Intellectually disabled sex offenders and non-intellectually by kPdDEQ8

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									Intellectually disabled sex offenders and
non-intellectually disabled sex offenders:
a comparison of phallometric test results


Ranger, R., Fedoroff, P. and Curry, S.
Forensic Research Unit
University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research
Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre
                                   Methods
Based on previous research, higher levels of overall sexual arousal and lower levels of
sexual arousal discrimination were expected to be exhibited in the group of intellectually
disabled sex offenders when compared to the other group.

Research files of adult men who had received treatment or assessment at the Sexual
Behaviours Clinic of the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre were used.

Non-parametric statistics were computed to test differences between groups.

  1 – N-ID-SO                       Non-Intellectually disabled sex offenders
  IQ Scores                         > 85
  N                                 52
  Sexual Interest                   Admitted sexual interest in children
  2 – ID-SO                         Intellectually disabled sex offenders
  IQ Scores                         < 70
  N                                 45
  Sexual Interest                   Admitted sexual interest in children
                                Ranger, R., Fedoroff, P. and Curry,
                                            S. (2012)
                                 Results
•   Matched on gender of victims (X²(2, N = 97) = 0.43, ns).
•   Matched on number of victims (Mann-Whitney U=768.0; ns). Median number of
    victims of 1 (range 1-16).
•   Matched on age group of victims (X²(2, N = 97) = 0.702,ns)
•   Degree of violence committed during the sexual behaviour did not differ between
    groups (Somers’ d .018 (Approx. T=.182; ns). The mode peaked at “minor injury” (N-
    ID-SO=53.8%; ID-SO=47.7%)
• Degree of intrusiveness of sexual behaviour. The mode peaked
  at “touch over and/or under clothing” (N-ID-SO=50%; ID-SO=60%),
  however the N-ID-SO group had a higher incidence of sexual
  intercourse (36.5%) than their ID-SO counterparts (15.6%)
  (Somers’ d -.236 ;Approx. T=-2.632; p = .008).




                            Ranger, R., Fedoroff, P. and Curry,
                                        S. (2012)
                         Results (2)
**Phallometry: an objective
   measurement of changes in
                                            Child Stimuli Median N-ID-SO
   penile circumference in                 ID-SO                1.62 X² = .477, ns.
   response to sexual stimuli**
                                           N-ID-SO             1.135
To test the hypotheses that the ID-SO
   group had higher overall arousal
   and less arousal discrimination,         Adult Stimuli Median N-ID-SO
   chi-square analyses were
   computed using Kruskal-Wallis for       ID-SO                1.17 X² = 1.049, ns.
   the three audio tapes.
1 - The Child audio tape involved          N-ID-SO              1.75
   sexual scenarios with a child
2 - The Adult audio tape involved
   sexual scenarios with a                 C-Coerce Stimuli Median N-ID-SO
   consenting adult
3 - The Child Coerce audio tape            ID-SO                      1.8 X² = .042, ns.
   involved coercive sexual                N-ID-SO                    1.4
   scenarios with a child
                         Ranger, R., Fedoroff, P. and Curry,
                                     S. (2012)
                                       Results (3)
                            Median Differences in Milimeters of
                             Change to Phallometric Stimuli
                       20
Milimeters of Change




                       15
                                                                             ID-SO
                       10                                                    N-ID-SO

                       5

                       0       Adult        Child       Child Coercive
                                       Ranger, R., Fedoroff, P. and Curry,
                                                   S. (2012)
                                                                Conclusions
•       Gender of victim, number of victim and age group of victim were compared for ID-SO
        and N-ID-SO. No significant differences were found. Both groups were similar in
        violence of sexual behaviour, however the N-ID-SO were significantly more likely
        to have engaged in more intrusive sexual behaviour when compared to ID-SO.

•       No significant differences were found between ID-SO and N-ID-SO on their
        responses to phallometric audio tapes. ID-SO displayed similar overall arousal to
        their N-ID-SO counterparts. ID-SO and N-ID-SO are not as different as predicted
        in terms of their arousal to phallometric stimuli.

•       Future research should focus on differences in sexual orientation between groups as
        well as control for medications at the time of phallometric assessment, as they can
        affect the results of the testing.
References and Acknowledgments

Blanchard, R., Watson, M., Choy, A., Dickey, R., Klassen, P., Kuban, M., et al. (1999). Pedophiles: mental retardation, maternal age, and sexual orientation. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 28(2), 111-127.
Rea, J., DeBriere, T., Butler, K., & Saunders, K. (1998). An analysis of four sexual offenders’ arousal in the natural environment through the use of a portable penile plethysmograph. Sexual Abuse: A
         Journal of Research and Treatment, 10(3), 239-255.
Reyes, J., Vollmer, T., Sloman, K., Hall, A., Reed, R., Jansen, G., et al. (2006). Assessment of deviant arousal in adult male sex offenders with developmental disabilities. Journal of Applied Behavior
         Analysis, 39, 173-188.
Rice, M., Harris, G., Lang, C., & Chaplin, T. (2008). Sexual preferences and recidivism of sex offenders with mental retardation. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 20(4), 409-425.

Forensic Research Unit, University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research

Sexual Behaviours Clinic, Integrated Forensic Program, Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre

Research Ethics Board, University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research

                                                                    Ranger, R., Fedoroff, P. and Curry,
                                                                                S. (2012)

								
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