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					                       SAFETY PROCEDURE NO.20
  The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER)

Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER) apply to every activity which involves
lifting or lowering articles or people ("lifting operations") with the aid of "lifting equipment".

"Lifting Equipment" (LE) is any device used for lifting or lowering loads; and the attachments used for anchoring,
fixing or supporting the equipment. The definition includes lift trucks and people carrying devices such as
passenger lifts, gondolas, cherry pickers and absailing equipment used at work.

University Policy for Health, Safety and Welfare at Work tasks Deans of Schools and Heads of Departments
with implementing University policy. This Safety Procedure sets out bullet points of which those involved with
management of LOLER must be aware.


What to do:

1: Check to see if any members of your school/department use (excluding riding in passenger lifts), maintain,
inspect, hire or supervise the use of lifting equipment at work; and if any staff authorise the use of lifting equipment
by contractors or students.

2: If you are confident they do not get involved in any of the above, you need take no further action; alternatively

3: If the reply to any part of 1 above is yes, you will need to refer to the relevant sections of this Safety Procedure.
If you have any questions about applicability contact the University Safety Manager.

Consult your School/Department Safety Liaison Officer and the members of staff involved in lifting operations.
their activities and assess the extent to which the Regulations apply.

Consider appointing a Technical Advisor (See University Policy Sections 2: Management Organisation and 5:
School/Department Statement of Organisation and Arrangements) and ensure they are informed/trained.

Risk assessment: It will be necessary to make a risk assessment (Safety Procedure No 10) and write procedures
which identify persons authorised to carry out the various tasks and state the procedures they are to follow.


Part 1: Lifting Equipment and Lifting Operations.
Part 2: Lift Trucks - including forklift trucks.

Availability:    Copies of this Safety Procedure are available from the University Safety Manager.
                 Also available in Word 97 format from the University Safety Manager.

 Safety Procedures set out University policy for complying with topic specific statutory requirements. The extent to which any
 particular Safety Procedure affects a department is relative to the location of, or activities undertaken in, that department. The
 applicability of a Safety Procedure should therefore be determined by the Department Head in consultation with DSLO's, managers
 and project leaders engaging in operational reviews, safety inspections, project planning and risk assessments etc.
 Safety Procedures are integral to University Policy and are to be incorporated into Section 3 ‘Arrangements For Effecting Policy.
 New editions and changes to existing Safety Procedures are to be brought to the attention of the employees concerned.




Page 1 of 12                                                                                                    29 March 2000
Part 1: Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment

1        Introduction

1.1      Lifting Equipment and Lifting Operations Regulations 1998 (LOLER) apply to every activity which
         involves lifting or lowering loads or people ("lifting operations") with the aid of "lifting equipment".

LOLER helps to clarify the roles and responsibilities of parties involved in hiring lifting equipment or engage
contractors who will use lifting equipment.

Applicability: LOLER applies to work activities including field trips and other off site work where staff or students
ride equipment provided or controlled by the "University".

Definitions (Regulation 2)

2.1      Lifting equipment:         Equipment used for lifting or lowering loads; and attachments used for anchoring,
         fixing or supporting the lifting equipment, it includes patient hoists used in hospitals.

2.1.1    Accessory for lifting     Slings and tackle used to attach loads to the lifting equipment.

2.2      Lifting operation         Any activity involving the lifting or lowering of people or other load.

3        Duty holders (Regulation 3)

3.1      University: as the employer, to ensure the equipment is safe for purpose and staff are trained and
         facilitated as necessary to work safely.

3.1.1    Employees: Responsible for LE, or who carry out, supervise or manage the lifting operations have a duty
         to work safely and in accordance with their training.

3.1.2 Risk controls
 Step  Control                                                                                  Actions needed
 1     Make an inventory of LE for which you are responsible or manage
 2     Draw up an LE inspection, test, examination schedule (Form 10. 6)
 3     Restrict use of LE to authorised personnel - e.g., key controls or
 4     Identify the types of lifting operations undertaken
 5     Ensure all staff in the operating, supervising trained, competent and
       authorised.     Form        10.7     ’Process    &  Workshop       Permit to
       Supervise/Enter/Operate’ or similar may be used

3.2      Hire & Loan of Hire of LE

3.2.1    The supplier has the duty of ensuring the equipment is safe and the lifting operation is carried out safely
         by a competent operator.

3.2.2    The general principal is that the supplier/erector of lifting equipment will provide written certificates of test
         and examinations where the equipment is to be operated by University personnel.

3.2.3    Hirers/Lessees: Select a competent contractor.

3.2.4    Do not operate equipment until they have checked current copies of certificates of test and examination.

3.2.5 Risk controls
 Step  Controls                                                                                     Actions needed
 1     Hire of equipment for use by University personnel.

 1.1       Take a copy of the current certificates of test and examination.

 1.2       Ensure operators are trained/competent to operate the particular equipment and
           not simply draw on general lifting operation skills.
 2         Contract lifting: Supplier provides the equipment and operator.

 2.1       Select a competent contractor to carry out the operation.
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 2.2       Work to a lifting plan (see 8 below) agreed with the person in control of the site
           or hirer (The lifting plan complements the wider project/site risk assessment).

 2.3       Ensure that driver and University staff, if involved, can communicate.

 2.4       Ensuring the operating area is safe by, for instance, closing off walkways,
           securing the site and warning notices (see 6. Positioning and installing).
 3         Loaning the use of equipment to visiting workers.

 3.1       LE should not be operated by contractors unless the operator is competent and
           follows a lifting plan agreed in consultation with the owner.

           Owner to instruct user in the safe use of the equipment.
 3.2
           Copies of the current certificates of test and thorough examination.
 3.3


4        Strength and Stability (Regulation 4)

4.1      LE, load parts and attachments to be of adequate strength and stability for each individual load raised
         or lowered.

4.1.1    Fixing points: Particular attention must be paid to the stresses incurred at the mounting or fixing points.

4.2      Ground surfaces: on which the equipment will travel and operate must also be assessed.

4.3      The wider requirements of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) apply to
         lifting equipment and "accessories". Consequently the equipment must be assessed for purpose and the
         conditions of use.

4.4   Risk controls: To ensure strength and stability
 Step Controls                                                                                  Actions needed
 1     When selecting LE account must be taken of:

 1.1      The integrity of the equipment, accessories and supports.

 1.2      Suitability for purpose

 1.3      Compatibility with the environment in which it will be operated, eg       weather,
          enclosed space, noise, people, open site, security,
 2        Factors which affect stability include:

 2.1      Strength of the surface on which the equipment will operate.

 2.2      Stability of the surface under maximum load conditions.

 2.3      If the surface is sloping, the angle of any slope.

 2.4      The size and stability of the load.

 2.5      Method by which the load will be lifted/lowered.

 2.4      The maximum wind loading that may occur.


5        Lifting equipment used for lifting persons (Regulation 5)

5.1      Passengers in, and persons working from, carriers to be protected from being crushed, trapped or struck
         by; or falling from the carrier.

5.1.1    Rescue - persons trapped inside a carrier must be protected from danger and be able to be freed.

Page 3 of 12                                                                                         29 March 2000
5.2   Risk controls
 Step  Control                                                                                      Action needed
 1     Passenger carrying: Prevent/prohibit people riding or being suspended from
       equipment which is not specifically designed for passenger carrying purposes; or

           Does not have clearly visible fixed plates stating its suitability for passenger
 1.1       carrying.
 2         Protection against passengers falling.

 2.1       Carriers which rise above 2m must have edge protection and other
           arrangements to prevent persons from falling or being thrown from.

 NB.       A "carrier" is any car, work platform, harness or hoist intended to carry persons.

 3         Protection against passengers being crushed.


           ???????????????????????????????????????????????
 3         Protection against carrier falling.

 3.1       Provide secondary suspensions – Where the risk of primary suspension failure
           cannot be eliminated.

 3.2       Carriers must also incorporate secondary suspension (such as enhanced safety
           coefficient suspension rope or chain.

 3.2.1     Must be inspected on each working day.

 3.2.2     Daily inspection to be recorded.


6        Positioning and installation (Regulation 6)

6.1      Position to avoid the need to lift over people’s heads and minimise the risks of the equipment or its load
         form;

6.1.1    striking a person; or

6.1.2    the load drifting, falling freely or being unintentionally released into the proximity of people.

6.2      Shafts & hoistway openings - To be fenced at every point from which a person might fall.

6.2.1    Maintenance/inspections: the requirement to fence openings and edges applies equally to inspection and
         maintenance personnel.

6.3   Risk controls: Prevention of people being struck by equipment and loads
 Step  Control                                                                                      Actions needed

 1.1       Prevent persons approaching to within 2m of or walking beneath travelling or
           slewing loads or equipment.

 1.1.1     Erect suitable and substantial enclosures or barriers where practicable.

           Control access; keep the lifting ground clear of persons other than those
 1.2       involved in the operation.

 2         Prevent of collision
           Site layout and clearances to prevent operating paths and swings from
 2.1       overlapping.
 3         Shafts and hoistway openings

 3.1       To be fenced at every point from which a person might fall.

7        Marking of Lifting Equipment (Regulation 7)
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7.1      LE and accessories must be clearly marked with its safe working loads.

7.1.1    In situations where the safe working load is reliant on the equipment configuration, the safe working load
         for each configuration must be clearly marked on the lifting equipment. Alternatively, information
         containing these details must be kept with the lifting equipment.

7.2      Equipment intended to carry people to be clearly marked.

7.3   Risk controls
 Step  Control                                                                                     Actions needed
 1     Ensure all equipment and accessories are marked with SWL.

 1.1       Where changes in equipment configuration affect safe working tolerances, a risk
           assessment, possibly supported with calculations, will be required.
 2         Lifting equipment intended for lifting people must be clearly marked as such.

           Equipment not intended for lifting people, but which may be used mistakenly,
 2.1       must carry a warning.


8        Organisation of Lifting Operations (Regulation 8)

8.1      Lifting operations must be properly planned (“the lifting plan”) by a competent person, appropriately
         supervised and carried out in a safe way.

8.2      The lifting plan complements the wider activity risk assessment. It is to be made in consultation with a
         named Technical Advisor or in the case of hired equipment the owner or driver.

8.3      Planning routine operations will normally be a matter for the people involved in the operation such as the
         slinger, driver or lift truck operator.

8.4   Risk controls
 Step  Control                                                                                     Action needed
 1     Factors to consider when planning the operation;

 1.1       The load to be lifted;

 1.2       Load weight, shape, centre of gravity, availability of lifting points;

 1.3       Load pick up position and where it will be put down;

 1.4       How often the LE will be used to carry out the task;

 1.5       The environment in which the LE will be used;

 1.6       Knowledge, training and experience of those involved in the operation.

 2         Example of a routine plan for an overhead travelling crane:

 2.1       Assess the weight of the load;

 2.2       Choose the right accessory for lifting (consider the weight and nature of the load,
           and the environment in which it will be used);

 2.3       Check the anticipated path of the load to ensure it is not obstructed and will not
           approach within 2m or be suspended over people;

 2.4       Prepare the set down place;

 2.5       Fit sling/accessory to the load;

 2.6       Make the lift (consider a trial lift to confirm stability; tag lines may be necessary
           to control swing);
Page 5 of 12                                                                                           29 March 2000
 2.7       Visibility obstructed - where the operator cannot see the load a second person is
           to guide the operator;

 2.8       Persons should not work on or make adjustments to suspended loads;

           Set down and remove accessories (consider the need for sole boards).
 2.9


9        Thorough Examination and Inspection (Regulation 9)

9.1      Competent persons: must draw up an examination scheme, ie a suitable scheme that determines the
         frequency of the thorough examinations.

9.2     Occasions on which thorough examination and inspection are required
 1      Scheme for inspection:  Drawn up by manufacturer or other competent person on the following
                                occasions;
 2      Commissioning:          LE must be thoroughly examined for defects before it is put into service for the
                                first time.
 3      Post installation:      After it has been relocated, if its safety is dependent on its installation.
 4      Hostile environments:   Where lifting equipment is exposed to conditions that may cause deterioration
                                likely to result in danger, it must be thoroughly examined as follows:

                                     for lifting people: at least every 6 months; and

                                     other lifting equipment: at least every 12 months.
 5      Exceptional                  LE must undergo thorough examination any event which may have adversely
        circumstances                affected the safety of the equipment.


10       Reports of Defective equipment (Regulation 10)

10.1     Persons undertaking thorough examinations must notify the user/owner immediately of any defects that
         are, or could be, a danger to people; and

10.1.1 as soon as practicable submit a written report to the owner and, if appropriate, the person hiring or leasing
       the lifting equipment (The user).

10.2     Notify the enforcing authority by sending a copy of every report of defects which present an existing or
         imminent risk of serious personal injury.

10.3     The information required to be included in a thorough examination report, together with the procedure for
         informing users within the University is set out at Table 1.

10.4   Risk controls: City University internal reporting protocol
 Aim: To ensure safety critical information following statutory testing and thorough examination is
 passed from Estate Services to user/operational School/Department promptly and the equipment
 remains out of use until repaired.

 The plant covered by statutory test and examination:

 A        Pressure systems and transportable gas containers;
 B        Gantry cranes located in Tait and Drysdale Buildings, Level 1;
 C        Lifting accessories (slings/grabs etc);
 D        Passenger lifts- across the estate;
 E        Catering – Northampton Square, Frobisher Crescent Finsbury Residences;
 F        Domestic plant.

 Estate Services role: Maintain a central inventory and arrange for statutory test and examination of equipment
 appearing on the inventory as prescribed by:

          Zurich           pressure systems
          Lloyds British   cranes and lifting accessories
Page 6 of 12                                                                                       29 March 2000
 School or Department role: Notify Estate Services of equipment subject to statutory test and examination
 before Commissioning, after reassembly (post installation) and after exposure to hostile environments or
 exceptional circumstances.

 Procedure

 Estate Services: will advise the user/operator School/Department office of inspection programmes to enable the
 operators to prepare. Thereafter, the School/Department will liaise directly with the visiting engineer to set up the
 inspection test/examination times/sequence.

 Line of communicating adverse reports (Regulation 10 applies)

 The inspecting engineers notify Estate Services, help desk, of any unsafe condition and where practicable isolate
 or alternatively mark unsafe plant.

 The Help Desk to notify the School Office (by phone) of all reports of unsafe condition or unserviceability. The
 telephoned messages will be followed by faxing a copy of the engineer's report. This is to ensure accuracy in
 identifying the defective plant.

 Information

 Estate Services to inform Help Desk staff of the procedure and its importance. A written instruction to be
 provided to ensure consistency of response.

 Inform Zurich and Lloyds British of the reporting arrangements.

 School/Department to ensure their staff in the reporting line are aware of the procedure to follow and the
 significance of the information, as follows:

 The School/Department office/recipient will notify the plant owner/project leader of the unsafe condition. A copy
 of the facsimile report to be given to Head of Technical Resources, Deputy Head of Technical Resources or in
 their absence the Department DSLO.


11.      Keeping of Information (Regulation 11)

11.1     EC declarations of conformity for LE obtained after 5 December 1998 to be kept for operational life of
         lifting equipment.

11.2    Risk controls: Use and keeping of reports inspection or examination
 Notifiable incidents or injuries.

 a)       If a reportable incident or injury occurs, a copy of the inspection and/or examination report(s) current at
          the time is to be attached to the injury/incident record.

 b)       Records of maintenance and repairs to load bearing components should also be retained as.

 c)      Incidents or departures from approved practice is to be notified to the USO on the University
         ****************(*Incident,
 Type of inspection or examination                               Keep for/until
 Thorough examination/test reports                               Equipment ceases to be used,
 Inspection reports of lifting accessories                       Two years.
 Reports relating to installation or assembly of equipment       Until the equipment ceases to be used at that
                                                                 location
 Reports relating to the deterioration in condition of equipment Either:
                                                                 A)       until the next report is made, or

                                                                   B)       two years, whichever is the later.
 Records relating to the inspection of equipment                   Until the next record is made.




Page 7 of 12                                                                                          29 March 2000
Table 1:            Reports of defects that are, or could be, a danger to people must include the following.

 1      Name and address of employer.
 2      Address of premises at which the thorough examination was made.
 3      Lifting equipment identity marks, including date of manufacture if known.
 4      Date of last thorough examination.
 5      Safe working loads, including those associated with equipment configurations.
 6      Where the thorough examination relates to the installation or assembly of the lifting equipment, notification
        of that fact and that it has been installed correctly and is safe to operate.
 7      Information as to whether the thorough examination relates to a 6 or 12 monthly examination carried out
        under an examination scheme, or an examination carried out in cases of exceptional circumstances where
        the safety of the lifting equipment may have been jeopardised. The report should also state that the lifting
        equipment is safe to operate.
 8      Details and identification of any parts found to be defective, including a description of the defect, where the
        defect is or could become a danger to people.
 9      Details of any necessary repairs, renewals or alterations to correct a defect.
 10     In cases where the defect may represent a danger to people, the following must be included: the time in
        which the defect could become a danger, details of repairs, renewals or alterations necessary to correct
        the defect
 11     The latest day on which the next thorough examination must be carried out.
 12     Details of any tests. If these are included in the thorough examination, the date.
 13     Name, address, qualifications and employment status of the person making the report - if the person is an
        employee then the name and address of his or her employer must be included.
 14     Name and address of the person signing or authenticating the report.
 15     Report date.
 16     Defects noted during an inspection of the lifting equipment which pose or may pose a danger to people
        must also be notified to the employer immediately.
 17     A written record of the inspection must be made.
 18     Employers may not use any lifting equipment notified as having a defect before the defect is corrected. In
        cases where the defect could become a danger, the lifting equipment may not be used after the time
        specified in the report (ie the time after which the defect is deemed by the competent person to be
        dangerous) until the defect is corrected.

Part 2: Lift Trucks - including forklift trucks
 Definition: “Lift truck” is a generic term for vehicles which, unlike cranes, rely on rigid components to support a
 load. Lift trucks may be rider-operated, self propelled or pedestrian operated.

 This Safety Procedure focuses on the operational aspects which need to be considered by managers and drivers
 of lift trucks. Appendix ‘A’ summarises requirements, contained in PUWER, relating to the mobile work
 equipment generally.

 What to do:

 1:            Check to see if any members of your school/department use or supervise the use of lift trucks; or if any
               staff authorise the use of lift trucks by contractors or students.

 2:            If you are confident they do not get involved in controlling or driving lift trucks, you need take no further
               action; alternatively:

 3:            If the reply to any part of 1 above is ‘yes’, you will need to refer to the relevant sections of this Safety
               Procedure. If you have any questions about applicability, contact the University Safety Manager.

 4:            Consult your School/Department Safety Liaison Officer and the members of staff who supervise or
               operate lift trucks.

 5:      Appointing a Technical Advisor (See University Policy Sections 2: “Management Organisation” and 5
 “School/Department Statement of Organisation and Arrangements”).

 6:            Ensure operators and supervisors are informed and, as necessary, trained, as indicated at 3 in the text.

 Risk assessment: It will be necessary to make a risk assessment (Safety Procedure No 10) of the activities and
 identify persons authorised to supervise and operate lift truck operations.

 Availability:        Copies of this Safety Procedure are available from the University Safety Manager.
Page 8 of 12                                                                                              29 March 2000
 Also available in Word 97 format from the University Safety Manager.

 Safety Procedures set out University policy for complying with topic specific statutory requirements. The extent to which any
 particular Safety Procedure affects a department is relative to the location of, or activities undertaken in, that department. The
 applicability of a Safety Procedure should therefore be determined by the Department Head in consultation with DSLOs, managers
 and project leaders engaging in operational reviews, safety inspections, project planning and risk assessments etc.

 Safety Procedures are integral to University Policy and are to be incorporated into Section 3 ‘Arrangements For Effecting Policy.
 New editions and changes to existing Safety Procedures are to be brought to the attention of the employees concerned.



Part 2: Lift Trucks - including forklift trucks.

1        Introduction

1.1        Mobile equipment and drive shafts: The general requirements relating to vehicles used in the
           workplace are contained in the PUWER 1998 Reproduced here under Appendix ‘A’: Extract from
           Safety Procedure No 19 (PUWER Regulations).

1.2        This guidance focuses on operational aspects, for the most part on "rider operated" lift trucks.
           However, the guidance is common to all lift trucks including pedestrian controlled trucks and industrial
           reach trucks.

1.3        Risk assessment procedure.

1.3.1      Activity review: Manager, in consultation with the driver, check through this guidance to identify those
           aspects which apply to the type of lift truck; how and where it is used. Their findings should be used to
           develop safe methods of working.

1.3.2      Pedestrian and work environment risk: Organising the safe movement of lift trucks is an important
           factor, for example, everything should be done to keep pedestrians away from lift truck routes, and
           warn pedestrians if they are in a lift truck operating area.

1.3.3      Operating Environment: Some care may be necessary to reduce the risk of explosion or fire. Thus,
           lift trucks should not be used in areas where flammable vapour, gases or dust are liable to be present,
           unless they have been suitably protected for such use.

1.3.4      Purchasing a ‘used’ lift truck: Check wheels and pneumatic tyres, brakes, horn, safety lock,
           overhead guard, back rest, attachments, dangerous moving parts, lights, noise level, comfort and rider
           vibration.

1.3.5      Indoor Use: Where environmental factors permit, an electric truck is preferable to combustion powered
           vehicles.


2        Operator/driver capability

2.1        No person should be allowed to drive a lift truck unless they have been selected, trained and authorised
           to do so or are being trained under supervision.

2.2        There is no criteria laid down as to who should be selected as a driver but those selected should show
           a reasonable degree of physical and mental fitness and aptitude.

2.3      Operator fitness

2.3.1      Medical screening is recommended before employment begins, at five yearly intervals, in middle age
           and after sickness or injury. Medical screens should cover the following:

2.3.2    full movement of the trunk, neck and limbs and normal agility

2.3.3    a stable disposition

2.3.4      in most cases, general effective use of both eyes (normal distant vision should not be less than 6/12
           with both eyes, that being the vision necessary to read a car number plate from 75 feet)

Page 9 of 12                                                                                                    29 March 2000
2.3.5    good hearing

2.3.6    no epilepsy unless the individual is eligible for an ordinary driving licence.


3        Training

3.1        Object: Operators to possess the skills needed to work the particular lift truck efficiently and with
           regard to their own safety and that of others.

3.2      Training should comprise three stages:

3.2.1    Basic skills and knowledge required to operate safely.

3.2.2    Specific job training for the particular vehicle.

3.2.3    OJT: Familiarisation at the workplace under supervision.


4        Operation

4.1        Those supervising and operating a lift truck must understand its basic characteristics. It is vital to know
           what the limits of the truck are to prevent the possibility of tilting or overturning.

4.2      The following information should be shown somewhere on the lift truck:

4.2.1    the name of the manufacturer

4.2.2    the type of truck

4.2.3    the serial number

4.2.4    the unladen weight

4.2.5    the capacity

4.2.6    the load centre distance

4.2.7    the maximum lift height.

4.3        Lift trucks should not be loaded beyond their safe capacity. Furthermore, the weight of the
           counterbalance (ie the truck itself) should not be increased in an attempt to lift heavier loads, as this will
           have an adverse effect on stability and safety.


5        Maintenance

5.1        The vehicle should be maintained and serviced as per the manufacturer's instructions; additionally:

5.2        Maintenance and serviceability checks should be made at the beginning of each shift of such things as
           tyres and batteries, oil levels etc.

5.3      A weekly, or 50 running hour, maintenance should also be carried out.

5.4      All working parts should be thoroughly examined at least once every six months.




Page 10 of 12                                                                                           29 March 2000
6        20 golden rules for drivers and supervisors

 1        If you are ill or for some other reason cannot operate your truck safely.
          Don’t drive, tell your supervisor.
 2        Passengers should not be carried -
          Unless a properly constructed position is provided
 3        Be particularly careful when driving where there are pedestrians.
          It is the operator's job to avoid the pedestrians and not the pedestrian's job to avoid the traffic
 4        Keep to the left - Except, when driving between rows of machines or racks where it is sometimes
          safer to keep to the centre of the gangway or aisle.
 5        Sound your horn at every potential danger spot -
          but remember that sounding your horn does not give you automatic right of way
 6        Stop before doorways -
          sound your horn and go through slowly
 7        Never run over cables or flexible pipes -
          unless they are suitably protected
 8        Be careful when braking-
          Braking violently when loaded may cause the load to fall off or the truck to tip
 9        Drive with the forks lowered - within 150mm, of level ground, mast tilted back.
          Because of the danger of overturning, the truck should not be driven with the load elevated for longer
          than is absolutely necessary
 10       When a high load restricts forward vision, drive in reverse,-
          except when going up an incline (see 14 below)
 11       Do not pick up a load if someone is standing close to it
 12       Stop people from walking underneath the load
 13       Do not pick up an unsuitable load or tone on an unsound pallet –
          it should be left alone and its condition reported to the supervisor
 14       When loaded always travel down slopes with the forks facing uphill, and up slopes with the
          load in front.
 15       When unloaded travel down slopes with forks facing downhill and slightly raised
 16       When travelling down slopes, travel slowly
 17       A truck should not be left unattended on a gradient.
          If in an emergency, it has to be parked on a gradient, chock the wheels.
 18       Never leave in gear – When leaving the truck even for a few seconds make sure that it is in neutral,
          the parking brake applied and the forks lowered
 19       Never permit anyone to ride a non-passenger vehicle or position.
 20       Always - Take extra care if vision is obstructed.


Appendix "A": Extract from Safety Procedure No 19 (PUWER Regulations).

Mobile equipment and drive shafts

Risk control plan (Regulations 25 to 27).
 Risk control     Safe condition                                                               Action needed
 Employees        Mobile equipment must not be used to carry employees unless it is
 Carried     on suitable for that purpose; and
 Mobile Work
 Equipment        a, incorporates measures to reduce any risks to safety (including risks
 (Reg 25)         from wheels or tracks), as low as is reasonably practicable.

                   b, equipment not intended for carrying people, but which may be ridden
                   mistakenly, must carry a warning.

 Rolling Over      Risks to riders/drivers to be minimised by:
 of     Mobile
 Equipment         a, stabilising the work equipment
 (Reg 26)
                   b, incorporating structures that restrict the vehicle from doing anything
                   other than roll on its side, or

Page 11 of 12                                                                                     29 March 2000
                  i, providing sufficient clearance to anyone being carried if it does roll over
                  further; or

                  ii providing an alternative device offering comparable protection.

                  c, Suitable restraining systems must be fitted to prevent anyone being
                  carried on the vehicle being crushed in the event of roll over.

                  d, Non-compliance with this regulation is permitted where:

                  i, compliance would increase safety risks

                  ii, it would not be possible to operate the vehicle as a result of complying,
                  or

                  iii it is not reasonably practicable in relation to a vehicle obtained prior to
                  5 December 1998.

 Overturning      Lift trucks used to carry employees must be adapted or equipped to
 of Lift Trucks   reduce, as low as is reasonably practicable, the risk to the employees'
 (Reg 27)         safety from overturning.

Risk control plan (Regulations 28 to 30).
 Self-propelled Where there are risks from self-propelled vehicles in motion, there
 Equipment        must be:
 (Reg 28)         A, facilities for preventing unauthorised start up

                  B, appropriate facilities for minimising the consequences of collisions in
                  situations where more than one item of rail mounted vehicle is in motion

                  C, devices for braking and stopping

                  D, emergency readily accessible controls or automatic systems, capable
                  of stopping the motion in the event of the main braking or stopping
                  devices failing

                  E, devices for improving the controllers’ field of vision, so far as is
                  reasonably practicable, where the original field of vision is inadequate to
                  ensure safety

                  F, lighting on the vehicle, if it is used at night or in dark places.

                  G, fire hazard, if the vehicle carries or tows anything that may represent
                  a fire hazard, fire fighting equipment to be on or kept close to the vehicle.
 Remote-          Where remote-controlled self-propelled vehicles present a risk to safety:
 controlled
 Self-propelled   A, the vehicle must come to rest automatically when it leaves its control
 Work             range; and
 Equipment        B, be fitted with devices to prevent risks from crushing or impact (unless
 (Reg 29)         other devices are capable of preventing this).


 Drive Shafts     In situations where there is a risk from the seizure of a drive shaft
 (Reg 30)         between vehicles and accessories or objects being towed; there
                  must be means for preventing such seizures, or,
                  A, if this is not possible, measures must be taken to avoid any adverse
                  effects on employees' safety; additionally:
                  B, there must be a system for safeguarding the transmission shafts on
                  vehicles, where such shafts could become soiled or damaged through
                  contact with the ground.




Page 12 of 12                                                                                       29 March 2000

				
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