World History Study Guide - Download as DOC by eYhL5doH

VIEWS: 9 PAGES: 14

									                American History Study Guide

Theme: Modern Democracy in the Global Era- Opportunities
                  and Challenges



Core Questions:
   What role have the six elements of geography played in the
     development of American Society?
   How and why did the United States develop into an
     economically, culturally, and politically developed nation?
   To what extent have the ideals of democracy and freedom
     influenced U.S. history?
   How can Americans overcome the violence and conflicts of
     the past to achieve unity and foster opportunities for all
     citizens?
   To what extend has Florida’s history mirrored the United
     States’ history? In what ways is Florida history unique?
Unit 1
Unit Question

What makes a democratic nation?

Time Frame

Block: 8 periods
Traditional: 12 periods

Key Concepts

1) The interactions of early European explorers and colonists
   with Native Americans influenced patterns of colonial
   settlement.
2) Revolution-era ideals provided the basis for competing
   interpretations of American national identity.
3) The Constitution established the first republic in the modern
   world and endures because it is a “living” document.

Additional Goals

      Reading maps and timelines
      Interpreting primary sources and political cartoons

Unit Performance Assessment

Students will write a persuasive essay assessing the extent to
which the Constitution has enabled the United States to live up
to the revolutionary ideals on which it was founded.
Unit 2
Unit Question

How can a diverse nation maintain unity?

Time Frame

Block: 10-11 periods
Traditional: 16 periods

Key Concepts

1) The formation of factions within the Washington
   administration led to the creation of America’s first political
   parties.
2) The desire to settle in the West led to opportunities for
   European Americans and the destruction of Native American
   cultures.
3) The United States divided along sectional lines prior to the
   Civil War.
4) American Society fractured into conflict and violence during
   the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Additional Goals

        Analyzing primary sources and political cartoons
        Using charts, tables, and graphs
        Assessing events from multiple perspectives
        Participating in role pay and simulations
Unit Performance Assessment

Students will create a series of visual representations that portray
various events and developments that affected national unity prior
to and during the Civil War. Visual representations should also
assess the extent to which national unity was reestablished as a
result of Reconstruction.
  Unit 3
  Unit Question

  What is the proper role of government?

  Time Frame

  Block: 10-11 periods
  Traditional: 16 periods

  Key Concepts

  1) Many factors enabled and fueled industrial growth in the
     United States, which had positive and negative effects on
     American society.
  2) Although reformers worked to correct the worst abuses of big
     business and government, progressive presidents made
     limited political and economic reforms.
  3) Women, African Americans, and other marginalized groups
     attempted to secure and/or expand their rights and
     opportunities.
  4) The federal government increased America’s power by
     following imperialist policies.

  Additional Goals

      Analyzing primary/secondary sources and political
       cartoons
      Fact versus opinion

Unit Performance Assessment

Students will create a campaign for an early 20th-century political
party that includes a platform outlining its domestic and foreign
policy goals.
Unit 4
Unit Question

Why do some nations play large roles in world affairs?

Time Frame

Block: 8 periods
Traditional: 12 periods

Key Concepts

1) The United States’ entry into World War I played a critical
   role in ending this prolonged and bloody conflict.
2) World War I created new opportunities for the
   underrepresented, while attacks on the civil liberties of
   immigrants and political dissidents increased.
3) The United States returned to isolation at the end of World
   War I, and at the terms of peace set for another international
   conflict.


Additional Goals

   Debating foreign policy
   Analyzing negotiations and primary sources


Unit Performance Assessment

Students will participate in a post-World War I debate between
American internationalists and isolationists.
Unit 5
Unit Question

How do times of hardship and change test a nation and its
people?

Time Frame

Block: 13-14 periods
Traditional: 20 periods

Key Concepts

1) The 1920’s were marked by economic prosperity, an
   increasing cultural divide between urban and rural dwellers,
   and a rebirth of African American culture.
2) The Great Depression created unprecedented hardship for
   Americans.
3) The New Deal dramatically changed the relationship between
   the American government and its citizens.
4) Allied military successes helped secure victory in Europe,
   while victory in the Pacific was achieved through America’s
   controversial use of nuclear weapons.
5) Americans at home played a vital role in the course of World
   War II.

Additional Goals

     Interpreting charts, tables, and graphs
     Engaging in debate/discussion
     Interpreting primary sources
     Analyzing maps
Unit Performance Assessment

Students will work in small groups to create a graphic novel
about a fictitious family that chronicles the impact of, and
responses to, the major events and developments of the period
on their lives.
Unit 6
Unit Question

What is the best way to organize society?

Time Frame

Block: 8 periods
Traditional: 12 periods

Key Concepts

  1) After World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union
     began a rivalry that dominated international relations for
     nearly 50 years.
  2) With the onset of the Cold War, Americans faced intense
     pressure to support the U.S. government.
  3) The United States and Soviet Union competed for the
     allegiance of emerging nations.

Additional Goals

     Analyzing maps and primary sources
     Engaging in simulations
     Interpreting timelines
     Analyzing case studies


Unit Performance Assessment

Students will design a museum exhibit of artifacts that portray the
origins and major events of the Cold War as well as an analysis of
the Cold War’s impact on American society to answer the Unit
Question, What is the best way to organize society?
Unit 7
Unit Question

In what ways do freedom and fairness come into conflict?

Time Frame

Block: 8 periods
Traditional: 12 periods

Key Concepts

1) After World War II, unprecedented economic growth
   provided many Americans with expanded economic
   opportunities, but also created a larger divide between the
   rich and the poor.
2) The civil rights movement attempted to eliminate the legal
   barriers that limited the rights of African Americans as well
   as the social practices that affected their social status.
3) The civil rights movement made great strides in achieving
   equality for African Americans and set the stage for women
   and other dispossessed groups to secure their rights.

Additional Goals

     Analyzing art as social commentary
     Interpreting primary/secondary sources
     Engaging in public speaking
     Consensus building
     Promoting activism
Unit Performance Assessment

Students will create a multimedia presentation that identifies
and analyzes the conditions that led to the civil rights movement
and evaluates the various goals and tactics of its key
participants.
Unit 8
Unit Question

Whose country is this?

Time Frame

Block: 10-11 periods
Traditional: 16 periods

Key Concepts

  1) The Vietnam War increased existing divisions in American
     society.
  2) Reform movements in the 1960’s and 1970’s were inspired
     by and modeled after the civil rights movement.
  3) In the 1960’s, the desire for change amongst adolescent baby
     boomers affected many existing cultural and political
     institutions.
  4) Watergate profoundly impacted Americans’ trust in their
     government and its leaders.

Additional Goals

   Promoting activism and citizenship
   Increasing community involvement

Unit Performance Assessment

Students will create thematic timelines that identify and describe
the events and developments that brought political and social
changes to the United States during the 1960’s and 1970’s and
analyze how these events and developments were interrelated.
Unit 9
Unit Question

What does the future hold?

Time Frame

Block: 13-14 periods
Traditional: 20 periods

Key Concepts

1) Presidents in the 1980’s cut government spending on social
   programs.
2) Conservative political leaders advocated increased military
   engagement with communist governments.
3) Economic expansion, major technological changes, and the
   rising power of special-interest groups characterized the
   1990’s.
4) In the early years of the 21st century, globalization has
   increased opportunity and anxiety in American society.
5) The events of September 11, 2001, focused U.S. attention on
   issues of global and national security, including how to
   respond to terrorism.

Additional Goals

     Utilizing GIS maps
     Analyzing cast studies
     Interpreting current events and political cartoons
     Engaging in debate/discussion
     Reading social commentary in art
Unit Performance Assessment

Students will create an educational pamphlet which identifies
the major domestic and foreign policy challenges the United
States faces as it moves into the 21st century and assess the
nation’s ability to address them.

								
To top