Docstoc

HOTS lesson plan-planets

Document Sample
HOTS lesson plan-planets Powered By Docstoc
					                                                Planet ME



Time: 90 minutes                                         Subject: Science and Creative Arts

Grade Level: 2nd Grade

Purpose of Lesson: The purpose of this lesson is to help the students comprehend the characteristics of
the eight planets, understand which characteristics fit which planet, and to relate the characteristics to
their own creativeness. This lesson will also help the students remember the in order in which the
planets are aligned. This lesson will show the student’s unique creative ways of developing a “Lost
Planet.”

Objectives:

    1. Knowledge: The student will list the eight planets of the solar system.
    2. Recall: The student will relate the mnemonic to the eight planets.
    3. Application: The student will construct their own mnemonic in order to help them relate the
       planets to their own sentence.
    4. Analysis: The student will show understanding of the eight planets and their properties by
       creating an acrostic poem, showing that they understand the characteristics of each planet.
    5. Synthesis: The student will hypothesize what the lost planet would look like in their own
       creative ways, by remembering what characteristics make up a planet.
    6. Evaluation: The student will evaluate the properties of a planet by creating and decorating their
       own “Lost Planet,” in order to show their uniqueness even through their art work.

Pennsylvania Standards:

    1.   3.1 A
    2.   3.1 B
    3.   AL 5.2
    4.   1.4
    5.   1.2 A
    6.   PS 1 D
    7.   AL 3.4

Pre Assessment:

The students have already learned about the characteristics of a planet in the previous lesson, learning
why each planet is unique.

The students already know that Pluto is not a planet anymore.
Set Induction:

The teacher will start by reviewing the eight planets in the solar system. The teacher will go to the
whiteboard, and have the students sit at their desks. When the students are ready, have them review
by asking them what the eight planets are. The teacher will have the students raise their hands when
answering the question. As each student gives a correct answer, write the planet’s name on the board.
When the students give all eight of the planets, show the video for the planet song. The video can be
found on you tube by typing in the search engine, “Anamaniacs-Our Solar System Sing-A-Long.” Before
showing the video, explain to the students that the words to the song will be shown on the screen, and
they are to follow along singing with the song. Repeat the video three times, in order for the students
to get a general knowledge of the song relating to the planets and their order. When the video is
finished, the teacher will ask, “What is wrong with the video we just sang-a-long with.” Hopefully, the
students will answer that Pluto is not a planet! If not, explain to them why Pluto is not a planet, found
on yesterday’s science lesson plan. When the students have an understanding of why Pluto is not a
planet anymore, ask the students if they can recall the song by telling the teacher the order in which the
planets are in. If the students can recall, great! Write on the white board: My Very Excellent Mother
Just Served Us Nachos. When finished writing, ask the students, “How can we relate this sentence with
the order of the planets?” When finished answering, ask the students which planet begins with the
letter M. If a student answers Mercury, then write it on the board under My, because the answer is
correct. If a student answers Mars, show the sing-a-long video again, so the students can see what the
answer is. Once the correct answer is given, move along. Ask the students which planet begins with the
letter V. If the students answer Venus, write in on the board under Very, because the answer is correct.
If the students are not sure what planet starts with V, show the sing-a-long video again. When the
students give the correct answer, ask them which planet starts with the letter E. The students should
know this answer, and again write it under Excellent. But if not, show the sing-a-long video again. Next,
ask the students which other planet begins with the letter M. If they answer Mars, then write it under
Mother, if they do not know, show the sing-a-long video again. When the students get the answer
correct, ask them what planet begins with J. If a student answers Jupiter, then write in on the board
under Just. If the students are unsure of the answer, show the sing-a-long. When the students get the
correct answer, ask the students what planet starts with the letter S. If a student answers Saturn, then
write it on the board under Served. If the students are unsure of the answer, show the sing-a-long.
When the students answer correctly, ask them what planet starts with the letter U. If a student answers
Uranus, then write it on the board under Us. If the students are unsure, have them watch the sing-a-
long. When the students answer correctly, ask them what planet begins with the letter N. If a student
answers Neptune, write the answer on the board under Nachos. If the students are not sure of the
answer, have them watch the sing-a-long. When the students have all of the correct answers, explain
how the mnemonic relates to the order of the planets. When the students seem to understand, play the
sing-a-long one more time and have all of the students sing together.
Procedures:

    1. The student will take out a piece of paper and a pencil.
    2. The student will be instructed to make their own mnemonic for the order of the planets. They
        can be as creative as they want.
    3. The student will be given ten minutes to create their unique mnemonic.
    4. The student will hand in their mnemonic, but it will not be graded.
    5. The student will be given the acrostic poem template attached to the lesson plan.
    6. The student will be given my example, attached to the lesson plan.
    7. The student will be directed to read aloud with the class the directions on the on the acrostic
        poem template.
    8. The student will be given ten minutes to create their poem.
    9. When finished, the student will hand in their acrostic poem, but it will not be graded.
    10. The student will be instructed to take out another piece of paper, and to write down how they
        think a ninth planet would look, and what characteristics it would have.
    11. The student will be given a Styrofoam ball that is located in the Science cabinet.
    12. When all of the Styrofoam balls are handed out, the student will be allowed to get their coloring
        markers.
    13. The student will be directed to make their own planet that they have created on their piece of
        paper.
    14. The student will be allowed to use whatever colors, shapes, or anything they want in order to
        create their own planet.
    15. The student will be given 30 minutes to create their own unique planets.
    16. When students are done with their planets, the student will be instructed to make a name for
        their planet. The planet’s name should be “Planet (their name).” So for example, my planet’s
        name would be “Planet Sadie.”

Closing:

Today we learned the order of the planets. Each of you created your own mnemonic and acrostic poem
to help you relate the planets to your experiences using your own creativity, in order to help you
remember the planets and their order. We also learned how unique our creativity is to each one of us
by creating our own planet. Now I would like each one of you to come to the front of the class and
explain why you chose to create your planet the way you did. (During recess, or specials time, hang the
planets on the classroom ceiling with paper clips.)

Follow-Up Activity:

For a follow up activity, I will try to allot time for a field trip to the planetarium. Permission from the
planetarium, principle, and parents/guardians will be obtained.
Adaptations and Accommodations:

    1. If a student needs one-on-one instruction during the writing activities, make sure to help,
       especially the ESL students in the classroom.
    2. Andrea should be given the enlarged print of the lyrics that goes along with the sing-a-long,
       which is attached to the lesson plan. She may also need extra help decorating her planet.
    3. Steven will need help holding the Styrofoam ball while decorating it, because it will be hard for
       him to hold the ball, while decorating it, because he only has one hand due to a birth defect.

Evaluation:

There will be no evaluation given. This lesson is to give the students a chance to make creative ways
that will help them learn the order of the planets; however, the student should successfully create their
own unique planet.

Connections to Real World Context:

    1. It is important for students to know that Pluto is no longer a planet. The quicker they are
       informed about Pluto being taken out of the Solar System, the easier it will be for them to grasp
       it. This will help the students in their future Science lessons.
    2. The students could one day relate what they have learned to Solar System findings by scientists
       in the future. For example, I had just read recently that scientists think they have found a new
       planet. The students could relate the planets they made to the new planet.

Materials:

    1.   YouTube video: “Anamaniacs-Our Solar System Sing-A-Long”
    2.   Enlarged print of the words to the YouTube video (for Andrea)
    3.   Previous Science lesson plan to go back to why Pluto is not a planet
    4.   Acrostic poem template
    5.   Example of Acrostic poem
    6.   Styrofoam ball
    7.   Coloring materials
    8.   Paperclips

Citations:

    1. (April 18, 2008). Anamaniacs-our solar system singalong. Retrieved September 21,
       2010, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8eFFnJsCjs
       Enlarged Print for YouTube Sing-A-Long




The closest to the sun is the planet
MERCURY. Next the shrouded planet
VENUS is as cloudy as can be. The
EARTH is next; we call it home, let’s
hope it stays that way. And then there’s
MARS it’s really red. What more can I
say! The gassy planet JUPITER’S as big as
planets come. Then there’s SATURN with
its mighty rings made up of tiny crumbs.
We travel on to NEPTUNE that’s a gassy,
freezing ball, and cold and tiny PLUTO,
it’s the furthest one of all!
                                    Acrostic Poem


Name: ____________________________                                   Date: _____________


Directions: Using the characteristics of each planet that we have learned, and the order of the
planets, create your own acrostic poem. On each line, start with the first planet’s first letter and
write a property of that planet, then write the second planet’s first letter and write a property
of that planet. Keep going for all eight planets. Do not forget to list the planets in order,
closest to the sun to the farthest. If you have any questions, ask for my help or to hear my
example.
        Example of Acrostic Poem to Read Aloud to the Students


M-ercury is the hottest planet because it is right next to the sun. It is also the
smallest planet.



V-enus is known as the cloud planet.



E-arth is made of water and land; it is also the planet on which we live.



M-ars is known as the red planet, because of its properties.



J-upiter is the largest planet of the solar system and the most gaseous.



S-aturn is the ringed planet, sometimes called “Lord of the Rings.”



U-ranus is the only planet that rotates on its side.



N-eptune is known as the blue planet, because it is covered in water.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:59
posted:9/16/2012
language:English
pages:7