Crissy Megow 1st Grade by mWrNSE

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									5 stages:
Prewriting
Drafting
Revising
Editing
Publishing
   Four Types of writing
    › Narrative
    › Informational
    › Persuasive
    › Response to Literature
    › *At least one sample from each should
      be collected/scored
    › 3 performance levels:
       Does not meet, Meets, and Exceeds
   Letter to the teacher persuading her to
    allow a popcorn party on Friday
In the prewriting stage the writer chooses a
  topic, considers the purpose, the
  audience, the form, and then creates a
  graphic organizer.



Tompkins, G.E. (2008). Teaching children to write.
  Teaching a writing balancing process and product.
  Upper Saddle, NJ: Pearson.
   Whole class/large group instruction:
    › Instructional time, modeling, and practice
      activities for each stage of the writing
      process (effective use of time, zone of
      proximal development, scaffolding,
      building schema)

    Independent instruction:
       During assessment activities for each
        stage of the writing process (ownership,
        individuality)
 Developmental: pairing with a partner,
  depending on severity, the student may
  still need one-on-one assistance
 Cultural: groups are sensitive to the fact
  that some may know more about the
  Underground railroad, these students are
  dispersed and encouraged to share
  what they know
 Linguistic: peer helper, “the 3 rule”, one-
  on-one restating
   Persuasive Writing
    › Augmentative- also known as
    › Point- how you feel about the topic
      (support or do not support)
    › Reasoning- why you feel this way about
      the topic
    › Audience- who you are writing to and
      trying to convince (persuade) them to
      feel the way you do about the topic
   Topic: Choose a topic that you know a lot
    about, brainstorm to elaborate
   Purpose: Decide why you are writing the
    text (to persuade/convince)
   Audience: Who you are writing to, who will
    read your text (appropriate language)
   Form: The type of text you write (letter,
    journal, report)
   Graphic Organizer: Put your thoughts down
    on paper to arrange your thoughts
Name ____________________
My letter is to:______________

I think that Harriet Tubman was an important
   person because:

1.________________________________________

  ________________________________________
2.________________________________________
  ________________________________________

3.________________________________________
 ________________________________________

4. ________________________________________
   ______________________________________

Megow, C. (2008). Persuasive Letter Organizer.
  Unpublished Manuscript. Valdosta State University,
  Valdosta, GA.
   Practice Activity
 Students fill in their persuasive letter
  organizers
 Trying to persuade the teacher that
  Harriet Tubman was an important person
 Checklist is provided to help
Prewriting Persuasive Letter Checklist

Name____________________Date______________

Did you Remember:

 1. The audience?
 2. The right form? (Letter)
 3. To stay on topic? (Harriet Tubman)
   4. To persuade your audience?

   5. To state your opinion?

   6. To give the reasons you felt this way?




Megow, C. (2008). Prewriting persuasive letter checklist.
  Unpublished Manuscript. Valdosta State University, Valdosta,
  GA.
             Meets            Needs       Does not
             Standards        Improvement meet
                2                 1       Standard
                                             0
Stated       Student stated                    Student did not
Opinion      what their                        state their
             opinion was on                    opinion on the
             the topic                         topic

Completion   Student wrote    Student wrote    Student wrote
             at least 3       1-2 supportive   no supportive
             supportive       reasons          reasons
             reasons
                            Meets Standards                Needs                         Does not meet
                              2                            Improvement                   Standard
                                                               1                            0
Wrote to the               Student wrote                  Student wrote to               Student did not
audience                   the letter to the              correct person,                write to correct
                           correct person                 but did not use                person and did
                           and kept him/her               appropriate                    not keep them in
                           in mind                        language for that              mind
                                                          person

Persuasive                 Student wrote to Student partially                            Student did not
                           persuade the     wrote to                                     write to
                           audience         persuade the                                 persuade the
                                            audience                                     audience
 Megow, C. (2008). Prewriting persuasive letter rubric. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
   Developmental Needs:
    › More time
    › Peer helpers
    › One-on-one (teacher)
    › Task analysis
    › Additional practice before assessment
   Cultural Needs:
    › Notebook for difficult words
    › One-on-one teacher assistance
   Linguistic Needs:
    › ESOL student-assistive technology (translator)
    › Peer helper
    › 3 rule
In the Drafting stage the writer
  begins a rough draft by using the
  information gathered in the
  prewriting stage.

Tompkins, G.E. (2004). Teaching writing: Balancing process and product.
   Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
 Use information from organizers
 Add more details
 Write on every other line
 Not final draft
    › Don’t worry about….
       Spelling errors
       Handwriting
 Use information from organizers
 First draft of persuasive letter to the
  teacher
 Why Harriet Tubman was an important
  person
    › At least 3 reasons
Did you Remember:

1. The audience? (Mrs. Megow)
2. To write the correct date?

3. To use all the information from the graphic
organizer?
4. To stay on topic? (Harriet Tubman)
5. To skip every other line?
            Did You Remember Cont.

           6. To persuade your audience?

           7. To state your opinion?
           8. To give the reasons you felt this way?
           9. Write your name at the bottom?


Megow, C. (2008). Persuasive letter checklist. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State
University, Valdosta, GA
                 Meets                Needs             Does not Meet
                 Standards            Improvement       Standard
                      2                  1                  0
Stated opinion   Student stated                         Student did not
                 what their opinion                     state their opinion
                 was on the topic                       on the topic
Completion       Student wrote at     Student wrote 1-2 Student wrote no
                 least 3 supportive   supportive        supportive
                 reasons              reasons           reasons
Wrote to the     Student wrote the    Student wrote to Student did not
audience         letter to the        correct person,   write to correct
                 correct person       but did not use   person and did
                 and kept him/her     appropriate       not keep them in
                 in mind              language for that mind
                                      person
                   Meets                 Needs                 Does not Meet
                   Standards             Improvement           Standard
                      2                      1                     0
Persuasive         Student wrote to      Student partially     Student did not
                   persuade the          wrote to              write to
                   audience              persuade the          persuade the
                                         audience              audience
Lines              Skipped every         Skipped and           Did not skip every
                   other line            then stopped          other line



Sign Name          Yes                                         No


    Megow, C. (2008). Prewriting persuasive letter rubric. Unpublished manuscript.
        Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
During this stage, the writer rereads the
 rough draft, shares the rough draft in a
 writing group, and revises on the basis
 of feedback received from the writing
 group (Tompkins, 2004, p. 18).


Tompkins, G.E. (2004). Teaching writing: Balancing process and product. Upper
   Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
   Read through your drafts to:
    › Rearrange, change, add, or delete
      text/ideas
    › Improve your thoughts/order
    › Do not worry about grammar
    › Or spelling mistakes YET!
 Independently revise own drafts
 Encouraged to
    › Change, delete, rearrange, and improve
 Reminded not to focus on spelling and
  grammar at this time
 Peer Revising
Did you remember to:

Read through your draft
Rearrange wording to make better
sense
Add ideas or details that needed to be
added
Delete ideas or details that needed to
be deleted
     Did you remember to (cont.)

     Consider the changes from peer revision

     Make appropriate changes from peer
     revision




Megow, C. (2008). Revising persuasive checklist. Unpublished manuscript.
     Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
Elements            Exceeds       Meets Criteria   Partially Meets   Does not meet
                    Criteria            2              Criteria        Criteria
                       3                                   1               0
Rearranged       Rearranged all   Rearranged       Somewhat or       No ideas or
Wording to       ideas/details    most             incorrectly       details were
make better      that needed to   ideas/details    rearranged        rearranged
sense            be rearranged    that needed to   ideas/details
                 throughout       be rearranged
                 draft


Added ideas or   Correctly        Added in ideas   Added 1-2         No ideas or
details          added in all     and details      ideas or details; details were
                 ideas and        where            more are          added
                 details where    appropriate;     needed
                 needed           more can be
                                  added
Elements             Exceeds          Meets Criteria   Partially    Does not meet
                     Criteria               2        Meets Criteria   Criteria
                        3                                  1              0
Deleted ideas    Deleted all         Deleted most        Somewhat or     No ideas or
or details       ideas/details        ideas/details        incorrectly      details were
                 that were            that were            deleted          deleted
                 irrelevant or not    irrelevant or not    ideas/details;
                 needed               needed               deleted
                                                           important
                                                           information
Changed ideas Changed all            Changed most         Somewhat or     No
or details    ideas/details           ideas/details        incorrectly      ideas/details
              that needed to          that needed to       changed          were changed
              be changed              be changed           ideas/details
              throughout draft

      Megow, C. (2008). Revising rubric. Unpublished manuscript.
           Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
During this stage, the writer sets the
 composition aside for a while,
 proofreads to locate errors, and
 corrects errors (Tompkins, 2004, p.
 22).

Tompkins, G.E. (2004). Teaching writing: Balancing process and product.
   Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
 Grammatical Errors
 Correct Spelling
 Correct Punctuation
 Correct Capitalization
 Proofreader’s marks
   Assessed on individually editing his/her
    persuasive letter to the teacher using
    proofreader’s marks and making
    appropriate corrections.
Did I remember to:

Correct all misspelled words?
Capitalize first letters in first word of each
sentence?
Capitalize first letter in all proper nouns?
Put a period in all telling sentences?
Put a question mark in all asking sentences?
  Did I remember to (Continued)

  Put an exclamation point in all excited
  sentences?
  Write in complete sentences?
  Use correct proofreaders marks?

Megow, C. (2008). Editing checklist. Unpublished manuscript.
     Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
Elements          Exceeds           Meets            Partially     Does not
                  Criteria          Criteria          Meets       meet Criteria
                     3                 2             Criteria          0
                                                        1
Spelling         Corrects all    Corrects all     Corrects all    Has more than
                 misspelled      misspelled       misspelled      4 misspelled
                 words           words except     words except    words
                 except 1        2                3-4

Capitalization   Corrects all    Corrects all    Corrects all     Has more than
                 capitalizatio   capitalization  capitalization   4 capitalization
                 n errors        errors except 2 errors except    errors
                 except 1                        3-4


Punctuation      Corrects all    Corrects all    Corrects all     Has more than
                 punctuation     punctuation     punctuation      4 punctuation
                 errors          errors except 2 errors except    errors
                 except 1                        3-4
Elements           Exceeds         Meets            Partially    Does not
                   Criteria        Criteria          Meets      meet Criteria
                      3               2             Criteria         0
                                                       1
Proofreader’s Correctly        Correctly uses    Incorrectly    Does not use
marks         uses             proofreader’s     used the       the
                 proofreader’s marks some of     marks          proofreader’s
                 marks most    the time          throughout     marks
                 of the time
Complete         Wrote in       Had one          Had 2          Had 3 or
                 complete       incomplete       incomplete     more
Sentences        sentences      sentence         sentences      incomplete
                 throughout                                     sentences

 Megow, C. (2008). Editing rubric. Unpublished manuscript.
      Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA
During this stage, the writer publishes
 his/her work. This may be done in
 several fashions. It may be published
 by making a book for it to go in,
 submitting it to the local newspaper
 or magazine, share it a puppet show,
 or etc (Tompkins, 2004, p. 25-26, 28).

Tompkins, G.E. (2004). Teaching writing: Balancing process and product.
   Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
 Write your final product
 Nicest handwriting
 Create illustrations
 Share your work (send letter)
   Publish letter by:
    › Writing final copy in nicest handwriting
    › gathering materials to illustrate
       Markers, colored pencils, etc.


   Send the letter
           Element                  Student              Student Did Not            Student Meets
                                 Partially met           Meet publishing              Publishing
                                  Publishing             Standard                     Standard
                                   Standard                    (1)                       (0)
                                       (2)
     Final draft               Final draft               Final draft               Student makes no
     written                   completely                partially written         attempt to write
                               written                                             final draft
     Illustration              Student has              Student has              Student made
                                 illustrations            illustrations               no attempt to
                                 that pertain to          that partially              illustrate.
                                 the story                pertain to story
     Handwriting               Student wrote            Student           Student made
                                 legibly                  partially wrote    no attempt to
                                 throughout the           legibly (2-4       write legibly
                                 text (1 or fewer         mistakes)
                                 mistakes)
Megow, C. (2008). Publishing rubric. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA.

								
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