Finding & Articulating a Research Question� AC ontextual by VI802W

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 12

									 Developing a Research
      Question…
An Overview of A Family-Focused
      Research Program

Presentation for LEAH Fellows
   Friday, October 9 2009

   Kathleen (Katy) M. Roche
   Part I: Developing a Research
             Question…

 Identifying an effective research question
 How a research question evolves
 Articulating a research question
   Part II: Overview of a Family-
   Focused Research Program…
 Progression of a family-focused adolescent
health research program over the past decade

- Overarching theme: Drawing from a
development-in-context perspective, identifying
modifiable factors which influence adolescent
health and well-being, particularly for youth living
in low-income, urban neighborhoods
      Part I. A. Identifying an
   Effective Research Question…
 Importance
Does the answer to your question have the
potential to IMPROVE important health issues
facing adolescents (e.g. informing program/policy
development)
 Innovative
How much is already known?
What is scientific rigor of prior research?
Are previous findings culturally or contextually
appropriate?
        Part I. A. Identifying an
     Effective Research Question…
 Theory
Although discipline specific, there should be a
compelling reason for your research question that
reaches beyond importance and innovativeness


Specificity
Too much breadth / lack of focus is a set-up for
failure…nothing is done well and it is usually not
feasible
      Part I. A. Identifying an
   Effective Research Question…
** Arguing “it hasn’t been done before” or
   “research methods are weak” is far
   more compelling when there is an
   argument for the empirical/theoretical
   importance of your question
       Part I. B. How a Research
          Question Evolves…
 Identify topic based on practice, policy, and/or
  research experience
 Carefully read empirical and theoretical work
  from multiple disciplines
 Should not solely rely on review of research on
  your outcome
 Iterative process: Conducting your own research,
  keeping up with the literature, attending national
  meetings, feedback from colleagues
        Part I. C. Articulating a
          Research Question
Issues to consider in articulating a research
   question:
1) Do you have a primary hypothesis? Based
   on what? What is your theory?
2) If you are interested in a particular
   population, why and is what you are
   examining particularly relevant?
3) Decide what you will NOT do
  Part II. Overview of a Family-
  Focused Research Program…
 Underlying motivation for a
  research program

 Taking advantage of opportunities
  early on
Part II. Overview of a Family-
Focused Research Program…
How do the influences that parents have on their
   adolescents vary depending upon the extent or risk and
   the degree of support that families experience in their
   neighborhood environment?



1)   Secondary analyses of national data
2)   Ethnic- and context-specific studies
3)   “Parenting” to punitive discipline and autonomy granting
4)   “Neighborhood” to neighborhood disorder to culture
    Part II. Progression of research
               program…
A) What sort of parenting guidance might pediatricians
    who work with racial and ethnic minority families
    provide? What does the literature tell us?

B) How do the influences that parents have on their
    adolescents vary depending upon the extent or risk
    and the degree of support in the neighborhood
    context?

C) What is the impact of parenting vis-à-vis a cultural
    context on adolescent well-being?
     Part II. Features of research
               program…
 Multiple disciplines
Developmental psychology…adolescence
Family sciences…parenting
Urban sociology…neighborhood
Public Health…importance, disparities,
   application of knowledge

 Use of Mixed-methods
 Theory

								
To top