Continuum of Care NOFA 2006 by ed6WhU3

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									Philadelphia’s 10-Year Plan:
Intake, Shelter and the
System of Housing and
Services

Presentation of Preliminary Data
         July 11, 2006
Prepared for
the Mayor’s Task Force
on Homeless Services
                          John F. Street, Mayor
                Pedro A. Ramos, Esq., Managing Director
                Dainette Mintz, Deputy Managing Director

     Prepared by the Center for Urban Community Services



                                                           2
July 11, 2006
Agenda
   1.     Introduction
   2.     Data Sources
   3.     Point in Time and Annual Homeless Count Data
   4.     Shelter Intake
   5.     Emergency Shelter
   6.     Transitional Housing
   7.     Permanent Supportive Housing
   8.     Next Steps




                                                         3
 July 11, 2006
                                                    1. Introduction


Meeting Objectives
1.      Present preliminary findings from Phase I Data
        Collection
2.      Receive feedback on information presented
3.      Identify additional data for collection
4.      Review project timeline and process




                                                                      4
     July 11, 2006
                                                           2. Data Sources


Data Sources
CUCS obtained quantitative data from the following sources:
1. OESS
        Agency budgets
        Homeless Management Information System (HMIS)
        HUD Annual Performance Reports (APRs)
        Transitional Housing Database
        HUD Supportive Housing Program Database
2. OHCD
        Shelter Plus Care Database
3. Project HOME
        Outreach Coordination Center and Grace Cafe
4. DBH
        Chronically Homeless Data
5. UPenn Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research (CMHPSR)
        Emergency Shelter Data


                                                                          5
  July 11, 2006
                                                      2. Data Sources


Data Sources
CUCS reviewed relevant planning and research documents
  including:
    The 2006 Consolidated Plan
    The 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness
    HUD Exhibit 1 for 2005 and 2006
    Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) Action Plan
    Homeless research articles and presentations (Burt,
      Culhane, Maguire, Poulin)




                                                                    6
  July 11, 2006
                                                                          2. Data Sources


Data Sources
CUCS conducted interviews and focus groups with:
1. OESS/OAS
        Deputy Managing Director
        Director of OESS
        Director of Policy and Planning
        Project Manager for 10-Year Plan
        Information Technology Manager and Project Leader
        Intake Staff
        McKinney Grant Specialist
        Other administrative and policy staff
2. Department of Behavioral Health and Mental Retardation Services
    (DDBH/MRS)
     Representatives from:
      Office of Mental Health (OMH)
      Coordinating Office for Drug and Alcohol Abuse Programs (CODAAP)
      Community Behavioral Health (CBH)
3. Shelter and Transitional Housing Provider Organizations
4. Consumers



                                                                                        7
   July 11, 2006
                                                      2. Data Sources


Data Sources
CUCS visited the following locations*:
    Family Reception and Eligibility Determination (FRED) and
    
    Ridge Avenue Intake Centers
   12 family and single adult emergency shelters
   3 transitional housing programs
CUCS interviewed the following people on site:
   OESS administrative staff
   Intake specialists
   Directors of programs
   Case managers
   Connections staff
   Consumers


* Site visit dates: May 16-17, June 13, June 28
                                                                    8
  July 11, 2006
                                                         3. Basic Facts


Point in Time Homeless Count Information
On the night of January 25, 2006:
 A total of 3,079 people were living in city-funded shelters
     1,469 were single adults – 1,122 males, 347 females,
    ~500 chronically homeless
     510 were households with children for a total of 1,610 people
     1,068 of them were children, ~900 of them were youth 16-21
     The average family size was 3.15 people with 2.1 children
 In addition, there were ~250 persons residing in Sunday Breakfast
  Rescue Mission and other faith-based shelters
 313 people were living on the streets (237 in center city)

Sources: OESS and Outreach Coordination Center



                                                                          9
  July 11, 2006
                                                               3. Basic Facts


Point in Time Homeless Count Information
 Using data from the same date in 2005, these
   numbers represent:
     8% (240 people) increase in the total number of
      people in shelters
             5% increase in single adults in shelters
             12% increase in people in families in shelters
    An increase of 105 people living on the streets in
    
    Center City
 The number of persons in shelters has increased by
  22% since 2003

Sources: OESS and Outreach Coordination Center
                                                                            10
  July 11, 2006
                                                          3. Basic Facts


Annual Count of Homeless Persons
 In 2005, there were 14,999 persons (unduplicated) who used
   the OESS shelter system
     9,471 -- single individuals
     2,004 -- heads of households
     3,506 -- children


 20% of the single individuals (1,918 of 9,471) who had a shelter
   stay in 2005 had been homeless one year or longer or had four
   homeless episodes in three years

 13% of families (255 of 2004) had been homeless one year or
   longer or had four homeless episodes in three years


Sources: OESS HMIS, UPenn CMHPSR

                                                                       11
   July 11, 2006
                                                3. Basic Facts


Chronically Homeless Persons
For 1999-2002, 2731 individuals met the criteria for
chronic homelessness
    41% had received substance abuse treatment for
     the uninsured
    10% had received services through the criminal
     justice initiatives
    52% had received public funded health services
    79% had active Medicaid at some time in last four
     years


    Source: Maguire, DBH


                                                             12
  July 11, 2006
                                                                         4. Shelter Intake


Intake – Consumer Profile
Characteristics of persons (singles and heads of household) that presented
at the intake centers from 1/1/06-3/31/06
Source: HMIS

Gender                Actual#      %   Race                                   #         %
Female                 1,208     52%   Black\African American            1,884        81%
Male                   1,104     48%   White                               341        15%
Transgender                2      0%   Black\non-African American           41         2%
Total                  2,314    100%   Not Applicable                       32         1%
                                       Asian                                27         1%
                                       Don't Know                           17         1%
                                       American Indian                      11         0%
                                       No Data                               5         0%
                                       Refused                               2         0%
                                       Native Hawaiian                       1         0%
                                       Pacific Islander (non-Hawaiian)       1         0%
                                       Alaskan Native                        1         0%



                                                                                        13
  July 11, 2006
                                                                                 4. Shelter Intake


Intake – Consumer Profile
  Characteristics of persons (singles and heads of household) that presented
  at the intake centers from 1/1/06-3/31/06
  Source: HMIS
Presenting Problem                     #     %
Evicted from Friend/Relative        661    29%   Secondary Problem                    #           %
Building Emergency                  196     8%   Evicted by Friend/Relative        533         23%
Legal/Illegal Eviction              177     8%   Insufficient Income/Resources     500         22%
Homeless Prevention                 144     6%   No Data                           735         20%
Evicted from Private Market         143     6%   Drug/Alcohol Issues               421         18%
Rent problems                       124     5%   Conflict with Family/Friends      240         10%
Fire Victim                          96     4%   Mental Health Problem             183          8%
Released from Prison                 78     3%   Medical Problem                   153          7%
Voluntary Left Friend/Relative       73     3%   Loss of Income                    137          6%
Domestic Violence                    66     3%   Loss of Employment                134          6%
Private Market Scheduled Eviction    50     2%   Depression                         76          3%
Stranded, non-resident               40     2%   None                               64          3%
L&I Unfit property                   40     2%   Poor Financial Management          53          2%
Other                               450    19%   Lost Job                           43          2%
                                                 Others                            439         19%
                                                                                                14
    July 11, 2006
                                                                    4. Shelter Intake


Intake Process– Single Men
Single men seeking shelter present at the Ridge Intake Center on Ridge
     Avenue
1.   Client enters Ridge Intake Center on Ridge Avenue
2.   Client goes through security check
3.   Client proceeds to Front Desk
4.   Service Rep at Front Desk enters client’s name in HMIS to see if the
     person is in system to assess if client has open purchase of services
     (POS) and what services client has received in the past
5.   Service Rep finds out from client what services are needed (shelter,
     community services, medical, food, appointment, etc) and assesses
     who should assist client. If client has special needs (medical, mental
     health), client is diverted to Special Needs worker
6.   Client sits in day room until worker can assist client with issue. Client
     may participate in dayroom activities – church service, presentations,
     haircuts, etc.
                                                                                   15
   July 11, 2006
                                                                      4. Shelter Intake


Intake Process – Single Men
7.      If client needs shelter placement – sees Intake Social Worker
8.      Intake Social Worker assesses if homeless diversion is possible –
        does client have other housing options with friends or family or can
        they go back where they came from
9.      If no diversion is possible, and client qualifies for shelter, Intake
        Social Worker checks vacancies and matches client with a shelter
        and issues a purchase of services (POS)
10.     Intake Social Worker conducts Reception Interview and provides
        information to client on rights and responsibilities at the shelter. In
        addition, a TB screen is conducted.
11.     If there are no vacancies, client may stay in overflow beds at Ridge,
        overflow beds in another shelter, or in “sit-ups” (chairs) at Ridge
12.     Client receives transportation assistance to get to shelter
13.     HMIS is used at shelter to collect additional data and track services

                                                                                     16
     July 11, 2006
                                                                                  4. Shelter Intake


Intake Process Steps – Single Women & Families
Single women and families seeking shelter present at Family Reception and
      Eligibility Determination (FRED) Intake Center

1.      Client enters FRED Intake Center*
2.      Client goes to Front Desk
3.      Service Rep looks in HMIS to see if client name is in system and to assess if
        client has open POS and what services client has received
4.      Service Rep finds out from client what services are needed (shelter,
        community services, medical, food, appointment, etc) and assesses who
        should assist client. If client has special needs (medical, mental health, etc),
        client is diverted to Special Needs worker
5.      There is also a Social Worker at the front desk who can do crisis intervention
        or conduct the reception interview immediately if needed
5.      If it is determined that family will likely receive shelter, an immunization history
        is taken and immunizations are provided to children if needed
6.      Client sits in waiting area until worker can assist client

*After 4:00 clients go to Eliza Shirley (Salvation Army) for shelter intake



                                                                                               17
     July 11, 2006
                                                                     4. Shelter Intake


Intake Process Steps – Single Women & Families
7.  If client needs shelter placement – sees Intake Social Worker
8.  Intake Social Worker assesses if homeless diversion is possible –
    does client have other housing options with friends or family or can
    they go back where they came from. Social Worker works closely
    with client and family and friends of client to make other housing
    arrangements when possible.
9.  If client qualifies for shelter, client may be placed in Eliza Shirley on a
    temporary basis (7-14 days) until another placement is made or may
    be placed at another shelter. The Intake Social Worker places clients
    depending on needs and family configuration and works to match
    these with vacancies in system
10. Intake Social Worker issues POS and apprises client of rights and
    responsibilities at the shelter.
11. Client receives transportation assistance to get to shelter
12. HMIS is used at shelter to collect additional data and track services
                                                                                   18
     July 11, 2006
                                                                          5. Emergency
                                                                              Shelter


Shelter – Consumer Profile
Characteristics of persons in emergency shelters – families (including
children) and singles from 1/1/06-3/15/06
Source: OAS - HMIS

Gender                Actual#      %   Race                                 #        %
Female                 2,505     38%   Black\African American          5,291       85%
Male                   4,084     62%   White                             716       11%
Transgender                3      0%   Black\non-African American        121        2%
                                       Asian                             111        2%
Total                  6,592    100%
                                       Total                           6,239      100%


 Age Range                  #      %    Case Type                           #       %
 0-5                     631      9%    Single - No Kids               4,150      63%
 6 - 11                  443      7%    Single Adult Family w/ Kids    1,827      28%
 12 - 17                 395      6%    Multi-Adult Family w/ Kids       325       5%
 18 - 20                 175      2%    Married Couple - w/ Kids         167       2%
 21 - 30                 832     13%    Other Multi-Adult w/o Minors      99       1%
 31 - 40               1,268     19%    Married Couple - No Kids          44       1%
 41 - 50               1,827     28%
 51 - 65                 946     14%    Total                          6,612     100%
 66 +                    106      2%
 Total                 6,623    100%
                                                                                        19
   July 11, 2006
                                                                     5. Emergency
                                                                         Shelter


Shelter – Consumer Profile
Characteristics of single consumers in emergency shelters in 2005
Source: OESS HMIS - UPENN CMHPSR

                                     Length of Stay                   #            %
 Gender                 #       %    <1 Week                     1,516           17%
 Male              6,902      74%    1 Week to 1 Month           2,548           29%
 Female            2,440      26%    1 Month to 3 Months         2,758           32%
 Transgender           4       0%    3 Months to 6 Months        1,097           13%
 Total             9,346     100%    6 Months to 1 Year            523            6%
                                     > 1 Year                      281            3%
                                     Total                       8,723          100%
Age Range                #      %
18 to 25 years        822      9%      The average length of stay was 72 days
25 to 35 years      1,421     15%
35 to 45 years      3,222     34%
45 to 55 years      2,830     30%
55 to 65 years        923     10%
> 65 years            250      3%
Total               9,468    100%

                                                                                   20
   July 11, 2006
                                                                     5. Emergency
                                                                         Shelter


Shelter – Consumer Profile
Characteristics of families (heads of household) in emergency shelters in
2005
Source: OESS – HMIS UPENN CMHPSR

Gender                    #       %    Length of Stay                  #            %
                                       < 1 Week                     362           19%
Male                   274      14%
                                       1 Week to 1 Month            341           18%
Female               1,734      86%
                                       1 Month to 3 Months          550           29%
Total                2,008     100%    3 Months to 6 Months         342           18%
                                       6 Months to 1 Year           203           11%
                                       > 1 Year                      85            5%
Age Range                 #       %
                                       Total                      1,883          100%
18 to 25 years         641      32%
25 to 35 years         690      34%     The average length of stay was 95 days
35 to 45 years         510      25%
45 to 55 years         142       7%
55 to 65 years          23       1%
> 65 years               5       0%
Total                2,011     100%


                                                                                   21
  July 11, 2006
                                                                                5. Emergency
                                                                                    Shelter


Shelter - Inventory
   There are 3,037 emergency shelter beds
      1,341 beds for single adults
      1,696 beds for persons in families/516 units


   There are 36 emergency shelters (not including faith-based):
      10 for single men
      8 for single women
      14 for single women and families
      1 for couples (couples are also placed in three other shelters)
      3 for youth


   In addition, there are:
       ~400 beds from voucher, overflow and seasonal
       ~250 beds from faith-based shelters



sources: City of Philadelphia HUD McKinney Inventory, Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission



                                                                                           22
    July 11, 2006
                                                                   5. Emergency
                                                                       Shelter


Shelter - Inventory
 Single shelters
    Generally dorm style
    Largest shelters for men – Ridge and Outley with over 220 beds
     each
    Smallest shelters for men – Perkins and Good Shepard – under 15
     beds each
 Families with single women
    Generally share space 2-4 families per room
    Some have private family rooms
    Largest family shelter – Kirkbride (~300 beds) and Stenton (~200
     beds)
    Smallest family shelter – IHN Host Congregations – 17 beds


 The majority of shelters have case management, 7 of the family
   shelters have Family Shelter Support Teams (FaSST) and 6 of the
   single shelters have Connections linking clients to the behavioral health
   system

                                                                               23
  July 11, 2006
                                                                           5. Emergency
                                                                               Shelter


Shelter - Costs
Expense Category                                  FY2007     Average Variance Variance
                       FY2005       FY2006    (projected) Annual Cost 2006/2005 2007/2006
Shelters            19,081,090   22,392,489   22,327,594   21,267,058      17%        0%
Case Management      2,191,192    3,605,477     3,599,743   3,132,137      65%        0%
Lease                2,497,320    2,219,825     3,048,218   2,588,454     -11%       37%
Security               547,381      796,000       796,000     713,127      45%        0%
Maintenance            597,000      597,000       597,000     597,000       0%        0%
Food                 1,267,732    1,623,224     1,623,224   1,504,727      28%        0%

Total Expenses      26,181,715   31,234,015   31,991,779   29,802,503     19%         2%
Census                   2,479        2,770        2,853        2,701     12%         3%
Expenses Per Diem        28.94        30.89        30.72       30.18       7%        -1%




  Source: OESS/OAS agency budget
                                                                                       24
  July 11, 2006
                                                                                                                       5. Emergency
                                                                                                                           Shelter


Shelter – Site Visits
   The shelters visited & associated characteristics are listed in the table
   below.
                                                                                                           Services             #
Provider                 Facility                     Population Served                Config              Provided         Beds/Units
ACTS Christian                                      single women and female-   families share rooms     FaSST, CM
Transitional Services    ACTS - Master             headed households                                                                120
                                                    single men                  M share several large    Connections, LS,
Bethesda Project         Our Brothers Place                                    rooms                    JT                          150
Episcopal Community                                 single women and female-   F share rooms            FaSST, CM
Services                 St. Barnabus              headed households                                                                100
                                                    female and male-headed      both open and private   CM, FaSST
Mt. Airy Bethesda        Stenton Family Manor      families                    rooms                                        206/65 units
People's Emergency                                  single women and female-   shared rooms             CM, JT
Center                   Emergency Shelter         headed households                                                         61/22 units
Resources for Human      Woodstock Family           single women and female-   F own room share K & B   CM,FaSST,
Development              Center                    headed households                                    Culinary program            215
                                                    single women and female-   F share space w/ part    Connections, RA
Salvation Army           Eliza Shirley             headed households           walls                                                125
                                                    couples, female and male   F has own motel room     FaSST, CM           118 beds/68
                         America's Best            headed households                                                               units
SELF Inc                                            single women               shared rooms             CM, Connections
                         Sheila Dennis                                                                                              115
                                                    single men                 shared rooms             CM
                         Low Demand                                                                                                 115
Somerset                                            single women               shared rooms             CM, Connections
                         Womens                                                                                                      66
                                                    female and male-headed     families share rooms     FaSST, CM
Traveler's Aid Society   Kirkbride                 families                                                                         314
                                                                                                                                           25
      July 11, 2006           Key: LS=life skills, JT=job training, RA=residential aids, CM=case management
                                                                  5. Emergency
                                                                      Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Findings from visits to the shelters clustered into the 7 main categories
listed below. Findings from each category are presented on the slides
that follow.

I.       Causes of Homelessness
II.      Co-occurring Conditions and Life Issues
III.     Trends in shelter population
IV.      Program Successes
V.       Shelter Challenges
VI.      Challenges to Exiting Shelter
VII.     System Challenges


                                                                             26
  July 11, 2006
                                                  5. Emergency
                                                      Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category I - Causes of Homelessness
    Women - Single and with children

    Forced out of family or friend’s house
    Fleeing domestic violence
    Eviction
    Mental health issues
    Insufficient income to afford an apartment
    Seeking subsidized housing




                                                             27
    July 11, 2006
                                                            5. Emergency
                                                                Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category I - Causes of Homelessness
    Single Men

    Drug use
    Inability to manage physical and mental disabilities
    Loss of employment
    Eviction
    Persons living in sub-standard conditions being forced out due
     to gentrification




                                                                       28
    July 11, 2006
                                                            5. Emergency
                                                                Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category II – Co-occurring Conditions and Life Challenges


 Substance use issues that prevented them from living on their
  own
 Key informants reported that over half of the consumers in the
  emergency shelter system were living with mental health issues
 Key informants estimated that over half of the women in shelter
  had histories of sexual abuse and trauma that was never treated
 Many consumers in the emergency shelter system had been
  homeless as children and/or had histories in foster care




                                                                       29
 July 11, 2006
                                                       5. Emergency
                                                           Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category III – Trends in Shelter Population



 More consumers presenting with mental health issues
 Very young mothers who struggle to parent effectively
 Persons unable to navigate life -- manage a household, budget,
  or hold down a job
 Persons with literacy issues -- many not completed high school
 “Generational returnees” – homeless children who have become
  homeless parents




                                                                   30
 July 11, 2006
                                                           5. Emergency
                                                               Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category IV – Program Successes – What is working



 Consumers noted that their case managers were assisting them
     with housing placements, education and receiving benefits
    Some consumers reported success with job training and
     placement and were eager to work
    Mothers in shelters reported that when childcare was provided
     they were able to work towards their educational and
     employment goals.
    Several consumers noted that they had created an important
     network of support at the shelter between case managers and
     other peers
    Providers reported having success in hiring former clients as
     staff
                                                                      31
    July 11, 2006
                                                 5. Emergency
                                                     Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category V – Shelter Challenges
 Women – Single and with children

 Case management service provision varies among
  shelters – some programs have evolved specific
  expertise with certain groups and populations
 Conflicts can arise when multiple families reside in
  one room and mediating conflict takes up staff time
 Consumers reported privacy concerns because of
  shared space with other families
 Families may need to be separated in the case of
  two-parent households, male-headed households
  and families with older boys

                                                            32
 July 11, 2006
                                                                5. Emergency
                                                                    Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category V – Shelter Challenges
    Single Men
 Key informants noted that large shelters can be chaotic and
     difficult to manage
    Case management service provision varies among shelters –
     some programs have evolved specific expertise with certain
     groups and populations
    Clients with behavior problems are a challenge to serve
    It was noted that it can be difficult to collect shelter fees and
     savings
    Accommodating working men is a challenge in the shelters



                                                                           33
    July 11, 2006
                                                             5. Emergency
                                                                 Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category VI – Challenges to Exiting Shelter



 Consumers do not earn enough money to pay market rents
 Consumers may not meet requirements for transitional housing
 Shelter staff noted long waits for transitional housing
 Shelter staff reported that many clients need transitional housing
 Consumers may not have the skills to live independently
 Decent, affordable housing options on the open market are
  extremely limited
 There is a long wait for subsidized housing
 It was reported that it is difficult to place large families, persons
  with histories with criminal justice system, undocumented
  persons and persons with D&A issues
                                                                          34
    July 11, 2006
                                                                 5. Emergency
                                                                     Shelter
Shelter – Reports from Site Visits and Provider
Interviews
Category VII – System Challenges


 Key informants noted that there is a need for specialized shelters for
  specific services/populations, e.g., Employment, Mental Health, D&A
  and low-demand programs
 There is no central source of information about transitional and
  permanent housing options in the city
 Coordination between city agencies can be difficult – e.g., OESS, DHS,
  DBH, although the DSS CARES database may assist with this process




                                                                            35
  July 11, 2006
                                                                                6. Transitional
                                                                                   Housing

Transitional Housing Clients
Single individuals who entered OESS transitional housing from June 2002-
June 2006
Source: OESS – Transitional Housing Database

Gender                      #          % Total   All clients discharged
                                                 from transitional
Female                     401          44.3%
                                                 housing (n=720)            #       % Total
Male                       504          55.7%
                                                 Unsubsidized Housing     138        39.9%
Total                      905         100.0%    Subsidized Housing        97        28.0%
Age Range at                                     Unknown                   65        18.8%
                                                 Private                   22         6.4%
Placement                   #          % Total   Permanent Housing          7         2.0%
18-24                      64            7.1%    D&A Program                3         0.9%
25-34                     108           12.0%    Jail/Prison                3         0.9%
35-44                     306           33.9%    Shelter                    3         0.9%
45-54                     327           36.2%    Hospice                    2         0.6%
                                                 SPC                        2         0.6%
55-64                      96           10.6%
                                                 Temporary                  2         0.6%
65 and up                   2            0.2%    Hospital                   1         0.3%
Total                     903          100.0%    WAA Shelter                1         0.3%

 Average length of stay for 12 month             Total                    346       100.0%
 TH program was 207 days                         no data=374

                                                                                              36
  July 11, 2006
                                                                6. Transitional
                                                                   Housing


Transitional Housing Clients
Characteristics of the 26% (164 of 639) of singles living in OESS-funded
transitional housing who were discharged from transitional housing
between June 2002-December 2005 and returned to shelter.
Source: OESS – Transitional Housing Database
Gender (Heads of
Household)                    #       % Total
Male                         127       77.4%
Female                        37       22.6%
Total                        164       100.0%

Age Range at
Placement                     #       % Total
18-24                        11         6.7%
25-34                        23        14.0%
35-44                        60        36.6%
45-54                        57        34.8%
55-64                        11         6.7%
65 and up                     2         1.2%

Total                       164        100.0%
                                                                              37
  July 11, 2006
                                                                                6. Transitional
                                                                                   Housing


Transitional Housing Clients
Families who entered OESS-funded transitional housing from June 2002-
June 2006
Source: OESS – Transitional Housing Database
Gender (Heads of
Household)                       #         % Total   All clients discharged
Male                             35          3.8%    from transitional
Female                          881         96.2%    housing (n=514)             #      % Total
                                                     Unsubsidized Housing     174        52.3%
Total                           916        100.0%
                                                     Subsidized Housing       109        32.7%
Age Range at                                         Unknown                    33        9.9%
Placement                         #        % Total   Private                     9        2.7%
18-24                           244         26.6%    Shelter                     3        0.9%
                                                     D&A Program                 2        0.6%
25-34                           334         36.4%
                                                     Temporary                   2        0.6%
35-44                           257         28.0%
                                                     SPC                         1        0.3%
45-54                            68          7.4%    Permanent Housing        -           0.0%
55-64                            12          1.3%    Jail/Prison              -           0.0%
65 and up                         3          0.3%    Hospice                  -           0.0%
                                                     Hospital                 -           0.0%
Total                           918        100.0%    WAA Shelter              -           0.0%

 Average length of stay for 12 month TH program      Total                    333       100.0%
 was 260 days – for 24 month, 459 days               no data= 181

                                                                                              38
  July 11, 2006
                                                               6. Transitional
                                                                  Housing


Transitional Housing Clients
Characteristics of the12% (51 of 418) of OESS-funded transitional housing
clients who were discharged between June 2002-December 2005 and
returned to shelter.
Source: OESS – Transitional Housing Database
Gender (Heads of
Household)                     #    % Total
Male                            1     2.0%
Female                         50    98.0%
Total                          51    100.0%

Age Range at
Placement                      #    % Total
18-24                          8     15.7%
25-34                         24     47.1%
35-44                         17     33.3%
45-54                          1      2.0%
55-64                          1      2.0%
65 and up                 -           0.0%

Total                         51    100.0%
                                                                             39
 July 11, 2006
                                                                                                 6. Transitional
                                                                                                    Housing


    Transitional Housing Clients
      Characteristics of the 248 heads of households who left transitional
      housing in 2004.
      Source: OESS – Transitional Housing Database/HMIS
                                                Client Type                                          % of cohort
      Gender (Heads of
                                                                                                   that returned to
      Household)                     % Total
                                                                                                    ES w/in 1 year
      Male                              29%
      Female                            71%     Males with D&A Treatment History (self-report)          78%
      Total                            100%     Families in 1 year program                              50%
                                                Male                                                    37%
      Ethnicity                      % Total    Discharge Status: Terminated                            37%
      African American                  88%     Singles Placed into Unsubsidized Housing                32%
      Caucasian                          8%     Hispanic                                                29%
      Hispanic                           3%     Single Individual                                       28%
                                                Placed into Unsubsidized Housing                        24%
      Total                            100%
                                                Self-Reported D&A History                               23%
                                                African American                                        18%
      Case Type                      % Total    Discharge Status: Withdrew Voluntarily                  18%
      Family                            57%     Families Placed into Unsubsidized Housing               17%
      Single                            43%     Males without D&A Treatment History (self-              16%
                                                Lack of D&A History (Self-reported)                     12%
      Total                            100%     Discharge Status: Completed Program                     11%
                                                Singles Placed into Subsidized Housing                  10%
14% (35 of 248) who left TH in 2004 returned    Female                                                  10%
                                                Family Unit                                              9%
to shelter                                      Families in 2 year program                               9%
                                                Caucasian                                                5%           40
        July 11, 2006                           Placed into Subsidized Housing                           3%
                                                Families Placed into Subsidized Housing                  0%
                                                                           6. Transitional
                                                                              Housing


Transitional Housing Clients
Persons living in HUD McKinney funded transitional housing
Source: HUD APRs 2005 and 2006 – 5 programs reporting
N = 15 single men and 56 families

Type                 Male   Female     Total Prior Living Situation                     %
Single              100%        0%     100% Emergency shelter                         93%
Family (HOH)          0%      100%     100% Transitional Housing                       3%
                                             Non-housing (e.g. street, park)           1%
Total                21%      79%      100% Hospital                                   1%
                                             Living with relatives/friends             1%
   Special Need                    %
   Domestic Violence             29%
   Drug Abuse                    27%
   Mental Illness                23%
   Alcohol abuse                 23%
   HIV/AIDS                       6%
   Development disability         3%
   Physical disability            3%
                                                                                         41
 July 11, 2006
                                                                                         6. Transitional
                                                                                            Housing


Transitional Housing Clients
Persons living in HUD McKinney funded transitional housing – Outcome
Measures for those who Exited the TH Programs
Source: HUD APRs 2005 and 2006 – 5 programs reporting
N= 10 single adults and 63 families
Monthly Income    Entry   Exit Variance
No Income          12%     1%      -11%   Income Sources                         Entry     Exit Variance
<=$250             26%    10%      -16%   Food Stamps                             89%      88%       -1%
$251-$500          44%    56%       12%
                                          Medicaid                                89%      85%       -4%
$501-$1,000        10%    16%        6%
$1,000-$1500        4%    10%        6%   Temp Aid Needy Familites (TANF)         70%      75%        5%
$1500-$2000         4%     4%        0%   Employment Income                        7%      18%      11%
$2000+              0%     3%        3%   Supp Security Income (SSI)               6%      11%        5%
                                          General Public Assistance                6%       8%        2%
                                          Other                                    6%       7%        1%
                                          Social Security Disability (SSDI)        6%       5%       -1%
                                          Social Security                          1%       1%        0%
                                          State Children's Health Ins. (SCHIP)     1%       1%        0%
                                          Veterans Benefits                        1%       1%        0%
                                          Veteran Health Care                      1%       1%        0%
                                          No Financial Resources                  10%       1%       -9%
                                          Unemployment Benefits                    0%       0%        0%
                                                                                                       42
  July 11, 2006
                                                                   6. Transitional
                                                                      Housing


Transitional Housing Clients
Persons living in HUD McKinney funded transitional housing – Outcome
Measures for those who Exited the Programs
Source: HUD APRs 2005 and 2006 - 5 programs reporting
N=10 single adults and 63 families


   Reasons for leaving                     %   Destination                     %
   Completed program                    53%    Permanent                     63%
   Non-compliance with project          21%
                                               Transitional                  15%
   Housing opportunity                  10%
                                               Institution                    1%
   Other                                 5%
   Death                                 0%    Emergency Shelter             10%
   Needs could not be met                4%    Other                          1%
   Criminal activity                     0%    Unknown                       10%
   Unknown/disappeared                   1%
   Disagreement with rules/persons       5%
   Non-payment of rent                   0%
                                         0%
   Reached maximum time allowed in project.




                                                                                 43
 July 11, 2006
                                                  6. Transitional
                                                     Housing


Transitional Housing Inventory
There are 3,878 transitional housing beds
    1,887 beds for single adults
    1,991 beds for persons in families (573 units)
Under development:
    76 beds for single adults
    181 beds for persons in families (65 units)
There are 37 providers of transitional housing providing
69 transitional housing programs
    16 are currently contracted through OESS
    28 are HUD-funded
    34 are supported by DBH

                                                                44
  July 11, 2006
                                                          6. Transitional
                                                             Housing


Transitional Housing Costs
 SHP transitional housing projects receive
  approximately $8.2 million from HUD annually
    $1.1 million -- leasing
    $1.4 million -- operating
    $5.3 million -- services
    $400k – administrative costs
 Based on cost information in the HUD APR reports for five
  programs serving 83 households, the average annual unit cost
  (including cash match) was $41,349.
 Based on the unit costs for three OESS funded transitional
  housing programs with a total of 215 units, the average annual
  unit cost was $16,970.
                                                                        45
  July 11, 2006
                                                                    6. Transitional
                                                                       Housing
Transitional Housing – Reports from TH Site Visits and
Provider Interviews

 Findings from visits to the transitional housing clustered into the 5 main
 categories listed below. Findings from each category are presented on
 the slides that follow.


 I.       Co-occurring Conditions and Life Challenges
 II.      Program Successes
 III.     Transitional Housing Issues
 IV.      Challenges to Exiting Transitional Housing
 V.       Resources Needed




                                                                                  46
   July 11, 2006
                                                          6. Transitional
                                                             Housing
Transitional Housing – Reports from TH Site Visits and
Provider Interviews

 Category I – Co-occurring Conditions & Life Challenges


 Mental health disorders – key informants indicated
     that between 50-75% of female clients had suffered
     from sexual abuse and the majority of them had not
     received treatment
    Substance use issues
    Literacy issues
    Unable to handle day-to-day tasks and
     responsibilities of life
    Lack of parenting skills
    Bad credit and high debt
                                                                        47
    July 11, 2006
                                                           6. Transitional
                                                              Housing
Transitional Housing – Reports from TH Site Visits and
Provider Interviews

 Category II – Program Successes



 Where there is aftercare, clients reported being satisfied with
  being connected to on-going case management
 CM helpful as a resource for housing and services
 Key informants reported success with education programs such
  as GED training
 It was reported that job training and job placement brought great
  satisfaction to clients




                                                                         48
  July 11, 2006
                                                              6. Transitional
                                                                 Housing
Transitional Housing – Reports from TH Site Visits and
Provider Interviews

 Category III – Transitional Housing Issues



 Some clients do not want to leave and do not follow through on
     moving to permanent housing
    After 12 or 24 months, providers reported that clients are not
     “done” – they still need a lot of care and support
    Aftercare is not available for all transitional clients
    It was reported that there is the constant stress of the “ticking
     clock” – case managers explained that they cannot spend
     enough time on consumers’ issues because they need to be
     focused on finding permanent housing
    Some clients do not want to participate in a program and do not
     engage in services
    Providers noted that many transitional housing clients are not
     ready for permanent housing when they leave
                                                                            49
    July 11, 2006
                                                            6. Transitional
                                                               Housing
Transitional Housing – Reports from TH Site Visits and
Provider Interviews

 Category IV – Challenges to Exiting Transitional Housing



 Consumers do not have enough money saved for housing
     expenses and do not earn enough to pay rent
    Clients often have bad credit and owe back utility payments
    There are insufficient affordable housing options
    Clients may lack the skills to live in independent housing
    Clients may not qualify for permanent supportive housing
    It was reported that clients with drug and alcohol issues were
     the hardest to place in permanent housing
    Consumers with criminal justice histories have trouble moving
     out of transitional housing
                                                                          50
    July 11, 2006
                                                            6. Transitional
                                                               Housing
Transitional Housing – Reports from TH Site Visits and
Provider Interviews

 Category V – Resources Needed



 It was suggested that aftercare be offered to all clients leaving
  transitional housing so that they can continue to have a support
  system in place
 There is a need for more subsidized housing for placement out
  of transitional housing
 Consumers stressed their desire to live independently in safe,
  affordable housing




                                                                          51
  July 11, 2006
                                                                    7. Permanent
                                                                     Supportive
                                                                       Housing

Permanent Supportive Housing Clients
Persons living in HUD McKinney funded permanent supportive housing

Source: HUD APRs 2005 and 2006                                     n=


 Prior Living Situation            %   Special Need                            %
 Emergency shelter               35%   Drug Abuse                            72%
                                       Mental Illness                        55%
 Substance abuse treatment       18%
                                       Alcohol abuse                         36%
 Transitional housing            16%
                                       HIV/AIDS                              24%
 Living with relatives/friends   14%   Physical disability                   13%
 Non-housing                     10%   Domestic Violence                      6%
 Other                            3%   Development disability                 1%
 Hospital                         1%
 Rental Housing                   1%
 Psychiatric facility             1%   Gender              Male   Female    Total
                                       Single              69%      31%     100%
 Jail/prison                      1%
                                       Family (HOH)        16%      84%     100%

                                       Total                53%     47%     100%

                                                                               52
 July 11, 2006
                                                                         7. Permanent
                                                                          Supportive
                                                                            Housing

Permanent Supportive Housing Clients
Persons living in HUD McKinney funded permanent supportive housing –
Outcome Measures for those who exited
Source: HUD APRs 2005 and 2006                                           n=
Monthly Income          Entry          Exit   Variance
No Income                16%            8%         -8%
<=$250                   27%           18%         -9%
$251-$500                15%            8%         -7%
$501-$1000               36%           54%        17%
$1001-$1500               5%            7%          2%
$1501-$2000               1%            3%          2%
$2001+                    0%            1%          1%

Income Sources                                Entry      Exit Variance
Medicaid                                       31%       35%        4%
Supplemental Security Income (SSI)             27%       32%        6%
General Public Assistance                      21%       20%       -1%
Food Stamps                                    22%       19%       -3%
Social Security Disability (SSDI)              12%       17%        4%
Employment Income                              10%       16%        7%
Temp Aid to Needy Familites (TANF)             16%        8%       -8%
Other (please specify)                          4%        7%        3%
No Financial Resources                         15%        7%       -9%
Social Security                                 2%        6%        4%
Unemployment Benefits                           1%        2%        1%
Veteran Health Care                             1%        1%        0%
Veterans Benefits                               1%        1%        0%
State Child Health Ins. Pgm. (SCHIP)            0%        0%        0%
                                                                                    53
  July 11, 2006
                                                                     7. Permanent
                                                                      Supportive
                                                                        Housing
Permanent Supportive Housing
Persons living in HUD McKinney funded permanent supportive housing –
Outcome Measures for those who exited

Source: HUD APRs 2005 and 2006

 Reasons for leaving                         %   Destination              %
 Completed program                         30%   Permanent              52%
 Non-compliance with project.              26%   Transitional            4%
 Left for housing opp before finish prog   11%   Institution             9%
 Other                                     11%   Emergency Shelter       6%
 Death                                      6%   Other                  18%
 Needs could not be met by project.         5%   Unknown                10%
 Crim activity/destruct of prop/violence    4%
 Unknown/disappeared                        3%
 Disagreement with rules/persons            2%
 Non-payment of rent/occup charge           2%
 Reached max time allowed in project.       0%




                                                                                54
 July 11, 2006
                                                           7. Permanent
                                                            Supportive
                                                              Housing

Permanent Supportive Housing Inventory
4,240 Permanent Supportive Housing Beds
     1,710 beds for single adults (512 for chronically homeless)
     3,530 beds for persons in families/ 929 units
566 beds under development
     89 beds for single adults (74 for chronically homeless)
     477 beds for families/139 units
84 programs funded by HUD
     49 SHP
     35 S+C – 707 units
11 currently contracted through city
 Permanent supportive housing is provided in both single-site
   and scatter site models
 All PSH programs have services attached to the units

                                                                      55
  July 11, 2006
                                           7. Permanent
                                            Supportive
                                              Housing
Permanent Supportive Housing Costs
 HUD McKinney annual funding:
      S+C -- ~ $6 million
      SHP – ~ $13.3 million
            Leasing: $3.5 million
            Operating $2 million
            Services $7 million
            Administration $750k
 Unit Costs: Based on information in the HUD
  APRs for 6 permanent supportive housing
  programs serving 160 households, the average
  annual unit cost (including cash match) was
  $15,193
                                                      56
 July 11, 2006
                                                                                                7. Permanent
                                                                                                 Supportive
                                                                                                   Housing
Permanent Supportive Housing Costs
Income required to afford Fair Market Rents (FMR) by apartment type

                                          HUD FMR
                            Apt Type        2006                Income
                              Studio            649             25,960
                               1 Bed            742             29,680
                               2 Bed            886             35,440
                               3 Bed          1,061             42,440
                               4 Bed          1,262             50,480
                  *Source calculation: Out of   Reach – National Low-income Housing Coalition




 Only 1% of clients (3 of 227) leaving permanent supportive
housing and 3% of clients (2 of 73) leaving transitional housing
could afford these rents

                                                                                                           57
  July 11, 2006
                                                                    7. Permanent
                                                                     Supportive
                                                                       Housing
Permanent Supportive Housing – Reports
from Provider Interviews
 It was reported that there are some clients who are residing in
     permanent supportive housing who could live independently without
     supportive services or with fewer supports
    There are clients who live in permanent housing who are unable to
     meet the obligations of tenancy and end up returning to the emergency
     and transitional systems
    Providers and consumers reported that there were long waiting lists to
     access permanent supportive housing and that in many cases clients
     did not meet eligibility requirements
    Overall, key informants stressed the need for new permanent
     supportive housing and more permanent affordable options for clients.
    Providers indicated that while it is important to have all models of
     housing – emergency, transitional and permanent, what is failing in the
     system is an exit strategy to place clients in permanent housing
    It was reported that there is a need for a variety of permanent housing
     solutions – single and scattered sites with varying levels of service
     provision


                                                                               58
    July 11, 2006
                                              8. Next Steps


Next Steps
 Complete data collection
      Target Date – July 28
      Second Data Presentation – August 15
 Analyze data with work groups
      August and September
 Create unmet need methodology
      August and September
 Develop and revise recommendations
      September and October
                                                          59
 July 11, 2006
                                                      8. Next Steps


Data Pending
 HMIS – emergency shelter client and program data
 DSS Cares data match between HMIS and other
    systems of care
   PHMC transitional housing outcome data
   PEC transitional housing outcome data
   Data on shelter fees and savings
   Additional data on funding for transitional and
    permanent housing
   Outcome data on Good Neighbors Program



                                                                  60
    July 11, 2006
                                                  8. Next Steps


Questions or Comments?
                             Contact:
                   Suzanne Wagner, Director
                 CUCS Housing Resource Center
                    120 Wall Street, 25th Floor
                      New York, NY 10005
                       Tel: (212) 801-3318
                      Fax: (212) 801-3325
                   Email: suzannew@cucs.org



                                                              61
 July 11, 2006

								
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