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THE SOUTHERN COASTLANDS ON THE SUBTROPICAL MARGIN

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 28

									Rediscovering the river
   Oil boom, World’s Fair, rehabilitation of
    riverfront.
   Commercial use cut off river access.
   Riverfront Expressway 1946-1969 (Moses and
    the Second Battle of New Orleans).
   James Rouse created Harbor Place (Boston’s
    Quincy Market, Baltimore’s market).
Transformation of the port
   1970s shipping technology.
   Port side cranes.
   Warehouses came down.
   Moonwalk, 1972.
   Port is transshipment point. Except coffee
    and sugar, no processing.
End of the boom                               (Ch. 5)


   OPEC raised prices, domestic oil flourished.
   Saudis let oil float – prices determined by
    immediate supply and demand.
   $50 a barrel in 1981, $35 in ‘85, $10 in ’86.
Great population shift
   1950s Jefferson Parish suburbanization.
   White flight.
   Schools became more segregated, post
    Brown v. Board.
   Housing the poor – urban renewal, public
    housing, and segregation.
A new population geography (Ch. 6)
    The Iron Law of Suburban Sprawl.
    Expansion of white territory, the teapot.
    Gentrification and urbanophiles.
Tourism                (Ch. 7)


   Oil bust, mechanization of docks, lack of
    manufacturing meant that unemployment was
    a central issue for the city.
   Tourism was the fallback position.
   Depends on French Quarter (preservation of
    which has been accidental) and St. Charles
    Avenue neighborhoods.
Tourism numbers
   1970s: tens of thousands.
   2000: 8-11 million a year ($4.78 billion).
   Result: National Trust for Historic Preservation
    lists the French Quarter in the annual List of
    Endangered Places.
Tourism
   French Quarter
   St. Charles Avenue

								
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