Critical Infrastructure

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					 Pandemic Flu
  and Critical
Infrastructure
       Jim Sideras
  RN, MSN, MIFireE, CFO, CMO
   sideras@post.harvard.edu
Objectives
•   What additional information do you need?
•   What can we do to help?
•   Determine Issues for further development
•   Now is the time to begin open discussion and
    planning
     • If it is not Pandemic Flu, it will be
       something else
     • Planning is everything
Flu strains can (and do) change
• As a strain of flu changes or mutates, it can
  impact other animals and humans

• It is hard to predict the impact to humans and
  whether it will continue to mutate
Generation of “Pandemic Flu”
      Avian               Avian
      virus            reassortant
                          virus




                                       Reassortment
              Avian        Huma          in humans
              virus           n
                            virus


                Reassortment         Avian-human
                   in hogs            pandemic
                                     reassortant
                                         virus
Prevention and education of
        Employees
Each infected person will spread
    flu to 2-3 healthy people
What is Critical Infrastructure?

 Sectors that provide the production of
      essential goods and services,
   interconnectedness and operability,
      public safety, and security that
 contribute to a strong national defense
         and thriving community.
What is Critical Infrastructure?
• Emergency         • Information
  Services            Technology
• Banking Finance
                    • Energy
• Chemical &
  HazMat            • Telecommo
• Defense           • Postal / Shipping
• Water             • Transportation
• Public Health &   • Food and
  Healthcare          Agriculture
          85%
   of critical infrastructure
resources reside in the private
            sector…
which generally lack plans for
    a catastrophic health
    emergencies such as
        pandemic flu
WHO’s Tracking a Potential Pandemic
Interpandemic Low Risk of            1
New Virus        Human cases
– no human cases Higher Risk of      2
                 human cases
Pandemic Alert No or limited
                 cases               3   Plan for mitigation

New virus causes Increased human     4 Plan Implementation
                 to human cases
human cases      Significant human   5 Strategy Execution
                 to human cases
Pandemic         Efficient spread    6
Biggest Impact to Business

  Will be derived directly or
        indirectly from
  unprecedented rates of…
absenteeism
  15-30%
Absenteeism rates of 15-30%
            due to:
           sickness
         quarantines
      travel restrictions
   family responsibilities
 fear of contracting disease
Wave Effect of Pandemic Flu
• Typical incubation period 2 days
• On average, an infected person will
  spread disease to at least 2 other people
• Epidemics will last 6 to 8 weeks in
  affected communities
• Multiple waves across the country are
  likely to occur with each wave lasting 2
  to 3 months
Global Impact from China
• 25% of export goes to U.S.
• Accounts for 20% of U.S. total imports
• 45% of China’s exports are:
   • Telecomm, textiles, apparel, auto
     parts, surgical masks and gloves
• U.S. “just in time” supply chains would
  be impacted
 Private sector should (from DHS)
• Establish process for infection control, including
  offsite work options and worker education

• Establish surveillance protocols to monitor
  health of employees

• Dev pandemic specific operations plans to
  maintain critical services despite absenteeism
 Private sector should (from DHS)
• Monitor international / national pan threat
  levels

• Coord with officials to share plans,
  preparation, and response/recovery
  information

• Est’b partnerships with other members of
  the sector to provide mutual support and
  maintain of essential services
Business Considerations
• Maintain essential operations and
  services with 40% absenteeism or
  resources not available
• Maintain essential service operations for
  6-8 weeks between waves
• Bolster depth of reserves for essential
  workers at all levels
• Provide delegations of authority and
  orders of succession planning and
  workers
Objectives
•   Determine Issues for further development
•   What additional information do you need?
•   What can we do to help?
•   Now is the time to begin open discussion and
    planning
     • If it is not Pandemic Flu, it will be
       something else
     • Planning is everything
 Pandemic Flu
  and Critical
Infrastructure
       Jim Sideras
  RN, MSN, MIFireE, CFO, CMO
   sideras@post.harvard.edu

				
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posted:9/16/2012
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