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					 LEA Application Part I




TAYLOR SCHOOL DISTRICT

 TRUMAN HIGH SCHOOL




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                                           SIG GRANT--LEA Application
                                            APPLICATION COVER SHEET

                                      SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT GRANTS (SIG)

Legal Name of Applicant:                                  Applicant’s Mailing Address:

Taylor School District                                    23033 Northline Rd.
                                                          Taylor, MI 48180


LEA Contact for the School Improvement Grant

Name: Brian Theil


Position and Office: Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction, Pre-K through 12


Contact’s Mailing Address: 23033 Northline Rd. Taylor, MI 48180

Telephone: 734-374-1219

Fax: 734-287-3710

Email address: TheilB@taylor.k12.mi.us
LEA School Superintendent/Director (Printed Name):                                   Telephone:
Mrs. Bethany Iverson                                                                 734-374-1206
Signature of the LEA School Superintendent/Director:                                 Date:

X___On file – Will be submitted with final application                               July 13, 2010
LEA School LEA Board President (Printed Name):                                       Telephone:
Mr. John Reilly                                                                      734-374-1206
Signature of the LEA Board President:                                                Date:

X_On file – Will be submitted with final application                                 July 13, 2010

The LEA, through its authorized representative, agrees to comply with all requirements applicable to the School
Improvement Grants program, including the assurances contained herein and the conditions that apply to any waivers that
the State receives through this application.




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                                                  GRANT SUMMARY

                                                                       District Code: 82150
     District Name: Taylor                                             ISD Code: 82
TaISD/ RESA Name: Wayne County



                                                               FY 2010
                                            School Improvement Grant – Section 1003(g)
                                                     District Proposal Abstract

           For each of the models listed below, indicate the number of Schools within the District/LEA intends to implement
           one of the four models: attach the full listing using form below in Section A , Schools to be Served, and the criteria
           for selection as attachments to this grant.

           Close/Consolidate Model: Closing the school and enrolling the students who attended the school in other, higher-
           performing schools in the district.


          XXX – Truman High School -                          TRANSFORMATION MODEL: Develops teacher and
           leader effectiveness, implements comprehensive instructional programs using student
           achievement data, provides extended learning time and creates community-oriented schools.

            Turnaround Model: Replace principal and at least 50% of the staff, adopt new governance, and implement a new or
           revised instructional model. This model should incorporate interventions that take into account the recruitment,
           placement and development of staff to ensure they meet student needs; schedules that increase time for both
           students and staff; and appropriate social-emotional and community-oriented services/supports.

           Restart Model: Close the school and restart it under the management of a charter school operator, a charter
           management organization (CMO) or an educational management organization (EMO). A restart school must admit,
           within the grades it serves, any former student who wishes to attend.




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                                   LEA APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

     SCHOOLS TO BE SERVED: An LEA must include the following information with respect to
       the schools it will serve with a School Improvement Grant.

From the list of eligible schools, an LEA must identify each Tier I, Tier II, and Tier III school the LEA
commits to serve and identify the model that the LEA will use in each Tier I and Tier II school. Detailed
descriptions of the requirements for each intervention are in Attachment II.
Note: Do not complete information about Tier III at this time.

 SCHOOL NCES TIER TIER TIER      INTERVENTION (TIER I AND II ONLY)
  NAME   ID #  I   II   III turnaround  restart closure   transformation
 Truman
 High
 School            X                                             X




 Note: An LEA that has nine or more Tier I and Tier II schools
 may not implement the transformation model in more than 50
 percent of those schools.




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 DESCRIPTIVE INFORMATION: An LEA must include the following
   information in its application for a School Improvement Grant. LEA’s are
   encouraged to refer to their Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) and
   District Improvement Plan (DIP) to complete the following:




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Provide a narrative description following each of the numbered items below for each
school the LEA plans to serve with School Improvement Grant funds.

1. For each Tier I and Tier II school that the LEA commits to serve, the LEA must:

              Describe the process the LEA has used to analyze the needs of
              each school and how the intervention was selected for each school.
              (Detailed descriptions of the requirements for each intervention are in
              Attachment II.) The LEA must analyze the needs of each Tier I, II or III
              school using complete and consistent data. (Attachment III provides a
              possible model for that analysis.) (Note: Do not complete analysis for
              Tier III at this time.)

              RESPONSE: Truman High School’s needs were analyzed by using multiple measures.

              MEASURE #1: Truman participated in MDE’s ‘Fast Track’ Schoolwide Title I
              Planning during the summer of 2009. The School Improvement Plan was submitted
              on September 1, 2009. After a revision to the parent involvement plan, the SWP
              was approved in February 2010. A Comprehensive Needs Assessment was done
              as part of the plan. Data from multiple assessments, non-academic data, process
              data, and perception data was collected and thoroughly analyzed.

Please read the CNA in Truman’s SWP, Appendix B, found at this URL:

http://truman.taylorschools.net/images/pdfs/Truman_School_Improvement_Plan-1-20-10.pdf

              MEASURE #2: Upon acceptance into the Fast Track’ Schoolwide Title I
              planning process, Truman became a ‘High Priority School’ and was eligible for
              services under the MDE’s Statewide System of Support, which includes principal
              coaches, Math, ELA, and Special Education coaches from Wayne County RESA.
              Truman received a Comprehensive School Audit as part of this system of support.
              Twenty Key Characteristics from the Michigan School Improvement Framework were
              used as a basis of the audit. Two auditors completed the audit and submitted a
              report.

              The Truman School Improvement Team, staff, parents, and community stakeholders
              developed a response to the audit. The findings were used to make improvements in
              curriculum, instruction and assessments.

              MEASURE #3: Truman staff, parents, and community stakeholders completed
              the AdvancEd Self Assessment in February 2010. Please read the assessment
              in Truman’s School Improvement Plan. The URL is listed under MEASURE #1.

              An analysis of these three measures was done by the Truman staff, parents,
              community stakeholders, Central Office staff, and Board of Education
              members. After reviewing and researching the four (4) models, it was
              determined that the Transformation Model was the best option for Truman.
              At a regularly scheduled Board of Education meeting, the transformation model was
              approved by a majority vote of the members.

              o   Describe how the LEA has the capacity to use school
                  improvement funds to provide adequate resources and related

                                                  6
              support to each TierI and Tier II school identified in the LEA’s
              application in order to implement, fully and effectively, the
              required activities of the school intervention model it has
              selected. (Data and process analysis to assist the LEA with this
              application may be found in the Sample Application (Attachment III) for
              each school and in the District Improvement Plan (Attachment IV). In
              the Rubric for Local Capacity, (Attachment V) local challenges are
              indicated by the categories “getting started” or “partially implemented.”

   Two methods were used to assess the district’s capacity to provide adequate
   resources and funding:

   1. Taylor School District completed a District Improvement Plan in the spring of 2010. A
      group of stakeholders met over a period of several months to thoroughly complete a
      Comprehensive Needs Assessment. The district used the CNA as a tool to determine the
      strengths and weaknesses of the district. Taylor School District followed the MDE-
      recommended template. The district assessed student data, as well as the system
      processes and protocols of practice that are in place to support student achievement.

   The complete District Improvement Plan (DIP) was submitted by the deadline and is in the
   MDE system for review by MDE personnel. We request that the School Improvement Grant
   readers review the DIP for further information. More detail will be submitted.

   2. Taylor School District stakeholders rated the district on the Rubric for Local Capacity.
      Following is a summary of the results:

   Process Review: Michigan Comprehensive Needs Assessment – Implemented

   Core District Function: Management and Operations - Partially Implemented

   Core District Function: Teaching and Learning – Partially Implemented

   Contextual Capacity: Labor and Board Relations – Getting Started

   Contextual Capacity: School Consolidation – Partially Implemented

   Contextual Capacity: Human Resources – Implemented


   Capacity to provide adequate resources is enhanced by Taylor School District’s State and
   Federal Programs/School Improvement Office. The SFP/SI staff works with teachers to
   develop curriculum that is aligned to the MDE’s Grade Level Content Expectations and High
   School Course Content Expectations. The curriculum has been rated ‘exemplary’ in MDE and
   USDE audits. Missing pieces to achieve exemplary instruction and assessment include: Funds
   to hire building-level staff to monitor teaching and learning, funds to provide extended
   learning opportunities, professional development to design and implement a high-quality
   assessment system, time to collaborate, and lack of parental involvement.
   The School Improvement Grant will allow Truman to provide the needed programs and
   services.

2. NOT APPLICABLE. If the LEA is not applying to serve each Tier I school, explain
   why it lacks capacity to serve each Tier I school.
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         If an LEA claims lack of sufficient capacity to serve each Tier I school, the
         LEA must submit written notification along with the School Improvement
         Grant application, that it cannot serve all Tier I schools. The notification
         must be signed by the District Superintendent or Public School Academy
         Administrator and the President of the local school board. Notifications
         must include both signatures to be considered.

         The notification must include the following:

            A completed online Michigan District Comprehensive Needs Assessment
            indicating that the district was able to attain only a “Getting Started” or
            “Partially Implemented” rating (link below) in at least 15 of the 19 areas
            with a description of efforts to improve.

            (http://www.advanced.org/mde/school_improvement_tasks/docs/edyes
            _report_template.doc

            Evidence that the district lacks personnel with the skills and knowledge
            to work with struggling schools. This includes a description of education
            levels and experience of all leadership positions as well as a listing of
            teachers who are teaching out of certification levels
            completed rubric (Attachment V) scored by the Process Mentor team
            detailing specific areas of lack of capacity

3. For each Tier I and II school in this application, the LEA must describe actions
taken, or those that will be taken, to—
                 A. Design and implement interventions consistent with the final
                    requirements.

                    PLEASE NOTE; INTERVENTIONS DESCRIBED IN
                    ATTCHMENT III, SECTION III: PROPOSED ACTIVITIES
                    AND THE BUDGET.

                    All interventions/activities meet the required components
                    of the Transformation Model. Permissible
                    interventions/activities are also planned.

                   B. Select external providers from the state’s list of preferred
                    providers;




                PLEASE NOTE: Wayne RESA and the Principal’s Fellowship are the
                external providers. Truman’s prior working relationship with these
                two providers has already shown success, as evidenced by improved
                AYP scores for 2009-2010. Services are described in Attachment III,
                SECTION III AND THE BUDGET. Truman High School would like to
                keep the option open to add additional external providers as more are
                eligible.

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                         C. Align other resources with the interventions;

                          PLEASE NOTE: The alignment of resources is found in the
                          current, MDE- approved Schoolwide Title I plan and in the ‘School
                          Resource File’ section of this grant application.

                         D. Modify its practices or policies, if necessary, to enable its
                          schools to implement the interventions fully and effectively
                          (Attachment VI is a rubric for possible policy and practice
                          changes); and


                      PLEASE NOTE: Attachment VI, “Policies and Practices Change
                      Analysis to Implement the SIG Final Requirements” is completed as requested
                      and is included in this grant application after Attachment III.


                         E. Sustain the reforms after the funding period ends.

                      PLEASE NOTE: Discussions have begun with Board of Education
                      members, Central Office staff, the Taylor Federation of Teachers,
                      parents, students, and community stakeholders. A plan for
                      sustainability will be developed and completed by January, 2011.

   4. Include a timeline delineating the steps to be taken to implement the selected
      intervention in each Tier I and Tier II school identified in the LEA’s application.
      (Attachment VII provides a sample rubric for principal selection if the LEA chooses
      an intervention that requires replacement of the principal.)




Draft Timeline for Implementation

Year 1: 2010 – 2011




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September 2010                     Implement:

                                          Professional Learning Communities
                                          Parental Involvement Programs
                                          CLASS A data system
                                          Extended learning: Mandatory after-school tutoring and credit
                                           recovery.
                                          ‘Adopt a Crew’ program
                                          Principal, ELA and math coaches through external provider.


September – October 2010           Recruit and hire staff: Positions listed in Section III - proposed activities
                                   and in budget.

                                   Set up Truman Coordinated Health Community Health Center



September 2010 – January 2011      Work with Taylor Federation of Teachers to develop a teacher evaluation
                                   system, teacher incentive system and flexible schedule.



October 2010                       Administer ‘WE’ pre-survey



October 2010 and ongoing through   Continue to implement and evaluate:
August 2011
                                          Professional Learning Communities
                                          Parental Involvement Programs
                                          CLASS A data system
                                          Extended learning: Mandatory after-school tutoring and credit
                                           recovery.
                                          ‘Adopt a Crew’ program
                                          Principal, ELA and math coaches through external provider.


                                   Ongoing monitoring and evaluation of SIG.



January 2011                       Implement teacher evaluation system and teacher incentive system.




May – June 2011                    Revise activities and budget for year 2 based on evaluation




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Year 2: 2011 – 2012

 September 2011 and ongoing    Continue to implement, evaluate and revise:
 through August 2012
                                          Professional Learning Communities
                                          Parental Involvement Programs
                                          CLASS A data system
                                          Extended learning: Mandatory after-school tutoring and credit
                                           recovery.
                                          ‘Adopt a Crew’ program
                                          Principal, ELA and math coaches through external provider.
                                          Principals’ Fellowship participation.
                                          Teacher retention and recruitment activities
                                          Truman Coordinated Health Community Health Center


 May – June 2012               Revise activities and budget for year 3 based on evaluation.
Year 3: 2012 – 2013

  September 2012 and ongoing    Continue to implement, evaluate and revise:
  through August 2013
                                           Professional Learning Communities
                                           Parental Involvement Programs
                                           CLASS A data system
                                           Extended learning: Mandatory after-school tutoring and credit
                                            recovery.
                                           ‘Adopt a Crew’ program
                                           Principal, ELA and math coaches through external provider.
                                           Principals’ Fellowship participation.
                                           Teacher retention and recruitment activities
                                           Truman Coordinated Health Community Health Center
                                           Plan for sustainability of programs.


  May – June 2013                          Evaluate School Improvement Grant – prepare reports


                                           Administer ‘WE” post survey


                                      Plan for 2013 – 2014 and beyond
   5. Describe the annual goals for student achievement on the State’s assessments in
      both reading/language arts and mathematics that it has established in order to
      monitor Tier I and Tier II schools that receive school improvement funds.


PLEASE NOTE: Truman made AYP through Safe Harbor for 2009-2010. Action plans for all
four (4) core areas are in Truman’s current approved Schoolwide Title I School
Improvement Plan. The action plans include gap analysis, research, timelines, activities,

                                                   11
and personnel responsible. The action plans will be updated prior to the September 1
deadline for online submission of school improvement plans.

Please refer to Truman’s approved Schoolwide Title I School Improvement Plan at this URL:

http://truman.taylorschools.net/images/pdfs/Truman_School_Improvement_Plan-1-20-10.pdf

Goal and objective statements:
Reading/English Language Arts:

Goal statement:

Truman students will improve on the ELA portion of the MME: Both reading and writing.

Measurable objective to support goal:

There will be a 10% increase annually in the number of students who score proficient on the ELA
portion of the MME – both reading and writing. This includes all sub-groups, including Special
Education and African-American males.

Mathematics:

Goal statement:

Truman students will improve on the mathematics portion of the MME.

Measurable objective to support goal:

There will be a 10% increase annually in the number of students who score proficient on the
mathematics portion of the MME. This includes all sub-groups, including Special Education and
African-American males.

      6. NO RESPONSE NEEDED. For each Tier III school the LEA commits to serve,
      identify the services the school will receive or the activities the school will implement.
      (No response needed at this time.)

      7. NO RESPONSE NEEDED. Describe the goals established (subject to approval by
      the SEA) in order to hold accountable its Tier III schools that receive school
      improvement funds. (No response needed at this time.)

      8. As appropriate, the LEA must consult with relevant stakeholders (students,
      teachers, parents, community leaders, business leaders, etc.) regarding the LEA’s
      application and implementation of school improvement models in its Tier I and Tier II
      schools.
             o Describe how this process was conducted within the LEA.




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PLEASE NOTE: The process was conducted as follows:

     Central Office personnel, Truman staff members, and Taylor Federation of
      Teacher members attend MDE and Wayne RESA informational meetings


     Central Office personnel and Truman staff members presented information to
      Board of Education members at board meetings.

     Truman High School principal and School Improvement Team members
      worked with teachers at one staff meeting before the end of the school year.
      There was no additional time to work with the entire staff at that time. Staff
      have been informed and involved through emails and phone calls throughout
      the process.

     Two (2) informational meetings and eight (8) work sessions were held to
      gather input and write the grant. Active members of the work sessions
      include: Board of Education members, Truman staff members, Central Office
      personnel, parents, and community members. Copies of agendas and notes
      from the meetings are on file in the State and Federal Programs/School
      Improvement office.




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        BUDGET: An LEA must include a budget that indicates the amount of school
          improvement funds the LEA will use each year in each Tier I, Tier II, and Tier
          III school it commits to serve.

           o   The LEA must provide a budget in MEGS at the building level that indicates the amount of
               school improvement funds the LEA will use each year to—
                   o Implement the selected model in each Tier I and Tier II school it commits to serve;
                   o Conduct LEA-level activities designed to support implementation of the selected
                       school intervention models in the LEA’s Tier I and Tier II schools; and
                   o Support school improvement activities, at the school or LEA level, for each Tier III
                       school identified in the LEA’s application. (No response needed at this time.)



     Note: An LEA’s budget must cover the period of availability, including
     any extension granted through a waiver, and be of sufficient size and scope
     to implement the selected school intervention model in each Tier I and Tier
     II school the LEA commits to serve.

     An LEA’s budget for each year may not exceed the number of Tier I, Tier
     II, and Tier III schools it commits to serve multiplied by $2,000,000.




PLEASE NOTE: A three year budget has been prepared and is in the MEGS system.




                                                      14
                                 ASSURANCES AND CERTIFICATIONS
                                         STATE PROGRAMS
         INSTRUCTIONS: Please review the assurances and certification statements that are listed
          below. Sign and return this page with the completed application.

CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS
No federal, appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for
influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of a federal agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or
employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the making of any federal grant, the
entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any
federal grant or cooperative agreement. If any funds other than federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to
any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member Of Congress, an
officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this federal grant or
cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form – LL*Disclosure Form to Report
Lobbying*, in accordance with its instructions. The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be
included in the awards documents for all sub-awards at all tiers (including subgrants, contracts under grants and
cooperative agreements, and subcontracts) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly.

CERTIFICATION REGARDING DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION, INELIGIBILITY, AND VOLUNTARY EXCLUSION –
LOWER TIER COVERED TRANSACTIONS
The prospective lower tier participant certifies, by submission of this proposal, that neither it nor its principals are presently
debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participating in this
transaction by any Federal department or agency. Where the prospective lower tier participant is unable to certify to any of
the statements in this certification, such prospective participant shall attach an explanation to this proposal.

ASSURANCE WITH SECTION 511 OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION APROPRIATION ACT OF 1990
When issuing statements, press releases, requests for proposals, solicitations, and other documents describing this project,
the recipient shall state clearly: 1) the dollar amount of federal funds for the project, 2) the percentage of the total cost of the
project that will be financed with federal funds, and 3) the percentage and dollar amount of the total cost of the project that
will be financed by nongovernmental sources.

ASSURANCE CONCERNING MATERIALS DEVELOPED WITH FUNDS AWARDED UNDER THIS GRANT
The grantee assures that the following statement will be included on any publication or project materials developed with
funds awarded under this program, including reports, films, brochures, and flyers: “These materials were developed under a
grant awarded by the Michigan Department of Education.”

CERTIFICATION REGARDING NONDISCRIMINATION UNDER FEDERALLY AND STATE ASSISTED PROGRAMS
The applicant hereby agrees that it will comply with all federal and Michigan laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination
and, in accordance therewith, no person, on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, age, sex, marital
status or handicap, shall be discriminated against, excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be
subjected to discrimination in any program or
activity for which it is responsible or for which it receives financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education or the
Michigan Department of Education.

CERTIFICATION REGARDING BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA EQUAL ACCESS ACT, 20 U.S.C.
7905, 34 CFR PART 108.
A State or subgrantee that is a covered entity as defined in Sec. 108.3 of this title shall comply with the nondiscrimination
requirements of the Boy Scouts of America Equal Access Act, 20 U.S.C.
7905, 34 CFR part 108.

PARTICIPATION OF NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS
The applicant assures that private nonprofit schools have been invited to participate in planning and implementing the
activities of this application.

ASSURANCE REGARDING ACCESS TO RECORDS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The applicant hereby assures that it will provide the pass-through entity, i.e., the Michigan Department of Education, and
auditors with access to the records and financial statements as necessary for the pass-through entity to comply with Section
400 (d) (4) of the U.S. Department of Education Compliance Supplement for A-133.

ASSURANCE REGARDING COMPLIANCE WITH GRANT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
The grantee agrees to comply with all applicable requirements of all State statutes, Federal laws, executive orders,
regulations, policies and award conditions governing this program. The grantee understands and agrees that if it materially
fails to comply with the terms and conditions of the grant award, the Michigan Department of Education may withhold funds
otherwise due to the grantee from this grant program, any other federal grant programs or the State School Aid Act of 1979
as amended, until the grantee comes into compliance or the matter has been adjudicated and the amount disallowed has
been recaptured (forfeited). The Department may withhold up to 100% of any payment based on a monitoring finding, audit
finding or pending final report.



                                                                       15
16
   4. ASSURANCES: An LEA must include the following assurances in its
      application for a School Improvement Grant.

See the Assurances and Certifications section of the LEA Application for a complete
list of assurances.



PLEASE NOTE: LEA leadership signatures, including superintendent and
Board of Education president, assure that the LEA will comply with all
School Improvement Grant final requirements.




   4. WAIVERS: The MDE has requested all of the following waivers of
      requirements applicable to the LEA’s School Improvement Grant. Please
      indicate which of the waivers the LEA intends to implement.

The LEA must check each waiver that the LEA will implement. If the LEA does not
intend to implement the waiver with respect to each applicable school, the LEA must
indicate for which schools it will implement the waiver.

    YES: Extending the period of availability of school improvement funds.


       Note: If an SEA has requested and received a waiver
       of the period of availability of school improvement
       funds, that waiver automatically applies to all LEAs in
       the State.


    “Starting over” in the school improvement timeline for Tier I and Tier II Title I
      participating schools implementing a turnaround or restart model.


    Implementing a schoolwide program in a Tier I or Tier II Title I
      participating school that does not meet the 40 percent poverty eligibility
      threshold.




                                          17
                                                        Baseline Data Requirements

Metric

School Data

Which intervention was selected (turnaround, restart, closure or transformation)?    Transformation

Number of minutes in the school year?                                                66,420 including PD

Student Data

Dropout rate                                                                         12.29%

Student attendance rate                                                              80%

For high schools: Number and percentage of students completing advanced coursework
for each category below

Advanced Placement                                                                   142

International Baccalaureate                                                          N/A

Early college/college credit                                                         N/A

Dual enrollment                                                                      54

Number and percentage enrolled in college from most recent graduating class          254 / 75.3%

Student Connection/School Climate

Number of disciplinary incidents                                                     2231

Number of students involved in disciplinary incidents                                 569

Number of truant students                                                                  3

Teacher Data

Distribution of teachers at each performance level category below                    N/A

Highly effective

Effective

Moderately effective

Ineffective

Teacher attendance rate                                                              15 teachers absent <10 days

                                                                                     67 teachers absent >10 days




                                                                    18
LEA Application Part II




          19
                                            ATTACHMENT III

                                       SCHOOL APPLICATION

                                 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT GRANT – 1003(g)

                                                FY 2010 – 2011

       The LEA must provide evidence of a comprehensive needs assessment and
       the thought process that it engaged in to formulate each school plan. The
       following form serves as a guide in the thought process. Please submit
       this form with the application.

School Name and code                                 District Name and Code
Truman High School - 06428                           Taylor School District - 82150
Model for change to be implemented: Transformation




                                                      21
School Mailing Address:
11211 Beech Daly Road
Taylor, MI 48180
Contact for the School Improvement Grant:

Name: Brian Theil

Position: Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction, Pre-K through 12

Contact’s Mailing Address: 23033 Northline Taylor, Michigan 48180-4694

Telephone: 734-374-1206
Fax:
Email address: TheilB@taylor.k12.mi.us


Principal (Printed Name):                                                        Telephone:

David. Zech                                                                      734-946-6551
Signature of Principal:                                                          Date:

X__ON FILE – Will be submitted with final application.                           July 12, 2010

The School, through its authorized representatives, agrees to comply with all requirements applicable to the School
Improvement Grants program, including the assurances contained herein and the conditions that apply to any waivers
that the District/School receives through this application.




         SECTION I: NEED

         1. As stated earlier in the grant application, a complete Comprehensive
         Needs Assessment was completed and included in the approved Truman
         High School Schoolwide Title I School Improvement Plan. Following is a
         portion of the data. The grant readers are encouraged to review the
         entire School Improvement Plan.




                                                        22
                        Student Enrollment Trends By Subgroups

                                                                          Total School Enrollment

               Group                      2006/07                2007/08             2008/09          2009/2010       Year 5:


                                        #            %          #          %        #        %        #         %     #   %
 Economically Disadvantaged            681          37%        785        44%      797      47%      867       58%
        Race/Ethnicity
       African American                                         430       24%       429     26%      370       26%
            Hispanic                                            42        2%        53      3%        58       4%
             Asian                                              18        1%        13      .7%       13       .9%
       Native American                                          16        1%        13      .7%       12       .8%
             White                                             1272       72%      1169     70%      951       68%
   Students with Disabilities          286          16%         287       16%       268     16%
Limited English Proficient (LEP)                                                   16       .9%
             Homeless                    46         3%         15         1%       40       2%        41       3%
    Neglected & Delinquent
             Migrant
               Male                    924          50%        901        51%      833      50%      672       48%
               Female                  914          51%        876        49%      847      50%      734       52%
     TOTAL POPULATION                  1838        100%        1777       100%     1680     100%    1406       100%




      Year         2006/07          2007/08               2008/09               2009/10            Year 5:

      Grade       #       %        #           %          #          %         #        %      #           %

         9       569      31       442         25        394         23     352      25

        10       459      25       447         25        417         25     343      24

        11       435      24       418         24        429         26     331      24

        12       375      20       470         26        440         26     380      27




      Totals     1838    100%   1777          100%    1680       100%       1406    100%




                                                          23
                                Sub Group Academic Data Analysis
                                             Grade: 11TH
                                Percent of Sub-group meeting State Proficiency Standards


                                         Reading                       Writing                           Total ELA

Group
                                 Year      Year      Year      Year      Year     Year      Year      Year            N/A
                                07/08     08/09     09/10     07/08     08/09    09/10     07/08     08/09

Social Economic Status
(SES Disadvantaged)
                                  37        32        35          8       15     15          20        23




Race/Ethnicity                    28        28        26          4       14        9        15        17

Students with Disabilities         8        16         9          0        5        3         0         7

Limited English Proficient
(LEP)
                                  <10      <10       <10         <10     <10       <10       <10      <10

Homeless                          20       <10       <10         10      <10       <10       20       <10

Neglected & Delinquent             0         0         0          0        0        0         0         0

Migrant                            0         0         0          0        0        0         0         0

Gender

 Male                             45        32        38         18       16        23       31        20

 Female                           45        43        47         22       28        24       31        37

Aggregate Scores                  45        38        43         20       22        23       31        29

State                             62        NA                   41       NA                 52        NA




        0= No data available

        <10 Sub Group too small-no data available

        These charts look at data for all students, data not available with no full academic year students removed.




                                                            24
                                       Sub Group Academic Data Analysis


                                                            Grade: 11TH




                                          Math                        Science                    Social Studies

Group
                               Year       Year    Year     Year        Year     Year    Year     Year       Year 09/10
                               07/0       08/0    09/1     07/0        08/0     09/1   07/08     08/0
                                8          9       0        8           9        0                9

Social Economic Status
(SES)
                                   9      20       21       22          21      22      56        55              51

Race/Ethnicity                     1      12        8       14          14       8      54        47              43

Students with Disabilities         2       7        3        6           9       0      14        31              21

Limited English Proficient
(LEP)
                                  <10     <10     <10      <10         <10      <10     <10      <10            <10

Homeless                          10      <10     <10       20          NA      <10     40       <10            <10

Neglected & Delinquent             0       0        0        0           0       0       0         0              0

Migrant                            0       0        0        0           0       0       0         0              0

Gender

 Male                             24      22       29       40          26      31      67        59              64

 Female                           16      21       21       30          22      23      63        64              52

Aggregate Scores                  20      21       25       35          24      27      65        62              58

State                             46      NA                57          NA              80        NA


                          Percent of Sub-group meeting State Proficiency Standards



           0= No data available

           <10 Sub Group too small-no data available

           These charts look at data for all students, data not available with non-full academic year students removed




                                                                 25
           Sub Group Non-Academic Analysis                      Year 2008-2009




                      #            # of              # of                    Unduplicated
                   Student                                                     Counts
Group                 s       Absences          Suspensio          # of
                                                    n                       In     Out*
                                                                Expulsion
                                                                             *
                             >10      ≤10       In     Out*         s
                                                 *

SES

Race/Ethnicity

Caucasian            978     450      528              123          3              465
                                                        8
Native
American              10       6          4             13          0               9

Hispanic              45      21          24            85          0               34

African              364     182      182              915          6              278
American
                      8        3          5                 9       0               3
Asian

Disabilities         255

LEP                   8

Homeless              39

Migrant               -        -          -                 -       -                -

Gender

 Male                804     332      340              153          5              478
                                                        1

 Female              803     330      403              830          4              311

Totals              1607




*ABSENCES ARE RECORDED AS 10 DAYS AND MORE THAN 10




                                           26
  Year: 2008/09



                                                                     Mobility

                    # of      # of         # of       #
                                                  promoted
Group             Students   Reten-   Dropouts     to next   Entering     Leaving
                              tions                 grade




SES Free &          831
Reduced Lunch


Race/Ethnicity

Caucasian           978                    57                  159          140

Native American     10                      1                   2               7

Hispanic            45                      3                  17               9

African             364                    29                  103              56
American
                     8                      0                   2               0
Asian

Disabilities        255

LEP                  8

Homeless            39

Migrant              -

Gender

 Male               804                    38

 Female             803                    52

Totals             1607                                        283          212




                                      27
                                         Enrollment and Graduation Data

                                                  Year: 2008/09

                             #            # Students in
                             Students     course/grade
                # of         enrolled     acceleration    Early HS         # of       # of         # promoted
                             in a                         graduation                              to next grade
  Grade       Students       Young 5’s                                 Retentions    Dropout
                             program

     9          394                                                                       11          394

    10          417                                                                                   417

    11          429                                                                                   429

    12          440                                                        73             81          281




          Number of Students enrolled in Extended Learning Opportunities

               and Information about Educational Development Plans (EDP)

                                                  Year: 2008/09

Number of      # Enrolled in      # Enrolled in       # of             # of Students in        Number of Students who
Students       Advanced           International       Students in      CTE/Vocational          have approved/reviewed
in Building    Placement          Baccalaureate       Dual             Classes                 EDP on file*
by grade       Classes                                Enrollment
                                  Courses

    8                   1

    9                  180                                                                                25%

    10                 219                                                                                22%

    11                 167                                                    206                         18%

    12                 139                                 16                   91                        58%




                                                          28
2. Identify the resources provided to the school (in particular, other state and
federal funds) to support the implementation of the selected model.

                                     School Resource Profile

   General Funds               Title I School           Title II Part A   Title III

                            Improvement                 Title II Part D
                          (ISI)
  Title I Part A                                        USAC -
                                                    Technology
  Title I
Schoolwide

  Title I Part C

  Title I Part D

  Title IV Part A              Section 31 a             Head Start        Special Education

  Title V Parts A-C            Section 32 e             Even Start

                               Section 41               Early Reading
                                                    First


Others:

Nutrition programs – Coordinated School Health Committee

Health/Dental/Vision and General Student Welfare

Local Foundations – Taylor Foundation for Excellence in Education

Parent groups – Booster club

Local Business – MASCO

Other businesses supporting Truman –

Big Boy, Texas Roadhouse, Costco, Sam’s, WalMart




                                                   29
Section II: Commitment

1.Describe the school staff’s support of the school improvement application and
their support of the proposed efforts to effect change in the school.

Truman High School staff members worked over the past year to create a comprehensive School
Improvement Plan following Title 1 guidelines. The plan was the work of Truman High School
administrators, Truman teachers, and District School Improvement personnel. The need for further
changes was discussed at staff meetings toward the end of the 2009-10 school year. A fundamental
change requested by the building committee was the creation of professional learning communities
(PLCS). This required an exemption from union contract language for the school. In a vote of the staff
by secret ballot, 93% approved the PLC plan. The PLC plan was subsequently approved by the Taylor
School District Site Steering Committee, teacher union leadership, and the Board of Education.

The timetable for this grant application did not permit time for a review by the entire staff of additional
changes included. These changes however are once again the product of a committee made up of both
administrators and representative teachers of Truman High School. Among the teachers invited to
participate were the school’s elected Department Heads and union leadership. The changes proposed
have broad support.

2. Explain the school’s ability to support systemic change required by the model
selected.

Systematic change required by the turnaround model will be supported by the creation of PLCs, the
installation of additional technology (additional computers, interactive white boards, security cameras),
and the restructuring of staff duties. Much of the student discipline and lunchroom duties of Assistant
Principals will be reassigned to others in order to restructure their time to monitor student learning.
Additional support personnel, particularly social workers, will be put into place to assess student needs
and address them quickly. The school day will be extended with supporting bus service to permit
additional tutoring and instruction for students in need. The extended school day will also support
extracurricular activities, which will assist in developing Truman into a true community school.


3.Describe the school’s academic in reading and mathematics for the past three
years as determined by the state’s assessments (MEAP/ MME/Mi-Access).

PLEASE SEE TRUMAN HIGH SCHOOL’S APPROVED SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN
FOR COMPLETE COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT, WITH ANALYSIS OF DATA.
PLEASE ALSO SEE SUB-GROUP DATA IN SECTION I: NEEDS.

Math: Sub-groups have made gains, with the exception of students with disabilities.

Reading: Very small gains in females and students with disabilities. All other sub-groups showed small
decrease in scores.




                                                     30
4.Describe the commitment of the school to using data and scientifically based
research to guide tiered instruction for all students to learn.

Truman High School is committed to research-based and data-driven instructional techniques. Students
will receive an assessment of need upon their initial enrollment. In addition, at regular intervals, teachers
will be asked to report on the progress of each student. Based upon the outcome of these assessments,
students will immediately receive alternate/additional instruction to address their needs. The School
District has put into place a software program allowing the accumulation of assessment data for each
individual student.

5.Discuss how the school will provide time for collaboration and develop a schedule
that promotes collaboration.

Truman High School has adopted PLCs. Teachers will meet on Wednesday after school for the purpose
of collaboration. The PLC plan was approved by 93% of the staff, reflecting a strong commitment to
increased student achievement.

6. Describe the school’s collaborative efforts, including the involvement of parents,
the community, and outside experts.


Truman High School pursues many collaborative relationships with the community and outside experts.
The school has a Homeless Liaison providing support outside of the school. It maintains a close
relationship with the Taylor Teen Health Center and is pursuing through this grant application to bring
their services into the school building itself. The school regularly brings in expert speakers to present
seminars on healthy life choices and career awareness for students and professional development for staff.
Through this grant application, the school is seeking to bring into the school expert coaches for
administration and teachers. College representatives are invited to meet with students annually and the
school is pursuing through this grant application field trips to introduce students to college campus
environment. The school also offers its students job-shadowing opportunities in participation with many
local businesses. Parent collaboration is encouraged through parent-teacher conferences conducted three
times a year. Next year, monthly parent meetings will be conducted. Through this grant application, the
school is seeking to open a parent center in the school and hold “Family Night” activities.



SECTION III: PROPOSED ACTIVITIES

1.Describe the proposed activities that address the required US Department
of Education school intervention that the school will use as a focus for its
School Improvement Grant.

See index and activities below: (All revisions since the July 14 submission are in italics)




                                                     31
                                             Index

                                     Transformation Model



A. DEVELOP & INCREASE SCHOOL LEADER EFFECTIVENESS

  1. Replace the Principal…………………………………………………………..……….…. 33

  2. Include student data in teacher/leader evaluation……………………………..…………... 34

  3. Evaluations designed with teacher/principal involvement……………………..……….….34

  4. Remove leaders/staff who have not increased achievement…………………..……….…..34

  5. Provide on-going job embedded staff development…………………………..…………....34

  6. Implement financial incentives or career growth or flexible work conditions……….……35

  7. Provide additional $ to attract and retain staff……………………………………….....….35

  8. Institute system for measuring changes in instructional practices that result from
     professional development……………………………………………………………….…35

  9. Ensure that school is not required to accept a teacher without the mutual consent
     of teacher & Principal, regardless of seniority………………………………………….....35

B. COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL REFORM STRATEGIES

  1. Use data to identify and implement an instructional program that is research based
     and aligned from one grade to the next as well as with state standards....……………..….35

  2. Promote continuous use of student data to inform instruction and meet individual
     needs of students…………………………………………………………….………….....36

  3. Conduct reviews to ensure that curriculum is implemented with fidelity and is
     impacting student achievement……………………………..…………………………......36

  4. Implement a school wide response to intervention model……………………...…….…...36

  5. Provide PD to teachers/principals on strategies to support students in least restrictive
     environment and English language learners……………………………………..……..…37

  6. Use and integrate technology-based interventions in secondary schools………..…….…..37

  7. Increase rigor (AP,IB, STEM, and others) …………………………………………......…37

  8. Summer transition programs or freshman academies…………………………..………....37

  9. Increase graduation rates through credit recovery, smaller learning communities,
     and other strategies………………………………………………………………………..37

  10. Establish early warning systems to identify students who may be at risk of
      failure………………………………………………………………………………….......41


                                               32
C. INCREASED LEARNING TIME AND CREATING COMMUNITY-ORIENTED SCHOOLS

    1. Provide increased learning time………………………………………………………….41

    2. Provide ongoing mechanisms for family and community engagement………………….41

    3. Partnering with parents and other organizations to create safe school environments
       that meet students’ social, emotion, and health needs…………………………….……..41

    4. Extending or restructuring the school day to add time for strategies that build
       relationships between students, faculty, and other school staff……………………...…..42

    5. Implementing approaches to improve school climate and discipline……………………42

D. PROVIDING OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITY AND SUSTAINED SUPPORT

    1. Provide operational flexibility (staffing, calendars/time/budgeting) to implement
       comprehensive approach to substantially increase student achievement and increase
       graduation rates……………………………………………………………………….….42

    2. Ensure that school receives ongoing, intensive TA and related support from LEA,
       SEA, or designated external leader partner or organization………………………..……43

    3. Allow the school to be run under a new governance arrangement....................................56

    4. Implement a per pupil school based budget formula weighted based on student needs...56


A. DEVELOP & INCREASE SCHOOL LEADER EFFECTIVENESS

The staff at Truman High School is committed to implement a variety of strategies to increase
teacher and leader effectiveness, with the overall goal of boosting student learning and
achievement. The proposed activities described in Section III address all required and some
permissible components of the Transformation Model.


A1 - Replace the Principal - Required

Taylor School District hired Mr. David Zech as the new principal of Truman High School in the fall
of 2008. The hiring of Mr. Zech was with the specific intent of improving performance and turning
around Truman High School

Mr. Zech has a diverse educational background with 22 years of successful administrative experience.
Prior buildings in which Mr. Zech has served have received Blue Ribbon recognition, been awarded
Governor’s Cups and earned Michigan Department of Education “A” Grades. In each building
assignment, Mr. Zech has led successful change and buildings have shown improvement.

Mr. Zech’s performance is considered above satisfactory. Change is occurring, test scores have
improved. For 2009-2010 Truman made AYP. An educational model is in place which focuses on
Clarity, Engagement, and Relationships. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) will be
implemented in the fall of 2010, which will improve staff communication, data analysis, and an end



                                                       33
result of higher student achievement. The staff overwhelming voted to stay after contracted hours one
hour per week to implement PLCs.

The Board of Education and Central Office administrators have selected Mr. Zech to continue the
transformation process that he started and has lead successfully at Truman High School. Due to a
number of factors before the arrival of Mr. Zech, there had been numerous principal turnovers. This
led to inconsistency and an inability to institute change at all levels. It is imperative to the strategies
proposed in this grant to keep the administration stable.

Due to the intent of this hire and current performance of Mr. Zech, Taylor Schools believes it is in
compliance with the requirements and expectations of this grant. Mr. Zech demonstrates the
competencies of a turnaround, transformation leader as identified by Public Impact (2008): School
Turnaround Leaders: Competencies for Success.


A2 - Include student data in teacher/leader evaluations – Required
A letter of understanding has been drafted between Taylor School District and the Taylor Federation of
Teachers for the purpose of establishing a design and implementation process for comprehensive teacher
evaluation and development. A similar understanding is currently being developed and drafted for
building administration. The union and the district agree a Teacher Development and Evaluation System
(TDES) is an essential component of implementing a school “Transformation Model.”

The letter of understanding is attached to this grant application.


A3 - Evaluations designed with teacher/principal involvement - Required
See above.

A4 - Remove leaders/staff who have not increased achievement - Required
Discussions regarding the gathering of student data as it pertains to teacher evaluations continue at the
Board of Education and union level. Steps to remove leaders and staff that have not increased student
achievement are being discussed. A draft Letter of Understanding is included at the conclusion of this
grant application. These discussions and decisions are included in the Year 1 Timeline.


A5 - Provide on-going job embedded staff development - Required

Job embedded professional development will take on a greater emphasis in 2010. The goal of job
embedded professional development is to enhance teacher’s content-specific instructional practices
through day-to-day teaching practice. The focus is on assessing and finding solutions for data-based,
authentic immediate problems. Key to this will be the existence of professional learning communities
(PLCs). The focus of (PLCs) is improving student learning through the analysis of current data that will
allow teachers to recommend prompt intervention strategies for struggling students. Common summative
assessments are currently administered across all four core areas. Teachers will be further in-serviced
on the use of formative assessments. The (PLCs) will foster a continuous stream of information between
teachers that will serve to credibly facilitate and successfully implement intervention strategies for
struggling students in a timely fashion.

We also will continue our work with the Wayne RESA principal and content area coaches. This includes
weekly administrator meetings with the principal coaches which will focus on Instruction (Classroom
Walk-Throughs), Data/Assessment, the School Improvement Plan and Leadership Development. The

                                                       34
content coaches will continue their work in classrooms modeling best practice instructional strategies.
Pages 44 – 56 include the goals and expectations of the coaches in more detail.

A6 - Implement financial incentives or career growth or flexible work conditions - Required
The recruitment and retention of good teachers is crucial. Financial incentives and flexible working
conditions will aid in that goal. Central administration will work with the Taylor Federation of Teachers
during the first half of the 2010 – 2011 school year to discuss and work towards implementation of the
following:

        (1) Teachers completing National Board Certification will have an opportunity to have all or part
        of their costs reimbursed.

        (2) Flexibility in the school day will include a zero and/or 6th hour, allowing teachers to start or
        end their day earlier or later. This also gives students flexibility in scheduling.

A draft Letter of Understanding is included at the conclusion of this grant application. These discussions
and decisions are included in the Year 1 Time-line.


A7 - Provide additional $ to attract and retain staff – Permissible

We are pursuing the possibility of offering signing bonuses ($5,000) to new hires. The money may be
given in one lump sum or divided over the first two years.

A8 - Institute system for measuring changes in instructional practices that result from professional
development - Permissible

This is part of the agreement with our external providers.

A9 - Ensure that school is not required to accept a teacher without the mutual consent of teacher &
Principal, regardless of seniority - Permissible

It is the intent of the Truman staff and administration to ensure that new teachers are committed to the
changes being implemented through this proposal. Therefore, an understanding with the union is being
pursued to make this policy possible.

B. COMPREHENSIVE INSTRUCTIONAL REFORM STRATEGIES

B1 - Use data to identify and implement an instructional program that is research based and
aligned from one grade to the next as well as with state standards - Required

Taylor School District has a district level curriculum, which is aligned with the Michigan Department of
Education High School Content Expectations. Each core subject has a Curriculum Team as well as a
School Improvement Coordinator to monitor curriculum and make adjustments in the curriculum when
changes are made at the State level. Each core curriculum team helps to develop pacing charts and choose
materials for classroom use, so that there is a progression from one grade level to the next. The pacing
charts are adhered to by all core teachers, which guide them through the required content. As the State’s
curriculum evolves, these teams ensure that the district’s curriculum evolves with it.




                                                     35
B2 - Promote continuous use of student data to inform instruction and meet individual needs of
students - Required

Instruction

Truman High School students receive instruction by our highly qualified staff. Differentiated instruction
is used to reach students at all ability levels. Teachers work to provide activities that support best
practice research teaching strategies to meet the needs of all students especially those students that are at
risk. Truman High School teachers are able to monitor results, reflect on achievement, and refine
instruction by meeting with fellow department members in Professional Learning Communities. This
ensures that the curriculum delivery is of the highest quality possible.

Assessment

The Truman staff meets by department to discuss progress in all core areas related to expectations
established by district and state standards. Through this process, teachers are able to assess curriculum
and instruction while addressing Truman’s specific population of at-risk students. Core areas meet to
analyze unit/chapter common assessments that the staff is currently developing. This allows for
immediate feedback for teachers. Job embedded professional development time is used to review common
assessments given by each core subject to reflect on student achievement. Both of these types of
assessment allow for timely feedback. Also, time is committed to analyzing standardized testing results,
including the EXPLORE, PLAN, ACT and MME assessments. The staff looks at trends over time, as well
as the alignment of scores from the EXPLORE, to the PLAN and then the ACT. All students are required
to take all three tests. As staff continually evaluates student progress and achievement, class instruction
and pacing is adjusted to ensure that all students will acquire the skills and knowledge that have the
endurance to be retained long after the assessment, apply them across academic disciplines and prepare
students for the next grade or course.


B3 - Conduct reviews to ensure that curriculum is implemented with fidelity and is impacting
student achievement – Permissible

One focus of the Wayne RESA principal coaches is to conduct Walk-Throughs. The Taylor administrators
were given professional development on 3 Minute Walk-Throughs throughout the year last year.

B4 - Implement a school wide response to intervention model - Permissible

Our district has implemented a three tiered K-2 Response to Intervention model at all of our elementary
schools.

At Truman High School, we also recognize the need for multiple levels of interventions to support our
struggling learners. Therefore, as mentioned throughout this grant application, we are focused on
developing new interventions and strengthening those that are already in place.




                                                     36
B5 - Provide PD to teachers/principals on strategies to support students in least restrictive
environment and English language learners - Permissible

We have implemented co-teaching in all core areas at all high school grade levels.

B6 - Use and integrate technology-based interventions in secondary schools – Permissible

The credit recovery program incorporates the internet based Plato and Carnegie software programs.
Premier Suite program provides literacy support. Some textbooks provide audio support for affected
students.

B7 - Increase rigor (AP,IB, STEM, and others) - Permissible

Based on guidance from our content coaches, this year we revised how we enroll students into our 5
areas of Advanced Placement classes as well as our accelerated classes. For the first time, we looked at
Plan and Explore scores in terms of student class selection. Regardless of GPA, students were identified
who had scores more than one grade level above the recommended college readiness benchmarks. Staff
personally talked to these students to encourage them to sign up for more rigorous courses. Some of our
AP teachers also visited classes to talk about their program and to encourage students to sign up. Last
year we had 142 students in Advanced Placement courses. Next year, we have 221 enrolled.


B8 - Summer transition programs or freshman academies - Permissible

The transition from middle school to high school will continue to be facilitated by Link Crew mentors
from the upper grades. New to the program are teachers who will “Adopt a Crew”, providing materials,
instruction, and encouragement to Link Crew leaders and their crew.

Truman will identify and target struggling readers coming from the middle schools. Those students will
participate in a four to six week, mandatory summer reading program. Reading specialists will be
available. Parental involvement will be underscored as a means of easing the transition to high school,
providing parent information, and exporting literacy back to the community. A strategies class for 9th
graders is being considered. The development of a student-teacher advisory system will be discussed for
future implementation.


B9 - Increase graduation rates through credit recovery, smaller learning communities, and other
strategies - Permissible


Specific interventions will be available to increase the graduation rate at Truman.
    Graduation Coaches will be added and funded through this grant to help ensure that students at
        risk of dropping out are identified and helped. We are exploring the use of the evidenced based
        Check and Connect Program to guide the work of our Graduation Coaches.
    A Transition Coordinator will serve to ease the entry of new students into Truman at all grade
        levels, as well as acquaint the new student and the family to what graduation requirements remain
        for them. Truman had 350 students enter after school began in 2009.
    The required after school tutoring for students who are identified early will aid in preventing
        failure and improving chances for graduation.
    Online Credit Recovery will be available both during and after school.




                                                   37
       Increased communication with home is essential to keep parents informed about graduation
        expectations for their child and to avoid any surprises occurring during their path to graduation.
        Expanding the experiential horizons of students is another key ingredient.
       Field trips to universities will be offered to both students and parents. The experience of seeing
        and walking a college campus is a powerful motivator for those who never had the chance.
       Summer scholarship programs will be more accessible for students. This might include an
        opportunity to attend a music camp or go out of state to a student seminar.
       Job shadowing and career pathway programs will continue, with the goal that students can take
        part in activities that inform them about and enrich their future goals.


Additionally, Taylor School District is in discussion with The American Academy, The American
Academy's innovative Dropout Recovery Program offers school districts a way to provide a complete
high school education to students beyond the reach of traditional programs. If this program cannot be
funded through the School Improvement Grant, we will fund it through the regular Title I budget or
district curriculum funds.

Website: The American Academy’s: http://www.schoolasaservice.com/dropout-recovery

Truman High School is committed to addressing attendance and dropout rates. Research and evidence-
based solutions have been studied. Truman High School staff members are using the National Dropout
Prevention Center/Network's research as a guide.

The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network has identified 15 strategies that have the most positive
impact on the dropout rate. These strategies are research and evidence based and have been
implemented successfully at all education levels and environments throughout the nation.

Staff members will research the 15 strategies to determine which will have the highest impact on Truman
High School students. This will be a topic of Professional Learning Communities, and staff members will
attend workshops and conferences on this issue. Conferences include the Dropout Prevention
Institute/School Attendance Symposium in Orlando, Florida on October 4 - 7, 2010 and the 22nd Annual
National Dropout Prevention Conference in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on November 14 - 17, 2010.

The 15 research and evidence based strategies follow:

School and Community Perspective

1. Systemic Renewal

A continuing process of evaluating goals and objectives related to school policies, practices, and
organizational structures as they impact a diverse group of learners.

2. School-Community Collaboration

When all groups in a community provide collective support to the school, a strong infrastructure sustains
a caring supportive environment where youth can thrive and achieve.




                                                    38
3. Safe Learning Environments

A comprehensive violence prevention plan, including conflict resolution, must deal with potential violence
as well as crisis management. A safe learning environment provides daily experiences, at all grade levels,
that enhance positive social attitudes and effective interpersonal skills in all students.

Early Interventions


4. Family Engagement

Research consistently finds that family engagement has a direct, positive effect on children’s achievement
and is the most accurate predictor of a student’s success in school.

5. Early Childhood Education

Birth-to-five interventions demonstrate that providing a child additional enrichment can enhance brain
development. The most effective way to reduce the number of children who will ultimately drop out is to
provide the best possible classroom instruction from the beginning of their school experience through the
primary grades.

6. Early Literacy Development

Early interventions to help low-achieving students improve their reading and writing skills establish the
necessary foundation for effective learning in all other subjects.

Basic Core Strategies

7. Mentoring/Tutoring

Mentoring is a one-to-one caring, supportive relationship between a mentor and a mentee that is based
on trust. Tutoring, also a one-to-one activity, focuses on academics and is an effective practice when
addressing specific needs such as reading, writing, or math competencies.

8. Service-Learning

Service-learning connects meaningful community service experiences with academic learning. This
teaching/learning method promotes personal and social growth, career development, and civic
responsibility and can be a powerful vehicle for effective school reform at all grade levels.

9. Alternative Schooling

Alternative schooling provides potential dropouts a variety of options that can lead to graduation, with
programs paying special attention to the student’s individual social needs and academic requirements for
a high school diploma.




                                                   39
10. After-School Opportunities

Many schools provide after-school and summer enhancement programs that eliminate information loss
and inspire interest in a variety of areas. Such experiences are especially important for students at risk of
school failure because these programs fill the afternoon “gap time” with constructive and engaging
activities.

Making the Most of Instruction

11. Professional Development

Teachers who work with youth at high risk of academic failure need to feel supported and have an avenue
by which they can continue to develop skills, techniques, and learn about innovative strategies.

12. Active Learning

Active learning embraces teaching and learning strategies that engage and involve students in the
learning process. Students find new and creative ways to solve problems, achieve success, and become
lifelong learners when educators show them that there are different ways to learn.

13. Educational Technology

Technology offers some of the best opportunities for delivering instruction to engage students in authentic
learning, addressing multiple intelligences, and adapting to students’ learning styles.

14. Individualized Instruction

Each student has unique interests and past learning experiences. An individualized instructional program
for each student allows for flexibility in teaching methods and motivational strategies to consider these
individual differences.

15. Career and Technology Education (CTE)

A quality CTE program and a related guidance program are essential for all students. School-to-work
programs recognize that youth need specific skills to prepare them to measure up to the larger demands
of today’s workplace.

Website: The Dropout Prevention Center/Network and the National Dropout Prevention Center for
Students With Disabilities:

http://www.dropoutprevention.org/




                                                     40
B10 - Establish early warning systems to identify students who may be at risk of failure - Permissible

Truman will identify and target struggling readers coming from the middle schools. Those students will
participate in a four to six week mandatory summer reading program. Reading specialists will be
available. Also, through the implementation of professional learning communities, teachers will meet
regularly to analyze research-based / evidence-based / data-driven common assessments (both summative
and formative) that will identify struggling students and prescribe prompt intervention strategies.
Included among those interventions are extended learning opportunities, mandatory and voluntary after-
school tutoring and credit recovery. Students placed in the mandatory tutoring and credit recovery will
be targeted by using bi-weekly tracking sheets provided by teachers. Students receiving a grade of D+
or lower will be required to attend tutoring and/or credit recovery until performance improves.

C. INCREASED LEARNING TIME AND CREATING COMMUNITY-ORIENTED SCHOOLS

C1 - Provide increased learning time - Required

Increased learning time for all students will be accomplished in many ways. Late bus runs, funded by this
grant will allow any student to stay after school for extended learning. Instructors will be on site for all
subject areas to supplement and/or reinforce prior instruction. Students will have an opportunity to
participate in credit recovery, a zero and 6th hour, after-school tutoring, and extended day activities for
elective classes, school clubs, and athletics. The extended school day will also facilitate mandatory after
school tutoring for struggling learners and enrichment opportunities for motivated students. The summer
reading program will strengthen incoming 9th graders’ literacy skills.

Teachers will continue to take advantage of the extended day by pursuing professional development
through workshops, conferences, webinars, etc. The nationally recognized Educational Research and
Dissemination Program (ERD) provided through the local teachers union and Madonna University has
afforded teachers a means to earn continuing education credits and professional collegiality.

Weekly, scheduled teacher PLCs will serve as the main impetus for change at Truman. The extended day
is the best means for effective teacher collaboration.

C2 - Provide ongoing mechanisms for family and community engagement - Required

Staying current with the questions and concerns of parents, students and staff members will be addressed
through the administration of the ‘WE” Survey. The "WE" surveys are an effective means of gathering
data pertaining to rigor, relevance, relationships, and leadership. The surveys can be administered in a
number of ways and the disaggregated data is reported out quickly. These surveys can also be made
available to students and staff, whereby all the necessary parts of the school’s educational and community
mission can be synergized. Parents need to be comfortable in the school environment. A parent center
will be created to link parents to upcoming school activities, current educational issues, and events in the
community. Parent nights, school tours, family activities and community celebrations will be held at
Truman. Partnerships with local businesses and government can provide increased awareness for Truman
families.

C3 - Partnering with parents and other organizations to create safe school environments that meet
students’ social, emotion, and health needs - Permissible

Truman is also committed to increased awareness, involvement, and outreach to both their extended
school family and the community at large. The Truman Coordinated Health Community Center will
work to address the health and wellness issues of both students and staff. Social workers will be available
to students and their families to help understand and cope with issues that can affect student focus. The


                                                    41
increased monitoring of attendance and disciplinary issues will help mitigate those problems. Truman
will become a center for educational and community information

Increasing Truman High School’s availability and effectiveness as both an educational and a community
asset will be undertaken. The Coordinated School Health Community Center will provide health care and
wellness services to Truman students and staff. A nurse will be on site during school hours. Social
workers will be available to help referred students with family issues, provide guidance for students with
drug and alcohol problems, and address issues of school violence and bullying. Social workers will be
available during the summer reading program to help identify potential issues with incoming 9th graders.
They will also be part of the intervention process with regards to absenteeism and disciplinary issues.


C4 - Extending or restructuring the school day to add time for strategies that build relationships
between students, faculty, and other school staff – Permissible

The proposal of late bussing for students will provide transportation for students to stay after school for a
multitude of reasons. Students will now be able to attend social events, after school programs and clubs,
which in turn, provides opportunity for more students to be involved in extracurricular activities. We
would like to extend on our current Link Crew program by having teachers “adopt a crew”. Teachers
will adopt a Link Crew group of 10-12 students, and meet with them throughout the year. This allows
teachers to build relationships with students in a different setting to increase the community-oriented
school, which is our ultimate goal.

Mandatory after-school tutoring and credit recovery will be implemented. Content area tutors will be
available for students identified as having difficulty in all subject areas. The time made available by
PLCs will also serve as the main branch of positive growth for the adoption of differentiated types of
instruction and increased opportunities for cross-curricular activities. Allowing teachers to meet, plan,
and review is key.


C5 - Implementing approaches to improve school climate and discipline – Permissible

The creation of a student-centered learning culture will be accomplished by engaging students in rigorous
academic strategies featuring differentiated instruction with cross-curricular activities, and focusing on
building literacy skills in all content areas. The Rigor, Relevance and Relationship model developed by
the International Center for Leadership in Education and supported by the Michigan Department of
Education will be followed. Through the implementation of professional learning communities, teachers
will meet regularly to analyze research-based / evidence-based/data-driven common assessments (both
summative and formative) that will identify struggling students and prescribe prompt intervention
strategies. Included among those interventions are extended learning opportunities. Included are
mandatory and voluntary after-school tutoring and credit recovery.


D. PROVIDING OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITY AND SUSTAINED SUPPORT

D1 - Provide operational flexibility (staffing, calendars/time/budgeting) to implement
comprehensive approach to substantially increase student achievement and increase graduation
rates - Required

The staff at Truman High School understands the importance of having operational flexibility to increase
student achievement. The implementation of PLCs was attained through changes made to the district and
school calendar as well as the length of the school day. These changes are unique to Truman and not in

                                                     42
place at other district schools in Taylor. Operational flexibility is evident through the establishment of
extended day transportation services for all students.

The additional funding from this grant allows Truman the financial flexibility to hire a nurse, social
workers, graduation coaches, transition coordinators, tutors, and other support staff. This also provides
the operational flexibility to define their roles. The services provided through this school-based approach
to will help alleviate many of the problems that delay or postpone graduation. They will also foster the
growth of our multi-faceted community based approach to increase student achievement.

D2 - Ensure that school receives ongoing, intensive TA and related support from LEA, SEA, or
designated external leader partner or organization – Required

        LEA:

        Our school district has a State and Federal Programs/School Improvement Office, which provides
        a wide variety of technical support. (1) Dr. Norman Malinowski, Director of State and Federal
        Programs, assists in all aspects of Title I, including budget and compliance guidelines.

        Germaine Jarvis, School Improvement Coordinator assigned to Truman, who provides technical
        assistance in the following areas: professional development; program development,
        implementation and evaluation; grant writing,; school improvement planning; and curriculum,
        instruction and assessment development, implementation and evaluation. (3) Beatrice Benjamin,
        Assessment Coordinator, who assists in interpreting all data, including the use of the CLASS A
        data system which helps us to identify the further needs of our students.

        SEA:

        Teacher workshops, monitoring of the grant implementation by MDE, annual comprehensive
        school-wide audit, support from MDE consultants.

        External Partner(s)

         Wayne County RESA will continue to provide principal, assistant principal, mathematics, and
         English Language Arts coaches who work directly in the building with staff and students.
         Strategies used are research and evidence-based. We are also working with Wayne County
         RESA to implement the embedded evaluation process, which is a tool designed to measure the
         impact of professional development and how it carries over into instructional practices.

         The Office of K-12 Outreach Programs, Michigan State University College of Education. The
         Truman High School Principal and the School Improvement Team will provide support through
         The Michigan Principals Fellowship (MFP) The MFP is a research-based approach to school
         improvement that provides principals and their School Improvement Teams with essential
         knowledge, skills, experiences and support that enable them to lead systematic instructional
         improvement and increased student achievement.

         Included in this application are detailed explanations of the services provided through the
         following:




                                                     43
       Following are detailed explanations of the services provided.

Wayne RESA Principal Leadership Expectations
Principal Coaching

INSTRUCTION

          Schedule regular classroom Walkthroughs and establish structure, specific focus areas, and a
           feedback/follow through process.

          Encourage use of EPAS (EXPLORE, PLAN, ACT DATA) and other data to improve student
           achievement.

          Work with principal to increase staff focus and dialogue on data-driven instruction
           (Professional Learning Communities, data-driven decisions, etc.)

          Work with curriculum leaders, staff, and content coaches to introduce and identify ACT
           College Readiness Standards (CRS) score ranges and to align with district and state
           standards.

DATA ASSESSMENT

          Assist principals to develop a structure and process to implement a data structure and
           protocol.
            Data collection, interpretation, and reporting,

              Action plan for ACT/MME, PLAN, EXPLORE, etc.

              Determine instructional priorities

SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT

          Assist in the review and modification of the School Improvement Plan.

          Support the implementation and monitoring of the School Improvement Plan.

          Meet with principal and School Improvement Team quarterly to review and monitor progress
           of the School Improvement Plan and gather data on the implementation of evidence-based
           strategies in the plan.

          Promote a school-wide focus on School Improvement Planning. Support principals in
           creating a school-wide focus on school improvement. Assist principals in creating a teaching
           and learning environment that is characterized by staff who assumes collective responsibility
           for raising student achievement.

          Support principals in preparing for MDE audit and assist in developing a plan of action to
           implement the audit recommendations.




                                                    44
   LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

             Assist the principal to increase his/her leadership knowledge and skills that will result in a
              greater sense of urgency to improve student achievement.

             Provide literature addressing best practices and current educational research.

             Assist in supporting the vision and goals of the district.

   ADDITONAL RESPONSIBILITIES

             Communicate and monitor project goals.

             Meet with principal weekly at an established date and time.

             Share professional development and meeting information.

             Establish regular School Technical Assistance Team (STAT) meetings with principal.

Wayne RESA Principal Leadership Coach Expectations -Assistant Principal Coaching

Instruction

      Provide structure and support for classroom Walkthroughs.
      Assist in the alignment of ACT College Readiness Standards with District and State Standards.
      Support in linking instruction/curriculum to aligned standards.


Data/Assessment

      Support in disaggregation and interpretation of data
      Support in the use of data to determine instructional priorities.
      Assist in developing an intervention plan based on data.
      Assist in developing an action plan for Michigan Merit Exam (MME) preparation and
       administration.


School Improvement

      Assist in the review and modification of the MDE School Improvement Plan.
      Support in the implementation and monitoring of the School Improvement Plan.
      Support in responding to School Improvement audits (i.e. NCA, Title I, MDE).


Leadership Development

    Assist in identifying methods to support the principal’s and district’s vision and goals.
    Provide with literature addressing best practices and current educational research.
    Assist to develop his/her leadership, organizational and administrative knowledge and skills.
   Note: Coaching support is provided for Assistant Principals in collaboration with the Principal

                                                       45
Mathematics and ELA coaches
Wayne RESA: High School Mathematics: Best Practices in Teaching and Learning in Mathematics

School/Coach:                             Grade Level Focus:              Month:

  Best Practices in          Strategies                 Modeling          Observed Evidence/Outcomes
   Teaching and
    Learning in
   Mathematics
   Components

                      Coach: Check all          Coach: Check all that     Coach: Check all that apply
                      that apply.               apply

                              Rich and                 Lively and               Blackboard
                               Stimulating               pleasant                  Configuration ____
                               Physical                  decorum ____             Collaborative
                               Environmen               Collaborative             Grouping ____
                               t ____                    Grouping ____            Posting Student
                              Collaborati              Harry Wong-               Progress _____
    Classroom                  ve Seating                The First Days           Posting Student Work
  Environment &                Arrangemen                of School ____            ____
    Structure                  t _____                  Grading                  Mathematical discourse
                              Established               Rubrics ____              among students _____
                               Routines                 Blackboard               Peer intervention for
                               _____                     Configuration             SE students ____
                              High                      ____
                               Expectation              Bloom’s
                               s ____                    Taxonomy ____
                              Classroom                Learner-
                               Discourse:
                                                         centered
                              Teacher-to-               environment
                               student                   ____
                              Student-to-
                               student
                              High Order
                               Thinking




                                                        46
                   Constructivi        Mathematical           Student presentations
                    st Approach          reasoning and           ____
                    ___                  problem-               Drawing pictorial
                   Discovery            solving ___             representations and
                    Approach            Inquiry in              conclusions _____
                    ___                  Instruction            Solving a simpler
                   Patterns &              o Inductive          problem ____
                    Relationshi                  reasonin       Adequate, time and
                    ps _____                     g ____          space ____
                   Vocabulary              o Deductiv          Student explaining their
                    Developmen                   e               work ___
Instructional
                    t __                         reasonin       Checking for
                   Algebraic                    g ___           Understanding ___
                    and                 Student-               Tables, graphs, written
                    geometric            centered                verbal statements,
                    reasoning            learning                diagram _____
                    and sense            activities ___         Word walls ___
                    making ___          Think-Pair-            Heterogeneous groups
                   Multiple             Share ___               ___
                    Representat         Checking for           Journals ____
                    ions ____            Understanding          Students creating math
                   Reading              ___                     problems ___
                    and Writing         Grading                Create and use graphic
                    ____                 Rubrics ____            organizers ____
                   Marzano’s           Identifying            Student work and
                    Nine _____           similarities and        presentations ____
                   Differentiati        differences            Mathematical discourse
                    on of                ____
                                                                 among students ___
                    Instruction         Note-taking
                    ___                  models:_____
                   Scaffolding               o Concep
                    materials                      t
                    ____                           mappin
                                                   g/
                                              o Graphi
                                                   c
                                                   organiz
                                                   ers
                                                   ____
                                              o KWL
                                                   model_
                                                   ___
                                              o Frayer
                                                   model
                                                   _____
                                        Problem-
                                         solving plan
                                         ____
                                        Teacher as
                                         facilitator

                                        47
                                        _____
                                       Brainstorming
                                        ____
                                       Closure
                                        Activities
                                         o Exit Slips
                                             ____
                                         o Journals
                                             _____
                                         o Oral
                                             statements
                                             _____
                                         o Written
                                             explanatio
                                             ns or
                                             Summaries
                                             _____
                                         o Others
                                             _____
                                       Real-world
                                        applications
                                       Student
                                        presentations__
                                        ____
                                       Hands-on
                                        learning _____
                                       Contextual and
                                        procedural
                                        knowledge
                                        _____
                                       Construction of
                                        algorithms ___




                   Exploration        Model standard       Promotes equity in
                    /Discovery/         manipulations         heterogeneous
                    Conjecture          and problem-          classroom ____
                    with                solving ____         Generates proficient
                    graphing           Enhance the           use of graphic utilities
                    utilities___        depth of              __
                   Problem             knowledge in         Confidence initiating
                    Analysis &          teaching and          problem-solving ____
Instructional       Solution            learning             Increase
Technology          ___                 concepts ___          comprehension of
                   Mathematic         Demonstrate           problem versus
                    al                  graphical,            technology ___
                    reasoning           tabular and          Increase development
                    and                 computational         of number sense and

                                       48
                    problem-           skills ____           exploring mathematical
                    solving ___       Develop               concepts ___
                   Expand             number sense in      Represent graphing
                    mental             contextual            data, tables and
                    computation        setting ____          solutions ___
                    skills ____       Prompts              Solve complex
                   Experience         student               problems ___
                    varied             discussions          Explanation of
                    concepts           _____                 deductive reasoning
                    and               Promote               skills more consistently
                    computation        inquiry               ____
                    s ___              learning and         Modifications ____
                                       investigation        Visual Modeling ____
                                       ____                 Verbal cueing ___
                                      Accommodation     
                                       s ____
                                      Modifications
                                       ____
                                      Visual
                                       Modeling ____
                                      Verbal cueing
                                       ___
                                      Guided
                                       Practice ___


             Assessment for           Data collection      Baseline data ___
             Learning                  and analysis         Using Pre/Post
                                       ___                   assessments results to
                   Diagnostic        Targeted              inform instruction ___
                    ___                intervention         Formative assessments
                   Formative          and feedback          ___
Assessment          ____               ___                  Intervention results ___
             Assessment of            Pre/post test        Grade
             Learning                  results ____          determination/policy
                                      Common                ___
                    Summative         assessments          Homework ___
                     ___               ____                 Student work ___
                  Standardize        Verbal/Oral          Record book ___
                     d ____            assessments
             Alternative               ___
             Assessments              Written or
                                       pictorial ___
                   Verbal/Oral       Project- based
                    assessments        ___
                    ___
                   Written or
                    pictorial
                    ___
                   Project-

                                      49
                           based ___
                          Other ___


                    Grading policy:

                    15 Fixes for Broken
                    Grades _____

                    Rule of Zero
                    Grading _____




SUMMARIES



Co-teaching




Demonstration
(Model) Lesson




Explain how
student work
reflects evidence
of
implementation.



Issues/Comments




                                          50
The Principals Fellowship

The Michigan Principals Fellowship

Office of K-12 Outreach Programs, Michigan State University College of Education

The Michigan Principals Fellowship (MPF) is a research-based approach to school improvement that
provides principals and their instructional leadership teams with essential knowledge, skills, experiences
and support that enable them to lead systematic instructional improvement and increased student
achievement. Not just another initiative or obligation competing for your time and attention, participation
in the Fellowship can help you manage your current school and district initiatives more effectively.

This three-year program has been developed as a central component of the Statewide System of Support
(SSOS), the Michigan Department of Education's strategy for supporting high poverty, low performing
schools. Participation in the Fellowship is now available to schools with SIG funds. MPF is a program
within the College of Education at Michigan State University.

       Fellowship Goal

The goal of the Michigan Principals Fellowship is to increase the capacity of the school principal and
instructional leadership team in the following areas:

       Leadership for change
       Changing the culture of a school to include internal accountability
       Multiple sources and uses of data for instructional improvement
       Shared understanding about effective teaching and what it looks like in practice
       The professional knowledge base for teaching
       Instructional program coherence
       The instructional core
       Models of effective turnaround practice

     Fellowship Timeline: A Three-Year CycleWork throughout the three-year cycle of the
Fellowship focuses on creating and expanding the essential school conditions for improved student
achievement. Rather than an off-the-shelf program, the Fellowship is designed to build the collective
capacity of the adults within a school and its particular context.

The organization of the Fellowship work ensures that principals and teachers have the fundamentals to
begin and sustain instructional improvement in their schools as well as the practical tools and skills to
identify which changes will translate into significant gains in student achievement.

                                                                             Year Three: Sustaining the
  Year One: Beginning the Work          Year Two: Deepening the Work
                                                                                       Work

Working as a team, the principal,     Exp The principal, coach and           The principal, coach and
school improvement coach (see         leadership team continue their         leadership team work on
below) and instructional leadership   growth by:                             institutionalizing a culture of
team work on:                                                                accountable practice by:
                                              expanding the capacity to
       Creating a culture of                  implement effective                  Developing

                                                    51
                                                                               Year Three: Sustaining the
  Year One: Beginning the Work          Year Two: Deepening the Work
                                                                                         Work

        improvement, including an              instructional and                      proficiency to
        accountable professional               leadership practice                    implement the
        community                             Increasing skills in using             strategies that result
       Creating a collective vision           data and in helping others             in increased student
        of what is possible,                   become adept in data                   achievement.
        including a shared                     analysis                              Demonstrating data
        understanding of                      Continuing to learn how to             proficiency in all
        instructional program                  manage complex change                  aspects of the
        coherence and the role                 in schools                             school’s work
        students have in their own            Using the school                      Ensuring
        education                              improvement plan,                      instructional
       Understanding the data                 identifying an appropriate             program coherence
        available to inform                    problem of practice and                across and between
        decisions about                        theory of action in order to           grade levels/subjects
        instructional improvement              provide focus for school              Planning for
       Learning about the change              improvement efforts that               continued progress
        process and how it impacts             will leverage the greatest
        staff, students and families           student improvement                   Continuing an
       Developing a clear                                                            emphasis on effective
        understanding of effective            Expanding the                          and efficient school
        instruction that leads to              accountable professional               organization
        improved student                       community to include
        achievement                            feeder schools and central
                                               offices
       Identifying effective
        organizational structures
        that support improved
        student achievement
       Fellowship Participation -
        SIG Pricing
       New Schools

        (New to the Fellowship or continuing Fellowship schools that have experienced significant
        staffing changes)

       Continuing Schools

       Leadership Coaching

Participants in the Michigan Principals Fellowship are strongly encouraged to include a school
improvement (leadership) coach as part of their reform plan and budget. Just as principals are the key
mechanism for improving instructional quality in schools, leadership coaches are the key mechanism for
providing on-site support that builds the capacity of school leadership teams.

Specifically, the role of a leadership coach is to increase the capacity of school leaders to develop and
exercise skills and practices related to visionary, instructional and operational leadership, as well as the

                                                     52
cross-cutting skills needed to exercise leadership in all areas. For this reason, schools are strongly
encouraged to include a leadership coach in their SIG proposals and budgets.

The Michigan Coaches Institute, also developed by the MSU Office of K-12 Outreach Programs for the
Statewide System of Support, has developed a cadre of highly trained leadership coaches focused on
building the capacity of principals to turn around struggling schools.

Through the Michigan Coaches Institute, effective coaches have developed both a mindset—a way of
approaching and thinking about coaching—and a skill set—specific competencies related to coaching
practice—that equip them to help principals and other school leaders build the capacity to turn around
troubled schools. They leverage their knowledge, skills, experience and demonstrated expertise in
building the capacity of principals to lead systematic instructional improvements and turn around high
priority schools.

       Fellowship Schedule

A supportive community of learners is developed through active participation in a combination of
residential summer institutes and ongoing seminars throughout the school year. Teams of six
faculty/professional staff members and the principal work to create and sustain a common commitment to
a shared understanding of what effective practice is and what practices need to change to produce
improved student outcomes.

New schools in the Fellowship meet for four two-day seminars during the school year (eight days total).
Continuing schools engage in a three-day summer institute and five one-day seminars (eight days total).
All institutes and seminars are held on the campus of Michigan State University. All schools involved in
the Fellowship have access to interactive online support and other program resources.

All schools are asked to create a school leadership team. Each team includes the school principal and six
faculty/professional staff members. In order to build a solid foundation and facilitate continued growth,
schools are required to maintain a minimum of four consistent members across the three-year Fellowship
cycle. A leadership coach or other trained facilitator is required to attend all on-campus events.

       Fellowship Participation - and SIG Pricing
       New Schools - (New to the Fellowship or continuing Fellowship schools that have experienced
        significant staffing changes)
       Continuing Schools

A three-year school commitment is required for Fellowship participation. Once commitment paperwork
has been finalized, annual invoices will be sent to the participating school.

The total fee for participation in the Michigan Principals Fellowship over three years is $145,050.
Annual invoices of $48,350 will be sent at the beginning of each fiscal year. This fee does not include a
school improvement coach. Districts should inquire about the availability of coaches through their ISD.

       Four two-day seminars (eight total days on the MSU campus)
       All meals
       All required books, binders and support materials
       Online support community
       Access to discounted hotel rooms


                                                     53
         Three-day Summer Institute (three days on the MSU campus)
         Five one-day seminars (five days on the MSU campus)
         All meals (only one dinner will be provided during the Summer Institute)
         All required book, binders and support materials
         Online support community
         Access to discounted hotel rooms

Contact

Office of K-12 Outreach Programs

College of Education

Michigan State University

263 Erickson Hall

East Lansing, MI 48824

Phone: 517.353.8950

Email: nauss@msu.edu




                                                     54
High School English Technical Assistance
                                         GUIDED READING
 BALANCED
 LITERACY
                        Before                 During                             After
 COMPONEN
    TS:
                Think Aloud                     Think Aloud               Think Aloud
                Activate prior                  Talk to the Text          Second Draft
COMPREHENS       knowledge                       Construct                  Reading:
   ION          Preview the passage              Meaning:                   o What does it
                 o Vocabulary                    Seven                           say?
                 o Text Structure                Comprehension               o What does it
                Make predictions                Strategies
                                                                                 mean?
                Establish a purpose            Highlighting Text:
                                                                             o What does it
                Generate Questions              Determining
                                                 Importance                      matter?
                QAR–Thick/Thin
                                                 Inferential Clues          Close/Critical
                 Questions
                                                Verifying/Checkin           Reading
                                                  g Inference               Summarization
                                                Article of the
                                                  Week



                Structural Analysis:             Structural               Vocabulary
                 Prefixes, Suffixes,               Analysis:                 Development:
  WORD           Greek/Latin Roots,                Prefixes, Suffixes,        o Concept of
  STUDY          Word Walls                        Greek/Latin Roots,             Definition
                Vocabulary                        Word Walls                 o Frayer
                 Development:                     Context Clues                  Model
                  o Concept of                    Linguistic and Non-        o Semantic
                      Definition                   linguistic                     Maps
                  o Frayer Model                   representations          Word Walls
                  o Semantic Maps                                           Word Sorts
                Pre-teaching Relevant                                      Linguistic and
                 Vocabulary (Tiers)                                          nonlinguistic
                                                                             representations

             Part 1 (15 min):               Part 2 (20 min.):            Part 3 (10 min.)
              Read aloud to                 Students read from          Facili tat ed
                 students from a variety        selected books/texts         Sharing: A few
                 of genres, topics, and         while you and the            students shared
 READING
                 authors.                       teacher held                 what they read;
 FLUENCY
              Set a purpose for                conferences with             classmates asked
                 listening                      them about the               the reader
                                                text and their               questions about the
                                                understandings               text

                                           55
                                                                              Students wrote
                                                                               reflections about
                                                                               what they read
                                                                              Students responded
                                                                               to their reading in a
                                                                               log
                      Writing Fluency:             First Draft              Personal
                       Freewrites                    Writing:                  Writing:
  WRITING              o Activated Prior             o Peer                    o Response to
                           Knowledge                      Response                 Literature
                       o Discussed Prompts:               Groups/              o Reading
                           Text, Art, Music,              Collaborativ             Logs/Journa
                           etc.                           e Writing                ls
                      Graphic Organizers            o 6+1 Writing             o Reader's
                      Pre-Writing-                       Traits                   Notebook
                       Persuasive Essay:            First Draft-             Second Draft
                       o Bump 1: Opening             Persuasive                Writing
                           Paragraph                 Essay:                    o Complicatin
                       o Bump 2:                     o Bump 1:                     g Fluency:
                           Supportive Details             Opening                  Revisiting
                       o Bump 3:                          Paragraph                Text
                           Counterargument           o Bump 2:                     Strategies
                                                          Supportive           o 6+1 Writing
                                                          Details                  Traits
                                                     o Bump 3:                Revising/Editing
                                                          Counterargumen       -Persuasive
                                                          t                    Essay:
                                                                               o Bump 1:
                                                                                   Opening
                                                                                   Paragraph
                                                                               o Bump 2:
                                                                                   Supportive
                                                                                   Details
                                                                               o Bump 3
                                                                                   Counterargum
                                                                                   ent

ASSESSMENT                       Formative Assessments – Reading and Writing


D3 – Allow the school to be run under a new governance arrangement – Permissible
This is not being pursued at this time.

D4 – Implement a per pupil school based budget formula weighted based on student needs –
Permissible
This is not being pursued at this time.




                                                56
2. Explain how the school will use data to inform instruction.

       We will use MME, ACT, Plan, Explore, Common Assessments, and CLASS A to establish an
        environment of early intervention, remediation, and credit recovery. Evaluation of our AYP data
        indicates a need for student improvement in all core areas. AYP data will be used to identify areas
        of improvement and specific student groups of need.

       During the PLC process, teachers will use the above mentioned data to establish timely
        interventions for those targeted student groups.

       Upon completion of the MME, ACT, Plan, Explore, and Common Assessments data will be
        distributed to Department Chairs/Department members for evaluation and disaggregation. Student
        scores will be distributed to students by the Guidance Center. Parents and community members
        will be invited to informational meetings.

       College and Career Readiness standards and benchmarks will be a focus of instruction along with
        analysis of data. Formative and Common Assessments will be used to determine student progress
        and mastery of learning skill sets. The following assessments will be used at specific grade levels:
        Explore – 9th grade, Plan – 10th grade, MME – 11th grade, Common Assessments – all grades,
        Formative Assessment – all grades. The adjustment of instruction will be the result of the
        evaluation of data and strategic planning during the weekly PLC process.

       We have content specific School Improvement Coordinators who work with staff to develop,
        implement and evaluate our School Improvement Plan which includes our Professional
        Development Plan. During school improvement team meetings, data is reviewed, best practices
        and evidence based strategies are researched and evaluated. Professional Development needs
        are then determined. Currently we use the Michigan School Improvement Framework which is
        based on the NSDC Standards for Staff Development.


3.List the individuals and job titles of the central office and school personnel who
will oversee the school receiving School Improvement Grant – Section 1003(g)
funds. Include the percentage of time dedicated to oversight of the school.

   a. Beth Iverson – Superintendent of Schools

   b. Brian Theil – Deputy Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction

   c. Norm Malinowski – Director of State and Federal Programs/School Improvement

   d. Germaine Jarvis, School Improvement Coordinator – State and Federal/School Improvement Office

   e. Dave Zech – Truman High School Principal

  f. Through this School Improvement Grant, a Grant Facilitator position will be created to oversee the
implementation and management of funds.




                                                    57
4. Explain specific school improvement technical assistance and evaluation
responsibilities needed. Include personnel responsible for coordinating such
services.

       Our school district has a State and Federal Programs/School Improvement Office, which provides
       a wide variety of technical support. (1) Dr. Norman Malinowski, Director of State and Federal
       Programs, assists in all aspects of Title I, including budget and compliance guidelines.

       (2) Germaine Jarvis, School Improvement Coordinator assigned to Truman, who provides
       technical assistance in the following areas: professional development; program development,
       implementation and evaluation; grant writing,; school improvement planning; and curriculum,
       instruction and assessment development, implementation and evaluation. (3) Beatrice Benjamin,
       Assessment Coordinator, who assists in interpreting all data, including the use of the CLASS A
       data system which helps us to identify the further needs of our students.

      Truman High School has chosen two (2) MDE-approved External Providers

       (1) Wayne County RESA will continue to provide principal, assistant principal, mathematics,
       and English Language Arts coaches who work directly in the building with staff and students.
       Strategies used are research and evidence-based. We are also working with Wayne County
       RESA to implement the embedded evaluation process, which is a tool designed to measure the
       impact of professional development and how it carries over into instructional practices.

       (2) The Office of K-12 Outreach Programs, Michigan State University College of
       Education. The Truman High School Principal and the School Improvement Team will provide
       support through The Michigan Principals Fellowship (MFP) The MFP is a research-based
       approach to school improvement that provides principals and their School Improvement Teams
       with essential knowledge, skills, experiences and support that enable them to lead systematic
       instructional improvement and increased student achievement.

ATTACHMENT VI

Policies and Practices Change Analysis to Implement the SIG Final
Requirements

Depending on the intervention model selected by the LEA, some policy and practice
changes may need to be implemented. Please indicate below which are already in
place, which are under consideration, and which are not needed.




                                                 58
Polices/ Practices                In Place         Under           Not
                                                   Consideration   Needed
     Leadership councils         X
      Composition

   Principal
  Authority/responsibility                         X

     Duties – teacher                             X

     Duties – principal                           X

     Tenure                      X

     Flexibility regarding                    X   X
      professional
      development activities

     Flexibility regarding our                    X
      school schedule (day
      and year)

     Waivers from district
      policies to try new                      X   X
      approaches


     Flexibility regarding                        X
      staffing decisions

                                                   X
     Flexibility on school
      funding




Job-Embedded                      NOT NEEDED
Professional Development
Topic requirements (e.g.,
every teacher must have 2
paid days on child
development every 5 years)
Content
• Schedule
• Length
• Financing
• Instructors                            59
• Evaluation
• Mentoring
Budgeting                         NOT NEEDED
*Modified from Making Good Choices – A Guide for Schools and Districts, NCREL, c2002,
1998

                                  Draft Letter of Understanding

                                             Between

                                    The Taylor School District

                                                and

                                  Taylor Federation of Teachers



This letter of understanding is made by and between the Taylor School District and the Taylor
Federation of Teachers for the purpose of establishing a design and implementation process for a
comprehensive teacher development and evaluation system.

The Union and the District agree a Teacher Development and Evaluation System (TDES) is an
essential component of implementing a school “transformation model.”

A district wide evaluation committee will be created consisting of equal representation of
District administrative staff and certified staff mutually agreed to by both the Union President
and the Superintendent. The committee will be charged with the task of designing and
implementing a TDES for the Transformation model of school reform that:

      is based on the common principles of “A Framework for Michigan

Educator Evaluations”

      is aligned to professional growth opportunities
      identifies multiple measures of strengths and weaknesses



For the Taylor Federation of Teachers

_______________________________              ___________________________________

For the Taylor School District

__________________________________             ___________________________________




                                                60
                           School Improvement Grant (SIG) Proposed 3 Year



District Name: Taylor School District

District Code: 82150

Building Name      Building Code                SY 2010/11              SY 2011/12             SY
2012/13             Building Total

Truman High       06428        $ 1,529,472       $1,461,989          $1,461,989             $4,453,450
   School




                                                                          District Total      $4,453,450
                                                                          for all 3 years



                                             Instructions:

Please enter the requested information. Enter dollar amounts that each building is requesting for the
three years of the SIG. Enter the district total for the 3 years. Add more rows as necessary. Schools
may request from $50,000 up to $2,000,000 per building per year. MDE will prioritize funding.


                                                  61

				
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