North East Vic Presentation by R96gPf3z

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									Slide 1

Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences – August 2010
North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area
Wangaratta Presentation
Slide 2

The North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences
was conducted during August 2010 and includes the following ten Local Government Areas;

•Albury
•Benalla
•Campaspe
•Corowa Shire
•Greater Shepparton
•Indigo
•Moira
•Strathbogie
•Wangaratta
•Wodonga
Slide 3

North Eastern Victoria Profile
Source: ABS, Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia, 2009 (cat. no. 3235.0) / ABS 2006
Census of Population and Housing

•Greater Shepparton comprised the largest share of the population of the North Eastern Victoria,
with an adult population of 49,153 (21% of the total NE Victoria adult population).

•Between 2004 and 2009 the adult population growth in North Eastern Victoria was lower
compared with the State (8% compared with 11%).

Note: data are for adult population (aged 15+)
Slide 4

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey data, Goulburn-Ovens-Murray LFR and Victoria (original data, 3
month moving average) and Australia (seasonally adjusted)

Unemployment rate

The majority (77%) of the North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area labour force resides in
the Goulburn-Ovens-Murray Labour Force Region. The remaining 23 per cent falls within the
Murray-Murrumbidgee Labour Force Region.

The unemployment rate (3 month average) in the Goulburn-Ovens-Murray Labour Force Region has
increased by 0.5 percentage points over the last year, from 7.1 per cent in October 2009 to 7.6 per
cent in October 2010. The current unemployment rate (7.6 per cent) is the highest it been since
November 1998 (8.2 per cent).

Slide 5
Priority Employment Area        Unemployment rate (Oct-10)
Central Coast-Hunter            4.4
Townsville-Thuringowa           4.4
Caboolture-Sunshine Coast             4.9
Port Augusta-Whyalla-Port Pirie 5.0
Australia                       5.0
South West Perth                5.5
Ipswich-Logan                   6.0
North Western Melbourne               6.2
Canterbury-Bankstown & SW Sydney 6.3
Northern & Western Adelaide 6.4
North West/Northern Tasmania 6.4
Sydney West & Blue Mountains 6.4
Illawarra                       7.0
Richmond-Tweed & Clarence Valley      7.0
Mid-North Coast                 7.0
Ballarat-Bendigo                7.0
South Eastern Melbourne               7.1
Southern Wide Bay-Burnett             7.3
Bundaberg-Hervey Bay            7.3
Cairns                 7.5
North Eastern Victoria          7.6
Slide 6

The above chart shows the change in PEA unemployment rates between September 2008 and
October 2010. Over this period, the largest increase in the unemployment rate was recorded in
North Eastern Victoria (up by 3.2 percentage points), followed by South Eastern Melbourne (up by
3.1 percentage points) and Cairns (up by 2.5 percentage points). Port Augusta-Whyalla-Port Pirie
(down by 1.0 percentage points) recorded the largest fall in the unemployment rate between
September 2008 and October 2010, followed by Richmond-Tweed and Clarence Valley and Mid-
North Coast (both down by 0.5 percentage points).
Slide 7

Source: Small Area Labour Markets

Unemployment rate
The unemployment rate in the Priority Employment Area of North Eastern Victoria increased by 1.5
percentage points over the 12 months to September 2010 to stand at 6.7 per cent. In contrast, the
unemployment rate for Australia was unchanged in the 12 months to September 2010, remaining at
5.3 per cent.
•Within the Priority Employment Area, the small area labour markets of Greater Shepparton (8.3 per
cent), Albury (7.5 per cent) and Benalla (7.4 per cent) had the highest unemployment rates in
September 2010.

The largest increase in the unemployment rate over the 12 months to September 2010 was in
Greater Shepparton (up by 2.0 percentage points to 8.3%), followed by Benalla (up by 1.9
percentage points to 7.4%).

Slide 8

Teenage labour market
Teenagers in the full-time labour market are more likely to be vulnerable to economic downturns.

•The teenage full-time unemployment rate in the Goulburn-Ovens-Murray Labour Force Region was
significantly higher (33.3 per cent) compared with Victoria (27.8 per cent) and Australia (24.0 per
cent) in October 2010
•In the last 12 months, the teenage full-time unemployment rate has remained relatively stable in
the Goulburn-Ovens-Murray Labour Force Region.
Slide 9

Long-Term Unemployment
Source: ABS, Labour Force Australia, Detailed – Electronic Delivery, October 2010 (cat. no.
6291.0.55.001), 12 month averages

•The number of people who have been unemployed for 52 weeks or more in the Goulburn-Ovens-
Murray LFR has increased by approximately 600 over the past year.
•The average duration of unemployment (51 weeks) is higher than for Victoria (36 weeks) and
Australia (35 weeks).
Slide 10

Source: DEEWR Administrative Data, September 2010; ABS Estimated Resident Population 2009

Reliance on income support in North Eastern Victoria:

More than one in five persons (21 per cent) of the working age population are in receipt of a
Centrelink benefit in the North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area. This is significantly higher
compared with Victoria and Australia (both 17 per cent).

A slightly higher proportion (5 per cent ) of the North Eastern Victorian working age population are
in receipt of an unemployment benefit (Newstart Allowance (NSA) or Youth Allowance (other) (YLO))
compared with Victoria and Australia (both 4 per cent).

The number of recipients of unemployment benefit increased by 20 per cent between September
2008 and September 2010, which is much less than the increases for Victoria (27 per cent) and
Australia (30 per cent).
Slide 11

Labour Market Outcomes for Persons (aged 15-74) with a Disability, 2009
This slide shows the effect of having a disability on labour market outcomes.

In 2009, over one in four (28.7 per cent) of employed persons aged 15-74 years reported having a
disability.
•10.4 per cent of employed persons (aged 15-74 years) reported having a disability that restricted
their employment or schooling.

In contrast, almost one in three (32.9 per cent) of the total population aged 15-74 years reported
having a disability in 2009.
•15.5 per cent of the population (aged 15-74 years) reported having a disability that restricted their
employment or schooling.
•The unemployment rate was much higher and the participation rate was much lower for people
with a disability that restrict their employment/schooling.
Please note: data excludes persons aged 65-74 years who are not in or marginally attached to the
labour force.
Slide 12

Employment by industry

Source: ABS, 2006, Census of Population and Housing

Another indicator of labour market vulnerability is a high concentration of employment in industries
that can be sensitive to economic downturns, such as the Manufacturing and Retail Trade industries,
or sensitive to seasonal weather conditions, such as Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing.

In this chart, the North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area is compared with Australia. The
chart shows the high concentration of employment in Manufacturing (15%) and Retail Trade (12%)
in the North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area.

Slide 13

Source: DEEWR, Regional Employment Projections, Goulbourn-Ovens-Murray Labour Force Region,
2010
•Total employment is expected to grow by 8 600 (6.0 per cent) in the five years to 2014-15;
•Projected employment growth is largest in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry
(2 400 or15.2 per cent); and
•Employment is projected to decrease in the Manufacturing industry (1 300 or -6.0 per cent).
Slide 14

Educational attainment
Source: ABS, 2006 Census data

The level of educational attainment is strongly linked with labour market performance and the
ability of a region (or its population) to respond flexibly to economic shock. Accordingly, regions with
relatively low levels of educational attainment tend, on average, to be less flexible in the face of
economic slowdowns and face greater labour market difficulties. For example, upon retrenchment,
those with lower educational attainment will find it significantly more difficult to find subsequent
employment than their more highly skilled counterparts.

•The proportion of 25 to 34 year old population in the North Eastern Victoria area who finished year
12 or equivalent (56 per cent) is lower compared with Victoria (73 per cent) and Australia (69 per
cent).

•The proportion of the 25 to 34 year old population in the North Eastern Victoria area who had
attained an Advanced Diploma, Diploma or Certificate (37 per cent) was higher compared with
Victoria (30 per cent) and Australia (32 per cent).

•The proportion of the 25 to 34 year old population in the North Eastern Victoria area who had
attained a Bachelor degree or higher (18 per cent) was lower compared with Victoria (33 per cent)
and Australia (29 per cent).

Slide 15
Educational attainment and labour market outcomes

Source: ABS, 2006 Census of Population and Housing

This chart shows the link between educational attainment and labour market outcomes for the
working age population in North Eastern Victoria.

As can be seen in this chart, those people in North Eastern Victoria with relatively high levels of
education perform better in the labour market, with higher labour force participation rates and
lower unemployment rates, compared with those with lower levels of educational attainment.
Slide 16

Source: DEEWR Trend Data, August 2010. DEEWR Employment Projections, 2014-15

•As mentioned previously, the level of educational attainment is strongly linked with labour market
performance and the ability of a population to respond flexibly to an economic shock. Post school
qualifications, for instance, allow people to gain employment in higher skilled occupations, such as
Professional, Manager and Technician and Trades Worker occupations, which tend to be more
stable, more in demand and higher paid.
•The largest increase in the number of jobs in the last five years has been in those suitable for
workers with a Bachelor Degree or higher. This trend is projected to continue for the next five years.
•There is also strong employment growth projected over the next five years for jobs that require a
Certificate II or III.
Slide 17

Source: DIAC Immigration Statistics (http://www.immi.gov.au/settlement/)
Calculations use the ABS, 2009 Estimated Resident Population.
Persons who immigrated to Australia in the last 5yrs (Arrival dates: December 2005 to November
2010)

Greater Shepparton LGA- Migrant Profile
•3,232 people migrated to the North Eastern Victoria PEA in the 5 years to November 2010. Greater
Shepparton had the largest intake of migrants (1,527 over the previous 5 years, or 2.4 per cent of
the total population). Other Local Government Areas in the Priority Employment Area received far
less migrants over the same period, with the largest being Albury (613 migrants) and Wodonga (413
migrants).
•Significantly, a large proportion of these migrants were humanitarian entrants (37 per cent). The is
well above the average share of humanitarian entrants for both Victoria (9 per cent) and Australia (8
per cent).
Slide 18

Source: ABS 2006 Census of Population and Housing

Greater Shepparton – Key labour market indicators by English language ability

This chart shows there is a link between English proficiency and labour market outcomes. Those
individuals with poor English language ability are more likely to be unemployed or not participate in
the labour market.

For example, those who speak English very well have an unemployment rate of around 7 per cent
and a participation rate of 65 per cent. However, for those who do not speak English at all, the
unemployment rate is much higher at 39 per cent and the participation rate is much lower at only 17
per cent.

In Greater Shepparton, 22 per cent of all persons who speak a language other than English at home,
either don’t speak English well, or don’t speak English at all. This is the highest of any LGA in the
North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area and is well above the average for Victoria (18 per
cent) and Australia (17 per cent).
Slide 19

Source: DEEWR, Internet Vacancies Index, October 2010

The North Eastern Victoria PEA is contained in the Bendigo & High Country region, which has the
highest number of internet vacancies outside of Melbourne (1,869 vacancies). Since May 2010, the
number of internet vacancies in the Bendigo and High Country region has increased by 31.6 per cent,
although this is the smallest increase outside of Melbourne.

The monthly Internet Vacancy Index (IVI) is based on a count of online vacancies lodged on SEEK,
MyCareer, CareerOne, and Australian JobSearch during the month. The data are based on a three
month moving average and then indexed.
Slide 20

Levels of socio-economic disadvantage

Source: ABS, Socio-economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), 2006, Index of Relative Socio-economic
Disadvantage.

This map shows SEIFA score by Local Government Area (LGA) within the Priority Employment Area.
The SEIFA index of relative disadvantage is derived from 2006 Census data related to disadvantage,
such as low income, low educational attainment, unemployment and dwellings with no car, among
other things.
A low score indicates a high level of relative disadvantage.
While no areas in the Priority Employment Area are markedly disadvantaged, there is some variance
between deciles of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage for the LGAs in the NE Victoria PEA.
Of the 10 LGAs in the region, five are ranked as being in the 5th decile. This means that they have an
‘average’ level of disadvantage. The remaining LGAs in the region are ranked in the 6th, 7th or 8th
deciles, meaning that they are less disadvantaged than the average LGA in Australia.
Slide 21

Source: DEEWR, North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area Survey of Employers’ Recruitment
Experiences, August 2010.

Survey Results
Recruitment Experiences 12 Months Preceding the Survey North Eastern Victoria

•The proportion of employers who had recruited was higher (75 per cent) compared with when
North Eastern Victoria PEA was previously surveyed in December 2009 (71 per cent) and all Priority
Employment Areas surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (65 per cent)

•More employers recruited due to staff turnover (83 per cent) compared with December 2009 (78
per cent) and all regions surveyed to June 2010 (81 per cent)
•A lower proportion of vacancies remained unfilled (3.0 per cent) compared with December 2009
(4.7 per cent) and all regions surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (4.8 per cent)

•A lower proportion of employers reported difficulty recruiting (51 per cent) compared with
December 2009 (61 per cent), although this is the same result as all areas surveyed to June 2010 (51
per cent)
Slide 22

Most recent recruitment activity

•Employers in North Eastern Victoria in August 2010 had a higher proportion vacancies unfilled (5.8
per cent) compared with all regions surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (5.2 per cent), but this
is less than when the area was last surveyed in December 2009 (6.5 per cent).

•Overall, 14 per cent of employers in the North Eastern Victoria PEA recruited staff that required
development, a similar result to when the area was last surveyed in December 2009 (15 per cent)
and all regions surveyed (14 per cent).

•Overall, 39 per cent of surveyed employers in the region reported difficulty recruiting for their most
recent vacancy, which was lower compared when previously surveyed in December 2009 (48 per
cent), but the same as for all regions surveyed (also 39 per cent).

The most common reasons reported for difficulty filling vacancies included:
• Technical skill requirements (45 per cent)
•Tight labour market/not enough applicants (27 per cent)
Slide 23

Unfill Rate by Occupation
Most recent recruitment activity
The occupations that had the highest unfill rates were those of Managers and Professionals (13.3
per cent) and Technicians and Trades Workers (12.7 per cent). Labourers and Machinery Operators
& Drivers were the occupations with the lowest unfill rate (0.0 per cent and 2.6 per cent
respectively).
Overall the unfill rate for North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area (5.8 per cent) was lower
compared with the last time this area was surveyed in December 2009 (6.5 per cent), but higher
than for all regions surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (5.2 per cent).
Slide 24

This slide shows the vacancies that employers considered difficult to fill in the North Eastern Victoria
Priority Employment Area in August 2010. The occupations fell across a range of skill levels and
included Chefs, Motor Mechanics, Registered Nurses, Sales Assistants (General) and Waiters.
Occupations highlighted with an asterisk (*) were difficult to fill when the area was last surveyed in
December 2009.
Slide 25

Competition for vacancies
The average number of applicants per vacancy in the North Eastern Victoria PEA area was lower (6.0
applicants per vacancy) when compared with all regions surveyed in the 12 months to December
2009 (8.4 applicants per vacancy).
North Eastern Victoria had a lower average number of suitable applicants (1.9 suitable applicants per
vacancy) compared with when the area was previously surveyed in December 2009 (2.7 suitable
applicants per vacancy) and all regions surveyed (2.5 suitable applicants per vacancy)

The occupations with the highest number of applicants were Clerical and Administrative Workers
(12.6 applicants per vacancy), Machinery Operators and Drivers (9.8 applicants per vacancy) and
Sales Workers (9.5 applicants per vacancy). There were few applicants and suitable applicants on
average for Labourers (2.3 and 1.3 applicants respectively) and Community and Personal Service
Workers (3.3 and 1.2 applicants respectively).

Slide 26

Reasons applicants unsuitable

Overall, 68 per cent of applicants for vacancies in the region were considered by employers to be
unsuitable for the position for which they had applied. Lack of work experience was the single most
common reason for applicant unsuitability (57 per cent), followed by a lack of qualifications or
training (24 per cent) and lacked basic work readiness (10 per cent).
Slide 27

Basic employability skills
Employers in the North Eastern Victoria PEA were asked when recruiting, whether they placed more
importance on the applicant’s personal traits and qualities or on their technical skills and experience.

The highest proportion of employers surveyed in North Eastern Victoria (44 per cent) thought that
both personal traits and qualities and technical skills were equally important. A further 33 per cent
of employers considered that personal traits and qualities were the most important, whilst 23 per
cent rated technical skill and experience as more important.

The sorts of personality traits or qualities sought after by employers included enthusiasm,
communication skills, confidence and motivation. These survey results indicate that in today’s
labour market, jobs seekers need to have both technical or job-specific skills and basic employability
skills.

Slide 28

•36% of businesses employed a least one Apprentice or Trainee;
       •68% of these employers reported they had experienced challenges;
       •The challenges most commonly reported were Apprentice and Trainees lacked soft skills
        (29%) and work readiness (24%)
•27% of businesses expected to recruit at least one Apprentice or Trainee in the 12 months
following the survey;
•17% of businesses expected to increase the number of Apprentices or Trainees employed;
•44% of businesses had employees undertake recognised training.

Slide 29




•58% of employers had heard of JSA or Job Network:
           •29% of employers who had heard of JSA or Job Network had used the service;
           •39% of employers who had used the service were not satisfied; and
           •The most common reason for dissatisfaction was referral of applicants whose technical
           skills did not match the job description.


Slide 30

Future recruitment expectations
Employers in the North Eastern Victoria PEA were asked about their recruitment expectations in the
12 months following the survey. Under half of all of employers (46 per cent) expected to recruit in
the 12 months following the survey (August 2010), which is higher than the level for all regions
surveyed in the 12 months to June 2010 (43 per cent).

Just over a third (35 per cent) of employers expect to experience difficulty in recruitment in the
coming 12 months, slightly lower than for all regions surveyed (37 per cent)

A low proportion (3 per cent) of employers in the North Eastern Victoria PEA expect to decrease staff
numbers in the 12 months following the survey, on par with the average for all regions surveyed in
2009 (3 per cent).

However, 14 per cent of all employers in the region remain unsure about recruitment in the year
ahead, largely due to uncertainty about demand for their products or services.




Slide 31

•      Labour market conditions have softened
•      Disadvantaged groups
         – Long-term unemployed; Lower educated
         – OTMESC; Teenagers
•      Target growth industries / occupations difficult to fill
•      Job seekers need to be job ready
         – Work experience / training / apprenticeships
         – Employability skills
•      Further engagement with employers
•      Work with the Local Employment Coordinator
Slide 32

Further information
More information on labour market conditions and other research on small areas can be found on
these web sites
        • www.deewr.gov.au/LMIP
        • www.deewr.gov.au/SkillShortages
        • www.deewr.gov.au/RegionalReports
        • www.deewr.gov.au/australianjobs
        • www.skillsinfo.gov.au
        • www.joboutlook.gov.au
A report on the survey findings for the North Eastern Victoria Priority Employment Area will be
placed on the regional reports section of the DEEWR- Regional Reports web site.

Thank you.

								
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