Literature Circles - Download as DOC - DOC by 0bY3vD

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									1. Discussion Director – a job well done earns bonus participation points!
      Your role is to develop a list of ten questions – some specific about the plot, characters, and action, and some
general - that your group will want to discuss about the reading for each meeting. Through your questions, you will
help people recognize important ideas in the book. And if your group doesn’t have answers, you must be prepared
to assist their understanding! Include the following questions and make up the rest on your own.
First section:
      From what point of view is the story being told?
      Why do you think the author chose this point of view?
      Does the society seem to be Utopian or Dystopian?
      What parts are unclear to you?
Second section:
      What have you learned about the society in this book?
      What parts are unclear to you?
Last section:
      Did the story end as you expected it to? Explain.
      Has your position changed on whether this book is about a Utopian or Dystopian society? Why?
      What parts are unclear to you?
      What themes did you find in this novel?
      How has the author developed these themes?
      What specific events in the story support these themes?
      Which is the dominant theme?
      Why do you think so?
      What seem to be the author’s concerns about society?
      Why do you think so?
     It is your responsibility to control the literary conversation so that everyone has a fair chance to express his or
her ideas. You must have leadership abilities in addition to a good understanding of the book in order to develop
questions that will evoke thoughtful discussion. You must have good attendance.

2. Illustrator
     Your job is to represent key scenes from the reading. Create a strip of four or five panels that summarize the
plot in each section of the book. You can draw, create through collage, or download images.
     You must be creative and a good thinker, in order to support your group member’s understanding through your
art. You must also justify why you chose to represent specific scenes. When you share your scenes, ask your group
members for their predictions about where the plot is going.

3. Literary Luminary
     You will bring attention to key lines, quotes, and details from the text. The selections can focus on what is
interesting, powerful, important, puzzling, or worth hearing.
      Choose at least two significant quotes for each section (and meeting) of the book. Be sure to explain why
          you chose those quotes.
      Explain the humor, irony, and important ideas in each section.
      Look up definitions for important, unfamiliar words and bring the information to the meeting. (You get to
          decide whether to just present the information or create an activity so the group members can learn what
          the words mean.)

4. Connector
     Your role is to identify relationships between the reading and the real world: students’ personal lives, people
their age, and events at school or in the community or in the news. You should also make connections between
current reading and literature that has been read previously. Other possible connections can be between events and
characters within the story.
First and second meetings:
      Include information on how the society in the book is similar to or different from your own.
      Develop and ask at least three “Why” or “What if” questions.
Last meeting:
      Develop and ask at least three “Why” or “What if” questions.
      Ask your group members whether they would recommend this book to a friend and why or why not.
      Then explain whether you would recommend this book to a friend, and explain why or why not.
      Would you and your group members read another book by this author based on your feelings about this
          book?
Those who aren’t prepared and don’t do their job hurt their group. It is also your job to remind group members of
the assigned reading and dates, and to make sure their assignments are complete and here to support your circle’s
discussion.

								
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