ahead to minimize or eliminate the need for backing. Always check to the rear before backing and
       use an observer when available. Make sure back-up alarms are working properly.
   10. Choose safest location possible to park equipment. Avoid parking in other equipment's blind spots.
   11. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard. Class B hard hats are
       required when working near overhead electrical lines
   12. Be aware of fire extinguisher locations on your equipment and make sure they are properly charged.
   13. Operators should be aware of employees and others on foot in work zones.
   14. Be aware of crushing and pinching hazards when using boom.
   15. Make sure cargo is properly loaded and secured. Check to make sure boom is secure before traveling.
   16. Truck speed should be adjusted for load and weather. Tire chains should be utilized as dictated by
       weather conditions.
   17. Always engage vehicle parking brakes and use wheel chocks before operating aerial device.
   18. Operator should watch the bucket and boom when beginning boom operation to prevent collision with
       obstructions.
   19. Never exceed the rated load capacity for bucket.
   20. When operating vehicle off the roadway be aware of hidden objects in the grass and unstable terrain.
   21. Wear safety harness and lanyard when in bucket.
   22. Do not leave equipment unattended with the engine running. Shut off engine and set the parking brake
       when equipment is not in use.
   23. If vehicle is equipped with A.C. engine heater, first switch current off and then unplug heater before


193
       getting into vehicle.


HURRICANE (FACILITY SAFETY)
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES
Hurricane (Facility Safety)
Hazard Review
Flying Objects                                                         Flooding                            Rain
Noise                                                                    Wind


Facility Preparation:

Exterior:
   1. Supervisors or their designee shall;
    a. Verify that outdoor hanging items are removed and secured indoors.
    b. Objects that might become airborne and cause damage or injury be secured or brought indoors.
    c. Contact Grounds Maintenance to remove dead, loose and/or broken branches.
    d. Assure vehicles are parked as far away from the facility as possible.

Interior:
    1.               Supervisors or their designee shall;
     a. Be prepared to shut down utilities, such as gas, electric and water if the hurricane is imminent.
     b. Assure that all facility (first floor) offices store items as high as possible off the floor.
     c. Assure that all papers from lower desk drawers and file cabinets are removed placed in a plastic bag
          and secured on top of the file cabinet or desk.
     d. Assure that all office equipment is shut down and disconnected from their power source.
     e. Assure that all office equipment, such as fax machines, computers, etc. located in front of windows, be
          relocated or secured. If secured, plastic should cover the equipment.
     f. Assure that all First Aid kits are fully stocked.
     g. Assure that all portable fire extinguishers are fully charged and ready for operation.
     h. Identify those who are CPR and First Aid trained.
     i. Assure that employees within the facility seek shelter away from windows and doors. Preferably an
          internal room on the lower floor(s).
     j. Assure that each department under their charge be supplied with a flashlight, battery operated radio and
          spare batteries.




194
IN-BODY SALT SPREADER
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES                                                 10/23/2003
In-Body Salt Spreader
Hazard Review
Inclement Weather                                        Flying Objects                      Traffic
Mounting/Dismounting                                     Overloading


1. Supervisors shall verify that operators are capable and qualified on each type of equipment before allowing
the equipment to be operated unsupervised.
2. Operators shall perform a pre-operational check of their equipment. Report all needed repairs promptly. Do
not use any equipment that is unsafe.
3. Make sure lighting is working properly on truck and spreader.
4. When mounting or dismounting equipment, use steps and handholds provided. Do not jump from the vehicle.
5. Keep hands and body away from all moving parts and be aware of pinch points.
6. Never make any repairs or adjustments on the unit while it is in operation.
7. All personnel must keep clear of spread area.
8. Disengage PTO and depressurize all lines before disconnecting.
9. Make sure spreader is properly secured to truck prior to beginning operation.
10. Do not exceed weight limitations.
11. Obtain assistance when installing and removing spreader from truck as needed.
12. Plan ahead to minimize the need for backing. Always check to the rear before backing and use an observer
when available. Make sure back-up alarms are working properly.
13. Spreader shall be calibrated consistent with predetermined application rate.
14. Spreader is to be cleaned and lubricated following each use.
15. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard. Eye protection is required when
calibrating spreader.




195
LADDER
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES
Ladder
Hazard Review
Pinching                                        Slip, Trip and Fall
Electrocution                                   Overexertion


1. Prior to Use: Inspect ladder for:
 a. Cracks, breaks or weak points.
 b. Make sure all steps and rungs are in place, intact, free from grease or oil, have slip resistant surfaces, and
     are firmly attached.
 c. Inspect rope for wear or frays.
 d. Safety feet are in place.
 e. Load rating.
 f. Tag “Out of Service” Replace if found defective. NOTE: Tag out of service with durable tag indicating
     the defect and the words “Do Not Use, Defective or write legibly Out of Service-Defective-Do Not Use
     with a permanent marker. Report the defective ladder to your immediate supervisor. Supervisors or their
     designee shall remove the ladder from service until repaired or replaced.
 2. To use a ladder: Safe usage:
 a. Do not use metal or conductive ladders near energized lines or equipment.
 b. Only one person on a ladder at a time.
 c. Wear shoes with clean, non-skid soles-NO LEATHER
 d. Always face the ladder when ascending or descending.
 e. Carry tools up or down on a belt or with a rope or hoist, NOT IN YOUR HANDS!
 f. Whenever possible, work with one hand on the ladder.
 g. Never step on the top two steps of a stepladder or the top four rungs of a straight ladder.
 h. Keep your body centered on the ladder so that the lower center portion of your torso is always between the
     side rails.
 i. Never move a ladder while you’re on it!
 j. Keep your movements on a ladder slow and cautious.
 k. When possible, have two people carry a ladder. When carrying a ladder alone, balance the center on your
     shoulder, Position it so the front end is above your head and the back end near the ground.
 l. When climbing, use rungs for handholds rather than side rails.

IMORTANT: When utilizing a portable straight or extension ladder to access a landing, such as a flat or pitch
roof, or when utilizing a ladder in or around a congested area, example: construction vehicles or other
operations are going on around the ladder, the ladder shall be secured at the top and bottom and warning
devices, such as cones must be placed to alert personnel to the ladder in use.

3. Setup

CAUTION: survey area of ladder use BEFORE using ladders to identify any hazards, such as, overhead power
                       lines, or any other hazard that may prevent the safe use of ladder.
a. Use help in setting up ladder, if possible.
b. Set base of ladder on firm, level surface. Use wide thick (3/4” minimum) boards under it if on soft ground.


196
c. Set the feet so they’re parallel with the surface the ladder rests against.
d. Position and secure the base section before raising ladder to upright position.
 NOTE: Position the ladder so that the distance from the ladders base to the wall is one-fourth the length of the
                                                  ladder extended.
e. Walk ladder up to vertical position using hand over rung method. Do not raise or lower with fly section
      extended.
f. Extend the ladder so there’s at least 3 feet above the top support/landing.
g. Engage rung locks.
h. Make sure rope does not create a tripping hazard or interfere with activity near ladder.
i. Gently lower ladder extended to rest on wall/support landing.
j. Don’t anchor the ladder on a window or window sash or place in front of a door unless it is blocked or
   locked.
k. Extend and retract fly section only from ground and when no one is on ladder. Do not overextend.
l. Step-ladder-make sure the spreader is completed extended and never use a stepladder as a straight ladder.




197
      MERCURY SPILL CLEANUP (SMALL)
      SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES
      SMALL Mercury Spill Cleanup and Post Exposure Procedures
      Hazard Review: Toxic
      Mercury (Hg) is defined as a hazardous material by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and
      the Maryland Department of the Environment, mercury is a toxic substance that can result in severe
      health effects. Therefore, all mercury "spills," including droplets of mercury from a broken
      laboratory thermometer; needs to be cleaned up following safe and environmentally sound
      procedures.

      Important: Liquid mercury evaporates at room temperature and gives off harmful, invisible and
      odorless vapors. Mercury is a fast moving liquid and spreads quickly, so promptly containing and
      controlling both the liquid and vapors are very important.



      1. Get people out of the spill area immediately. Keep uninvolved people and pets away until the
      spill is completely cleaned up.

      2. Contact the Department of Occupational Safety and Health Immediately.

      3. Donn the appropriate personal protective equipment. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
      MUST be worn when responding to a small spill mercury cleanup.

      4. Try to reduce area temperature to below 70 degrees F to minimize mercury evaporation. Close all
      heating/air-conditioning vents in the incident room/area until the cleanup is completed.

      5. Close the inside door to the incident/area. If weather allows, open exterior doors and windows.

      6. Blow fresh air into the environment to dilute the mercury’s vapors.

      7. If you or any other person comes in contact with the mercury, stay in the area so you do not spread
      contamination.

      8. Dike the spill area using rags or other disposable items to prevent spreading. NOTE: Spreading
      sand, or sawdust in a circle around the spill to stop the mercury from spreading is the preferred
      method.

      9. Add an “amalgamating” powder, if available to the spill to make the mercury solid and reduce
      evaporation. Mercury spill kits containing amalgamating powder can be procured through local
      safety and health vendors.
      Small spills are those involving less than a dime-sized puddle of mercury metal. These small spills
      can be scooped up using a small, disposable dustpan, (index cards, playing cards or other rigid
      sources can be used in lieu of a dustpan). Additionally, using an eyedropper or turkey baster to suck
      up the puddle is acceptable.



198
      Pick-up procedures: Work from the outside of the spill area to the center of the spill area. Push the
      mercury beads together with a card, stiff paper to form larger droplets. Push the beads into a plastic
      disposable dustpan or use the eye-dropper/baster to suck up the mercury.

      10. Place the mercury into a vapor proof, sturdy unbreakable container. (Plastic jars or other thick-
      walled plastic bottles work well.
      NOTE: Anything that touched or held the liquid mercury, including anything used to clean up the
      mercury, should also be considered contaminated and must be disposed of as mercury waste.

      11. Inspect your shoes and clothing for mercury.

      12. Place the mercury container and any other contaminated items in a Hazardous Waste bag.

      13.Wash hands with plenty of soap and water if other parts of your body are contaminated, shower
      or bath as soon as possible.

      14. Dispose of the contaminated material as appropriate. (Regulated Hazardous Waste Disposal Co.)

      15.Continue to air out the spill area for 48 hours.

      16.All employees exposed to the mercury must complete an Incident Statement immediately or
      within 24 hours of the exposure/incident. Contact the Office of Occupational Safety and Health at
      ext. 21992.

      LARGE SPILLS: Mercury Spills larger than a dime-sized puddle must be handled hazardous
      material clean up professional.

      NOTES:

            NEVER use an ordinary vacuum or shop vacuum to clean up mercury. Vacuuming mercury
             will blow vapors into the area, thereby increasing the likelihood of human exposure, but will
             also contaminate the vacuum cleaner.
            NEVER use a broom or a paintbrush to clean up mercury. It will break the mercury into
             smaller beads and further scatter the mercury.
            NEVER allow people whose shoes or clothing may be contaminated with mercury to walk
             around the facility.
            NEVER put mercury in the trash.
            NEVER put mercury in a burn barrel.
            NEVER pour or allow mercury to go down the drain.
            ALWAYS get an experienced professional to clean up large spills!




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SNOW PLOW OPERATION
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES                                                   10/23/2003
Snow Plow
Hazard Review
Stationary Objects                           Lifting                                         Traffic
Pinching/Crushing                            Inclement Weather                               Hooking/Unhooking


1. Operators shall perform a pre-operational check of their equipment. Report all needed repairs promptly. Do
not use any equipment that is unsafe.
2. Supervisors shall verify that operators are capable and qualified on each type of equipment before allowing
the equipment to be operated unsupervised.
(Road trip evaluation)
3. Inspect plows and components prior to use as follows and repair or replace any items found to be deficient:
a. Check plow, plow frame and shear flange for cracks, broken welds or loose bolts.
b. Check shear flange and pins for proper bolt grade, size, tightness and condition.
c. Check safety chains and blade for wear and condition.
d. Check for leaky or damaged hydraulic lines, fittings or cylinders.
e. Check lube points and lube as needed.
f. Check all controls to ensure smooth and correct operation.
4. Be aware of pinch points when installing or removing plows. Keep your hands away. Do not lift with your
back. Get help and use lifting equipment as needed.
5. Always use safety chains or protective blocking when changing blades or performing other work on plows;
never trust the hydraulic system!
6. Adjust your plowing speed to the conditions, i.e. traffic volumes, pedestrians, highway conditions, material to
be plowed, terrain and visibility. Always plow under the posted speed limit.
7. While plowing, watch for bridge joints, water meters, manholes, railroad tracks, etc.
8. Check the condition of the plow periodically during use using the guidelines provided in number 3a, 3c and
3d above.
9. The use of markers on ends of plow is recommended for visual contact by driver.
10. Prior to plow operations the operator shall perform a pre-route practical review.
NOTE: It is recommended to mark hazards on route maps during the pre-route practical review..




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TAILGATE SPREADER
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES                                                 10/23/2003
Tailgate Spreader
Hazard Review
Backing                                           Traffic          Pinching/Crushing
Hooking/Unhooking


1. Supervisors shall verify that drivers are capable and qualified on equipment before allowing the equipment to
be operated unsupervised.
2. Operators shall perform a pre-operational check of their equipment. Report needed repairs promptly. Do not
use any equipment that is unsafe. Make sure lights are working properly on truck and spreader.
3. Plan ahead to minimize or eliminate the need for backing. Always check to the rear before backing and use
an observer if available. Make sure back-up alarms are working properly.
4. Be aware of crushing or pinching hazards when installing, adjusting or removing spreader. Get help or use
machinery if necessary.
5. Make sure spreader is securely attached prior to beginning operation.
6. Spreader shall be calibrated to be consistent with pre-determined application rates.
7. Spreader is to be cleaned and lubricated after each use.
8. When mounting or dismounting equipment, use steps and handholds provided. Do not jump from the vehicle.
9. Disengage PTO and depressurize all lines before disconnecting.
10. All personnel must keep clear of spread area.
11. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard. Eye protection is required when
calibrating spreader.
12. Prior to salt spreading operations the operator shall perform a pre-route practical review.




201
EXCAVATION, TRENCHING AND SHORING

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Hazard Review
Cave-In                                       Utilities                  Surface Encumbrances
Hazardous Atmosphere                          Slip, Trip, Fall           Falling Loads
Water Accumulation
1. No excavation work shall be started prior to Miss Utility (1-800-257-7777) being notified and confirmation
has been made that all utilities in the area have been properly located and marked in accordance with Miss
Utility laws.
2. Any excavation greater than 4 feet deep must:
a. be provided with an adequate exit (steps or ladder) every 25 feet if employees are expected to enter
b. be tested for hazardous gases or oxygen deficiency if such conditions are likely to exist.
3. Any excavation greater than 5 feet deep must:
a. meet the conditions in item 2, above
b. have an adequate means of protection
c. be inspected prior to and during the work shift by a "competent person."
4. The "competent person" must be on site at all times that employees are in the excavation and shall have the
authority to stop work if hazardous conditions are detected.
5. Only persons receiving special training may be qualified as "competent persons."
6. Employees shall not work under loads being handled by excavating or lifting equipment.
7. If employees enter the excavation, both the removed soil and other work material shall be stored at least two
feet from the edge.
8. An employee shall not enter an excavation prior to it being protected from cave-ins by an adequate protective
system, or sloping and/or shoring of the walls, as determined by the competent person.
9.Personal protective equipment such as safety vests, safety shoes, hard hats and safety glasses must be worn as
appropriate for the work area.
10 If a trench box, shoring or other protective system will be used, engineering data, information on the
installation, use, placement and removal of the equipment utilized, must be kept on site.




202
  FORK LIFT & HEAVY EQUIPMENT SAFETY

  Hazards
  Struck By/Against -                       Contact with -              Exposure -
  Traffic                                   Uneven Terrain              Inclement Weather
  Caught in or between -                    Exposure -                  Struck By/Against -
  Rollover                                  Noise                       Flying Objects
          The following are the minimum safety practices for the operation of forklifts and heavy equipment
          (cranes, bulldozers, backhoes, etc.): Refer to the appropriate Safe Operating Procedure (SOP) or
          the manufacturers recommendations for specifics.
           a. Only trained and authorized operators are permitted to operate a forklift or heavy equipment.
               Every operator must have successfully completed training in forklift or heavy equipment
               operations.
           b. Prior to operating the forklift or equipment, the operator must test: the brakes, steering
               controls, warning light, clutch, horn, fluid levels, and other devices for safe and proper
               operation.
           c. Never check the engine while it is running.
           d. Document your inspection results and equipment defects using the attached Inspection Report
               Form. Report defects to a mechanic shop supervisor. immediately. No defective equipment
               shall be used. Authorized personnel should make adjustments and repairs only.
           e. Wash the equipment whenever necessary. The equipment must be kept clean and free of oil
               and grease.
           f. Employees should operate the equipment/forklift within a safe speed and within rated load
               capacity. Drive to the right. Do not exceed 10 miles per hour, or posted authorized speeds.
           g. Passengers are not permitted on forklifts or heavy equipment.
           h. Mobile equipment should never be left unattended without first shutting off power,
               neutralizing controls, setting brakes, and lowering forks or bucket. Do not park on an incline.
           i. All mobile equipment must have a functional fire extinguisher on board.
           j. Sound horn at exits, corners, cross aisles, intersections, and when approaching pedestrians.
               Do not use horn needlessly or for an undue length of time.
           k. Always look in the direction equipment is traveling, looking backward when backing up, even
               for a short distance. Keep a clear view of the path. When forward vision is obstructed, drive
               in reverse.
           l. When traveling, with or without a load, keep forks or bucket as low as possible.
           m. Avoid following pedestrians or other vehicles too closely, especially when operating on
               inclines or in noisy areas.
           n. Proceed up and down all ramps and inclines slowly. Wait for passengers to exit the ramp
               before attempting to proceed up or down. When going down a ramp or incline always use
               low gear and the slowest speed control. Do not go down ramps or inclines with the load at
               the front of the forklift. Never travel up a ramp or incline in reverse. When traveling up a
               ramp or incline loaded forklifts should be driven with the load upgrade.
           o. An approved personnel cage must be used when elevating personnel with a forklift. Attach the
               cage prior to use. Do not travel with passengers in the cage.
           p. Personal protective equipment should be used as instructed. Hard hats should be worn where
               danger of falling objects exist.
           q. If the forklift is equipped with a seatbelt, the belt must be worn at all times.




203
  Forklift Inspection Check List
  Distribution:  Copy to Mechanic Shop Supervisor  Employee Department Copy
  Date:                    Inspector:_            ____        Title:______________
  Grade: 1 = Satisfactory, 2 = Needs some attention, 3 = Needs immediate action
   Item                                                           Grade     Comments
   Operator Training
   Personnel operating the forklift properly trained.
   Condition of Forklift
   Brakes
   Steering controls
   Warning lights
   Horn
   Clutch (if applicable)
   Engine
   Overhead guard
   Capacity Sign posted
   Fire Prevention
   Fire extinguisher on board & functional
   Fluids
   Levels Adequate
   Fueling done to avoid spilling
   If spillage occurs, is fuel washed away completely from
   forklift and area and measures taken to control vapors
   before restarting engine? NOTE: Do not wash fuel into
   storm or sanitary drains.
   Personal Protective Equipment
   Hard hats provided & worn where danger of falling
   objects exist
   General PPE rules on proper clothing & footwear followed
   Additional OSHA Requirements
   Are driving paths marked, in good condition, and clear?
   Repairs are conducted in designated areas
   Operating rules posted & enforced
   Batteries charged in properly vented rooms (no smoking)
   Are dust & fume exposures generated by the forklift
   through operation, fueling, or repair controlled?
   Seatbelt in forklift and worn while operating the forklift
   Other:
  Action Taken:
  Inspector:
       Reported deficiency to Mechanic Shop Supervisor
  Mechanic Shop:
       Repairs/Corrections must be completed by: (Date)_________________
       Repairs/Corrections mentioned above have been completed on.________________________
  Mechanic Shop Supervisor                                             Date:


204
GAS PUMP

Safe Operating Procedure – January 5, 2007

Hazard Review


Exposure to vapors               Contact with - Struck By - Flying Objects
and fire/explosion               Vapors and fire
Procedure for Refueling – Trucks, Mobile Equipment and Portable Containers

STEPS:

1. Park vehicle parallel to the fuel pump. Position the vehicle to have its fuel tank opposite the
pump.
2. Apply parking/maxi brakes.
3. If operating a gas engine, always shut engine off before starting the fuel pump.
4. Never smoke, light matches or use lighters while refueling.
5. When using the card lock system, follow the instruction on the screen.
6. Make sure the pump meter is returned to zero before pumping.
7. Place the nozzle of the hose in the fuel tank of the vehicle, start the pump, fill the tank by
depressing the lever on the nozzle. Do not overfill the tank, or use any device to hold the
nozzle open while fueling.
7. When the fuel tank is filled, shut off the pump and place the nozzle back on the mount. (DO NOT
OVERFILL)
8. Any spills are to be contained immediately. Use oil dry on any small spills. Absorbent pads
are to be used on larger spills. All spills are to be reported to purchasing.
10. Fuel spilled on hands or exposed skin shall be flushed/washed off A.S.A.P.

CAUTION:

Do not get back into your vehicle during refueling -- even when using the nozzle's automatic hold-open
latch. If you must reenter your vehicle, discharge the static electricity buildup when you get out by
touching the outside metal portion of your vehicle, away from the filling point, before attempting to
remove the nozzle.
Use only the hold-open latch provided on the gasoline pump. Never jam or force the hold-open latch open
by using some other object such as the gas cap.
When dispensing gasoline into a portable gasoline can, use only an approved container. Always place the
container on the ground and keep the pump nozzle in contact with the container when refueling to avoid a
static electricity ignition of fuel vapors. Containers should never be filled inside a vehicle, in the trunk, on
the bed of a pickup truck, a flat bed or on the floor of a trailer.




205
HAND REMOVAL OF VEGETATION

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Hazard Review
Chain Saws                             Sharp Edged Tools            Poisonous Plants/Snakes/Insects
Thorns                                 Unwieldy Brush               Slip, Trip and Fall
Overcrowding of Workers                Moving Equipment             Utility Lines
Animals

1. Review Safe Operating Procedures for applicable equipment and perform pre-operational checks.
2. Determine the traffic control needs from the Work Zone Safety Handbook.
3. Park in areas that: provide safe entrance and exit of the work area; do not create potential conflicts with other
vehicles and equipment operating in the work area; and provide maximum protection for workers getting in and
out of the vehicles.
4. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard. Hearing eye, face, foot and leg
protection are required when using chain saws or chippers.
5. Cut and stack brush in manageable pieces that are easily handled to avoid back injuries.
6. Utilize appropriate mechanical means when moving large quantities of brush.
7. Be aware of poisonous plants, insects, snakes, animals, and animal waste products and carcasses. It is a good
practice to wear long sleeve shirts, gloves and high-top boots when hazards cannot be avoided.
8. Allow ample space for each employee to work safely. Don't bunch up.
9. Employees on foot must use extreme caution to stay clear of operating equipment. Always establish eye
contact with operator before approaching equipment.
10. Chain saw and chipper operators must be trained and qualified.
11. Use caution when handling tools with sharp edges. Gloves are required when sharpening tools.
12. Be aware of loose material, excavation drop-off, tripping hazards, uneven ground and other obstructions.
13. Do not cut limbs that may contact overhead utility lines. Observe and stay clear of overhead utilities.
14. Tree-trimming, which would require climbing, shall only be performed by a specialist or with the assistance
of a bucket truck.
15. Use extreme care when cutting trees, brush, etc. that are under stress, e.g., ice conditions.




206
LIFTING PRACTICES

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

Hazard Review
Overexertion
Strain, Sprain




Lifting
1. Before lifting the load, think of alternate means of moving it (push, pull, roll, pour or pump, two man lift
etc.).
2. Have firm footing and make sure the standing surface is not slippery.
3. Determine the best way to hold the load using any handles, gripping areas or special lifting tools. Get a firm
grip on the load.
4. Keep your back straight by tucking your chin in.
5. Tighten your stomach muscles and lift with your legs.
6. Lift the load slowly. DO NOT JERK!
7. Hold the load as close to the body as possible. Be sure you position the load close to the body before lifting.
8. Do not twist during your lift or when moving the load. Turn with your feet, not with your back.
9. Set the load down gently. Use your legs and keep your back as straight as possible. Do not toss, sling the
load.
10. Be sure your fingers are out of the way when putting the load down and when moving the load through tight
spaces.
11. Don't try to be a superman. Ask for help if you need it and use mechanical means wherever it's available.




207
      JUMP STARTING

      SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


      Hazard Review
      Fire                             Moving Traffic                    Corrosive Acid
      Electrical Shock                 Eye Injury                        Parking
      Toxic Materials                  Explosive Gases                   Slip, Trip and Fall
      1. Improper procedures or techniques may result in personal injury and/or damage to the electrical
      system or computer components.
      2. Employee MUST COMPLETE BATTERY TRAINING before jump-starting equipment.
      3. Is the vehicle in a safe location to be jump-started?
      4. If the battery is distorted/deformed, cracked, leaking, or missing a vent cap, DO NOT jump-start,
      call maintenance for assistance.
      5. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard. Eye (Goggles) and hand
      protection is required.
      6. When working at night, have adequate lighting available.
      7. Avoid leaning over the battery whenever possible.
      8. Do not expose the battery to open flames or sparks (NO SMOKING).
      9. Be sure any batteries that have filler caps are properly filled with fluid.
      10. Do not allow battery acid to contact eyes or skin. NOTE: When acid buildup is noticed, a
      thorough cleaning of the terminal connections should be completed whenever possible.
      11. Both discharged and charged batteries must be of the same voltage.
      12. Do not stand between vehicles.
      NOTE: On extremely cold days when you find your battery is discharged, DO NOT jump-start!
      Contact vehicle maintenance. Warning: A frozen discharged battery can create the charged jumper
      battery to explode.
      13. Use proper procedure in accordance with the operator's manual. If no special instructions apply,
      proceed as follows for negative grounded batteries:
      Make the jumper connections:
       * Connect one end of the red jumper cable to the positive (+) terminal of the booster battery and the
      opposite end to the positive (+) terminal of the discharged battery
       * Connect one end of the black jumper cable to the negative (-) terminal of the booster
      battery and the opposite end to an engine bolt head or good metal contact on the vehicle
      to be started, not to the negative battery terminal of the discharged battery
       Check the cables to make sure they will not be in the way of moving parts when the vehicle is started
       * Start the engine of the vehicle with the good battery and run it at a moderate speed
       * Start the engine of the vehicle with the discharged battery
       * Remove all cables in reverse sequence. Begin by removing the cable from the engine of the vehicle
      that had the discharged battery.
      14. Keep hands and equipment from all moving parts, belts, machinery, etc.
      15. Once a vehicle is jump started, that vehicle must be returned as soon as is practical to the mechanic
      shop for battery evaluation and maintenance.




208
MOWER TRACTOR

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Hazards
Struck By/Against -                        Contact with -                Exposure -
Traffic                                    Uneven Terrain                Inclement Weather
Caught in or between -                     Exposure -                    Struck By/Against -
Rollover                                   Noise                         Flying Objects

   1. Operators shall perform a pre-operational check of their equipment. Be familiar with the operator's
       manual. Report needed repairs promptly. Do not use any equipment that is unsafe.
   2. Supervisors or their designee shall verify that operators are capable and qualified on each type of
       equipment before allowing the equipment to be operated unsupervised.
   3. Watch traffic when driving around guide markers, signs, culverts, etc. or anytime machine encroaches
       on travel lane.
   4. Don't mow too close to fences and be alert for utility pole guy wire, concrete right of way markers, etc.
   5. Use caution when mowing on steep slopes. Watch for hidden holes or washouts and reduce speed and
       follow all manufacturers recommendations.
   6. Use caution when mowing downhill on wet or green grass, as brakes are less effective.
   7. Shut off tractor when performing equipment repair activities.
   8. Keep area clear of personnel on foot.
   9. Do not dismount unless motor is off, blades have stopped and brake is set.
   10. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard, i.e. eye and foot protection,
       etc..
   11. Keep mower adjusted to proper height above ground to prevent throwing debris.
   12. Do not run side mount flail in the up position.
   13. Replace missing flail knives to maintain balance.
   14. Ensure debris guard is in place and in good condition.
   15. Use caution not to place equipment in locations where it is subject to getting stuck.
   16. Never attempt to start or operate the machine except from the operator's station.
   17. Operators shall wear seat belts and/or shoulder harnesses as provided.
   18. Stay clear of all moving parts, cables, shafts, belts, flywheels, etc.
   19. Check frame for cracks and loose bolts.




209
   OUTDOOR SAFETY

SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES


Heat Index SOP

Hazard Review

Ultraviolet Rays
Heat

Heat Index Protocol:

On average, about 175 Americans succumb to the taxing demands of heat every year. Our bodies dissipate heat by
varying the rate and depth of blood circulation, by losing water through the skin and sweat glands, and as a last resort,
by panting, when blood is heated above 98.6°F. Sweating cools the body through evaporation. However, high relative
humidity retards evaporation, robbing the body of its ability to cool itself.
When heat gain exceeds the level the body can remove, body temperature begins to rise, and heat related illnesses and
disorders may develop.
The Heat Index (HI) is the temperature the body feels when heat and humidity are combined. The chart below shows
the HI that corresponds to the actual air temperature and relative humidity. (This chart is based upon shady, light wind
conditions. Exposure to direct sunlight can increase the HI by up to 15°F.)
(Due to the nature of the heat index calculation, the values in the tables below have an error +/- 1.3F.)

Note:
        The Safety Department will announce the expected Heat Index Classification in advance whenever possible.
         Supervisors and employees are to take the proper “Action Steps for Prevention” as indicated within each
         classification.
        Elderly employees, those on certain medications or drugs and persons with weight and alcohol problems are
         particularly susceptible to heat reactions.
        Light meals are better than fatty foods as they are easier on the digestive system.
        Employees must remember that a lack of sleep, obesity, alcohol use and similar factors can increase the risk of
         heat related illnesses.
        Employees should not take salt tablets but should get extra salt through their normal meals.
        Frequent, short breaks in the shade are better than infrequent, long ones.




Possible Heat Disorder (Concern) and Steps for Prevention on next page




   210
                               Concern:    Fatigue possible with prolonged exposure and physical activity.

                               Action Steps for Prevention:

                               Supervisors:
                                   Ensure employees are wearing the proper clothing, such as, city issued uniform, to
                                       include proper footwear, sweatbands and city issued sunglasses if appropriate.
CLASS I     80°F - 90°F
                                   Provide/authorize additional cool down breaks if needed.
                               Employees:
                                   Begin drinking fluids before you feel thirsty, preferably 2 cups of water before
                                       beginning work then 2-4 additional cups each hour during work.
                                   Don't get too much sun. Sunburn makes the job of heat dissipation that much more
                                       difficult. Employees should wear sun protection on exposed parts of their body.

                               Concern:     Sunstroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion possible.

                               Action Steps for Prevention In Addition to the above.

                               Supervisors:
                                   Supervisors must allow employees who have not been working in a hot environment
                                       to adjust to the heat before expecting full productivity.
                                       Limit employee prolong exposure whenever possible. Limit work in direct sunlight
CLASS II    90°F - 105°F               when feasible.
                                   Supervisors should schedule heaviest and or any hot work during the cooler morning
                                       hours whenever possible.
                                   Provide/authorize additional cool down breaks and fluids.
                                   When possible, supervisors should consider an earlier schedule to reduce risk.
                               Employees:
                                   Drink additional fluids.
                                   Beware of signs for heat related illness.

                               Concern:     Sunstroke, heat cramps, and heat exhaustion likely, and heat stroke
                               possible.

                               Action Steps for Prevention

                               Supervisors:
                                   Limit employees prolong exposure.
CLASS III   105°F - 130°F
                                   Limit work in direct sunlight when feasible.
                                   Change employee schedule to, as early as possible.
                                   Limit or avoid assigning stenuous work when possible.
                               Employees:
                                   Drink additional fluids.
                                   Beware of signs for heat related illness.

                               Concern:     Heat stroke highly likely with continued exposure.

                               Action Steps for Prevention:
                               Supervisors:
                                    Change employees schedule to the earliest time of the day, such as 5:00 or 6;00
                                       A.M. until.
                                    Remove employees from direct prolonged exposure and avoid working in direct
                                       sunlight.
CLASS IV    130°F or greater
                                    No stenuouse activity should be performed.
                                    Provide employees with indoor work whenever possible.
                                    Provide employees with mechanical ventilation.
                                    Follow the SOP above while providing additional cool down breaks and fluids.
                               Employees:
                                    Drink additional fluids.
                                    Beware of signs for heat related illness.




   211
                                  Temperature (F) versus Relative Humidity (%)

°F              90%         80%              70%                60%              50%         40%


80                    85           84                82                 81             80          79


85                    101          96                92                 90             86          84


90                    121          113              105                 99             94          90


95                                 133              122                113             105         98


100                                                 142                129             118         109


105                                                                    148             133         121


110                                                                                                135




Heat Disorder Symptoms and Treatment on next page.




     212
                                       HEAT DISORDER SYMPTOMS

 CONDITION SYMPTOM                                               TREATMENT
                                                                 Ointment for mild cases if blisters appear. If
                  Redness and pain. In severe cases, swelling of breaking occurs, apply dry sterile dressing.
 Sunburn
                  skin, blisters, fever, headaches               Serious, extensive cases should be
                                                                 seen by a physician.
                                                                Firm pressure on cramping muscles, or gentle
 Heat             Painful spasms usually in muscles of legs and
                                                                massage to relieve spasm. Give sips of water.
 Cramps           abdomen possible. Heavy sweating.
                                                                If nausea occurs, discontinue use.
                                                                   Get victim out of sun. Lay down and loosen
                  Heavy sweating, weakness, skin cold, pale        clothing. Apply cool wet cloths. Fan or move
 Heat
                  and clammy. Pulse thready. Normal                victim to air conditioned room. Sips of water.
 Exhaustion
                  temperature possible. Fainting and vomiting.     If nausea occurs, discontinue use. If vomiting
                                                                   continues, seek immediate medical attention.
                  High body temperature (106°F, or higher).        Move the victim to a cooler environment.
                  Hot dry skin. Rapid and strong pulse. Possible   Reduce body temperature with cold bath or
 Heat
                  unconsciousness. Heat stroke is a severe         sponging. Use extreme caution. Remove
 Stroke
                  medical emergency. Summon medical                clothing, use fans and air conditioners. If
 (or sunstroke)
                  assistance or get the victim to a hospital       temperature rises again, repeat process. Do
                  immediately. Delay can be fatal.                 not give fluids.




213
      Cold Weather Safety
      1. Whenever possible, schedule coldest part of work for the warmest part of the day.
      2. Reorganize work procedures to minimize sitting still or standing for long periods of
      time.
      3. All employees who have not been working in the cold environment must adjust to the
      cold before expecting to be fully productive (5-7 days).
      4. Be sure to drink plenty of warm, sweet, caffeine-free, non-alcoholic drinks or soup.
      5. Take regular rest breaks.
      6. Wear the proper clothing in layers. Cotton, polypropylene or lightweight wool should
      be next to the skin. Outer garments should be of waterproof, wind resistant material like
      nylon.
      7. A good example of layering would be a wool shirt or sweater over a cotton one and
      then an outer nylon jacket.
      8. Employees should be sure to wear a hat or other head covering as up to 40% of heat
      loss can occur when the head is exposed.
      9. Wear waterproof boots with two pairs of socks. The inner pair should be cotton and the
      outer pair wool.
      10. Employees should wear gloves for light to moderate work anytime the air temperature
      falls below 40 degrees F.
      11. Keep as dry as possible and have extra clothing readily available to change into if you
      do get wet.
      12. Remember! The frequency of accidents is higher in cold weather. Make allowances
      for your slowed reflexes and numbed hands when doing your job.




214
Sun Exposure
Information for both on and off the job.

1. By far, the most common cause of skin cancer is overexposure to the sun. Ninety percent of all skin cancers
occur on parts of the body that usually are not covered by clothing.
2. People who sunburn easily and have fair skin with red or blond hair are most prone to develop skin cancer.
The amount of time spent in the sun also affects a person's risk of skin cancer.
3. To prevent skin cancer:
    a. Cover up with a wide-brimmed hat and a bandanna for your neck. Wear long-sleeved shirts and pants,
        which the sun cannot penetrate.
        b. Use sunscreens to help prevent skin cancer as well as premature aging of your skin. Use a Sun
        Protective Factor (SPF) rating of 15 or higher. Women may receive added protection by using tinted
        opaque cosmetic foundation along with a sunscreen. Apply sunscreen at least an hour before going into
        the sun and again after swimming or perspiring a lot. Do not use indoor sunlamps, tanning parlors, or
        tanning pills.
        c. You can still get burned on a cloudy day. Try to stay out of the direct sun at midday, because sunrays
        are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Beware of high altitudes - where there is less atmosphere to
        filter out the ultraviolet rays.

   4. Know your skin. Whatever your skin type, do a monthly self-examination of your skin to note any moles,
   blemishes or birthmarks. Check them once a month and if you notice any changes in size, shape or color, or
   if a sore does not heal, see your physician without delay.




215
Flagging Traffic
1. Always set up flagging stations so that they are highly visible to traffic with good approach sight distance.
2. NEVER stand in a lane that is open to traffic.
3. Signs and paddles should be clean and readable. Always remove signs when flagging operations are not in
progress.
4. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment including a safety vest.
5. Be aware of escape routes in case of emergency and always face oncoming traffic.
6. Give clear and concise messages to drivers and coordinate with other flaggers.
(Note: Flaggers should communicate through the use of portable radios when possible).
7. Flaggers should be trained and certified in flagging techniques prior to beginning a flagging operation.
8. Be aware of moving equipment in the work zone. Always establish eye contact with the operator before
approaching equipment.




216
Working Near Overhead High-Voltage Lines
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES



Hazard Review
Electrocution             Fire                                                Moving Equipment
Burns                     Electrical Arc Explosions                           Moving Traffic

1. Prior to beginning job, examine the worksite to determine if there are any overhead high-voltage lines (600
volts or higher) at the worksite. If it is necessary to perform work within six feet (or ten feet for equipment) of
overhead high-voltage lines (600 volts or higher), the site supervisor/crew leader shall immediately contact the
SL&TC department.
NOTE: Work shall not begin until authorized by the SL&TC department supervisor or a qualified
representative.

2. If it is necessary to perform work within six feet (or ten feet for equipment) of overhead high-voltage lines
(600 volts or higher), the SL&TC department supervisor or his/her qualified representative shall make
precautionary safety measures with the utility company that may include any or all of the following:

* The overhead high-voltage lines being de-energized
* Temporary placement of mechanical barriers being done to separate and prevent contact between equipment,
material, other objects, or persons and high-voltage lines
* Temporary relocation or raising of the high-voltage lines being done
* Other precautionary safety measures as recommended by the utility company

3. Perform pre-operational checks of the equipment prior to beginning the job.

4. Ensure that warning signs that state "UNLAWFUL TO OPERATE THIS EQUIPMENT WITHIN TEN
FEET OF OVERHEAD HIGH-VOLTAGE LINES" are located within the equipment and is readily visible to
the equipment operator and is located on the outside of the equipment to be readily visible to other personnel at
the work site.

5. All personnel on the worksite shall wear Class B hard hats which provide protection against high-voltage.
Additionally, any other electrical protective devices (e.g., rubber insulating gloves, rubber matting, etc.) shall be
used as applicable.

6. No materials or any covered item is to be stored within ten feet of the overhead high-voltage line.

7. The overhead high-voltage line is not to be raised, moved or displaced for any reason unless precautionary
safety measures have been made with the utility company.

8. No excavation of any portion of any foundations of the structures, including guy anchors which support any
overhead high-voltage lines is permitted.

9. If the equipment does contact an overhead high-voltage line, the equipment operator and other on-board
personnel shall remain on that piece of equipment until the overhead high-voltage line is de-energized.


217
10. If fire breaks out from the contact between the equipment and the overhead high-voltage line, the equipment
operator and any other persons, shall jump off the piece of equipment with both legs against each other (not
spread apart). These individuals shall then "bunny" jump/hop with both legs against each other for no less than
25 feet but as far as the individuals can get away from the overhead high-voltage line.




218
Fire Safety
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

Buildings
1. All employees should know escape routes and locations of fire exits.
2. All fire exits must be unobstructed, unlocked and marked.
3. Fire/smoke alarms should be tested and fire drills conducted regularly.
4. All employees should know the location of and how to use fire extinguishers.
5. Facilities should be periodically inspected to ensure fire extinguishers are charged and to identify and
eliminate fire hazards. Fire extinguisher locations should be properly marked.
6. Wiring and/or extension cords used for office machines or other appliances should be checked periodically.

Job Sites
1. When refueling vehicles, turn off engines. No smoking or open flames are permitted in the area.
2. Use extra caution when working with flammable materials on job site. Refer to MSDS.
3. Use only approved marked safety containers for storing and transporting flammable materials.
4. After refueling portable tools/equipment with gasoline engines, move at least 25 feet from refueling site to
start engine.
5. Operator should know the location of and how to use the fire extinguishers. Fire extinguishers should be
inspected to ensure that they are charged.
6. Allow space for fuel expansion in fuel tanks and containers.




219
      Poisonous Snakes, Insects and Plants
      Like most accidents and injuries, prevention is important in controlling hazards from
      poisonous snakes, insects and plants. Therefore, each employee should review the work
      activities planned to determine what exposures might exist. Efforts should then be made
      to minimize situations, which might result in a snakebite, insect sting or exposure to
      poisonous plants. Employees should also avoid wearing bright clothes, perfumes, after-
      shaves, etc., to help minimize attraction of snakes or insects.

      Snakes
      1. Employees should wear work boots, long pants and long sleeved shirts when going into
      hazardous areas.
      2. Employees should make as much noise as possible when approaching a possible snake
      area to give the snake time to leave.
      3. Employees should avoid reaching or stepping into hidden areas whenever possible.
      4. If a snakebite should occur, the employee should:

             a) Remain as calm as possible.
             b) Move away from the snake.
             c) Apply a constricting bandage (not tourniquet) between the wound and
             heart. A finger should be able to pass under it. Apply ice to bite area, if
             available.
             d) Allow a fellow worker to transport him/her to closest medical facility.
             e) If possible, kill snake and carry to medical facility for identification.

      5. Under no circumstances should incisions and suction be used to treat a snakebite
      unless:

             a) The victim is over 1.5 hours from medical assistance, and
             b) The person administering first aid has received advanced training in
                medical assistance such as First Responder, EMT, etc.




220
      Copperhead Snake
        Copperhead (snake), common name for a venomous North American snake of the pit viper
        family, recognized by its copper-colored head and body. Like the related water moccasin and
        rattlesnake, the copperhead is a potentially dangerous snake, although there are very few human
        fatalities recorded from the bite of the copperhead. It is found in hilly country from Massachusetts
        to northern Florida and westward to Illinois, Texas, and northern Mexico. The copperhead is 75 to
        125 cm (30 to 50 in) long and has a coppery, bronze, brown, or pinkish-brown body marked with
        bands of darker brown in an hourglass pattern. The tip of the tail is usually greenish or yellow.




        Canebrake Rattlesnake
        Crotalus horridus
        Rattlesnakes have stout bodies and flattened, triangular heads. Most rattlesnakes are typically
        gray or brownish, although some have bright yellow or burnt orange markings. Many have
        blotched patterns, typically a series of light-bordered dark hexagons down the center of the back
        and a dark streak running from each eye to the angle of the jaw.




221
      Insect Stings
      Employees should:
      1. Wear appropriate clothing.
      2. Avoid areas where insects might be whenever possible.
      3. Schedule work in infested areas during the cool months.
      4. Avoid high smelling after-shaves, colognes, etc., that may attract insects.
      5. Use available insect repellents
      6. If a sting does occur, any stinger should be removed by scraping a card across the
      wound (DO NOT SQUEEZE) The area should then be WASHED WITH SOAPY
      WATER. Apply cold compress to control swelling. Take antihistamine as needed for
      minor itching and swelling.
      7. NOTE: If the patient has had an allergic reaction to stings, sever swelling, difficulty
      breathing, feels faint or has multiple bee or wasp stings, seek medical care immediately.


      Ticks
      Ticks are especially important because of the possibility of Lyme Disease.
      To minimize exposure, employees should follow these guidelines:
      1. Wear appropriate clothing when working in wooded areas.
      (Light colors to more easily see the ticks, long pants and long sleeves. Tuck shirt into
      pants and pants into socks)
      3. Use the available Tick Repellent
      4. Check yourself at least twice a day, paying particular attention to the hair, neck and
      groin area. (complete a naked full body exam upon returning inside)
      5. Notify your supervisor if a tick is found and request that the date and condition (i.e.,
      attached? crawling?) be noted for future reference. (If possible, retain ticks and place in a
      container for identification of the tick type by OHS)
      6. To remove a tick: Place fine-point tweezers around the tick’s mouthparts, as close to
      the skin as possible, and gently pull the tick out.
      7. Notify your supervisor and the Safety Department for a referral to OHS if fever, chills,
      headaches or muscle aches develop within 3-10 days after exposure. In some cases, a rash
      may develop on the wrists and ankles 1-3 days after the fever begins.




222
                                                                   All four deer tick stages
      All four stages of Ixodes scapularis, the black-legged or deer tick with dime for size comparison.
      Engorged deer tick nymph




      Engorged deer tick nymph of Ixodes scapularis, the deer or black-legged tick.

      Poisonous Plants
      The typical city employee has exposure to at least three types of poisonous plants: poison
      oak, poison ivy and poison sumac. Reactions range from mild (very little or none) to
      severe (rash and blisters). Employees who have no reaction may not have become
      sensitized, but once they are, future exposures can result in an allergic reaction.
      To avoid problems with poisonous plants, employees should:
      1. Avoid working in severely infested areas if at all possible. (Learn what the plants look
      like.)
      2. Wear long sleeve shirts, long pants, and work gloves. If you are performing clearing
      activities with either hand (e.g., bush axes, weed eaters, etc.) or powered tools use eye
      goggles/safety glasses to prevent poisonous plants from entering your eyes.
      3. Use silicone protective or other barrier creams where available.
      4. Wash any exposed body parts with soapy water as soon as possible after contact.
      5. Be sure that any clothes or shoes that may have been exposed receive a thorough
      washing. Leftover oils on anything could cause a reaction even days later.
      6. If a severe reaction develops, contact your supervisor and the safety department for a
      referral to OHS for possible treatments.
      7. Avoid rubbing your eyes if you have been in contact with poisonous plants.

      Poison Oak




223
          In the West, this plant may grow as a vine but usually is a shrub. (Pictured). In the East, it grows as a shrub.
          Hair grows on its fruit, trunk and leaves, which have three leaflets.




          Poison Ivy




          In the East, Midwest and South, it grows as a vine. In the far Northern and Western United States, Canada
          and around the Great Lakes, it grows as a shrub. Each leaf has three leaflets.


          Poison Sumac




          Grows in standing water in the Northeast and Midwest and in swampy areas in parts of the Southeast. Each
          leaf has seven to 13 leaflets.



Domestic and Wild Animals
Field employees are at risk from exposure to all types of animals, their waste products and their carcasses.
Rodents and other animals can harbor disease-causing agents very harmful to humans. Care should be taken to
avoid all wild animals and domestic animals that have the potential to harm you.
To avoid accident or injuries associated with rodents and other animals observe the following guidelines:

1. Be aware of your surroundings and note any wild or suspicious acting animals in your work area. If
necessary, seek safe shelter from these animals.
2. Avoid reaching or stepping into or over hidden areas that may contain such animals.


224
3. When working with soil, be aware of signs that indicate above or below ground animal nests and take
appropriate action to prevent contamination by dust or injury from bites.
4. Spray animal carcasses with a disinfectant (Lysol) prior to removal and wear rubber gloves to remove animal
carcasses. Dispose of dead animals in compliance with applicable county health guidelines. Wash exposed skin
with an antibacterial or disinfectant soap after removal and disposal of the animal.
5. If an animal bite occurs, clean the wound with soap and water, and follow appropriate first aid procedures.
Immediately report the incident to your supervisor and safety department.
6. Transport any bite victim to OHS located at 490-L Prospect Blvd. (If possible, safely capture the animal so it
can be tested for any known disease-causing agents.)
7. If exposure to airborne particles and dust from a nest does occur, immediately report the incident to your
supervisor. (If possible, and without exposing yourself, mark the site without disturbing it so trained personnel
can collect samples to determine if any disease-causing agents are present.)
8. Avoid direct contact with bird, bat and other animal droppings. Areas where birds and bats roost should be
avoided or appropriate respiratory protection shall be used.
9. Avoid direct contact with animal blood. Wear rubber gloves if contact with animal blood cannot be
prevented. Dispose of rubber gloves properly. Wash hands thoroughly with an antibacterial soap after disposal
of rubber gloves and before eating, drinking or smoking.




225
First Aid


If an injury occurs, the first aider should :
1. Evaluate the accident area to ensure he does not become involved in the same accident situation. The injured
person should not be moved unless a life threatening condition exists.
(Example: A person's car catches on fire after a wreck and they could be burned up.)
2. Remain calm and take charge of the situation until professional medical help arrives.
3. Direct others briefly and clearly as to how they can help or secure help.
4. Conduct a primary survey of the victim to detect life-threatening conditions that require immediate attention.
These include:

A. Respiratory Arrest

                                                                                 -to-mouth using barrier
        device.
                                                                                   orm it.

B. Bleeding
* Apply direct pressure using a sterile bandage or the cleanest material available.
* Elevate the bleeding part of the body above the head if no fractures are involved and injury will not be
aggravated.
* Apply pressure at closest available pressure point.
* Apply a tourniquet only as a last resort and only if bleeding cannot be controlled any other way.

C. Shock
* Be prepared to treat for shock even when there is little or no injury. First aid procedures are:
* Keep victim lying down.
* Provide as much fresh air as possible.
* Loosen tight clothing at the neck, waist and chest.
* Keep the victim warm and dry by wrapping in blankets or similar materials.
* Do not give victim anything by mouth.
* Help victim maintain a good positive attitude by remaining calm, using reassuring tones and keeping
onlookers away.
5. Determine if transportation is necessary. Transportation of the injured person will depend on the judgment
call of the first aider. In many cases, particularly with fractures, back and similar injuries, it is wiser to call 911
for professional help. They have backboards, inflatable splints and other equipment that can be used to move
the victim without causing additional injuries.
6. Only after the life threatening injuries and medical help has been requested, should the first aider proceed to
the following steps. Most of these additional steps may not be necessary if medical help can get to the site.

      materials that are available. It is only necessary for this material to last until the victim can be
      moved to professional medical help.
                                           best available material. Shovel handles, sticks, rolled up
      newspaper, etc., can be used as improvised splints.
7. When all else fails, the first aider should use his best judgment and do whatever is necessary to save the life.



226
Definition
                    s the immediate care given to a person who is injured or ill.

Principal Aims are:



                   the victim as comfortable as possible while waiting for assistance.
Training Policy

       medical assistance is not reasonably accessible in terms of time and distance.

Exposure to Blood or Bodily Fluids
Bloodborne Pathogens

Hazard Review

1. Always treat blood and bodily fluids as if they are infected with transmittable diseases.
2. Report any accident/incident involving the transfer of blood or bodily fluids to the supervisor immediately.
3. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will be provided and used by all employee's considered to be at risk of
infection.
4. Gloves are to be worn for touching blood and bodily fluids, mucous membranes or non-intact skin of all
persons, for handling items or surfaces soiled with blood or bodily fluids, and for rendering assistance to injured
persons.
5. Always wash hands and arms after helping a victim. If washing facilities are not available, transports the
exposed individual to a facility where soap and water are available.
6. For employees trained in CPR, separate yourself from direct contact with the victim by using a one-way
resuscitating device.
7. Any items located that are believed to be human waste products (i.e., blood, soiled clothing, needles, or items
identified with the universal biohazard symbol) should be handled only with personal protective equipment.
8. All items known to be contaminated with blood or bodily fluids should be disposed of in a plastic bag, along
with gloves and other protective equipment used in the disposal process.
9. All equipment and working surfaces shall be decontaminated with an appropriate disinfectant to eliminate the
potential for infection.

(See The City of Frederick’s Policy and Procedures # 15-03, Titled: The City of Frederick Bloodborne
Pathogen Exposure Control Program.)




227
   OXY – ACETYLENE CUTTING AND WELDING
   SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

   Hazard Review
   Lifting                                 Debris In Eyes      Burns To Eyes and Exposed Skin
   Fire                                    Burning Clothes     Explosion
   Pinching, Cutting and Crushing          Confined Space      Toxic Fumes

   1. Do not attempt to use oxy-acetylene cutting equipment until properly trained.
   2. Avoid exposing cylinder to excess heat.
   3. Always wear approved safety equipment: gloves, goggles, helmets, etc.
   4. Check work area for flammable materials and keep fire extinguishers nearby.
   5. Keep oil and grease from hoses, cylinder, regulator and all fittings.
   6. Never use oxygen as a substitute for compressed air or feed into a confined space.
   7. Keep an adequate space between your work and the cylinders.
   8. Acetylene should never be used above 15 PSI.
   9. Use a striker to light the torch, not matches or lighters. Do not re-light the torch from hot metal.
   10. Use correct pressures and tip sizes.
   11. Never wrap hose or hang torch around cylinder valves or regulators.
   12. Hoses should have check valves in correct position.
   13. Have good ventilation while cutting. Respiratory equipment may be required.
   14. Never cut or weld on any container that has held flammable substance.
   15. Keep hoses away from sparks, hot metal, and sharp surfaces and from being run over by heavy
   equipment.
   16. Always stand to one side of an oxy-acetylene outfit when turning on the cylinders.
   17. Never move a cylinder by dragging, sliding or rolling.
   18. Keep protective cap in place and avoid striking it against something that could cause a spark.
   19. Identify oxygen and acetylene tanks by labeling, not by color code alone.
   20. Blow out cylinder valves before attaching regulator.
   21. Release regulator screw before opening valve. Open cylinder valve slowly.
   22. Do not allow cylinders to lie in a horizontal position.
   23. Do not pick up cylinders using the valve protector cap.
   24. Acetylene valve should not be opened more than one half turn. Oxygen valve should be fully opened
   when in use.
   25. If the cylinder valves leak or function improperly, do not attempt to repair. Contact the supplier.
   26. Cylinders shall be properly secured to prevent them from being knocked over.
   27. Cylinders shall not be transported with gauges attached.
   28. Release pressure on regulators when work is finished.
   29. Light the acetylene gas before opening the oxygen valve.




228
HERBICIDE AND OTHER SPRAYING
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

Hazard Review
Moving Traffic                High Pressure Hoses                               Uneven Ground
Slip, Trip and Fall           Restricted-Use Chemicals                          Temperature Extremes
Moving Equipment              Poisonous Plants/Insects/Snakes                   Animals

1. Review Safe Operating Procedures for applicable equipment and perform pre-operational checks.
2. Determine the traffic control needs from the Work Zone Safety Handbook. The use of a shadow vehicle is
recommended for high volume roadways.
3. Park in areas that: provide safe entrance and exit of the work area; do not create potential conflicts with other
vehicles and equipment operating in the work area; and provide maximum protection for workers getting in and
out of the vehicles.
4. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard, i.e. workboots with safety toe,
ankle support and proper tread for the terrain. Highly visible clothing when working in or near vehicular traffic.
Safety spectacles or goggles. Wear all additional equipment required by chemical label and U.S. Department of
Agriculture. Impermeable gloves, boots, coveralls and face shields are required when handling pesticides.
5. Refer to instructions for applying or mixing chemicals.
6. Read product labels, MSDSs and pest control recommendations before handling chemicals. The documents
are required to be at application site.
7. Make sure soap and water are available at work site.
8. Do not exceed recommended pressure, check for wear and tear on hoses, and make sure pressure regulator is
working. Test pump and system and calibrate prior to adding chemicals?
9. Employees on foot must use extreme caution to stay clear of operating equipment. Always establish eye
contact with operator before approaching equipment.
10. Be aware of loose material, excavation drop-off, tripping hazards, uneven ground and other obstructions.
11. Take extra precautions to prevent heat and cold stress when working in extremely hot or cold temperatures.
12. When operating spray trucks off roadway, be aware of hidden objects in grass and unstable terrain. ??
13. Be aware of poisonous plants, insects, snakes, animals, and animal waste products and carcasses. It is a
good practice to wear long sleeve shirts, gloves and high-top boots when hazards cannot be avoided.
14. Be aware of escape routes in case of emergency.
15. Before backing make sure area is clear and use an observer when available.




229
SEEDING – MULCHING AND TOP DRESSING ACTIVITIES AND INSPECTION
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

Hazard Review
Moving Traffic          Moving Equipment                         Poisonous Plants/Insects/Snakes
Lifting                 Hot Flammable Materials                  Dust
Flying Particles        Uneven Ground                            Overcrowding of Workers
Animals


1. Review Safe Operating Procedures for applicable equipment and perform pre-operational checks.
2. Determine the traffic control needs from the Work Zone Safety Handbook.
3. Park in areas that: provide safe entrance and exit of the work area; do not create potential conflicts with other
vehicles and equipment operating in the work area; and provide maximum protection for workers getting in and
out of the vehicles.
4. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard.
5. Employees on foot must use extreme caution to stay clear of operating equipment. Always establish eye
contact with operator before approaching equipment.
6. Proper lifting techniques shall be used. Get help or use equipment if necessary.
7. Be aware of escape routes in case of emergency. It is a good practice to face oncoming traffic while on foot.
8. Be aware of loose material, excavation drop-off, tripping hazards, uneven ground and other obstructions.
9. Allow ample space for each employee to work safely.
10. Use caution when handling hot/flammable materials. Review MSDS for each material used.
11. Take extra precautions to prevent heat and cold stress when working in extremely hot or cold temperatures.
12. Be aware of poisonous plants, insects, snakes, animals, and animal waste products and carcasses. It is a
good practice to wear long sleeve shirts, gloves and high-top boots when hazards cannot be avoided.
13. Watch for flying sand, fertilizer and mulch during seeding and mulching operation. Be aware of wind
direction and try to work upwind. Eye protection should be worn.
14. When operating trucks and other equipment off of the roadway, be aware that there may be hidden objects
in the grass and unstable terrain.
15 Before backing make sure area is clear and use an observer when available




230
VEHICLES - GENERAL
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

Hazard Review
Struck Against (Backing)                    Fall from different level (Riders)
Struck Against/By (Inclement Weather)         Struck By (Combustibles-Housekeeping)
Struck Against/By (Merging into traffic)
Struck By (Entering/Exiting)                  Exposure (Smoking)
   1. All drivers shall be properly licensed.
   2. Supervisors or their designee shall verify that drivers are capable and qualified on each type of vehicle
       before allowing the vehicle to be operated unsupervised, i.e. passenger van, pick-up, jeep, sedan, etc.
   3. Drivers shall perform a pre-operational check of their vehicle. Be familiar with operator's manual.
       Report all needed repairs promptly. Do not use any vehicle that is unsafe.
   4. Be aware of fire extinguisher locations on your vehicle and make sure they are properly charged.
   5. Only trained and authorized employees may jump-start a vehicle. All others shall contact vehicle
       maintenance for service.
   6. Operators and passengers shall wear seat belts and shoulder harnesses as provided when vehicle is in
       motion.
   7. Keep windshield, windshield wipers, windows and mirrors clean.
   8. Mirrors, rear and side shall be checked/adjusted, as needed each time the vehicle is entered and prior to
       placing vehicle in motion.
   9. When entering or exiting the vehicle, use the three point procedure and check for hazards, such as,
       oncoming traffic, uneven terrain etc.
   10. During high winds maintain firm hold on doors when opening/closing.
   11. During inclement weather, low visibility or when wipers are on, headlights are to be on.
   12. Clear dash of any articles prior to placing vehicle in motion. (WARNING: To prevent combustion -
       Never place aerosol (paint can (spray) or fuel products (cigarette lighter) on dash or in direct sunlight.)
   13. Do not store any aerosol or fuel products within vehicle for any extended period of time unless the
       vehicle is designed for that purpose, i.e. spray cans (paint) etc.
   14. No unauthorized (non-employee) personnel shall be allowed to ride in a City vehicle unless specifically
       authorized by supervision.
   15. No employee may ride on any vehicle unless specifically designed by the manufacturer for that purpose.
       NOTE: Truck beds are not designed to carry passengers.
   16. Employees shall not smoke any tobacco product in a vehicle when there is second hand smoke exposure.
   17. Always drive defensively.
   18. Check side mirrors before pulling into traffic.
   19. Drivers should be aware of employees and others on foot in work zones.
   20. When operating a vehicle off of the roadway, be aware of hidden objects in the grass and unstable
       terrain.
   21. The City prohibits the following distracted driving activities while the vehicle is in motion:
           1. Operating a hand held cell phone except for *emergencies. Cell phones with hands free devices
                are authorized but minimal use is expected.
           2. Two-way radios are to be used only when necessary and only for brief communications. For
                other than brief communications, the operator must safely pull the vehicle off the roadway and
                stop while engaging in a conversation,
           3. The use of Personal Digital Assistant devices, PDA’s..


231
   22. During rain or snow drivers shall maintain additional distance behind other vehicles as appropriate.
   23. Plan ahead to minimize or eliminate the need for backing. Always check to the rear before backing.
   24. Choose the safest location possible to park vehicles. Avoid parking in other vehicle/equipment's blind
       spots.
   25. Whenever possible set parking brake and shut off ignition when exiting vehicle.
   26. Vehicles that require the ignition to stay in the on position or require the engine to be running to
       complete a task or operation shall have the parking brake set and the wheels chocked if possible while
       the operator is out of the vehicle.
   27. When exiting a vehicle within a hazardous area the driver and passengers shall wear appropriate
       personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard, i.e. safety vest when working in or near
       vehicular traffic.
   28. Be aware of crushing and pinching hazards when using tailgates.
   29. *Never leave the vehicle ignition keys in the vehicle while unattended.

*A vehicle is considered unattended when the operator is 25ft. or more away from the vehicle which remains in
his/her view, or whenever the operator leaves the vehicle and it is not in his/her view. This definition was
extrapolated from CFR 1910.178 (m) (5) (ii).




232
TREE FELLING
SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

Hazard Review
Utility Lines                                    Wind          Dead Limbs/Hollow Spots
Poisonous Plants, Insects                        Snakes        Slip, Trip and Fall
Animals


1. Each work location where tree felling is to be done shall be under the direction of a person trained and
qualified in tree felling.
2. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment consistent with the hazard. Hard hat, eye and face
protection, hearing protection, leg protection (chaps) and safety toe boots are required when using a chain saw.
3. Be aware of poisonous plants, insects, snakes, animals, and animal waste products and carcasses. It is a good
practice to wear long sleeve shirts, gloves and high-top boots when hazards cannot be avoided.
4. Before felling any tree the following should be considered:
                        / Lean of the tree
                                / Decayed, hollow or other weak spots
                                    / Location of other workers and equipment
                                        ouble when the tree falls


5. The work area should be cleared and an escape route planned before any cutting is started.
6. Each employee involved in the felling shall be instructed exactly what to do. All workers not involved in the
operation should keep clear of the work area.
7. A notch or backcut should be used in felling trees over ten inches measured at belt height. No tree shall be
felled by ripping or slicing cuts.
8. The depth or penetration of the notch should be about one-third the diameter of the tree.
9. The opening or height of the notch should be about 2 1/2 inches for each foot of the tree's diameter.
10. The backout shall be made higher than the point of the notch to prevent kickback.
11. An audible warning must be given when the tree is ready to fall. Feller must shut off saw before retreat.
12. If there is danger from the tree falling in the wrong direction, wedges, block and tackles, rope or wire cable
shall be used. Wire cable should not be used when there are electrical hazards present. All limbs shall be
removed from trees to a height and width sufficient to allow the tree to fall clear of any wires and other objects
in the vicinity.
13. Extra caution should be used when trees are rotten, split, hollow or frozen because they may fall in an
unexpected direction even though the cut is made on the proper side.
14. Keep clear of the butt of the tree when it starts to fall.
15. Multiple cutting on the same felled tree should be avoided. Be aware of others working in the area. Limbs
often roll/move during cutting and removal.
16. Worker must not approach a feller closer than twice the height of the tree until eye contact with the feller
has been established.




233
      WORK ZONE SAFETY
      SAFE OPERATING PROCEDURES

      Hazard Review
      Moving Traffic                                                 Foot Injury
      Eye Injury                                                     Weather
      Slip, Trip and Fall


      1. Improper procedures or techniques may result in personal injury to workers while working in or
      near vehicular traffic.
      2. Employee MUST COMPLETE at a minimum a review of the “ABC’s of Work Zone Safety”
      Video before working in or near vehicular traffic.
      3. The employee at a minimum should be aware of their surroundings, maintain visibility and have
      good communication while working in or near vehicular traffic.

         A. Awareness
                          i.   Know where the traffic is
                         ii.   Know where you are in relation to the traffic
                        iii.   Always keep an eye on traffic: never turn your back
                        iv.    Always have an escape route

         B. Visible
                          i.   Wear fluorescent retro-reflective clothing
                         ii.   Use hazard lighting
                        iii.   Use state approved retro-reflective signs
                        iv.    Use high visibility markings for vehicle.

         C. Communication
                     i. Everyone knows and understands what safety controls are in place
                    ii. Pedestrians and traffic clearly understand their travel routes through the
                          work zone
                   iii. “When in doubt, give a shout.”




234
SECTION 5 CHARTERS




235
THE CITY OF FREDERICK MANAGEMENT SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER

Purpose: It is the policy of The City of Frederick to provide a safe workplace and protect the health of our
employees. To help accomplish this, a management safety committee was established with the primary goal of
gaining input to identify and address safety and health problems or concerns.
Membership/Structure: City of Frederick Management representatives, Safety and Loss Control Manager and
Safety Assistant. Elections to fill the seat of Chairperson and Vice Chairperson shall occur from the
membership and rotated every two years. Membership on the Committee includes:
Directors: A Management representative or his/her designee with authority to act on all major expenditures or
procedural matters. The Management representative or his designee shall be aware of our insurance costs and
the need to control losses.
Safety and Loss Control Manager: The Safety and Loss Control Manager should attend all safety committee
meetings and be an advisor to the Committee.
Chair person: One member shall chair all meetings. The chairperson should work with the Safety and Loss
Control Manager and other committee members to plan meeting agendas.
Vice Chair person: One member shall serve as Vice Chair who will assist and fill the vacancy of the
Chairperson should the need arise.
Secretary: The Safety Assistant shall take all minutes and maintain an action item list.
Attendance: The Management Safety Committee is a required activity for the following Departments; Permits,
Code Enforcement, Engineering, Public Works, Personnel, Recreation, Public Safety, and Purchasing. All other
Departments shall attend on a voluntary or as requested basis.
Meetings: The committee will meet on the second Tuesday of each month at the Department of Public Works
(DPW) Training Room. The meeting will last 1.0 hr. depending on agenda and will start promptly at 9:00 a.m.
A written agenda will be provided to all members by the committee chairperson.
Minutes shall be recorded of all Committee meetings with copies to be distributed to the Mayor, Chief Officers,
Board of Alderman and all committee members. Copies of minutes shall be retained by the Secretary for future
use.
Committee Responsibilities: Assist in the planning, direction, and control of The City of Frederick loss
control activities.
Assist in the development, implementation and revisions of The City of Frederick safety manual and other
safety programs.
Review accidents and losses.
Review and follow-up on employee suggestions as made by the Employee Safety Committee.
Assist in determining training needs and rendering support as directed by The City of Frederick.
Order of Business:
Record of attendance
Approval of previous minutes
Consideration of old business
Review of recent accidents, including near misses
Presentation of new business
Other:
Reports on special assignments
Progress report on safety program
Special features, such as a film, a talk, or a demonstration by a specialist, slides, etc.
                                Safety First! Don’t “Expire” Before You “Retire”!
Revised 3/21/02



236
THE CITY OF FREDERICK EMPLOYEE SAFETY COMMITTEE CHARTER
Purpose: It is the policy of The City of Frederick to provide a safe workplace and protect the health of our
employees. To help accomplish this, an employee safety committee was established with the primary goal of
gaining input to identify and address safety and health problems or concerns.
Membership/Structure: The City of Frederick, Department Employee Representatives, and the Safety and
Loss Control Manager. Elections to fill the seat of Chairperson, Vice Chairperson and Secretary shall occur
from the membership and rotate every two years.
Membership on the Committee includes: Departmental Employee Representatives: The following
departments are required to elect and or designate a representative to serve a term: Permits, Engineering,
Human Resources, Recreation, Public Safety, Safety, Purchasing and each department within the Department of
Public Works.
Safety and Loss Control Manager: The Safety and Loss Control Manager should attend all employee safety
committee meetings and be an advisor to the Committee.
Chair, Vice Chair and Secretary: The committee shall elect members who have served a minimum of one
year on the committee to the position of Chairperson, Vice Chairperson and Secretary. The chairperson shall
work in cooperation with the Safety and Loss Control Manager and other committee members to plan meeting
agendas. Another member shall serve as Vice Chair who will assist and fill the vacancy of the Chairperson
should the need arise. One member will be elected to take all minutes at the meetings.
Attendance: The Employee Safety Committee is a required activity for the following Departments: Permits,
Engineering, Human Resources, Recreation, Public Safety, Safety, Purchasing and each department within the
Department of Public Works. All other Departments shall attend on a voluntary or as requested basis.
Meetings: The committee will meet on the third Thursday of each month at the Department of Public Works
(DPW) Training Room. The meeting will last 1.0 hr. depending on agenda and will start promptly at 7:30 a.m.
A written agenda will be provided to all members by the committee chairperson. Minutes should be taken of all
Committee meetings with copies to be distributed to all members. Copies of minutes should be retained for
future use.
Committee Responsibilities: Assist in the development, implementation and revisions of The City of
Frederick safety manual and other safety programs.
Accident Review
Review and follow-up on employee suggestions and concerns.
Assist in determining training needs and rendering support for the Safety and Health Program.
Order of Business:
Record of attendance
Approval of previous minutes
Consideration of old business
Review of recent accidents, including near misses
Presentation of new business
Other:
Reports on special assignments
Progress report on safety program
Special features, such as a film, a talk, or a demonstration by a specialist, slides, etc.
                                Safety First! Don’t “Expire” Before You “Retire”!
3/21/02




237
SECTION 6 RECORD OF REVISIONS

Revision   Date of      Date Entered   Revision Made by   Revision Made
#          Revision
1          9-5-02       9-5-02         Jill Kline         Added Safety Shoe
                                                          Certificate sec 5 pg
                                                          13, updated rev Sec
                                                          5 pg 14.
2          1-2-03       1-2-03         Jill Kline         Replaced Confined
                                                          Space (Section 4)
                                                          with new Policy and
                                                          Procedure
3          4-10-03      4-10-03        Jill Kline         Added Ladder Safety
                                                          (Section 41) which
                                                          moves following
                                                          sections forward one
                                                          number. Added new
                                                          table of contents.
4          5-14-03      5-14-03        Jill Kline         Updated       Vehicle
                                                          SOP with revised
                                                          SOP.          Updated
                                                          Hazardous Energy
                                                          Policy
5          7-18-03      7-18-03        Jill Kline         Updated Sect. 17 to
                                                          include Emergency
                                                          Notification Form
6          12-10-2003   12-10-2003     Jill Kline         Revised manual to
                                                          have same font
                                                          /format.and Changed
                                                          Mayor and Board of
                                                          Alderman to Mayor.
7          1-6-04       1-6-04         Dan Patton         Revised Reasonable
                                                          Suspicion      Testing
                                                          procedures. Revised
                                                          the        Emergency
                                                          Notification
                                                          procedures to reflect
                                                          the Removal of
                                                          Government Affairs
                                                          Officer and replaced
                                                          with            Public
                                                          Information Officer.
                                                          Removed          Chief
                                                          Human       Resources
                                                          and Administrative
                                                          Officer to Chief
                                                          Financial/Human
                                                          Resources Officer.

238
                                         Added several SOP’s
                                         Removed             the
                                         Infectious    disease
                                         guidelines-redundant
                                         the guidelines are
                                         within              the
                                         Bloodborne
                                         Pathogens Policy.
8     12/7/04    12/7/04    Dan Patton   Reformatted
                                         document, removed
                                         sections     between
                                         documents          and
                                         inserted 5 main
                                         sections,         such
                                         Government
                                         Required P&P and
                                         Elective,     SOP’s,
                                         Charters and P&P
                                         Under Development.
                                         Replaced SOP hot
                                         weather with heat
                                         index, added sop
                                         safe           lifting.
                                         Drug/Alcohol testing
                                         procedures         was
                                         moved to coincide
                                         with Drug/Alcohol
                                         Policy.      Revised
                                         Bloodborne
                                         pathogens Appendix
                                         A, to reflect new
                                         position titles, i.e.
                                         CAA and Sewer
                                         department.
9     12/22/04   12/22/04   Dan Patton   Defined
                                         “Unattended” within
                                         Vehicle Safety SOP
                                         per ESC requests.
                                         page 214.
10    9/28/05    9/28/05    Dan Patton   Inserted Excavation
                                         Trenching Policy &
                                         Procedures     within
                                         Government
                                         Required           and
                                         inserted      Vehicle
                                         Operator        Policy
                                         within Elective.



239
11    1/8/2007     1/8/2007     Alysia Portner   Entered Gas Pump
                                                 SOP and updated
                                                 TOC
12    2/21/2007    5/2/2007     Alysia Portner   Entered       revised
                                                 Respirator Protection
                                                 Policy
13    7/17/2004    5/15/2007    Alysia Portner   Entered       revised
                                                 Accident
                                                 Investigation
                                                 Reporting
                                                 Notification Policy
14    5/24/2007    5/24/2007    Alysia Portner   Changed     phone
                                                 numbers from 301-
                                                 694-2546 to 301-
                                                 600-2546
15    10/16/2007   10/16/2007   Alysia Portner   Updated       Work
                                                 Status Report
16    1/11/2008    1/11/2008    Alysia Portner   Updated TOC and
                                                 Confined      Space
                                                 Policy

17    2/21/2008    2/21/2008    Alysia Portner   Updated Respirator
                                                 Policy
18    2/18/2009    2/18/2009    Alysia Wiles     Updated TOC &
                                                 BBP Policy
19    3/5/2009     3/9/2009     Alysia Wiles     Updated      Vehicle
                                                 Operator Policy
20    9/16/09      9/16/09      Dan Patton       Revised Respirator
                                                 Policy
21    12/14/2009   12/14/2009   Alysia Wiles     Revised Blood borne
                                                 Pathogens policy
22    4/6/2010     4/6/2010     Alysia Wiles     Replaced old Heat
                                                 index with updated
                                                 Heat Index
23    11/16/2010   11/16/2010   Alysia Wiles     Revised    Confined
                                                 Space entry permit,
                                                 added Appendix E &
                                                 F.
23    11/16/10     11/16/10     Dan Patton       Insert Prescription
                                                 Drug Program
23    11/16/10     11/16/10     Dan Patton       Revised      Vehicle
                                                 SOP to reflect the
                                                 Distracted Driving
                                                 Verbiage



240
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