Dr Aung Tun Thet's presentation by thanhtoonstar

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									THE ROLE OF CIVIL SOCIETY IN
 QUALITY HEALTH CARE OF
        MYANMAR

  STRATEGIC ALLIANCES

     Prof.Dr.Aung Tun Thet
INTRODUCTION
Civil Society
 Recognized and included in health policies and
  programmes
 Critical factor in determining public health
Civil Society
   Social arena between the state and the individual
    or household
   Lacks:
   Coercive or regulatory power of the state
   Economic power of the market
   Possess:
   Social power or influence of ordinary people
CSOs
 Non-state, not-for-profit, voluntary
  organizations
 In some cases, states or private for-profit sector

  provide significant funding - question their
  independence
Non-governmental organizations
(NGOs)
 Used interchangeably with the term CSOs
 Media

 Professional Associations – MMA; MNA;
  MHAA; MDA
 MPG; PGK; Yadana Metta
CSOs
 More prominent, more visible and more diverse
 Address imbalances of power between state
  and civil society
 Reactions to centralized authority

 Dissatisfaction with state performance on
  public services
 Dissatisfaction with state policies
CSOs
 Global policy issues
 Human rights

 Environment

 Debt

 Development

 Health
CSOs
   Widely connected and organised into national and
    global networks
   Email and the Internet
THE ROLE OF CIVIL SOCIETY
ORGANIZATIONS IN THE
HEALTH SECTOR
CSOs
   Long history of involvement in public health
   1978 Alma Ata declaration – HFA 2000
   PHC - People’s participation
   Securing health gains
MDGs – Health Goals
   Influenced by political, legal, investment, trade,
    employment, and social factors
   CSOs involvement widened
   Youth organizations
   Trade Unions
CONTRIBUTION TO
HEALTH SYSTEMS
Health Services
 Service provision
 Facilitating community interactions with services

 Distributing health resources such as condoms,
  bed nets, or cement for toilets
 Building health worker moral and support
Health promotion and
information exchange
 Obtaining and disseminating health information
 Building informed public choice

 Implementing and using health research

 Helping to shift social attitudes

 Mobilising and organizing for health
Policy setting
 Representing public and community interests in
  policy
 Promoting equity and pro-poor policies

 Negotiating public health standards and

  approaches
 Building policy consensus, disseminating policy

  positions; and
 Enhancing public support for policiies
Resource mobilisation
and allocation
   Financing health services
   Raising community preferences in resource
    allocation
   Mobilising and organising community co-financing
    of services
   Promoting pro-poor and equity concerns in
    resource allocation
   Building public accountability and transparency in
    raising, allocating and managing resources
Monitoring quality of
care and responsiveness
 Monitoring responsiveness and quality of
  health services
 Giving voice to marginalised groups,

  promoting equity
 Representing patient rights in quality of care
  issues
 Channelling and negotiating patient complaints

  and claims
HEALTH SERVICE
DELIVERY
CSOs
   Major role
   FBOs; Religious organizations
   Mobilising effective demand for service
   Building awareness of community needs
   Innovative approaches later replicated by the state
    sector
   Evidence-based health planning and community
    preferences
CSOs
   Provide care to disadvantaged groups
   Assist governments in treatment campaigns and
    disease control programmes
   Drug distribution, reaching vulnerable communities,
    and fostering innovative approaches to disease
    control
CSOs
   Providing services in response to community needs
    and adapted to local conditions
   Lobby for equity and pro-poor health policies
   Intermediary between communities and government
   Reach remote areas poorly served by government
    facilities
   Provide services less expensive and more efficient
CSOs
   Provide technical skills
   Innovate and disseminate good practices
   Contribute to public understanding and enhance
    public information
   More effective interaction between services and
    clients
   Enhancing community control over health
    interventions
CSOs
   Significant variability in the quality and scope
   Not responsive
   More accountable to international agencies that
    fund them
ADVOCACY, POLICY AND
STANDARD-SETTING
CSOs
 Transforming public understanding and
  attitudes
 Promoting healthy public choices;

 Building effective interactions between health

  services and clients; and
 Enhancing community control over and

  commitment to health interventions
CSOs
   Monitoring of the impact of global agreements on
    public health
   Global policy areas: trade agreements and health
   Prices of and access to drugs
   International conventions and treaties on health
    related subjects such as landmines, environment,
    breast milk substitutes and tobacco
   Debates around policies and public health standards.
CSOs
   Health and human rights issues:
   patients rights,
   women's and children's health rights,
   reproductive health rights and
   occupational health risks
CONCLUSION
Systematic Collaboration
 Between governments and civil society
 CSOs adapt to needs of the health sector

 States work with civil society to:

 Organise the social dimensions of health actions,

 Build wider constituencies for health rights and
  goals
 Strengthen public accountability and

  responsiveness
Systematic Collaboration
 CSOs speak with one voice
 Legitimacy of CSOs
Benefits of Collaboration
   Outweigh the risks of possible tensions in CSO-
    state interactions
Strategic Alliances
   Enhancing legitimacy of health policies and
    programmes
   Improving public outreach
   Advocacy of health goals
   Information exchange
   Increasing inputs

								
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