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									                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 4
SCHOOL LOCATION ................................................................................................................. 4
THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK FACULTY AND STAFF .............................................. 5
             School Program Director .................................................................................................... 5
             BSW Program Coordinator ................................................................................................ 5
             BSW Field Education Coordinator..................................................................................... 5
             MSW Field Education Coordinator .................................................................................... 5
Faculty ............................................................................................................................................ 6
Staff ................................................................................................................................................. 7
The School Office Manager is responsible for administering MSW admissions, personnel, budget,
staff supervision, and other school activities. Mary is the primary contact person for questions
about MSW admissions. .................................................................................................................. 7
SOCIAL WORK PROGRAMS ................................................................................................... 7
NASW CODE OF ETHICS .......................................................................................................... 8
BSW PROGRAM MISSION ........................................................................................................ 8
BSW PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ....................................................................... 8
BSW PRACTICUM COURSE OBJECTIVES .......................................................................... 9
FIELD EDUCATION AND THE PRACTICUM COURSE ................................................... 10
Curriculum Objectives and Integration .................................................................................... 10
GLOSSARY OF TERMS ........................................................................................................... 10
PLACEMENT RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ...................................................................... 12
Agency Selection .......................................................................................................................... 12
Field Instructor Selection............................................................................................................ 13
Benefits for Field Instructors ..................................................................................................... 13
Field Instructor Orientation and Training ............................................................................... 14
FIELD EDUCATION ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................... 15
Social Work Program Responsibility for Coordination of Field Education .......................... 15
Faculty Liaison Responsibility ................................................................................................... 15
Field Instructor Responsibility................................................................................................... 16
Agency Representative Responsibility ....................................................................................... 16
STUDENT ADMISSION AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR FIELD EDUCATION................ 17
Admission ..................................................................................................................................... 17
Student Responsibility ................................................................................................................ 17
FIELD PLACEMENT: OPTIONS AND EXPECTATIONS ................................................. 18
Concurrent Placement ................................................................................................................ 18
Placements Outside of the Anchorage Area .............................................................................. 18
Outside Employment and Concurrent Coursework ................................................................ 18
Paid Placements and Stipends .................................................................................................... 18
Placement within the Student’s Place of Employment............................................................. 19
Late Placements ........................................................................................................................... 19
Required Hours ........................................................................................................................... 19
Attending Conferences, Workshops, and Other Special Activities During Placement Hours
....................................................................................................................................................... 19
Student Absences ......................................................................................................................... 19


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Scheduled Holidays ..................................................................................................................... 20
Strikes ........................................................................................................................................... 20
Seminar......................................................................................................................................... 20
Placement Conflicts with other Class Attendance .................................................................... 20
Student Drops or Withdrawals from Practicum Courses ....................................................... 20
A Grade of “C” in Practicum ..................................................................................................... 21
Less than “C” Grades in Other Social Work Courses ............................................................. 21
Policy on “Incomplete” Grades .................................................................................................. 21
OVERVIEW OF THE FIELD PLACEMENT PROCESS ..................................................... 21
Process for Entry into a Placement ............................................................................................ 21
DISSATISFACTION AND TERMINATION .......................................................................... 23
Early Intervention and Problem Solving .................................................................................. 23
Student-Initiated Request for Termination of the Placement ................................................. 23
Agency-Initiated Request for Termination of the Placement .................................................. 24
         No Fault Terminations...................................................................................................... 24
         Agency-Initiated Termination For Cause ......................................................................... 24
Termination Criteria ................................................................................................................... 26
EVALUATION PROCESSES .................................................................................................... 27
Overview of the Student Evaluation Process ............................................................................ 27
Evaluation Role of the Faculty Liaison ..................................................................................... 27
Establishing a Grade for the Practicum .................................................................................... 27
Evaluation of the Field Education Process ................................................................................ 28
FIELD EDUCATION COMMITTEE....................................................................................... 28
SAFETY AND RISK MANAGEMENT .................................................................................... 28
General Policy .............................................................................................................................. 28
Professional Liability and Insurance ......................................................................................... 29
Use of Personal Vehicles and Flying in Small Aircraft ............................................................ 29
Job Site Risks and Hazards ........................................................................................................ 30
Bloodborne Pathogens ................................................................................................................ 30
Tuberculosis ................................................................................................................................. 30




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                                                  2
Appendices

                                           Appendix A:
                                             Forms

 #1   UAA Affirmative Action Policy
 #2   UAA Harassment Policy
 #3   Organization Profile
 #4   Field Instructor Application
 #5   Agency Placement Decision Form
 #6   Affiliation Agreement
 #7   Disclosure Forms
 #8   BSW Field Placement Agreement
 #9   Health Brochure
#10   Accident Insurance Form


                                         Appendix B:
                          Assignments, Instructions, and Fall Syllabus


 #1   Field Instructor Check List for Student Agency Orientation
 #2   Report on Community Visit
 #3   Self Help Group Visit
 #4   Guidelines for Agency Orientation Summary Report
 #5   BSW Learning Contract Format
 #6   BSW Weekly Time Sheet
 #7   Guidelines for Weekly Learning Log
 #8   Learning Portfolio
 #9   Supervisor Agenda
#10   Annotated Reading File
#11   Annotated Resource File
#12   Social Work Roles and Performance Standards

SWK 495A Fall Syllabus


                                          Appendix C:
                                        Evaluation Forms

#1    Field Education Communications Rating Scale
#2    Student End of First Semester Self-Assessment
#3    Field Instructor Assessment of Student
#4    End of Placement Competency Assessment Paper
#5    Agency Evaluation of the BSW Field Education Program
#6    Student Evaluation of the BSW Field Education Program




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                                   INTRODUCTION

This manual will assist students, field instructors, agency representatives, and field
faculty in understanding what is to happen during the field placement. It summarizes the
current BSW field education policies and procedures of the University of Alaska
Anchorage School of Social Work. It provides forms and instructions for field placement
assignments and other required paperwork. To the greatest extent possible, BSW field
education policies and procedures are developed in collaboration with those who serve as
field instructors for our students, and both field instructor and student input is sought in
developing field education expectations. Copies of this manual can be found and
downloaded in pdf form at:
http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/socialwork/field_education/students/BSW/upload/BSW-
manual.pdf




                                SCHOOL LOCATION
The School of Social Work offices are located in Suite 106 of the Gordon Hartlieb Hall,
northwest of the Lucy Cuddy Dining Center. We are nearest the North Parking Lot.

Our mailing address is:        UAA School of Social Work
                               Gordon Hartlieb Hall, Suite 106
                               3211 Providence Drive
                               Anchorage, Alaska 99508-8230


Our main phone number is:      (907) 786-6900


Our fax number is:             (907) 786-6912


Our home page address is:      http://socialwork.uaa.alaska.edu


Our business hours are:        Monday through Friday
                               8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Alaska Standard Time


The office of the College Dean is located in Room 205 of the Professional Studies Building. The
Dean’s staff may be reached by phone at (907) 786-4406.




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      THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK FACULTY AND STAFF
The School of Social Work has a strong, experienced, and active faculty and staff who are able to
help you with a variety of needs. Feel free to contact these individuals for assistance.

School Program Director
Elizabeth A. Sirles, M.S.W., Ph.D.
The Director is the chief administrator for the School of Social Work. The Director is responsible
for the day-to-day operations of the school and management of the School’s resources. The
Director is available to assist students who have special needs or are having problems within the
School. Please feel free to stop by the Director’s office to discuss concerns, share ideas, and
become involved in School activities.

BSW Program Coordinator
Kathi Trawver, M.S.W., Ph.D.
The BSW Program Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the
BSW Program, BSW program development, and working with the Social Work faculty and staff,
UAA administration, and CSWE to ensure BSW program integrity. The Coordinator is
responsible for scheduling undergraduate courses, overseeing the advisement of BSW students,
overseeing the BSW budget, and trouble-shooting for the BSW program. If you have any
questions or concerns about the BSW Program, feel free to contact Professor Trawver.

BSW Field Education Coordinator
Janet Emerman, M.S.S.W.
The BSW Field Education Coordinator is responsible for identifying and training field
instructors, placing BSW students in field settings, overseeing the field education process, and
handling problems that may arise for BSW students or field instructors regarding field education.
Collaborating with the MSW Field Education Coordinator, Janet works to ensure quality
opportunities for BSW and MSW students.

MSW Program Director
Chad Morse, M.S.W.
The MSW Program Coordinator is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the
MSW Program, MSW program development, and working with the Social Work faculty and
staff, UAA administration, and CSWE to ensure MSW program integrity. If you have any
questions or concerns about the MSW Program, feel free to contact Professor Magen.

MSW Field Education Coordinator
Eva Kopacz, M.S.W.
The MSW Field Education Coordinator is responsible for identifying and training field
instructors, placing MSW students in field settings, overseeing the field education process, and
handling problems that may arise for MSW students or field instructors regarding field education.
Collaborating with the BSW Field Education Coordinator, Eva works to ensure quality
opportunities for MSW and BSW students.

MSW Distance Field Education Coordinator
Janet Emerman, M.S.S.W.
The MSW Distance Field Education Coordinator has the same responsibilities as the on campus
MSW and BSW Field Education Coordinators with the added element of coordinating students,
field instructors, and agencies throughout the state of Alaska and in some cases in the lower 48
and foreign countries.




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                                              Faculty
Mary Dallas Allen, Assistant Professor. The College of William and Mary, B.S. (1995);
Virginia Commonwealth University, M.S.W. (2001); Portland University, Ph.D. (2008).
Telephone: 786-6992                          Email: mdallen@uaa.alaska.edu
Tracey Burke, Associate Professor. Villanova University, B.A. (1989); University of
Minnesota-Twin Cities, M.S.W. (1994); University of Washington, Ph. D. (2003).
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 5               Email: t k b u r k e @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
Patrick M. Cunningham, Associate Professor. University of Utah, B.S. (1960); Fordham
University, M.S.W. (1964); University of Utah, D.S.W. (1989).
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 2                Email: a f p m c @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
Janet Emerman, Clinical Professor. University of Wisconsin-Madison, B.A. (1971); M.S.S.W.
(1972).
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 3              Email: j a n e t @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
Bernita Hamilton, Adjunct Professor. University of Illinois, B.S. (1974); Arizona State
University, M.S.W. (1979)
Telephone: 269-3906                          Email: afblh@uaa.alaska.edu
Eva Y. Kopacz, Professor. Goshen College, B.A. (1972); Western Michigan University, M.S.W.
(1974). On sabbatical for Fall 2011 semester.
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 9              Email: afeyk1@ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
Randy H. Magen, Professor. Michigan State University, B.A. (1979); University of Wisconsin-
Madison, M.S.S.W. (1987); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Ph.D. (1992).
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 1              Email: m a g e n @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
Chad Morse, Clinical Professor. Harding University, B.A. (1985); Washington University in St.
Louis, M.S.W. (1987).
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 4              Email: a f c e m @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
Leona Schick, Adjunct Professor. University of Alaska Fairbanks, B.S.W. (1996); University of
Michigan, M.S.W. (1999).
Telephone: (907) 2250-4865                     Email: lschick1@uaa.alaska.edu
Elizabeth A. Sirles, Professor. University of Kansas, B.G.S. (1978); University of Kansas,
M.S.W. (1980); Washington University in St. Louis, Ph.D. (1984).
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 7                Email: s i r l e s @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
Kathi Trawver, Assistant Professor. University of Northern Iowa, B.A. (1979); University of
Alaska Anchorage, M.S.W. (1998).
Telephone: (907) 7 8 6 - 6 9 1 5              Email: a f k r t @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u




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                                                  Staff

School Office Manager:
Mary Parker                Phone: 7 8 6 - 6 9 1 1       email: m a r y @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
The School Office Manager is responsible for administering MSW admissions, personnel, budget,
staff supervision, and other school activities. Mary is the primary contact person for questions
about MSW admissions.

School Assistants:
Bethany Foster            Phone: 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 0     email:        befoster@uaa.alaska.edu
Eva Wilson                 Phone: 7 8 6 - 6 9 0 0    email:         eva@ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
The School Assistant is responsible for managing the overall daily operation of the office and
serves as Fiscal Assistant to the Office Manager. Eva is cross-trained in the academic, field
education, and distance program functions in order to assist all visitors and callers.

MSW Academic Program Assistant:
Sharie Field                 Phone: 7 8 6 - 6 9 7 1    email: sharie@ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
The Academic Assistant is responsible for supporting the faculty, students, and distance delivery
program in a variety of tasks and responsibilities. Sharie is cross-trained in the School’s overall
functions in order to assist all visitors and callers.

Field Education Assistant:
Suzanne Dvorak              Phone: 7 8 6 - 6 9 1 0       email: s u z a n n e @ u a a . a l a s k a . e d u
The Field Education Assistant is responsible for assisting with the operations of the BSW and
MSW Field Education Programs. Suzanne is also cross-trained in the School’s academic,
distance, and overall functions in order to assist all visitors and callers.




                              SOCIAL WORK PROGRAMS
The University of Alaska Anchorage is part of the State of Alaska's University system. The
School of Social Work is an academic unit in the College of Health. The School administers the
Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) and the Master of Social Work (MSW) degree programs.

The Social Work Program at UAA began in 1973 within the Department of Sociology. By 1976,
the course work for a BSW was in place and the Board of Regents approved the BSW degree.
UAA then sought national accreditation for its social work program from the Council on Social
Work Education (CSWE). CSWE is the only nationally recognized professional body authorized
to accredit social work programs at the baccalaureate or master's level in the United States.
Accreditation of the BSW Program was granted in 1978 and has continued ever since. Re-
affirmation of the accreditation was granted in June 2002.

In February 1994, the University Board of Regents approved the Master of Social Work degree
curriculum. The first MSW cohort was admitted in August 1995 with the first graduating class in
1997. In June 1999, the MSW Program was granted Accreditation, retroactive to all graduating
classes of the MSW Program. Both the MSW Program and the BSW Program were granted full
accreditation for eight years in June 2002 and are now accredited through 2018.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                             7
                              NASW CODE OF ETHICS
Knowledge of and demonstrated commitment to the ethics and values of professional social work
practice as expressed in the National Association of Social Workers' Code of Ethics is expected of
all parties involved in social work field education. The Code of Ethics will be distributed and
discussed prior to the beginning of field education and throughout the field education experience
and will be referred to regularly in practicum course assignments. The NASW Code of Ethics can
also be accessed on line at       www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code

                             BSW PROGRAM MISSION
In keeping with the expressed mission of the University of Alaska Anchorage, the mission of the
UAA BSW program is to prepare generalist social workers who enhance human well-being and
promote social and economic justice for people of all backgrounds, particularly those in Alaska.
Alaska’s unique and rich multicultural population, geographic remoteness, and frontier status
allow the real potential for skilled social work professionals to make a profound impact on social
and economic injustice in our state. Generalist social work practice is defined as a multiple
theoretical orientation of values and skills that is transferable between and among diverse
contexts and locations and a) uses the systems, person-in-environment, strengths, and client
empowerment perspectives; b) provides multi-system level interventions (micro – mezzo –
macro); c) applies critical thinking to the planned change process (engagement, assessment,
intervention, evaluation, termination); d) integrates direct practice with social policy and social
work research; and e) is guided by the NASW Professional Code of Ethics.

                BSW PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
BSW Program Goals
Based upon the mission of the BSW program, the BSW program goals are to prepare generalist
social work practitioners who are:
Goal 1: Competent in multiple entry-level practice roles across client systems, particularly within
the state of Alaska;
Goal 2: Committed to the enhancement of human well-being;
Goal 3: Committed to the promotion of social and economic justice for people of all backgrounds,
particularly those in Alaska;
Goal 4: Guided by the values and ethical standards of the social work profession;
Goal 5: Prepared to enhance the quality of service delivery system; and
Goal 6: Knowledgeable, skillful, and sensitive with people from diverse backgrounds.

BSW Program Objectives
The UAA BSW program objectives, as derived from the mission and goals above, define what
BSW graduates should be able to do. UAA BSW graduates:

    1. Demonstrate professional use of self and apply critical thinking skills to professional
       generalist social work practice.
    2. Display use of professional standards, values, and ethics.
    3. Are sensitive to the needs of diverse and at-risk populations, and practice without
       discrimination.
    4. Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and apply
       strategies of advocacy and social change to advance social and economic justice.
    5. Are knowledgeable of the history of the social work profession, its current structures, and
       issues.



BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         8
    6. Apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice planned change process
        with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
    7. Apply empirically-based theoretical frameworks and knowledgeable of the bio-
        psychosocial-spiritual variables that affect development, behavior, and interactions.
    8. Analyze, formulate, and influence social policies.
    9. Evaluate research studies and apply research findings to practice interventions.
    10. Use communication skills effectively with consumer populations, colleagues,
        organizations, and communities.
    11. Effectively use supervision and consultation.
    12. Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems, and seek
        necessary organizational change.


                 BSW PRACTICUM COURSE OBJECTIVES
    1. Apply planned change/problem-solving methodology in social work practice.
    2. Perform a variety of entry-level practice roles.
    3. Articulate understanding of and sensitivity to diverse and at-risk populations.
    4. Demonstrate a BSW entry-level ability to link clients with community services and
       opportunities.
    5. Communicate professionally in speech and in writing.
    6. Utilize the policies, procedures, and structure of the field placement agency and its
       context in the large Alaska service community.
    7. Compare and contrast professional values and ethical standards underlying social work
       practice with personal values and ethics.
    8. Demonstrate professional use of self and of supervision.
    9. Develop the skills to independently research professional topics and issues related to
       his/her practicum.
    10. Establish professional boundaries and develop self-awareness.

These practicum course objectives outline the expectations for each student in field education and
should be reflected in the activities specified in the student’s Learning Contract and subsequent
student evaluations each semester. The two semesters of field education are viewed as a
sequence, commencing in the fall of any given year and finishing in the spring semester.
Achievement of course objectives is somewhat dependent upon the individual agency experiences
and opportunities, but attainment of these objectives is expected by the conclusion of the
practicum sequence.




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         FIELD EDUCATION AND THE PRACTICUM COURSE

Curriculum Objectives and Integration

The BSW curriculum builds upon a liberal arts foundation. Baccalaureate general education
requirements and other required and elective coursework prepare the student for viewing social
problems within the context of systems theory; within the context of a larger culture. The course
sequence in social work is designed to provide students with a professional social work identity:
the history of the social work profession, an understanding of at-risk and diverse populations, the
role of social and economic justice in social welfare, an understanding of human behavior in
social environment, methods for implementing change and practicing with a variety of system
sizes, research design and methods, and the understanding and analysis of social policies. Every
social work course infuses content on professional values and ethics.

Field education and the practicum course offers the student an opportunity to integrate the
knowledge, values, and skills developed in academic courses with hands-on experience in a
community setting under the supervision of an experienced social work professional practitioner.
Course assignments also facilitate the integrative process through further critical analysis and
group sharing among students at similar levels of professional development


                               GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Affiliation Agreement: The formal letter of agreement between the agency and the University
specifying the terms of the placement and the responsibilities of each party.

Agency Supervisor: The agency professional directly responsible for supervising the student’s
day-to-day activities. Usually the field instructor and agency supervisor will be the same person.

Agency Representative: A person employed by the placement agency who represents the
agency in all matters relevant to the placement. Usually the field instructor and the agency
representative will be the same person.

BSW Field Education Coordinator: The faculty member of the social work program who has
overall responsibility for development and implementation of the field education component of
the BSW curriculum.

Concurrent Placement: A placement in one agency setting that extends over two semesters
(fall and spring), requiring 16 hours per week in the placement setting, and requiring the two
semester practice sequence to be taken concurrently. This is the “norm” in the UAA BSW
Program.

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE): The national organization that establishes
standards for and accredits BSW and MSW educational programs.

Faculty Liaison: The faculty person who has responsibility for the monitoring of an individual’s
field placement. The BSW Field Education Coordinator may serve as the faculty liaison. The
faculty liaison typically is also the practicum seminar instructor for the student.




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Field Education: Language describing that part of the social work curriculum which
encompasses the required field placement. Some organizations use the term internship or
practicum.

Field Instructor: A professional, qualified, experienced MSW-or BSW-degreed social worker
who supervises, instructs and mentors the social work student in the field placement. The field
instructor usually is an employee of the agency in which the student is placed. The CSWE
requires that field instructors be graduates of an accredited social work program and
recommends a minimum of two years of professional, post-graduate experience.

Learning Contract: A written contract written by the student early in the field placement, with
oversight and approval by the field instructor, that specifies the terms of the placement including
hours, work schedules, and learning expectations/objectives.

Learning Log: A weekly documentation of the student's activities and experiences in the
placement. Significant learning experiences are analyzed and progress on learning goals and
objectives is identified.

Learning Portfolio: A compilation of assignments documenting attainment of the learning
objectives and integration of knowledge, skills, and values over the entire field education
sequence.

Outside Field Instructor: The term used for a field instructor recruited from among qualified
social workers in the community who provides the weekly supervision to a student who is placed
in an agency which does not employ a social worker who meets UAA / CSWE field instructor
requirements.

Practicum: A term used to describe a social work field experience in a selected learning setting.
Historically, social work education has used the terms field education, field placement, or field
work interchangeably with practicum.

Practicum Seminar: The accompanying weekly class meeting of the students enrolled in
placements, where they process their field experiences, integrate classroom knowledge with
practice, and focus on professional self-development.

Stipend: A fixed, regular allowance given to a student to assist with educational expenses. The
stipend must be paid as specified as long as the student remains in good standing at the
placement and in the Field Education Program. The stipend cannot be contingent upon
performing specified duties or working specified hours for the sponsor’s convenience or
advantage.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         11
                 PLACEMENT RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
 For most social work students, the heart of their professional educational experience is their
 placement. It is during the placement that the student pulls all the pieces of his/her professional
 education together in the “real world” of an organization delivering services to a consumer
 population. The UAA School of Social Work attempts to reach out into the practice community to
 identify organizations that might be interested in hosting social work students. Educational
 opportunities that can be offered to social work students are explored in advance of any planning
 for student placement in order to ensure that such arrangements will both support the mission and
 goals of the host organization and meet the learning expectations of the social work degree
 program. The School also seeks out professional degreed social workers in the practice
 community who have the necessary qualifications and interest in working with placement
 students. This section describes the UAA Social Work School’s process for selecting and
 preparing organizations and the professionals who will work with students during their
 placements. Organization Profile forms and Field Instructor Applications are found in Appendix
 A.

 Agency Selection

 The UAA BSW Program selects host organizations demonstrating the following qualities:

 1.   willingness by the agency to assist the UAA Social Work Program to meet its goals and
      objectives for professional social work education;
 2.   commitment of necessary staff time and resources to support, supervise, and evaluate
      students placed at the agency;
 3.   a philosophy of service that is congruent with social work values and ethics;
 4.   provision of work space, equipment, and resources necessary for performance of tasks
      assigned the student;
 5.   willingness and ability to assist the university in providing appropriate and diverse learning
      opportunities for students;
 6.   identification of a staff member meeting CSWE requirements to serve as field instructor or
      willingness to enter into an agreement with a social worker meeting those requirements to
      serve as field instructor;
 7.   identification of a staff member to serve as agency representative when the field instructor is
      off-site;
 8.   willingness to expose and involve the student in all agency functions relevant to the
      placement, including unit staff meetings and case conferences;
 9.   acceptance of students without discrimination related to race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual
      orientation, religion, physical disability, or political belief;
10.   the existence of adequate agency resources to develop and operate the agency program
      without dependence upon students, unless the following conditions are satisfied: (a) the
      student’s role in the development of a project is negotiated in advance; (b) the proposal
      represents a unique learning opportunity for the student; and (c) the student is not used in
      lieu of paid staff or compensated in any way for the work;
11.   timely and accurate submission by the organization and staff involved in the proposed
      placement of required information necessary to determine if CSWE requirements are met.




 BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         12
Field Instructor Selection

The UAA BSW Field Education Program works with Field Instructors who meet the
following criteria:
1.    a. Possess BSW or MSW degree from an accredited school of social work,
      b. have a minimum of two years of post-degree professional social work experience, and
      c. demonstrate commitment to professional ethics and values including no history of ethical
         violations in his/her career.
2.    Be in one of the following roles:
      a. an employee of the field work agency who meets CSWE standards; or
      b. a social worker meeting CSWE standards who is not an employee of the agency, but is
         willing to serve as an outside field instructor and enters into an agreement with the
         university and the placement agency; or
      c. a UAA faculty member or employee meeting CSWE standards who enters into an
         agreement with the placement agency to serve as an outside field instructor when the
         agency does not have a person meeting CSWE standards available.
3.    Understand the goals and objectives of social work education and demonstrate commitment
      and capability to take on the role of social work educator and mentor.
4.    Demonstrate ability to conceptualize, communicate and demonstrate in practice the
      knowledge and skills of generalist social work.
5.    Submit necessary documentation to the social work program to demonstrate competency and
      preparedness for the role of field instructor.
6.    Have adequate time available to provide supervision for the student and to participate in
      university provided orientation and training. A minimum of one hour per week individual
      supervision is required in addition to time needed to meet with the faculty liaison and to
      evaluate the student’s performance.

Benefits for Field Instructors
Working with students can be a rich and rewarding experience in and of itself, as well as a
springboard to other professional opportunities and experiences. The benefits can include:

      Satisfaction of contributing to the growth and development of well prepared
       new practitioners.
      Opportunity to develop skills as teachers and supervisors through specialized training and
       continuing education activities.
      Opportunity to satisfy continuing education requirements for professional licensing.
      Timely information on teaching possibilities, courses, and continuing education
       offered at UAA.
      Library privileges, including some computer resources, at the UAA Consortium Library.
      Opportunity to shape social work education through membership on
       University committees.
      Recognition within the Alaska social work community as a social work field educator.
      Access to consultation from University faculty and departments.
      Opportunities for networking and social interaction with other social work professionals.


BSW Field Manual 2012-13                        13
Field Instructor Orientation and Training

Professionals involved in the UAA field education process take on a role crucial to the
development and training of Alaska's future professional social workers. This includes the
responsibility to understand the educational objectives of the program and his/her role in assisting
the student to attain them. The BSW program annually provides a comprehensive orientation to
its field education program. A variety of means are utilized to help field instructors and other
agency personnel who work with students prepare for their roles, including group orientation, site
visits, provision of written materials, and telephone consultation. The faculty liaison and the BSW
Field Education Coordinator are available for consultation as needed in addition to regularly
scheduled contacts.

Social workers who apply to serve as field instructors for BSW students must complete an
orientation/training held at the beginning of the fall semester each year. The orientation is
designed to answer many common questions, introduce School faculty, encourage interaction
between field instructors, and prepare the field instructor for the role he/she is taking on. Agency
representatives other than the field instructors are encouraged to attend these sessions.
Certificates of attendance are provided for all training activities, indicating content and number of
hours of the training. All field instructors attend the orientation session even if they have attended
during an earlier year. Students attend the same orientation session to ensure both parties hear the
same material and begin to work together as a team on the field education experience.


FIELD INSTRUCTOR ORIENTATION IS PROVIDED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

       Orientation to the BSW curriculum and to field work,

           Orientation to generalist social work practice as taught in the UAA BSW program,

               Introduction to teaching-learning principles relevant to field instruction
                processes, and to stages in the learning process and professional development,

                    Familiarization with the process of effective student supervision and
                     mentoring, including diversity as an issue in supervision,

                        Skill-building for educational assessment and learning plan development
                         and for evaluation and documentation of student learning,

                            Problem-solving in placement supervision, and

                                Skills in achieving cultural competence in practice.


The UAA BSW Field Education Coordinator often schedules an additional meeting during the
spring semester to bring field instructors together for information sharing and skill building.
Agency representatives are encouraged to attend, as are all social work faculty members.

The School advertises a calendar of colloquia each year for which field instructors and other
professionals from the community can receive certificates of attendance which may help them
meet continuing education requirements for professional licensing.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                          14
         FIELD EDUCATION ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Social Work Program Responsibility for Coordination of Field Education

1.   Appoint a Coordinator of Field Education and sufficient other field faculty in order to
     administer and implement the BSW Field Education Program;
2.   Assure good working relationships and communication among students, field instructors,
     field placement organizations, and the MSW Program;
3.   Recruit a wide array of organizations and agencies representative of the types of work
     settings students will be entering after leaving the program and the diversity of the
     community served by the program as potential placement sites;
4.   Assist in recruiting qualified social workers to serve as field instructors;
5.   Orient and train field instructors;
6.   Screen and approve field placement sites;
7.   Evaluate field organizations and instructors in terms of their contribution to the educational
     mission of the practicum course and BSW Program;
8.   Establish criteria and process for evaluation of student performance; and
9.   Establish a mechanism for obtaining systematic feedback from the field instructors for
     planning and improving the field instruction program.

BSW field faculty have a responsibility to structure field education activities and support field
instructors/agency representatives who engage in field education. Below are the responsibilities
of faculty liaisons, field instructors, and agency representatives:

Faculty Liaison Responsibility

1.   Develop a positive working relationship with the student, the field instructor, the agency
     representative, and others involved in the student’s field education experience by being
     available on a reasonable basis, having a working knowledge of BSW Program policies and
     procedures, and understanding the expectations of the field site agency;
2.   Serve as the representative of the BSW Program with the field site agency and personnel
     associated with the field work placement;
3.   Coordinate the placement process at specific sites as requested by the BSW Field Work
     Coordinator;
4.   Assure implementation of BSW Program and field education policies and procedures in all
     aspects of the practicum experience by providing consultation and necessary materials
     including course objectives;
5.   Facilitate student’s professional growth in the field placement agency and assist any party in
     managing difficulties that may arise in the placement;
6.   Monitor and facilitate the student’s learning in the placement by reviewing and approving
     the student’s learning contract, reviewing and providing feedback on assignments; making at
     least one on-site visit to each site each semester; participating in student evaluation;
     assisting with the evaluation of each field placement site and instructor; and
7.   Facilitate the continuous quality improvement activities of the Field Education Program
     through participation in planning, training, and evaluation in collaboration with the Field
     Work Coordinator.



BSW Field Manual 2012-13                           15
Field Instructor Responsibility
1.   Facilitate the student’s learning by establishing and maintaining positive working relationships with
     the student, the faculty liaison, the agency representative, and others involved in the field education
     program;
2.   Help ensure the student meets practicum course requirements by developing a working knowledge
     of the course objectives, procedures, requirements, and the integration of the field placement
     experience in the total social work educational program;
3.   Promote a successful outcome in the field placement through participation in student selection,
     orientation to the agency, development of learning objectives reflecting program requirements and
     student career goals; evaluation, and timely and constructive feedback to the student concerning the
     strengths and weaknesses of his or her performance;
4.   Maximize student’s professional growth and learning through participation in activities designed to
     promote continuous expansion of the ability to apply social work skills in progressively more
     challenging situations;
5.   Assure that the student is able to implement social work values and ethics in all professional
     interactions in the field work setting through weekly supervision and by example;
6.   Facilitate student learning and achievement of objectives by being accessible to the student at
     reasonable intervals (minimum of 1 hour/week), identifying and collaborating with the agency
     representative and faculty liaison to resolve problems or disputes as early as possible, and serving as
     champion for the student’s professional development; and
7.   Promote the continuous improvement of the BSW Program and practicum course through
     participation in feedback activities designed to evaluate the program and course.

Agency Representative Responsibility
The positions of field instructor and agency representative often will be filled by the same person;
however, a field placement agency may separate these roles when a person meeting field instructor
qualifications is not available, an agency has multiple student placements, or an agency elects to separate
the roles. The agency representative will work with the outside field instructor, with the student, and with
his/her own colleagues in the organization to ensure that the field education process works well for all
involved. The agency representative will:
1.   Represent the field placement agency in all interactions with the program, including negotiating the
     agreement between the agency and the BSW Program, selecting students, evaluating the students
     and the field education program, resolving conflicts, and developing an acceptable learning contract;
2.   Assure that the field placement enhances the development of a student’s professional skills to work
     with diverse populations, vulnerable at-risk groups, and progressively more challenging situations
     dealt with by the agency by assignment to programs and duties maximizing experiential learning;
3.   Help ensure the student meets practicum course requirements by developing a working knowledge
     of the course objectives, procedures, requirements, and the integration of the field placement
     experience in the total educational program;
4.   Assure the agency supports the placement by provision of adequate working space and other
     essential materials;
5.   Promote the achievement of field education and student learning objectives by orienting the student,
     field instructor (if necessary), and faculty liaison to the agency- including its service mission,
     expectations, values, priorities, and key personnel;
6.   Help ensure the safety of the student in the placement by fully disclosing any known or suspected
     risks at the field site during the pre-placement selection process, and by arranging for the appropriate
     training to minimize risks; and
7.   Monitor student completion of any agency required background checks and/or confidentiality
     training and notify faculty liaison of any non-compliance.



BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         16
               STUDENT ADMISSION AND RESPONSIBILITY
                       FOR FIELD EDUCATION
 Admission
 The request for formal admission to the BSW degree program and the application for
 practicum are submitted together in October of any given year. Requirements are outlined
 in the BSW Student Handbook.
 Students must be fully admitted to the BSW degree program and practicum before being placed
 in a field education placement setting. It is recommended and assumed that students entering a
 field placement will have sufficient coursework completed to allow for a moderate course load
 (9 to15 credits) while doing field work.
 Once a student is accepted into the BSW program and is beginning field education, there are
 responsibilities that the student bears which help shape a successful academic and experiential
 year:

 Student Responsibility
 1. Accepts responsibility for and ownership of his/her own learning process.
 2. Actively seeks to establish a positive, courteous and effective working relationship with the
     field instructor, other staff of the host organization as appropriate, and the faculty liaison.
 3. Within the placement setting, engages in professional relationships and change efforts in a
     manner that reflects a commitment to the ethics and values of the social work profession,
     and to the mission, policies, and procedures of the placement organization, and that assures
     the confidentiality of clients at all times and in all circumstances.
 4. Engages with the field instructor in preparing a learning contract to guide the field learning
     process.
 5. In response to varied client needs and requests, selects from a repertoire of intervention
     theories and conducts social work assessments, problem identifications, and evaluations of
     interventions based on the learning contract and the syllabus for the practicum course.
 6. Completes placement and seminar learning assignments as required by the learning contract
     and the course syllabus and does so in a timely and appropriate manner.
 7. Completes the weekly learning log and time sheet and provides copies to the field instructor
     and the faculty liaison in a timely manner.
 8. Completes all other required written work essential to effective practice in the agency and
     documents his/her work through the compilation of the learning portfolio.
 9. Prepares for and participates in weekly supervision meetings with the field instructor.
10. Meets with the faculty liaison as necessary, but at least once per semester at the agency, to
     keep the liaison aware of his/her progress, achievements, and concerns during the course of
     the placement.
11. Attends and actively participates in the weekly field seminar.
12. Completes all University requirements in relation to the field placement.
13. Engages in on-going self-assessment, including a formal written end-of-semester self-
     assessment, in concert with the field instructor and the faculty liaison.
14. Informs the field instructor and the faculty liaison of potential problems and conflicts in a
     timely and appropriate manner so as to ensure opportunity for discussion and problem
     solving at the earliest possible time.
15. Provides the BSW Field Education Coordinator with an end of the year evaluation of the
     field placement experience.




 BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         17
To maintain good standing in the BSW Field Education Program students must

     Be enrolled in the BSW Program
     Obtain a grade of “C” or better in all required social work courses
     Maintain enrollment in the concurrent senior practice courses.


        FIELD PLACEMENT: OPTIONS AND EXPECTATIONS
Concurrent Placement
The BSW placement occurs as a concurrent, two-semester placement beginning in the fall
semester and continuing into the spring semester. Students must take the senior practice courses
concurrently. Any deviation from this structure is subject to School approval in advance and is
dependent upon the availability of program and placement resources necessary to ensure a quality
field experience.

Placements Outside of the Anchorage Area
The BSW Field Education Coordinator will work closely with students who desire placements
outside of the Anchorage area. Such placements are dependent upon the availability of faculty
and agency resources to accommodate student requests, and are difficult to arrange because of the
concurrent structure of the BSW field education program. Students are encouraged to make their
desires known at the earliest possible time to the BSW Field Education Coordinator, and must
recognize that such a request may extend the number of semesters necessary to complete the
degree.

The additional costs of any distant placement, such as telephone and faculty travel costs, will be
considered before approving that placement. Students may be asked to assume financial
responsibility for those additional costs as a condition of having the placement approved. Costs
will include at least one on-site visit per semester by the faculty liaison and any
telecommunication costs. New placements will require at least one pre-placement planning visit.

Outside Employment and Concurrent Coursework
Employment while maintaining full time student status and participating in field education is not
recommended. Employment at the placement agency is not permitted. Agencies may offer
stipends to students. See the BSW Field Education Coordinator for further information. To avoid
potential conflict of interest, employed students must inform the BSW Field Education
Coordinator at any time during the field placement of accepted offers of employment.
Maintaining the quality of the educational experience and development of professional skills will
be the highest priority in all situations. Students who wish to engage in both outside employment
and concurrent coursework will be expected to maintain satisfactory performance in the
placement.

Paid Placements and Stipends
The School of Social Work seeks and encourages organizations to support social work education
by developing stipends and scholarships for students enrolled in the program. For stipends other
than those provided through the School, arrangements for awarding such stipends are negotiated
between the organization offering the stipend and the School. Except for job related expenses
such as travel, per diem, etc., payments by the organization other than stipends to practicum
students are not permitted.



BSW Field Manual 2012-13                        18
Placement within the Student’s Place of Employment
The policies of the UAA School of Social Work prohibit students from practicum placements in
agencies or organizations in which the student is employed.
Miscellaneous Fees Associated with Placements
Some placement agencies may require official background checks, drug screening, and/or
immunizations; or may have optional fees for items such as parking, mileage expenses, etc. These
costs are not covered by the University, and should be discussed by the student with the agency
representative at the time of the placement interview or upon beginning the practicum.

Late Placements
When a student is placed after the semester has begun he/she must complete all required field
education hours and learning assignments. However, the timeline for completion may be
renegotiated between the student, field instructor, and faculty liaison.

Required Hours
BSW students complete 16 hours per week in the agency over the course of the two semesters, for
a total of 448 hours. The student is expected to schedule hours during the usual business hours of
the placement agency when the social work staff is present. Placement schedules are expected to
be consistent across the entire semester; students may not finish the placement early or carry
hours from one semester into the next semester.

Hours credited may not include time traveling to and from the agency, meals unless recognized
by the agency for its staff as work time, work done at home, or learning assignments for the field
site or the seminar. One hour of this time is to be in the form of educational supervision of the
student by the field instructor. Students and field instructors should recognize that field education
is an integral part of the coursework for the BSW degree and that learning assignments outside of
placement hours are both expected and appropriate.

Attending Conferences, Workshops, and Other Special Activities During Placement Hours
Students are encouraged to seek out opportunities to enhance their professional development and
to acquire specific practice knowledge and skills. Should such opportunities arise that conflict
with placement hours, the student is to explore with the field instructor the feasibility of taking
time away from placement activities in order to attend some external training or other special
activity. If the student and field instructor agree that the training is beneficial to the placement
experience and wish to credit the hours to the field education itself, the faculty liaison must be
contacted and agree with that decision. Otherwise, any leave hours requested by the student to
attend the training and approved by the field instructor are to be made up by the student according
to a plan arranged prior to the actual absence.

It is the responsibility of the student and field instructor to establish in advance whether special
training hours will be credited as part of placement hours. Conferences, trainings, workshops, or
other special activities that are not a normal part of the placement are to be documented in the
learning log and time sheet along with the number of hours of placement time that were
approved. If the student does not get approval in advance for the number of hours that will count
as regular placement time, he/she may not count that time as regular placement hours.

Student Absences
Students are expected to make up all absences, and to phone in to the agency and/or to the field
instructor on the day of any illness-related absence and in advance for any other absences.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                          19
Scheduled Holidays
The only scheduled University holidays during the two-semester placement are:
                  Labor Day
                  Thanksgiving
                  Winter Semester Break
                  Alaska Civil Rights Day
                  Spring Break

Students are responsible to make up hours that fall on days that are holidays for the agency.

Strikes
In the event of a strike impacting the student's placement setting, the student will not participate
in the strike in his/her capacity as a field education student. Hours lost due to the strike are to be
made up when the strike ends or special arrangements are to be made with the field instructor and
faculty liaison for alternative learning activities if that is deemed appropriate. If a strike appears
likely to be very lengthy a change in the placement setting may be necessary.

Seminar
The student will participate in a weekly on-campus practicum seminar throughout the field
placement. Time spent in seminars is not credited toward field education hourly requirements.
Participation in seminars is mandatory. The quality of a student's performance in the seminar is
considered part of the grade for the course. Seminar assignments will further enhance and
challenge the student to demonstrate integration of academic content with actual practice in the
agency setting.

Placement Conflicts with other Class Attendance
It is critical that the student, when initially interviewing for the placement, clearly identify other
course obligations, including the practicum seminar. Placement hours are not to be scheduled
during other classes in which the student is enrolled. However, there may be circumstances or
events in the agency when the student may wish to request permission to be absent from another
class. It is always the prerogative of the involved course instructor to approve or deny that
request. Field instructors are discouraged from asking students to take on placement
responsibilities that conflict with other course commitments.

Student Drops or Withdrawals from Practicum Courses
Students must follow regular University procedures and requirements for dropping or
withdrawing from a practicum course. Partial credit for hours worked in the placement will not be
granted to students dropping or withdrawing from the practicum. The student should be aware
that School policy requires that they also drop or withdraw from any accompanying practice
course, unless an exception is made to that policy by the School.

The student must meet with the faculty liaison when dropping or withdrawing from a placement
to ensure that the agency termination occurs in a professional manner and that services provided
to consumers are managed appropriately. Students must promptly return to the host agency any
program materials, keys, equipment, or other items which have been provided for the student’s
use.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                          20
A Grade of “C” in Practicum
Students need to maintain a grade of “C” or better in all social work courses. However, a grade of
“C” in either of the practicum courses will be cause for the BSW faculty to review the student’s
performance and program standing and to possibly meet with the student to discuss barriers to an
improved practicum performance and a plan for effecting an improvement.

Less than “C” Grades in Other Social Work Courses
BSW program policy states that students must maintain a "C" or better in all social work courses
in order to move forward into the next courses in the sequence. A grade of less than "C" in the
concurrent practice course will, under normal circumstances, prevent the student from taking the
next practicum course until the practice course has been repeated and a grade of "C" or better
earned. The final decision in such matters is made by the BSW Program Coordinator.

Policy on “Incomplete” Grades
All work for a practicum course must be satisfactorily completed before the student may enroll in
the next course in the sequence. A student may submit a written request for an incomplete to the
faculty liaison, but must do so two weeks in advance except in the event of emergencies. In most
situations the student is aware much earlier that he/she will be unable to complete the required
work and/or hours. The decision to grant a request for an Incomplete is at the discretion of the
faculty liaison/instructor.

          OVERVIEW OF THE FIELD PLACEMENT PROCESS
Process for Entry into a Placement
In the winter and spring prior to the beginning of the fall semester the BSW Field Education
Coordinator meets with each student individually to discuss class schedules, areas of interest, and
any special needs related to placement. The BSW Field Education Coordinator or a designee then
contacts agencies interested in hosting students. Effort is made to develop placements in response
to student interests and learning needs. In no case shall a student make independent contacts
with organizations in the community to arrange for a placement.

Once a pool of potential placements has been identified, individual students are again contacted
by BSW field faculty and decisions are made as to where the student will interview. In choosing
places to send the student for an interview, the BSW Field Education Coordinator will attempt to
match educational needs and student preferences with agency availability; however, educational
needs will take precedence. To maximize diversity in learning, the program will avoid placing
students with prior field instructors, employers, or agencies in which students have served as a
volunteer, intern, or practicum student. The student should approach the placement interview as if
applying for a job, taking a resume and being prepared to discuss strengths, weaknesses, and
desired areas of experience. The potential field instructor and/or agency representative and the
student discuss the kinds of experiences the agency would offer and together assess the fit
between student and agency.

In the event a student interviews at two (2) or more agencies where the agencies decide to not
take the student for reasons related to the student’s unprofessional interview performance or
where the agency raises serious questions as to the student’s readiness or appropriateness for
BSW field education, the BSW Field Education Coordinator has the right to discontinue the
placement process. In this event, the student, the BSW Field Education Coordinator, and other
BSW faculty as appropriate will meet to help the student make a plan to identify and correct the
issues resulting in denial. Failure to negotiate a placement in a timely manner may result in
discontinuation in the program or deferral of practicum until the next academic year.



BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         21
In the fall, prior to the student's entry into the placement, the student and field instructor together
attend a mandatory orientation. Additionally, the student attends a series of pre-placement
orientation workshops designed to help the student successfully prepare for entry into his/her
agency experience. The student will also go into the community to explore formal and informal
resources relevant to his/her placement experience.

Management of Field Experiences once the Student is Placed
Together the student and field instructor will establish a weekly schedule for the student's time in
the agency, with one hour scheduled for supervision. The student is encouraged by field faculty
to divide the sixteen hours per week into large blocks of time, such as half days, rather than
scatter the hours out over the course of the week.

Immediately upon entry into the field placement, the student and the field instructor sign a field
placement agreement, which is an attachment to the formal multiple-year Affiliation Agreement.
It is then given to the student's faculty liaison for signature.

The first two weeks of the placement are devoted to orientation within the agency. Upon
completion of the orientation the student, in collaboration with the field instructor, completes a
learning contract and gives a copy to the faculty liaison for final review and approval. The faculty
liaison arranges times with the student and field instructor for a minimum of one site visit to the
agency each semester. Ideally, in the first semester the faculty liaison makes two visits – one at
the point that learning contracts are finalized and one toward the end of the semester. The liaison
is available to the student and the field instructor on demand and according to the schedule of
visits they have agreed to for the semester.

Each week the student submits his/her learning log and time sheet to the field instructor and the
faculty liaison. The field instructor and the faculty liaison are responsible for timely review of the
student’s weekly log and all written work required of the student as part of his/her placement.
Appropriate feedback, oral and written, are given to the student on an on-going basis to ensure
that the learning opportunities are maximized.

The student completes a self-assessment toward the end of the semester and gives a copy to the
field instructor for review. The field instructor also completes an end-of-semester student
assessment which is shared with the student. The agency representative is an important part of the
assessment process and will also be fully included. All assessments and written assignments are
submitted to the faculty liaison toward the end of the semester. Together with the field instructor,
the faculty liaison establishes a grade for the course, incorporating information from the
assessments, the site visits, and the assignments and participation in the practicum seminar.
During the final site visit of the semester, time is spent looking ahead to the student's learning
goals for the second semester.

Before leaving for his/her semester (Christmas) break the student is responsible for ensuring that
any services needed by his/her assigned clients have been referred to the appropriate agency staff.
The student returns to the field placement in mid-January when the new semester begins. Upon
his/her return to placement the student formally updates in writing his/her learning contract. The
process for the second semester is essentially the same as that for the first semester, with the
liaison making at least one scheduled visit to the agency. The student completes a Competency
Assessment Paper and the field instructor completes a second student assessment at the
completion of the field education experience.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                           22
                  DISSATISFACTION AND TERMINATION
Early Intervention and Problem Solving
The School strongly encourages parties involved in disputes, differences of opinion, or otherwise
feeling dissatisfied with a situation to address the issues early, using means such as problem
solving techniques, mediation, or other informal processes. The following formal procedures may
be utilized at any time by any party; however, it is hoped that formal procedures will be employed
only when communication and good will between the parties appears to have broken down or one
of the parties is unwilling or unable to engage in a constructive problem resolution process.

Student-Initiated Request for Termination of the Placement
When a student accepts an assignment to a specific organization as a placement site, the student is
expected to fulfill the agreement and complete that placement. Students should be aware that
termination of a placement has serious implications including the fact that an acceptable
alternative placement may not be available. If the student becomes dissatisfied with the
placement, the following problem-solving steps are to be utilized, unless the situation involves
allegations of serious offenses by the field instructor or agency personnel such as sexual
harassment, threats or intimidation, or demands that the student commit an unethical or unlawful
action. In the latter situations the student is to immediately contact the faculty liaison for
assistance. The process for Student-Initiated Requests for Termination is outlined below:

1.   The student is to discuss his/her concerns with the field instructor and the agency
     representative (if applicable) in a constructive, focused manner in an attempt to resolve the
     issue(s). Any party may invite the faculty liaison. Together the student and the field
     instructor will develop a plan for remediating the issue(s), identifying specific steps with
     timelines for completion of required tasks and activities.
2.   If unresolved at this agency level, the student can take the situation to the faculty liaison and
     in his/her absence, to the BSW Field Education Coordinator. The liaison will address the
     situation with all parties involved and attempt to come to some satisfactory solution. As part
     of this the faculty liaison will work with the student and field instructor to lay out a written
     plan of action, identifying expectations of all parties and timelines for those expectations.
     He/she will keep the BSW Field Education Coordinator informed of the situation.
3.   If still unresolved, the student may request permission from the BSW Field Education
     Coordinator to terminate the placement. This request must be in writing and must contain a
     detailed statement of the facts and grounds for the request. The BSW Field Education
     Coordinator, in consultation with the faculty liaison, field instructor, and other agency
     representatives as appropriate, will review the request and respond in writing with a decision
     within ten (10) business days following receipt of the request. Copies of the Coordinator's
     decision will be provided to the faculty liaison, the field instructor, the agency representative
     (when applicable), the student’s academic advisor, and the student’s file.
     a. If a decision is made to allow the student to terminate his/her placement, the faculty
        liaison will meet with the student and the field instructor to develop an appropriate plan
        to terminate the student's agency responsibilities in a professional manner.
     b. If a decision is made to deny the request for termination of the placement, the faculty
        liaison will meet with the student, the field instructor, and the agency representative
        (when applicable) to develop a written plan outlining expectations and responsibilities
        related to continuation of the placement. Copies of this plan will be provided to all parties
        to the plan, and to the BSW Field Education Coordinator and the student’s file.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                          23
4.   When a student-initiated termination is approved, the BSW Field Education Coordinator will
     make reasonable efforts to find an alternative placement able to meet the student’s
     educational needs; however, an alternative placement may not be available or it may be too
     late in the semester to start a new placement.
5.   When a student-initiated termination is approved, the faculty liaison, together with the BSW
     Field Education Coordinator, will determine how many of the hours performed in the
     terminated placement will be credited toward the satisfaction of field education hour
     requirements. Certain activities, such as orientation to the new agency and its policies and
     procedures, will be required without repetition of credit for those hours.

Students terminating a placement without following this process shall be subject to a failing
grade for the course. Termination of a placement under any circumstances without
advance, written consent of the BSW Field Education Coordinator shall discharge the BSW
Program from any obligation, actual or implied, to arrange or sanction a placement for the
duration of the semester.

Agency-Initiated Request for Termination of the Placement
Agencies may request termination proceedings for internal issues unrelated to the student
(“No Fault”) or for cause attributable to the student’s behavior or performance. The procedures
for each follow:

No Fault Terminations
There may be situations when a placement is terminated due to circumstances beyond student or
agency control, such as a change in the availability of the field instructor or key agency personnel
involved in the placement, closure of a program, or a major policy change affecting the
placement. The field agency is expected to notify the faculty liaison as early as possible when a
placement must be terminated for “no fault” reasons. The BSW Field Education Coordinator will
make reasonable efforts to locate another placement and to facilitate the student’s completion of
the field education hours during the same semester. The hours accrued by the student in the first
placement will be credited toward the total number of hours required to complete the placement.
Students need to realize that moving to another agency may require some additional time be spent
in orientation activities at the new agency.
Whenever possible, the field instructor is encouraged to explore with other agency staff all
alternative plans that might allow the student to remain in the placement under different
supervision or in another program. Replacement inevitably requires additional effort and
considerable stress for the student faced with that change. In all such situations the student is to
be made aware of the possibility of the placement ending as soon as that possibility is known to
the field instructor or other agency personnel.

Agency-Initiated Termination For Cause
The field instructor and/or agency representative is encouraged to call the faculty liaison for
assistance in assessing student behavior and/or actions and in developing an intervention or
remedial plan at the earliest possible time whenever a problem is recognized or suspected. Under
normal circumstances the student is to be promptly informed by the field instructor and/or agency
representative of any problem(s) generated by his/her actions or behavior. The student should also
be given clear instructions on what improvement is expected and a time line for those
improvements is to be identified in writing if the field instructor or other agency personnel feel
there is potential to remedy the situation. A significant role for the faculty liaison is that of
mediator when the need exists.

If the problem situation does not respond to the above supervisory process, or if the initial
professional judgment of the field instructor or other agency personnel is that the student’s



BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         24
actions and/or behavior justify an immediate termination of the placement, the following
steps are to be followed.
1.   The field instructor or another agency representative is to contact the faculty liaison or the
     BSW Field Education Coordinator and follow-up within 5 business days of that initial
     contact with a written statement to the BSW Field Education Coordinator, describing the
     specific reasons for requesting termination of the placement.
2.   If deemed necessary or if so requested by the field instructor, the host agency administrator,
     or the faculty liaison, the BSW Field Education Coordinator will remove the student from
     duties in the agency while the situation is being addressed. The student will not accrue hours
     while removed from duties at the agency.
3.   The written statement seeking termination by the agency is also provided to the student who
     then has the opportunity to respond in writing to the BSW Field Education Coordinator
     within five (5) calendar days. Both documents are to be provided to all parties involved
     (field instructor, faculty liaison, agency representative as appropriate, and student file).
4.   The BSW Field Education Coordinator, in consultation with the faculty liaison, will review
     the allegations and meet with any or all of the persons involved in order to fully evaluate the
     circumstances of the situation, exploring all reasonable options in order to determine the best
     course of action. The BSW Field Education Coordinator’s finding will be documented in
     writing with copies provided to all parties within ten (10) business days following receipt of
     the written statement in #1 above. Copies of all documentation are placed in the student's
     academic file.
     a. If the student is terminated from the placement for just cause, he/she will receive a grade
        based on performance compared to the expectations for the entire semester; however, in
        no case will a grade higher than “D” be granted. The BSW Field Education Coordinator
        will put in writing a recommendation as to whether or not the student may re-apply to
        repeat practicum at some later time. Additional sanctions by the agency, the School of
        Social Work, and/or the University may be pursued as appropriate, such as notifying
        UAA Enrollment Services that the student is no longer in good standing in the BSW
        program. Note: Resolution without termination does not necessarily imply the
        student will receive a passing grade for the course.
     b. If the BSW Field Education Coordinator finds that the agency failed to provide the
        student with procedural rights as specified above, or that there was no clear and
        convincing evidence substantiating the agency’s allegations, or that termination of the
        placement is a more severe response than the offense merits, then he/she will attempt to
        either replace the student in another unit of the agency or find an alternative placement in
        the community. The BSW Field Education Coordinator, in coordination with the faculty
        liaison, will determine the extent to which hours accrued to date will apply to the new
        placement. If no suitable placement can be found to complete that semester, the student
        may be given an opportunity to enter another placement at a future time. Depending upon
        the circumstances, the student may be required to complete additional hours in order to
        meet the educational objectives of the practicum, and depending on the timing and the
        availability of another placement, the student may have to repeat the course.
     c. If feasible, a "close-out" meeting is held with the student, field instructor, faculty liaison
        and any other essential agency personnel, as available, in order to review the
        circumstances that resulted in the termination of the placement and to ensure that the
        student’s work in the agency and with clients is closed out appropriately.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                          25
 The student is referred to the BSW Student Handbook and the current UAA Catalog for
 information on grieving a grade or a program decision if he or she is not satisfied with the
 outcome.



 Termination Criteria

 Grounds for termination from the field placement and the practicum course include, but
 are not limited to the following:

 1.   Excessive absenteeism or tardiness - excused or unexcused;

 2.   Failure to provide reasonable notice of an unscheduled absence from the field placement;

 3.   Termination of the placement by the student without following prescribed procedure;

 4.   Serious or repeated violations of the NASW Code of Ethics;

 5.   Serious or repeated violations of the agency's policies and/or procedures;

 6.   Sustained low level of performance unresponsive to corrective action;

 7.   Reporting to the placement site under the influence of drugs or alcohol;

 8.   Evidence of a personal behavior problem of the student manifesting itself in performance in
      the practicum or that is incompatible with the profession of social work such as abusing a
      child, elder, or dependent person under his/her care; domestic violence conviction; criminal
      acts; or current substance abuse or dependence;

 9.   Maintaining, after it has been addressed, a hostile, negative attitude incompatible with the
      values of the profession of social work manifested in behavior towards clients, instructors,
      peers, agency staff, and /or University personnel;

10.   Failure to maintain generally accepted professional boundaries and behaviors in respect to
      agency clients and staff;

11.   Any sexual relationship with an agency client;

12.   Failure to disclose critical background information in application forms, pre-placement and
      placement interviews; and

13.   Failure to meet academic and behavioral standards specified in the University catalog and
      student handbooks.




 BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         26
                              EVALUATION PROCESSES
Overview of the Student Evaluation Process
Evaluation of and feedback on student progress begins when the student enters field education
and should be continuous. The development of a learning contract requires self-evaluation on the
part of the student and joint evaluation by the student, the field instructor, and the faculty liaison
as to what efforts will be made to satisfy course requirements. From the beginning of field
education the student and field instructor engage in assessment of the student's progress towards
achievement of course objectives. This on-going evaluation takes place primarily by way of:
          Supervisory conferences.
          Preparation, review, and assessment of student assignments.
          Meetings with the faculty liaison to discuss progress made in the placement.
          Completion of the end-of-semester assessments.

The course syllabi identify objectives and indicators for each course and outline what is required
as part of the evaluation process for each practicum course.

Evaluation Role of the Faculty Liaison
The faculty liaison has a primary role in ensuring the overall quality of the field education
process. The liaison is involved from the point that the student enters the practicum course until it
is completed. He/she oversees and approves with the field instructor the student's learning
contract, oversees formal appraisal of the student's ability to accomplish the objectives of the
practicum course, and makes a minimum of one site visit to the placement agency each semester
both to monitor student performance in the placement and to ensure that the agency is providing
essential resources needed to successfully accomplish the learning goals for the placement. The
faculty liaison has responsibility for providing support and technical assistance, and for trouble-
shooting problems that occur during the placement. The faculty liaison makes every reasonable
effort to ensure that the student is made aware in a timely manner of any problems in his/her
placement performance and that expectations for improvement are outlined clearly for the
student.

Establishing a Grade for the Practicum
The faculty liaison, with input from the field instructor and the student, establishes a grade for the
practicum course. The UAA BSW Program grades field education courses on a scale of A to F. In
order to move on to the next practicum course in the sequence the student must have achieved a
grade of “C” or better in the current semester of field work. A grade of “C” or lower in practicum
will automatically bring about a faculty-student review of performance and progress.

Assessment forms are included in the appendices. Both the student and the field instructor engage
in assessments of the student's ability to accomplish the objectives outlined in the learning
contract and in the syllabus for the practicum course. The field instructor has important
responsibility for evaluation of the student's actual achievements in the placement. When
evaluating the student it is critical that the field instructor refers back to the objectives identified
in the course syllabus and in the student's learning contract. The student's overall management of
the placement, his/her demonstrated ability to successfully carry out learning tasks in the
placement, and his/her overall progress in developing skills for entry level generalist social work
practice are all to be considered when recommending a grade for the practicum. The completed
assessments are exchanged between the student and the field instructor and copies provided to the
faculty liaison.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                           27
The faculty liaison reviews both the student's end-of-semester self-assessment and the field
instructor's assessment of the student, and evaluates the student's written assignments, attendance,
and quality of participation in the practicum seminar in making the final grade determination. The
written assessments become a part of the student’s permanent file in the School.

Evaluation of the Field Education Process
The policies and procedures of the BSW program ensure that there is a periodic review of all
student evaluation tools and of grading standards for field education. One avenue for such review
is the Field Education Committee, and any comments and suggestions are welcomed by the BSW
Field Education Coordinator. Students and Field Instructors are asked to complete an end-of-year
Student Evaluation of the Placement Process which is intended to assist the BSW Field Education
Coordinator in on-going efforts to improve and strengthen the field education program.

                       FIELD EDUCATION COMMITTEE
The UAA School of Social Work Field Education Committee plays an essential role in ensuring
that the BSW and MSW Field Education Programs are well developed, appropriately delivered,
and periodically assessed. The Committee works in an advisory capacity to the faculty of the
UAA School of Social Work to ensure that the field education sequence effectively complements
and integrates with the overall curricula of both the BSW and MSW degree programs. Committee
functions include:
     review and comment on the field education curriculum;
     review and comment on the field education policies and procedures;
     review and comment on the field education evaluation criteria;
     assist faculty in developing field instructor orientation and training;
     assist faculty in developing practicum resources; and
     assure that the programs adequately prepare students to work in Alaska and other places
         with culturally and ethnically diverse populations by representing the special needs of
         those populations to the programs.

This committee is comprised of faculty, students, field instructors, and others from the
community involved in field education and is co-chaired by one member from the professional
community and one of the two field education coordinators (BSW or MSW). Interested persons
are encouraged to apply to serve on this committee by submitting a letter of interest to any
member addressed to the Chair, Field Education Committee. Dates for regularly scheduled
meetings are established annually and are published in the School calendar.


                      SAFETY AND RISK MANAGEMENT
General Policy
Students should recognize that field placements, as any workplace, may involve exposure to
potential risks and hazards. In addition to documented risks from disgruntled employees and
clients, many agencies serve clients with histories of assaultive behavior or employ modes of
intervention such as home visits in which security may be significantly less than with traditional
office-based services. The field instructor and agency representatives working with the student
should describe any known risks or potential hazards to the student in advance. No student should
knowingly expose him/herself to bodily injury or harm and no field instructor or agency
representative should assign a student to a function where such risk is present without training




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                         28
specific to the risk and without teaching the reasonable precautions a prudent social worker would
take in such situations. Exposure of students to known risks should occur only if there is no other
way to accomplish an educational objective. In all situations, students should be permitted to
decline any assignment which exposes them to excessive risk without prejudice.

Students are expected to take reasonable precautions for their own safety. This includes parking
vehicles in safe areas, avoiding being the only person in an office after hours without adequate
security, avoiding being alone with clients known to be violent, and leaving the site of a home
visit immediately on discovering that drugs or alcohol are in use.

The following suggestions are offered for ways for agencies to proactively address the issue of
safety and risk management:
     Preparing/training the student to deal with emergencies and crises that are likely to

      be a part of the agency experience.
     Establishing guidelines for student behavior, dress, interactions, communications

      that minimize potential risk for harm or injury.
     Carefully selecting clients to be assigned to the student.

     Routinely keeping the student informed and aware of issues and events that might

      lead to risk for harm or injury.
     Determining the extent to which there is risk of harm or injury when the student is

      involved in client-related or other interactions away from the agency setting.
     Reviewing the liability coverage of the agency and the University.



Professional Liability and Insurance
It is a policy of the UAA School of Social Work to provide professional liability insurance for
field education students. This is purchased through the University Risk Management Office and is
in effect as long as they are operating within the scope and range of agency and University
requirements for the field placement. Further information on that coverage and other coverage
available through the University of Alaska can be requested of the UAA School of Social Work
or the University Risk Management Office. Agencies requiring proof of insurance may make a
written request to the University of Alaska Anchorage’s Office of Risk Management.

Student Accident Insurance
The UAA School of Social Work will offer student accident insurance for each field education
student who submits the form in Appendix A. A description of this coverage can be found in
Appendix A.

Use of Personal Vehicles and Flying in Small Aircraft
Using personal vehicles for job related travel other than commuting to and from the agency site
involves additional risks, particularly if others are being transported. Since most agencies do not
cover personal vehicles under their insurance policies, students using personal vehicles should
consult with the agency to determine what agency policy states regarding the use of personal
vehicles. They should contact their own insurance agency to see what activities are covered.
Students are not to transport clients in personal vehicles.

From time to time it may be necessary to fly to remote villages in small aircraft to provide social
services. Given the inherent risks, field instructors or other agency representatives should disclose
in advance whether this activity will be required of a student accepting the placement. If he/she
accepts the travel assignment, the student should be prepared for an emergency with adequate
clothing, survival gear, food and water, and should notify the faculty liaison in advance of such



BSW Field Manual 2012-13                          29
travel plans. The UAA Office of Risk Management does offer additional insurance to cover such
educational/travel experiences.

Job Site Risks and Hazards
Agency representatives are expected to fully disclose any known or suspected risks to the student
at the field site as part of the pre-placement selection process.

Students are expected to review and become familiar with the agency's policies and procedures
for identifying and dealing with job site hazards, violent clients, and other emergencies.
Particular attention should be paid to procedures related to violent clients in both office and home
visit settings.

Students, field instructors, and agency representatives should ensure that students are trained to
deal with potential risks as early as possible in the placement.

Bloodborne Pathogens
If the student is at any risk of infection by bloodborne pathogens (e.g., HIV, Hepatitis B), he/she
must be provided training involving recognition of the risks and procedures to minimize the risk
of infection. Students placed in residential facilities, hospitals, or agencies dealing with high-risk
patients should be particularly sensitive to this potential risk.
After education and training, the student may wish to consider immunization against Hepatitis B.
Immunization may be available at the agency, the Municipality of Anchorage Department of
Public Health, or the UAA Student Health Center. The student should be prepared to pay for any
part of the cost not covered by his/her health insurance.

Tuberculosis
The prevalence of TB is increasing. Students anticipating placement in a setting serving client
populations with higher than normal risk for TB should be tested prior to starting the placement.
This is usually done by a simple skin test at low cost. Some agencies may require this testing
and/or provide it for all paid and non-paid staff.




BSW Field Manual 2012-13                          30

								
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