Almond butter

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					Almond butter
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Almond butter is a food paste made from almonds. Almond butter may be                              Almond butter
crunchy or smooth, and is generally "stir" (susceptible to oil separation) or
"no-stir" (emulsified). Almond butter may be either raw or roasted, describing
the almonds themselves prior to grinding. Recommendations suggest
refrigerating almond butter, once opened, to prevent spoilage and oil
separation. [1]

                  Contents
 1 Nutrition
     1.1 Comparison to peanut butter
     1.2 Raw versus roasted almond butter
 2 References


Nutrition
Almond butter is high in monounsaturated fats,[2] calcium, potassium, iron
and manganese [3] . It’s considered a good source of riboflavin, phosphorus,
and copper, [3] and an excellent source of vitamin E,[4] magnesium, and
fiber.[2] Almond butter also provides dietary protein.                                                     Details

                                                                                    Type                                   Spread
Comparison to peanut butter
                                                                                    Main ingredient(s)                     Almonds
Almond butter is an alternative to peanut butter for those with peanut allergies.
It contains significantly more fiber, calcium, potassium, iron and manganese
                                                                                                 Almond butter, plain,
than peanut butter,[3] and about half the saturated fat, [5] although a slightly                  without salt added
higher total fat content.                                                                     Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
                                                                                       Energy                     2,648 kJ (633 kcal)
Raw versus roasted almond butter
                                                                                       Carbohydrates              21 g
Although the macronutrient profiles of roasted and raw almonds are similar, [6]        - Dietary fiber            3.7 g
many adherents of raw foodism believe the roasting process reduces the
                                                                                       Fat                        59 g
nutritional value of the almonds.[7] They also argue that the beneficial enzymes
                                                                                       - saturated                5.6 g
found in unroasted almonds are destroyed when the almonds are heated above
                                                                                       - monounsaturated          38.3 g
40 °C (104 °F). [8]
                                                                                       - polyunsaturated          12.4 g
                                                                                       Protein                    15 g
References
                                                                                       Zinc                       3 mg (32%)
   1. ^ Smith, S.E.. "What is Almond Butter?"   . Retrieved November 9, 2011.                      Percentages are relative to
                                                                                                 US recommendations for adults.
   2. ^ a b Calories in Almonds                                                                  Source: USDA Nutrient Database
   3. ^ a b c
      http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12354500/Articles/ADA10_SunflowerAlmondButter.pdf   Sunflower Seed Butter and
      Almond Butter as Nutrient-Rich Alternatives to Peanut Butter
   4. ^ Vitamin E and Minerals: Eye Nutrition from Nuts - AllAboutVision.com
   5. ^ http://www.fitsugar.com/Nutritional-Comparison-Peanut-Butter-Almond-Butter-3248632
   6. ^ Composition of Foods: Nut and Seed Products...Raw, Processed, Prepared; - US Department of Agriculture Handbook No. 8-
      12, September 1984:31-36
   7. ^ Graham, Douglas. "The Challenges of Going on a Raw Food Diet" . FoodnSport.com. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
   8. ^ Kane, Emily. "Enzymes: The Difference Between Raw and Cooked Foods" . RawFoods.com. Retrieved 2012-02-06.
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