LEO BAECK DAY SCHOOL CURRICULUM: MYP (6-8 by v7166R

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									THE LEO BAECK DAY SCHOOL: GENERAL SYNOPSIS OF SUBJECTS’ APPROACH TO PROGRAMME COURSES.
LANGUAGE B: HEBREW (STANDARD) GRADE 7
 THE LEARNER PROFILE: Reflective, Caring, Knowledgeable, Inquirers, Thinkers, Communicators, Open-minded, Risk-takers,
 Principled, Balanced. (These attributes are explicitly explored and are implicitly embedded throughout our school community.)
 IB AREAS OF INTERACTION: Approaches to Learning. Health and Social Education. Human Ingenuity. Environments. Community
 and Service. (These common organizing strategies, frame inquiry and give context to unit content. A selection of these are embedded in each
 unit of inquiry, within and across subjects)
           Approaches to Learning and Teaching Strategies                                        Assessment: Criteria Related
 (Teachers and students employ a range of differentiated methods to         (Teachers employ a range of Formative assessment, Summative
 construct effective learning in different learning environments)           assessment, Student self-assessment strategies, tasks and tools)
 Organization         Communicatio Thinking                Attitudes        Strategies                            Tools /Recording Devices
 and                  n and             and Reflection and                  (Teachers use these a range of        (Teachers use a range of these
 Transference         Information       Skills             Collaboration    these to provide a balanced view      to document evidence of
 Skills               Skills                               Skills           of student learning)                  student learning)
 •Responsibility      •Language         •Acquiring         •Appreciation    •Performance: quizzes, tests          •Rubrics
 •Study habits        skills            specific subject •Enthusiasm        •Observations                         •Checklists
 •Note making         •Oral decoding    knowledge          •Independence •Selected responses                      •Benchmarks
 •Homework            strategies        •Numeric           •Perseverance    •Reflections                          •Rating scales
 •Research            •Subject          •Verbal            •Confidence      •Open-ended original responses        •Provincial Achievement
 strategies           specific terms    •Problem           •Curiosity       •Process Journals                     charts/levels (OMOE)
 •Class               •Verbal, Non-     solving            •Respect: self/  •Response Journals                    •Exemplars
 preparation          verbal            •Creative,         others/world     •Design workbooks                     •Anecdotal
 •Mind maps           •Presentation     Lateral thinking •Cooperation,      •Interviews                           •Continuums
 •Self discipline     skills            •Critical          •Commitment      •Open-ended                           •Learning logs
 •Group roles         •Participation    thinking/questio •Effort            •Research                             •MYP Subject specific
 •Learning            •Literacy skills, n-ing              •Empathy         •Portfolios                           Assessment Criteria
 styles:              •Media Literacy •Analysis            •Tolerance       •Presentation                         • MYP subject specific Interim
 Gardner’s            •Tech. Literacy Bloom’s levels       •Integrity       •Conferences                          objectives
 Multi-               •Referencing      •Metacognition     •Conflict        •Other…                               •Other…
 intelligences        sources           •Self              resolution       Assessment Tasks
 •Time                •Intellectual     awareness          •Negotiation     (Teachers use a range of these to collect evidence of student learning)
 management           property          •Perception        •Group           Compositions (artistic, musical, physical, written)
 •Making              awareness         •Generating        responsibilities Solutions/ products (as responses to problems)
 connections          •Persuasion       ideas              •Other…          Essays, Exams, Research, Investigations, Reports,
 •Overlapping         •Other…           •Reasoning                          Performances, Other…
 ideas/concepts                         •Other…
 •Other…

 MYP FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS IN THE LBDS LANGUAGE B: HEBREW (STANDARD) GRADE 7
 This LANGUAGE B: HEBREW course outline has been developed and reviewed, collaboratively, with the three fundamental MYP concepts in
 mind: holistic education, intercultural awareness and communication. These foundation principles of the MYP inform, and are inextricably
embedded in, the LANGUAGE B: HEBREW syllabus objectives and in the units of inquiry that flow from these. LBDS students come to an
awareness of the interconnected nature of knowledge. We view the development of the whole student as essential to our mandate as
educators. Real world complexities are viewed as opportunities for LBDS students to contextualize their learning through the MYP Areas of
interaction. The LANGUAGE B: HEBREW syllabus content and context encourages and promotes international- mindedness by engaging and
exploring other cultures and perspectives. Through the units of inquiry, we seek to build understanding and respect for our own and for different
cultural views. The LANGUAGE B: HEBREW courses promote open and effective communication skills for students to articulate their learning
in a wide variety of modes, and to enable them to communicate on a global level. International-mindedness is explicitly and implicitly explored
and practiced by students who authentically shape their own learning through the use of the Learner Profile throughout our school community.

TEXTS and RESOURCES                                                       • OTHER
MYP: FROM PRINCIPLES INTO PRACTICE                                        Radio and television reports, speeches, or any other recorded
MYP: SUBJECT GUIDE: LANGUAGE B                                            information, televised news bulletin, weather reports, and so on, or a
IBO.ON-LINE CURRICULUM CENTRE                                             movie in Hebrew. A variety of texts, textbook passages, magazine and
INTERNET                                                                  newspaper articles, short stories and novels. A range of factual and
     Madregot Zayin/Chet                                                 literary texts. Illustrations or photographic information that complement
     Shmuel Aleph/Beit, Melachim Aleph/Beit (Cassuto)                    the text. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is used as
     Pirkei Avot (Beit)                                                  means of expanding students’ knowledge of the world in which they
     Reform Haggadah (CCAR)                                              live, gaining access to a broader range of language resources and as
    • Teacher made materials                                              a new channel for developing skills.
   • Kitzur Shulchan Aruch/Shaarei Mo'ed

COURSE DESCRIPTION. LANGUAGE B: HEBREW (STANDARD). MYP LEVEL 2
The primary aim of Language B in the MYP is to encourage students to gain competence in a modern language other than their mother tongue,
with the long‑ term goal of balanced bilingualism.
The expectations for Hebrew in Grade 6 focus on students’ ability to use their knowledge and skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing,
viewing, and representing to understand, critically analyse, and communicate a broad range of information and ideas from and about their
multicultural, multimedia environment. Junior students’ language knowledge comes from their prior knowledge and from the foundational
language knowledge and skills acquired in the primary school years. The expectations in the junior years build upon this foundation. Hebrew in
Grade 6 is designed to engage students in meaningful interactions with a wide variety of texts. They analyse the structure and elements of a
variety of text forms, and create a variety of oral, print, and media texts in order to communicate their own ideas and opinions for a variety of
purposes and audiences. Modelled, shared, and guided learning experiences provide the instructional support Grade 6 Hebrew students’ need
to communicate ideas and information using a greater variety of oral, written, and media forms. The course gives students numerous
opportunities to use Hebrew for real purposes and in real situations; for example: listening to Hebrew spoken by live and recorded voices, and
by people of different ages, speaking in at different rates; discussing subject matter, reading materials, personal concerns and interests;
preparing and giving oral presentations; playing roles in dramatizations and simulations; conducting surveys and interviews.
Learning additional languages greatly contributes to the holistic development of students. Proficiency in a second language gives students
access to a broader range of input, experiences and perspectives. The study of Hebrew aims to encourage in the student a respect for and
understanding of Hebrew and the ancient and modern culture surrounding it, and to provide a skills base to facilitate further Hebrew language
learning.. Hebrew teachers concentrate on each of the strands of language: listening, speaking, reading and writing. These skills are
interrelated, though in some instances teachers may wish to deal with them as discrete skills. In Grade 7, Hebrew continues to develop as the
primary language of instruction in Langauage B, as students give presentations, reports, engage with peers in cooperative group work and
assume more independent work.
The use of the Areas of Interaction introduces a new dimension to the inquiry and allows for a richer and in depth exploration of concepts and
topics. “Approaches to Learning” is common to all units of study. The areas of interaction are used as starting points to develop units of work in
Hebrew, or as bridges to explore connections with other disciplines and real-world issues.

Aims                                                                     Objectives
The aims of studying Hebrew state in a general way what the              The objectives state the specific targets that are set for learning
teacher may expect to teach, and what the student may expect to          HEBREW. They define what the student will be able to accomplish as a
experience or learn. In addition, they suggest how the student may       result of studying Hebrew
be changed by the learning experience.                                   At the end of the course students should be able to:
The aims of the teaching and study of HEBREW are to:                     • communicate information, ideas and opinions
• enable the student to use Hebrew effectively as a means of             • demonstrate comprehension of specific factual information and
practical communication, providing a sound base of communication         attitudes, expressed in spoken and written contexts
skills necessary for future study, work and leisure                      • identify main ideas and supporting details and draw conclusions from
• enable the student to understand the nature of language and the        spoken and written texts
process of total language learning,                                      • understand and appropriately use structures and vocabulary
which comprises the integration of linguistic, cultural and social       • request and provide information in both spoken and written contexts
components                                                               • engage actively in oral production using comprehensible pronunciation
• enable the student to develop an appreciation of a variety of literary and intonation
and non‑ literary texts                                                  • take part in formal and informal communications.
• offer insight into the cultural characteristics of the communities
where Hebrew is spoken
• encourage an awareness and understanding of the perspectives of
people from other cultures
• promote involvement with different communities, where relevant
• provide access to varied sources of information
• foster curiosity, a lifelong interest and enjoyment in language
learning.
At LBDS, these aims are organized into three strands: Oral Communication (Listening, Speaking), Reading, Writing. In each of these strands,
teachers are guided by the MYP objectives for Language B. These relate directly to the MYP assessment criteria, which, in turn, structure our
evaluation and grading of student work:
Oral communication
Criterion A Oral communication—message and interaction Maximum 8
Criterion B Oral communication—language Maximum 8
Writing
Criterion C Writing—message and organization Maximum 8
Criterion D Writing—language Maximum 8
Reading comprehension
Criterion E Reading comprehension Maximum 16
FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS FOR LBDS LANGUAGE B: HEBREW GRADE 7
TEFILOT, TANACH, RABBINICS, ISRAEL, TORAH/TANACH, HOLIDAYS & JEWISH LIFE
By the end of Grade 7 students will be able to:
• develop an understanding between classical and modern Hebrew
• study and appreciate the classical Jewish texts in the original Hebrew
• study and appreciate modern Hebrew literature and its history
• develop conversational skills
• be familiar with elementary functional Hebrew grammar
• be able to lead Rosh Chodesh services as a class
• expand vocabulary and be able to use it in all areas of study
• have a sense of pride in belonging to the Jewish people and the State of Israel
Oral Communication:
• listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a variety of purposes;
• use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
• reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral
communication situations.
Reading:
• read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, graphic, and informational texts, using a range of strategies to construct
meaning;
• recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
• use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
• reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after
reading.
Writing:
• generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose and audience;
• draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational, literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and
audience;
• use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies, and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression,
and present their work effectively;
• reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the
writing process.

INSTRUCTIONAL/TEACHING TIME: STUDENTS HAVE EIGHT PERIODS OF LANGUAGE B: HEBREW EACH WEEK. THIS TOTALS OVER
200 CLASSROOM CONTACT HOURS DURING THE YEAR TO ACHIEVE THE OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE THROUGH THE UNITS OF
INQUIRY LISTED IN THE GRADE DOCUMENTS ON THE CURRICULUM PAGE. THESE UNITS ARE REVIEWED AT THE END OF EACH
ACADEMIC YEAR.

								
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