Docstoc

079_D 3.3-3.5 Life-Cycle Assessment and Environmental Assessment_1_

Document Sample
079_D 3.3-3.5 Life-Cycle Assessment and Environmental Assessment_1_ Powered By Docstoc
					                                         
                                                          
                                               Proposal full title: 
    Algae and aquatic biomass for a sustainable production of 2nd generation biofuels 
      
                                              Proposal acronym: 
                                                AquaFUELs 
                                                          
                                            Type of funding scheme: 
                                                Cooperation  
                                            Theme 5 ­ Energy 
      
                                   Deliverables 3.3 and 3.5 
                    Life­cycle assessment and environmental assessment 

 
Name of the coordinating person: 
Mr. Raffaello Garofalo  
Coordinator email:       ebb@ebb‐eu.org 
Coordinator phone:   +32 2 7632477 
Coordinator fax:         +32 2 7630457 
 
    REV         Date                                    Organisation       Beneficiaries       Dissemination 
                                                                             involved               level 
    Rev 0    29/03/2011    Dongxu Xu, Raphael Slade,         IMPERIAL        BGU, EBB,                PU 
                                Ausilio Bauen                            IMPERIAL, IMIC, NE 
    Rev 1    10/05/2011         F. Gabriel Acien               UAL              UAL                   PU 
    Rev 2    15/05/2011    Dongxu Xu, Raphael Slade,         IMPERIAL        IMPERIAL                 PU 
                                Ausilio Bauen 
    Rev3     10/06/2011       Benoit Queguineur,               ISC              ISC                   PU 
                                Jessica Ratcliff  
    FINAL  15/06/2011      Dongxu Xu, Raphael Slade,         IMPERIAL        IMPERIAL                 PU 
                                Ausilio Bauen 
 
Disclaimer: the views expressed in this document are purely the authors' own and do not reflect the views of 
the European Commission 
                                                       AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                           Coordination Action 
                                                           FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



                                                   Table of contents 
 
1.           Introduction ....................................................................................................... 9 
      1.1      Objective and structure of this Report................................................................... 9 
      1.2      The Aquafuels project .......................................................................................... 10 
 
2.           An introduction to algae cultivation and use .................................................... 11 
      2.1      Algae Strains ......................................................................................................... 12 
         2.1.2         The US Aquatic Species Program (ASP) ....................................................... 14 
      2.2      Micro‐algae Production Systems: Raceway Ponds and Photo‐bioreactors.......... 14 
         2.2.2         Open Pond Systems..................................................................................... 15 
         2.2.3         Closed Systems ............................................................................................ 16 
      2.3      Recovery of Biomass: harvesting.......................................................................... 21 
         2.3.2         Lipid and product extraction ....................................................................... 22 
      2.4      Conversion to Biofuels.......................................................................................... 23 
      2.5      Biomass productivity ............................................................................................ 24 
         2.5.2         Solar Conversion Efficiency.......................................................................... 25 
         2.5.3         Lipid biosynthesis and oil producing algae strain selection ........................ 27 
 
3.           Life Cycle Assessments of algae biomass production ........................................ 28 
      3.1      Introduction to Life Cycle Assessment ................................................................. 28 
      3.2      System Boundaries ............................................................................................... 30 
         3.2.2         LCA boundary selection: EU Guidelines ...................................................... 30 
         3.2.3         LCA boundary selection: RMEE method ..................................................... 30 
         3.2.4         Allocation guidelines ................................................................................... 31 
         3.2.5         Impact Assessment...................................................................................... 31 
 
                                                                                                                                             1
                                                       AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                           Coordination Action 
                                                           FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


4.           Review of micro‐algae LCA ............................................................................... 33 
      4.1     Functional Unit ..................................................................................................... 34 
      4.2     System boundaries ............................................................................................... 35 
      4.3     Allocation strategies ............................................................................................. 35 
      4.4     Sources of data ..................................................................................................... 36 
      4.5     Algae composition and strain assumptions.......................................................... 37 
      4.6     Productivity assumptions ..................................................................................... 38 
      4.7     Global Warming Potential .................................................................................... 39 
      4.8     Other critiques levied at algae LCA....................................................................... 40 
      4.9     Conclusions on the existing LCA studies............................................................... 41 
 
5.           Meta‐analysis of micro‐algae production systems ............................................ 42 
      5.1     Meta‐model approach and assumptions. ............................................................ 42 
         5.1.2        Meta‐model system description and boundaries ....................................... 43 
         5.1.3        Functional Unit and basis for comparison................................................... 45 
      5.2     Results .................................................................................................................. 46 
      5.3     Conclusions........................................................................................................... 54 
 
6.           Environmental impacts of micro‐algae production ............................................56 
      6.1     Water Resources................................................................................................... 56 
      6.2     Land Use ............................................................................................................... 57 
      6.3     Nutrient and Fertilizer Use ................................................................................... 58 
      6.4     Carbon fertilisation............................................................................................... 58 
      6.5     Fossil Fuel Inputs .................................................................................................. 59 
      6.6     Eutrophication ...................................................................................................... 59 
      6.7     Genetic Modified Algae ........................................................................................ 60 
      6.8     Algal toxicity ......................................................................................................... 61 

                                                                                                                                               2
                                                       AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                           Coordination Action 
                                                           FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


      6.9      Conclusions........................................................................................................... 61 
 
7.           Review of macro‐algae LCA ...............................................................................62 
 
8.           Environmental impacts of macro‐algae production .......................................... 66 
      8.1      Land use and near‐shore area use........................................................................ 66 
          8.1.2        Cultivation at sea ......................................................................................... 66 
          8.1.3        Tank based cultivation on land.................................................................... 67 
          8.1.4        On‐shore  facilities  for  sea  and  tank  cultivation,  wild  harvest  and  bloom 
      harvest……….................................................................................................................... 67 
      8.2      Use of Near‐shore/Off‐shore space...................................................................... 67 
      8.3      Freshwater Use..................................................................................................... 68 
      8.4      Fertiliser and nutrients ......................................................................................... 68 
          8.4.2        Cultivation at sea:........................................................................................ 68 
          8.4.3        Land‐based tank cultivation ........................................................................ 70 
      8.5      Macro‐algal Domestication and Genetic Engineering.......................................... 71 
      8.6      Ecosystem Effects ................................................................................................. 72 
          8.6.2        Cultivation at Sea......................................................................................... 72 
          8.6.3        Land‐based Tank Cultivation ....................................................................... 73 
          8.6.4        Wild Harvest................................................................................................ 73 
          8.6.5        Harvest of blooms ....................................................................................... 74 
      8.7      Environmental Contamination ............................................................................. 74 
      8.8      Conclusions........................................................................................................... 75 
 
9.           Conclusions and recommendations .................................................................. 75 
      9.1      Conclusions for micro‐algae LCA, and environmental impacts ............................ 75 
      9.2      Conclusions for macro‐algae LCA and environmental impacts ............................ 77 
 
                                                                                                                                            3
                                                       AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                           Coordination Action 
                                                           FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


10.            References ........................................................................................................78 
 
11.            Annex 1: Heterotrophic Microalgae...................................................................87 
 
12.            Annex 2: Review of existing micro‐algae LCA Studies........................................ 89 
       12.1       Kadam 2001/2 ..................................................................................................... 89 
          12.1.2  Functional Unit and System Boundaries ..................................................... 89 
          12.1.3  Source of Data ............................................................................................. 89 
          12.1.4  Process......................................................................................................... 90 
          12.1.5  Results ......................................................................................................... 91 
          12.1.6  Discussion.................................................................................................... 91 
       12.2       Lardon et al. 2009............................................................................................... 91 
          12.2.2  Functional Unit and System Boundaries ..................................................... 92 
          12.2.3  Source of Data ............................................................................................. 92 
          12.2.4  Process......................................................................................................... 92 
          12.2.5  Results ......................................................................................................... 93 
          12.2.6  Discussion.................................................................................................... 95 
       12.3       Clarens et.al. (2010) ........................................................................................... 95 
          12.3.2  Functional Unit and System Boundaries ..................................................... 95 
          12.3.3  Source of Data ............................................................................................. 96 
          12.3.4  Process......................................................................................................... 96 
          12.3.5  Results ......................................................................................................... 97 
          12.3.6  Discussion.................................................................................................... 98 
       12.4       Jorquera et.al. (2010) ....................................................................................... 100 
          12.4.2  Functional Unit and System Boundaries ................................................... 100 
          12.4.3  Results ....................................................................................................... 101 
          12.4.4  Discussion.................................................................................................. 101 

                                                                                                                                           4
                                                       AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                           Coordination Action 
                                                           FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


        12.5       Sander& Murthy (2010) ................................................................................... 102 
           12.5.2  Functional Unit and System Boundaries ................................................... 102 
           12.5.3  Source of Data ........................................................................................... 102 
           12.5.4  Process....................................................................................................... 103 
           12.5.5  Results ....................................................................................................... 103 
           12.5.6  Discussion.................................................................................................. 106 
        12.6       Stephenson et.al. (2010) .................................................................................. 106 
           12.6.2  Functional Unit and System Boundaries ................................................... 106 
           12.6.3  Source of Data ........................................................................................... 107 
           12.6.4  Process....................................................................................................... 107 
           12.6.5  Results ....................................................................................................... 108 
           12.6.6  Discussion.................................................................................................. 110 
        12.7       Campbell et.al. (2010) ...................................................................................... 110 
           12.7.2  Functional Unit and System Boundaries ................................................... 110 
           12.7.3  Source of Data ........................................................................................... 110 
           12.7.4  Process....................................................................................................... 111 
           12.7.5  Results ....................................................................................................... 111 
           12.7.6  Discussion.................................................................................................. 113 
 
13.             Annex 3: Expert Stakeholders participating in this study .................................114 
 
14.             Annex 4: Questionnaire...................................................................................115 
 
15.             Annex 5: Assumptions of Normalized Modelling .............................................118 
 
16.             Annex 6: Example of data normalization .........................................................119 
     

                                                                                                                                          5
                                                      AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                         Coordination Action 
                                                         FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



    

                                                     List of Figures 

                                                                   
Figure 2.1 : A raceway pond and farm .................................................................................... 16 
Figure 2.2: Tubular photobioreactor system & Flat plate Photobioreactor............................ 19 
Figure 2.3: Algal biomass conversion strategies...................................................................... 23 
Figure 2.4: Yearly sum of global solar irradiance averages over the period of 1981 to 2000. 26 
Figure 2.5: World map of algae biomass productivity ............................................................ 26 
Figure 3.1: The analytical stages in Life Cycle Assessment ..................................................... 29 
Figure 5.1: Algae LCA meta‐modeling approach..................................................................... 43 
Figure 5.2: Description of meta‐model process ...................................................................... 44 
Figure 5.3: Definition of Net Energy Ratio (NER) .................................................................... 45 
Figure 5.4: NER Biomass production: comparison of published values with normalised values 
               for algal biomass production................................................................................ 47 
Figure  5.5:  Net  Energy  Ratio  for  biomass  production  in  raceway  ponds:  comparison  of 
               published values with normalised values............................................................. 49 
Figure 5.6: Net Energy Ratio for biomass production in photobioreactors PBRs: comparison 
               of published values with normalised values for algal biomass production.......... 50 
Figure 5.7: Illustrative estimates for carbon dioxide emissions from algal biomass production 
               in raceway ponds.................................................................................................. 51 
Figure 5.8: Illustrative estimates for carbon dioxide emissions from algal biomass production 
               in photobioreactors PBRs. .................................................................................... 52 
Figure 5.7: Net Energy Ratio for biomass and lipid production in raceway ponds: comparison 
               of normalised values............................................................................................. 53 
Figure  5.8:  Net  Energy  Ratio  for  biomass  and  lipid  production  in  PBRs:  comparison  of 
               normalised values................................................................................................. 54 
Figure 10.1: General system boundaries for the comparison of electricity production via coal 
               firing vs. coal/algae co‐firing in Kadam’s study .................................................... 89 

                                                                                                                                        6
                                                  AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                      Coordination Action 
                                                      FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


Figure 10.2: Simplified flow diagram for microalgae production in Kadam’s study ............... 90 
Figure 10.3: Process chain overview from Lardon’s study ...................................................... 93 
Figure 10.4: Comparison of impacts categories in Lardon et al ’s study................................. 95 
Figure 10.5: Schematic of system considered in Clarens study .............................................. 97 
Figure 10.6: System Process in Jorquera’s study................................................................... 100 
Figure 10.7: Process flow diagram from Sander & Murthy’s study ...................................... 104 
Figure       10.8:       Energy         and        Emissions          associated          with        unit        process                            
              in Sander & Murthy’s study................................................................................ 105 
Figure 10.9: Process chain for production of 1 ton biodiesel in Stephenson et al’s study ... 108 
Figure       10.10:       LCA       results        for      base        case       production          of       biodiesel                            
              from Stephenson et al’s study ............................................................................ 109 
    




                                                                                                                                7
                                                   AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                      Coordination Action 
                                                      FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


 

                                                  List of Tables 

                                                               
Table 2.1 : Overview on commercially produced micro‐algae ................................................ 13 
Table 2.2: Overall Comparison of Open versus Closed Systems.............................................. 18 
Table 2.3: Illustrative energy requirements of a tubular photo‐bioreactor’s design .............. 19 
Table 2.4: Advantages and disadvantages of alternative closed photobioreactor designs..... 20 
Table 4.1: LCA studies on algae derived fuels ......................................................................... 33 
Table 4.2: Function units used in the LCA studies ................................................................... 35 
Table 4.3: Algae composition assumption in LCA studies ....................................................... 38 
Table 4.4: Algae productivity assumptions used in LCA studies.............................................. 38 
Table 4.5: Overview of Global Warming Potential claims in algae biomass LCA..................... 40 
Table  10.1:  Most  important  material  and  energy  flows  generated  by  the  production 
               of 1kg of biodiesel from Lardon et al’s study ....................................................... 94 
Table 10.2: Life cycle burdens of Algae, Corn, Canola, and Switch grass in Virginia............... 98 
Table 10.3: Comparative analysis of three cultivation methods from Jorquera’s study ....... 101 
Table 10.5: GHG emissions (kg CO2 equivalent) for 1 ton km truck use ............................... 111 
 
    Error! No table of contents entries found. 




                                                                                                                              8
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                             Coordination Action 
                                             FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



 

1. Introduction 

1.1 Objective and structure of this Report 

This  report  explores  the  environmental  impacts  of  algae  production  and  the  merits  of  Life 
Cycle  Assessment  (LCA)  as  a  tool  for  examining  the  future  environmental  performance  of 
transport fuels produced from algal biomass. Specifically, this report examines: 
    •   The  current  production  methods  and  future  possibilities  of  using  algae  to  produce 
        biofuels. 
    •   The current status of Life Cycle Assessments of algae derived fuels that are available in 
        the  academic  literature;  the  strengths  and  weakness  of  these  studies  are  assessed  in 
        detail. 
    •   The environmental impacts from micro‐algae and macro‐algae cultivation 
 
The report is structured as follows: 
    •   Chapter  1  describes  the  objectives  and  structure  of  the  report,  and  introduces  the 
        AquaFUELS project of which this research is part.  
    •   Chapter  2  introduces  the  basic  concepts  of  algae  cultivation  and  processing  and 
        reviews the options for cultivation, harvesting and biofuel production. 
    •   Chapter  3  describes  the  principles  of  life  cycle  assessment  and  the  alternative 
        approaches to setting system boundaries, and allocating impacts to products. 
    •   Chapter  4  presents  an  analysis  of  the  micro‐algae  LCA  that  are  available  in  the 
        academic  literature.  Strengths  and  weaknesses  are  identified  and  the  studies  are 
        critiqued. This critique draws on both literature sources and data gathered from expert 
        stakeholders.  
    •   Chapter  5  presents  a  meta‐model  of  the  energetics  of  micro‐algae  production.  The 
        data  presented  in  the  LCA  studies  is  re‐analysed  and  normalised  to  permit  a 
        comparison of the alternative production systems in terms of 1) the energy produced, 
        and 2) the energy required to construct and operate the system. 
    •   Chapter  6  reviews  the  major  environment  impacts  which  could  influence  sitting 
        decisions for micro‐algae cultivation. 
                                                                                                       9
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    •   Chapter 7 reviews LCA for macro‐algae 
    •   Chapter  8  review  the  major  environmental  impacts  associated  with  macro‐algae 
        cultivation. 
    •   Chapter 9 presents overall conclusions and recommendations.  


1.2 The Aquafuels project 

The  work  presented  in  this  report  was  undertaken  within  the  context  of  an  EU  sponsored 
project:  Aquafuels  (AquaFUELs,  2010).  This  project  aims  to  bring  together  and  co‐ordinate 
existing  knowledge,  and  to  establish  the  state  of  the  art  for  research,  technological 
development and demonstration activities regarding the exploitation of algal biomass for 2nd 
generation  biofuels  production.  A  secondary  objective  of  the  project  is  to  put  robust  and 
credible  information  about  algae  into  the  public  domain,  and  thereby  counter  some  of  the 
more extravagant claims that have been expressed in the media.  




                                                                                                    10
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



     

2. An introduction to algae cultivation and use 
Algae  are  a  large  and  diverse  group  of  plant‐like  aquatic  organisms  which  range  from  multi‐
cellular  macroalgae  –  e.g.  seaweeds  such  as  giant  kelp,  which  can  grow  up  to  60m  –  to 
unicellular  microalgae  –  as  small  as  3µm.  Depending  on  the  species,  algae  can  be  farmed 
(algaculture)  in  either  freshwater  or  saline  conditions  (Carlsson,  et  al.,  2007,  Schenk,  et  al., 
2008). Most algae are photoautotrophic, converting solar energy into chemical forms through 
photosynthesis  and  a  variety  of  biochemical  pathways.  However  many  species  display  some 
degree  of  heterotrophism,  utilizing  organic  carbon  as  their  primary  source  of  carbon  and 
energy  (Barsani  and  Gualtieri,  2006).  Heterotrophic  algae  are  reviewed  in  Annex  1.  The 
mechanisms  of  algal  photosynthesis  are  very  similar  to  photosynthesis  in  higher  plants  and 
their  products  are  molecularly  equivalent  to  conventional  agricultural  crops  (Graham  and 
Wilcox, 2000). Although both micro and macro‐algae are of interest within the context of the 
Aquafuels  project,  there  is  an  emphasis  within  this  report  upon  micro‐algae.  The  reason  for 
this is that despite macro‐algae having being cultivated on a larger scale globally than micro‐
algae, there are few assessments of the impacts in the scientific literature.  
 
Microalgae  are  a  broad  group  of  unicellular  and  simple  multi‐cellular  photosynthetic 
microorganisms that lack complex cell structure and organization. As a source of biomass for 
biofuels, potential advantages of algae include:  
        •   high photosynthetic yields (up to a maximum of 5‐6% conversion of light c.f. 1‐2% for 
            the majority of terrestrial plants);  
        •   the ability to grow in fresh, salt and waste water; 
        •   high overall oil content (dependent on species and growth conditions); 
        •   ability to produce non‐toxic and biodegradable biofuels as well as high concentrations 
            of  commercially  valuable  compounds  such  as  proteins,  carbohydrates,  lipids  and 
            pigments; 
        •   the ability to be used in conjunction with wastewater treatment; 
        •   possibility  of  cultivation  on  unproductive  desert  land,  thereby  reducing  competition 
            for agricultural land.  
    Regarding biofuel production, microalgae can provide different types of biofuels, including: 
methane (produced by anaerobic digestion of algal biomass); biodiesel (from algal fatty acids); 
                                                                                                           11
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


ethanol  (produced  by  fermentation  of  starch);  and  hydrogen  (produced  biologically)  (Chisti, 
2007, Wang, et al., 2008).  


2.1 Algae Strains 

The final products from algae aquaculture are determined by the species, strain, and growth 
conditions.  The  US  Aquatic  Species  Program  (ASP)  looked  at  over  3000  species;  including 
strains  that  can  exist  in  myriad  of  different  environments.  One  point  they  focused  on  was 
getting, and then growing, a strain in its native environment, as this was considered to have a 
greater  chance  of  success  (Sheehan,  1998b).  The  factors  which  make  an  algal  strain  more 
suitable for biofuel production include the following properties: 
       •   a high lipid productivity; 
       •   a high photosynthetic efficiency; 
       •   robustness  to  growth  environment  (and  in  particular  the  ability  to  survive  the  shear 
           stress from mixing); 
       •   be able to withstand or dominate wild strains in the event of contamination; 
       •   have a high CO2 sinking capacity; 
       •   able to grow in a variety of temperatures and seasons; 
       •   be able to provide (valuable) co‐products; 
       •   be  able  to  self  flocculate,  or  display  some  of  those  characteristics  (Brennan  and 
           Owende, 2010). 
    
   There  are  currently  no  algal  strains  that  meet  all  these  criteria.  There  may  also  be 
additional requirements depending on the location. 
   The  dominant  species  currently  in  commercial  production  are  Isochrysis,  Chaetoceros, 
Chlorella,  Arthrospira  (Spirulina)  and  Dunaliella  (Carlsson,  et  al.,  2007).  An  overview  of 
commercially grown algae is shown in Table 2.1. 




                                                                                                         12
                                     AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                        Coordination Action 
                                        FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                 Table 2.1  Overview on commercially produced micro‐algae 




                                                                              
Source: (Pulz and Gross, 2004) 

                                                                                 13
                                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                              Coordination Action 
                                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


2.1.2        The US Aquatic Species Program (ASP)  

    The  United  States  National  Renewable  Energy  Lab  (NREL)  initiated  its  Aquatic  Species 
Program (ASP) in 1978. This programme undertook comprehensive research on algae derived 
fuels. After 20 years of research, and 3000 algae strains screened, the project terminated at 
1996 due to low oil prices in that decade (Sheehan, 1998b). The overall conclusion for the ASP 
project was that low cost production of biofuels from algae was not likely to be feasible within 
short or medium term. Although the final report from NREL indicated that the biodiesel from 
algae  would  only  become  cost  effective  if  conventional  diesel  prices  rose  to  twice  the  1998 
levels which was 27 U.S. dollar per barrel.  
    Factors that have contributed to the renaissance of interest in algae derived fuels, include 
policies  at  regional  and  national  levels,  concerns  about  the  security  of  supply  of  fossil  fuels, 
and sustained high oil prices.  


2.2 Micro‐algae Production Systems: Raceway Ponds and Photo‐bioreactors  

    Algal  production  systems  may  be  classified  as  either  photoautotrophic  or  heterotrophic. 
Photoautotrophic systems use light as the energy source 1, while heterotrophic production use 
organic  substances  (such  as  glucose)  to  provide  the  energy  the  algae  require.  Some  algae 
strains  can  combine  these  in  a  mixotrophic  process.  Currently,  the  dominant  method  is 
photoautotrophic  production  of  algae  as  it  is  the  most  economically  and  technically  viable, 
and shall be the only method discussed here (Brennan and Owende, 2010). 
    There  are  two  alternative  methods  for  growing  photoautotrophic  algae:  Open  Systems 
(Raceway  Pond  System)  and  Closed  Systems  (Photo‐bioreactors  (PBRs).  These  systems,  and 
their variations, are discussed below. An overall comparison is presented in Table 2.4. 




    1
       The reaction in photosynthesis can be summarized as 6CO2 + 12H2O + photons                    C6H12O6 + 6O2 + 6H2O. Eight photons 

must be absorbed to fix one CO2 and two H2O molecules, yielding one base carbohydrate (CH2O) molecule. As the average 

energy  of  “photosynthetically  available  radiation  (PAR)  photons  is  around  217  kJ  (accounting  for  about  43%  of  incident 

sunlight on the Earth’s surface), while the energy content of a single carbohydrate (CH2O) is about 467 kJ/mol, it follows that 

the maximum efficiency is roughly 11.6%. In actuality, most plants only have 0.5‐2% efficiency, due to other limitations such 

water  and  nutrient  availability,  as  well  as  an  excess  or  lack  of  sunlight,  while  algae  can  have  as  much  as  3‐8%  efficiency 

(Lardon et al., 2009; Vasudevan & Briggs, 2008). 
                                                                                                                                            14
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


2.2.2     Open Pond Systems 

   Currently,  the  majority  of  commercially  grown  algae  are  produced  using  open  pond 
systems. These can include natural water bodies such as lakes, lagoons, and ponds, or artificial 
systems such as raceway ponds. The latter is the most common, and has been used since the 
1950’s. In a typical raceway pond the area is divided into a rectangular grid containing a closed 
loop oval shaped channel ~0.2m deep (shallower systems are not commercial, but have been 
reported for research purposes. Ponds have to be kept shallow in order to allow the sunlight 
to penetrate the water. In most designs some form of mixing and circulation equipment is also 
required to stabilize algae growth and prevent sedimentation. Examples of a typical Raceway 
pond  and  an  Open  Pond  farm  are shown  in  Figure  2.1.  One  of  the  largest  of  these  types  of 
systems is the Werribee wastewater treatment plant in Melbourne, Australia, which is 11,000 
ha and relies on gravitational flow (Brennan and Owende, 2010, Schenk, et al., 2008). 
   Raceway ponds that need extra infrastructure (e.g. a paddle wheel) for mixing and tend to 
be more expensive to construct than a simple gravity led ponds, as the construction material 
(i.e. concrete or compacted earth) has to be able to withstand the shear stress from mixing. 
For  an  Open  Pond  Raceway,  a  typical  harvest‐growth‐harvest  cycle  is around  4  days  (Sander 
and Murthy, 2010). 
   A  comprehensive  study  undertaken  by  the  US  Department  of  Energy  with  a  variety  of 
different  strains  showed  that  algae  selected  on  the  basis  of  laboratory  results  would  not 
compete  as  well  as  those  that  spontaneously  colonized  and  subsequently  dominated  the 
pond,  although  these  adventitious  species  may  not  have  all  the  desirable  biofuel  properties 
(Sheehan,  1998b).  One  method  to  overcome  this  is  to  carefully  cultivate  and  select  species 
that  can  dominate  the  system,  such  as  using  the  local  species,  or  extremophiles  that  can 
survive well in very particular environments (e.g. extreme temperatures, pH, or salinity). For 
example,  Spirulina  thrives  at  high  pH  levels  (9  –  11.5),  while  Dunaliella  salina  grows  well  in 
saline  water  (Schenk,  et  al.,  2008).  Another  option  is  to  cultivate  the  algae  in  greenhouse 
conditions  to  control  the  temperatures  and  limit  contact  with  contaminating  species  (Hase, 
2000). 
   Their main advantages of raceway pond systems are that they are relatively easy to operate 
and maintain, chiefly due to the simplicity of the design, and have a low energy requirement. 
The  main  is  disadvantage  is  that  since  they  are  open  to  the  air,  there  is  higher  evaporative 
losses and lower utilization of the available CO2 due to diffusion to the atmosphere, which can 
lead to changes in the composition of the growth medium harmful for the algae. A comparison 


                                                                                                           15
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


of  open  versus  closed  systems  is  provided  in  Table  2.2  (Schenk,  et  al.,  2008,  Brennan  and 
Owende, 2010, Chisti, 2007, Oilgae, 2010).  

                                     Figure 2.1 A raceway pond and farm 




                                                                                                        

   Source: (Sheehan, 1998b)   


2.2.3    Closed Systems  

   The other option for cultivating algae is using a closed system, or photo‐bioreactor (PBR). 
These  systems  have  gained  in  popularity  as  more  high‐value  products  have  been  produced 
from  algae.  PBRs  tend  to  be  more  complex  and  expensive  than  open  systems,  but  allow  for 
better control of the algae culture environment: they can prevent contamination and can be 
successfully  used  to  cultivate  single  species;  operate  at  high  biomass  concentration;  can  be 
erected over any open space; offering better control of the temperature; and reduce water or 
CO2 loss (Amin, 2009, Chisti, 2007, Pulz, 2001a). 
   Tubular photobioreactor consists of an array of transparent tubes (either plastic or glass) of 
0.1m or less in diameter (to allow the sunlight to penetrate the dense medium and allow for 
high  biomass  productivity).  In  a  typical  system  the  micro‐algal  broth  is  circulated  round  the 
system  from  a  central  reservoir,  which  also  serves  to  degas  the  medium  (preventing  oxygen 
accumulation),  harvest  the  broth,  and  introduce  new  broth.  Sedimentation  is  prevented  by 
either  mechanical  or  airlift  pumps.  The  latter  is  more  inflexible,  but  does  allow  CO2  and 
oxygen to be exchanged between the medium and the gas. The system is continuously mixed 
to  prevent  sedimentation,  even  at  night  when  no  growth  occurs  (Amin,  2009,  Brennan  and 
Owende, 2010, Chisti, 2007).  



                                                                                                           16
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


   In order to maximize production, incident light needs to be diluted over the surface of the 
reactors. This prevents a small area of algae from being oversaturated with light. One of the 
simplest  approaches  to  sunlight  dilution  is  to  orient  photo‐bioreactors  vertically,  instead  of 
horizontally,  to  catch  the  sunlight  over  a  large  surface  area  (Benemann,  2010a).  More 
generally,  the  tubes  can  be  laid  out  horizontally,  vertically  (as  shown  in  Figure  2.2),  laid  out 
north to south to maximize solar collection, or coiled around a central support structure. The 
ground may also be covered by white plastic to increase the reflectance. 
   Minimizing  the  auxiliary  energy  demand  is  also  an  important  design  parameter.  In  most 
PBR designs energy is required for pumping and mixing to ensure good mass transfer of CO2 
andO2. Mixing also helps to prevent the cells from staying too long in dark or bright zones of 
the reactor, something that can reduce productivity. Energy may also be needed to cool the 
reactors.  Pumping  energy  requirements  can  be  reduced  by  minimizing  the  hydrodynamic 
pressure  of  the  system.  This  can  be  achieved  by  increasing  the  diameter  of  the  tubes 
(something that may also reduce the overall cost), but the diameter cannot be increased too 
far;  otherwise  light  may  not  be  able  to  penetrate  the  core  of  the  tube.  From  a  design 
perspective there is also a limit on the length of a continuous tube, as the pH may vary within 
the  system,  CO2  may  be  depleted,  and  most  importantly,  photosynthesis  produces  oxygen 
which can inhibit algal growth (Brennan and Owende, 2010, Chisti, 2007, Patil, et al., 2008). 
   Tubular  systems  require  periodic  cleaning,  and  this  increases  the  operational  cost  and 
water  demand.  They  are  also  more  expensive  than  raceway  ponds  due  to  the  higher 
infrastructure costs. Illustrative energy requirements of a tubular PBR are shown in Table 2.3. 
The comparative advantages and disadvantages of alternative closed photobioreactor designs 
are outlined in Table 2.4. 




                                                                                                             17
                                    AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                       Coordination Action 
                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


               Table 2.2: Overall Comparison of Open versus Closed Systems 




                                                                               
 
Source: (Pulz, 2001b) 

 


                                                                                  18
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                             Coordination Action 
                                             FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


       Table 2.3: Illustrative energy requirements of a tubular photo‐bioreactor’s design 

    Total incident solar energy                     I=150w/m2 
    Photo conversion efficiency (PCE)               PCE=5% 
    Auxiliary energy demand                         50W/m3 
    Areal water coverage                            50L/m2 
    Areal auxiliary energy demand                   2.5W/m2 
 
Source: (Lehr,2009) 


                  Figure 2.2: Tubular photobioreactor system & Flat plate Photobioreactor  




                                                                                                       

    Source: (Chisti, 2008a) 


    There are many alternative Tubular Photo‐bioreactor designs, including flat plate, annular 
or column PBRs. Flat  plate PBRs increase the surface area of illumination and allow for high 
density of cells over a thin layer. Column Photobioreactors offer better control and volumetric 
mass transfer rates, and are aerated from the bottom. Their performance is equal to or better 
than  tubular  Photobioreactors.  Flat  plate  systems  were  researched  a  lot  in  the  early  days, 
while column reactors are receiving a lot of attention now, although both systems are still in 
pilot scale(Brennan and Owende, 2010).  




                                                                                                     19
                                              AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                 Coordination Action 
                                                 FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    Table 2.4: Advantages and disadvantages of alternative closed photobioreactor designs 
                                               
PBR  
                                Advantages                               Disadvantages 
System 


                                                                    • Higher energy requirements 
                           • Large illumination surface area        • Some degree of wall growth 
                           • Suitable for outdoor cultures          • Fouling 
                           • Relatively cheap                       • Requires large land space 
Tubular                    • Good biomass productivities            • Gradients of pH, dissolved 
photobioreactor            • Allows culture of single species           oxygen and CO2 along the 
                           • More control and accurate                  tubes 
                               addition of nutrients and            • Demonstrated at pilot scale 
                               water                                    but not scaled up, not 
                                                                        commercial 


                           • High biomass productivities 
                                                                    • Difficult to scale‐up 
                           • Easy to sterilize 
                                                                    • Difficult temperature control 
                           • Low oxygen build‐up 
Flat plate                                                          • Small degree of hydrodynamic 
photobioreactor 
                           • Readily tempered 
                                                                         stress 
                           • Good light path 
                                                                    • Some degree of wall growth 
                           • Large illumination surface area
                                                                    • Only at pilot scale 
                           • Suitable for outdoor cultures 
                           • Compact 
                           • High mass transfer                     • Small illumination area 
                           • Low energy consumption                 • Expensive compared to open 
Column                     • Good mixing with low shear                 ponds 
photobioreactor                 stress                              • Shear stress 
                           • Easy to sterilize                      • Sophisticated construction 
                           • Reduced photo‐inhibition and           • Only at pilot scale 
                                photo‐oxidation 
     
    Source: (Schenk, et al., 2008, Brennan and Owende, 2010, Chisti, 2007, Oilgae, 2010) 
 




                                                                                                       20
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


2.3 Recovery of Biomass: harvesting 

The choice of harvesting method will depend on the type of species involved (i.e. size, density, 
etc.), the quantity that needs to be processed and the desired final product. Generally, there 
are two main steps: 
   • Bulk harvesting – separate the biomass from the broth to achieve a slurry with 2‐7% solid 
       content  (involving  a  concentration  factor  of  100‐800)  (e.g.  flocculation,  gravity 
       sedimentation). 
   • Thickening – concentrate the slurry (i.e. centrifugation, filtration, ultrasonic aggregation). 
       This  is  generally  the  more  energy  intensive  step  (Brennan  and  Owende,  2010,  Molina 
       Grima, et al., 2003). 
    
   The  harvesting  process  can  be  highly  energy  intensive  and  be  quite  complex  due  to  the 
relatively small size of some microalgal cells (3‐30µm diameter), as well as the relatively dilute 
nature of the algal broth (it can be less than 0.5 kg / m3). Some species are easier to harvest 
than others, for example, Spirulina (which is 20‐100µm long) can be harvested relatively easily. 
Overall, harvesting can contribute as much as 20‐30% to the final cost of production. Notably, 
the cost of  recovery from photobioreactors may be significantly smaller than from raceways 
because  the  biomass  concentration  is  greater  (Brennan  and  Owende,  2010,  Chisti,  2007, 
Molina Grima, et al., 2003).  
   Flocculation  is  an  effective  method  to  aggregate  the  cells  and  increase  the  effective 
‘particle’  size,  which  facilitates  the  downstream  processing.  It  is  important  to  choose 
flocculants  that  are  non‐toxic,  effective  in  low  concentrations  and  will  not  increase  the 
amount  of  downstream  processing.  Micro‐algal  cells  generally  have  a  negative  charge  so 
multivalent metal  salts  are  often  effective  coagulants  (i.e.  Ferric  Chloride  (FeCl3),  Aluminium 
Sulphate  (Al2(SO4)3,  alum)  and  Ferric  Sulphate  (Fe2(SO4)3)).  Alum  is  already  widely  used  in 
wastewater treatment. Other options include Polyferric Sulphate (PES), pre‐polymerized metal 
salts, or cationic polymers (polyelectrolyte’s) (Molina Grima, et al., 2003) 
   Filtration is a relatively slow process, but may be a feasible option for low value products 
where a higher level of moisture is acceptable. Conventional filtration can be used for larger 
algal species, while membrane or ultra‐filtration may be necessary for smaller species. For low 
volumes of broth, filtration may be the more economically sound option. 
   Gravity  sedimentation  can  be  used  for  larger  species,  but  centrifugation  is  usually  the 
preferred method of recovery. It is a more energy intensive method, but is also faster and can 

                                                                                                       21
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


handle  larger  volumes.  It  also  requires  more  maintenance  and  has  higher  costs,  but  can 
increase the slurry concentration by up to 150 times and be up to 95% efficient (Brennan and 
Owende, 2010, Molina Grima, et al., 2003, Oilgae, 2010). 


2.3.2     Lipid and product extraction 

   Once harvested, the biomass has to be processed rapidly as it is easily perishable. At this 
stage it is typically 5‐15% solid content, but can perish in only a few hours. Algal biomass tends 
to have a water content of 80‐90% and low energy density, which, along with the inferior heat 
content, makes the biomass harder to use for heat and power generation, necessitating pre‐
treatment (Patil, et al., 2008).  This  can be achieved by dehydration or drying, which are the 
most  common  methods  to  treat  the  slurry,  although  more  expensive  than  just  mechanical 
dewatering. Drying methods include: spray drying, drum drying, freeze‐drying, or solar drying. 
The  choice  depends  on  the  desired  product.  Solar  drying  for  example  is  the  cheapest  and 
simplest option, but also takes the longest, while freeze and spray drying are expensive and 
can  cause  damage  to  the  cells  (although  freeze‐drying  may  help  extraction  of  oils).  It  is 
important to establish a balance between the drying efficiency and cost effectiveness, as well 
as the impact on the final product. Temperatures greater than 60°C, for example, can decrease 
the  lipid  yield  or  denature  other  components  in  the  biomass  (Brennan  and  Owende,  2010, 
Molina Grima, et al., 2003). 
   To  extract  the  contents  of  the  cells,  cell  disruption  is  often  necessary.  This  can  be  done 
mechanically  or  chemically.  Mechanical  methods  can  include  using  high  pressure 
homogenisers, bead mills (agitation with glass or ceramic beads), or ultra‐sonication (for small 
scale  only).  Chemical  methods  include  using  organic  solvents  (e.g.  hexane),  or  supercritical 
fluid  extraction,  and  may  prevent  the  necessity  of  drying  the  cells  first  (saving  a  lot  of  the 
energy  and  costs),  but  may  present  health  and  safety  issues  (Molina  Grima,  et  al.,  2003, 
Oilgae,  2010).  It  is  currently  commonly  done  using  the  same  approximate  method  as  for 
soybean extraction (hexane solvents), so the algal biomass should have approximately 9 – 11% 
moisture content, but this is still the subject of much discussion (Sheehan, et al., 1998a). The 
choice of extraction method depends on the final product. 
    




                                                                                                            22
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                             Coordination Action 
                                             FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


2.4 Conversion to Biofuels 

There  are  multiple  strategies  to  convert  algae  to  energy,  depending  on  the  choice  of  final 
product  (i.e.  electricity,  biofuel,  etc.)  Some  of  the  strategies  that  can  be  employed  are 
illustrated in 2.3.  

                              Figure 2.3: Algal biomass conversion strategies 




                                                                                                        

   Source: (Brennan and Owende, 2010)  


   Many  of  the  methods  of  processing  the  algal  oil/biomass  are  developed  from  those 
conventionally  used  for  other  systems  (i.e.  the  conversion  of  vegetable  oil  to  biodiesel  or 
soybean conversion). Most of these techniques are well established and researched, such as 
transesterification – a chemical reaction between triglycerides and alcohol (such as methanol 
or ethanol) in the presence of a catalyst (such as sodium hydroxide) to produce biodiesel and 
the  by‐product  glycerol.  Glycerol  also  has  commercial  value.  The  final  output  is  similar  to 
diesel, and the process is relatively simple, so this has been a favoured method for conversion 
of vegetable oils (Demirbas, 2009). 
                                                                                                      23
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


   Some methods do not require the oil to be extracted, and can convert the whole biomass 
into fuels (such as pyrolysis, gasification, and anaerobic digestion). Other methods, such as the 
Fischer‐Tropsch  method  for  biomass  gasification  could  also  provide  the  heat  needed  for  the 
drying phase (since it is an exothermic reaction). Newer and lower cost methods are emerging 
as well, such as the extraction and simultaneous transesterification of oils using supercritical 
ethanol  or  methanol.  Some  work  at  high  temperatures  (such  as  pyrolysis  or  direct 
combustion),  while  others  (such  as  anaerobic  digestion)  work  at  room  temperature.  Many 
have potential for large scale systems. However, due to the abundance of methods, and the 
relative  uncertainty  of  which  will  be  the  preferred  conversion  method,  they  shall  not  be 
discussed further (Brennan and Owende, 2010, IEA, 2010). 


2.5 Biomass productivity  

There  are  several  factors  to  be  considered  for  optimal  algae  growth.  Mostly,  they  should 
recreate as best as possible the natural process of algal growth, which includes:  
   • Sunlight  –  this  can  be  the  limiting  factor  as  it  means  no  algae  is  produced  at  night  and 
       commercial production is limited to areas with a high incidence of solar radiation. This 
       can be complemented with artificial lighting, but this adds to the energy consumption 
       of the system, so is used almost exclusively at pilot scale production.  
   • Nutrients  –  these  include  Nitrogen  (N),  Phosphorus  (P),  Iron  (Fe)  and  Silicon  (Si).  Most 
       algae  require  N  to  be  in  soluble  form  (such  as  nitrate,  ammonium  or  urea),  although 
       some can fix atmospheric nitrogen directly. Phosphorus is required in lesser amounts, 
       but is less readily bioavailable, so must be supplied in excess of the required amounts, 
       while Silicon is only important to certain species of algae (such as diatoms). 
   • CO2  –  microalgae  can  fix  this  from  three  sources,  namely:  the  atmosphere;  discharge 
       gases  from  heavy  industries  (such  as  power  plants);  or  soluble  carbonates.  Most 
       microalgae  can  utilize  considerably  higher  amounts  of  CO2  than  under  normal 
       conditions (up to 150,000 ppm), so excess carbon can be fed to the system. Typically, 
       microalgal  biomass  contains  50%  carbon  by  dry  weight,  so  producing  100  tonnes  of 
       algal biomass fixes 183 tonnes of carbon dioxide. 
   • Temperature – although there are strains of algae that can survive extreme temperatures, 
       generally,  the  optimal  temperature  is  around  20°‐30°C  (Brennan  and  Owende,  2010, 
       Chisti, 2007, Kadam, 2001). 
    

                                                                                                            24
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


2.5.2     Solar Conversion Efficiency 

   Photosynthetic Efficiency (PE) is one of the major factors used to evaluate the growth rate 
of  terrestrial  plants,  and  is  defined  as  the  fraction  of  light  energy  which  is  fixed  as  chemical 
energy  during  photo‐autotrophic  growth.  In  common  with  terrestrial  plants,  there  are  two 
metabolic  pathways  by  which  algae  fix  CO2,  known  as  the  C3  (Calvin  cycle)  or  C4  pathways. 
Most algae use the C3 pathway which has a maximum theoretical efficiency of ~12% (Tredici, 
2010).  The  maximum  that  can  be  practically  achieved,  however,  is  ~5%.  This  is  roughly 
equivalent to the photosynthetic efficiency of a leaf. The C4 pathway is more efficient (up to 
twice the photosynthetic efficiency of C3 plants. (Lundquist, et al., 2010)) and can be found in 
diatoms and sugar cane. Many algae strains, however, have evolved to tolerate low light level 
and are not only unable to use large amounts of energy at peak light intensities but actually 
performed  worse  under  conditions  of  high  exposure  to  light.  This  is  the  principle  of  light 
dilution in photobioreactor design. 
   Solar radiation is, nevertheless, one of the most important factors influencing algal growth, 
and in areas of high insolation (>6 kWh/m2/day), the theoretical maximum production rate for 
algae  is  approximately  100  g/m2/day  (Darzins,  et  al.,  2010).  The  minimum  level  considered 
adequate for algal growth is ~1.5 kWh/m2/day.  
   The  yearly  average  solar  irradiance  in  different  parts  of  the  globe  is  shown  in  Figure  2.4. 
And, using the 1.5 kWh/m2/day criteria it appears that the majority of the earth‘s land surface 
is  to  be  suitable  for  algae  production.  To  achieve  high  levels  of  production  throughout  the 
year, however, it is desirable that there is little seasonal variation. For practical purposes the 
suitable locations are those areas where insolation is not less than 3000 hours/yr (average of 
250  hours  /month)  (Necton,  1990,  AquaFUELs,  2011b).  Most  commercial  microalgae 
production to‐date has occurred in low‐latitude regions. Israel, Hawaii and southern California 
are  home  to  several  commercial  microalgae  farms.  Figure  2.5  shows  the  potential  yield  of 
algae biomass at 5% photosynthetic efficiency (Tredici, 2010). Productivity is highest in warm 
countries  close  to  the  equator  where  there  is  little  seasonal  variation  in  sunlight  levels  and 
temperatures. (AquaFUELs, 2011b). 
    




                                                                                                              25
                                                  AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                      Coordination Action 
                                                      FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


           Figure 2.4: Yearly sum of global solar irradiance averages over the period of 1981 to 
                                                                2000. 




                                                                                                                            
                        Source: (Meteotest); database Meteonorm (www.meteonorm.com) 


                                Figure 2.5: World map of algae biomass productivity  

    




                                                                                                                        

   Source: (Tredici, 2010);   (tonnes ha‐1 year‐1) at 5% photosynthetic efficiency considering an energy content of 20 MJ           
kg‐1 dry biomass. 




                                                                                                                               26
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


2.5.3    Lipid biosynthesis and oil producing algae strain selection 

   The  most  common  lipids  in  algal  cells  are  Triacylglycerides  (TAG),  which  are  formed  from 
fatty  acids  and  glycerol.  The  lipid  content  in  algae  can  range  from  1%  to  50%  and  can  vary 
greatly with the growth conditions. TAG storage is an important adaptation for photosynthetic 
organisms  that  feast  and  famine  with  the  diurnal  cycle  as  TAG  produced  during  the  day 
provides a carbon and energy source for the night.  
   In  eukaryotic  algae,  lipid  content  is  normally  inversely  proportional  to  growth  rate;  with 
lipid  is  increasing  when  growth  is  inhibited  by  lack  of  nutrients,  such  as  nitrogen  or  silicon 
(Lundquist,  et  al.,  2010).  The  fatty  acid  composition  of  membrane  fluidity  and  triglyceride 
carbon  chains  can  vary  in  length  depending  upon  the  algae  species,  and  environmental 
conditions  during  growth.  The  growth  limitation  is  not  thought  to  be  due  to  reduced 
biosynthetic  rates  but  rather  to  reduction  in  other  cellular  components,  leaving  a  higher 
proportion of lipid overall (Lundquist, et al., 2010). 




                                                                                                           27
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



     

3. Life Cycle Assessments of algae biomass production 
This  chapter  introduces  basic  concept  of  Life  Cycle  Assessment  and  describes  the  current 
methodologies for conducting Life Cycle Assessment studies. 


3.1 Introduction to Life Cycle Assessment  

Life‐Cycle  Assessment  (LCA)  is  a  process  formalised  by  the  International  Standards 
Organisation(ISO,  1997)  to  evaluate  the  environmental  burdens  associated  with  a  products 
and processes. LCA seeks to identify and quantify energy and materials consumed and waste 
released  to  the  environment,  thereby  enabling  the  evaluation  and  comparison  of 
environmental  improvement  options.  The  assessment  includes  the  entire  life  cycle  of  the 
product,  process,  or  activity,  encompassing  extracting  and  processing  raw  materials; 
manufacturing, transportation and distribution; use, re‐use, maintenance; recycling, and final 
disposal” (SETAC, 1993).   
    In contrast to other environmental management tools, which tend to focus on specific life 
stages  of  a  product  or  process,  LCA  analyses  the  entire  life  cycle,  looking  up  and  down  the 
supply‐chain,  from  raw  material  extraction  to  final  disposal.  LCA  is  not  site  specific  and 
includes burdens and impacts outside the immediate factory gates. The argument in favour of 
the LCA approach is that, whilst traditional environmental assessment tools may overlook the 
problem  of  burden  shifting  or  displacement,  LCA  ensures  that  environmental  impacts  which 
have  been  identified  and  reduced  at  one  stage  of  the  life  cycle  are  not  replaced  by  other, 
possibly greater, environmental impacts elsewhere.  
    The  application  of  LCA  methodology  encompasses  four  phases,  Illustrated  in  Figure  3.1, 
below.  
•       Goal and scope definition: sets the boundaries for the analysis, defines the level of detail 
        and the functional basis for comparison. 
•       Inventory  Analysis:  quantifies  emissions,  energy  and  raw  materials  for  each  process  and 
        presents these in a process flow chart. 
•       Impact Assessment: quantifies and groups effects of the resource use and emissions into a 
        number of environmental impact categories which may be weighted for importance 
•       Interpretation:  reports  the  results  and  evaluates  the  opportunities  to  reduce  the 
        environmental impact of the product or service. 
                                                                                                         28
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                           Figure 3.1: The analytical stages in Life Cycle Assessment 




                                                                                         

                                          Source: (De Smet, et al., 1996) 


   Although LCA is a popular tool it has a number of widely recognised limitations: 
       •   The  quality  of  an  LCA  depends  on  the  quality  and  availability  of  accurate  data.  For 
           many  processes  and  materials  such  data  does  not  (yet)  exist  or  is  not  readily 
           accessible. 
       •   LCA  methods  are  inherently  subjective.  Numerous  assumptions  must  be  made  in 
           particular relating to the definition of boundaries, the choice of data sources and the 
           weighting and allocation of impacts 
       •   LCA is a bottom‐up analysis tool which is best used to compare alternative products or 
           services 
       •   LCA do not take account of rebound effects where environmental and cost efficiency 
           improvements are cancelled out by greater consumption. 
    
   System boundaries, allocation strategies and impact assessment, in particular, merit further 
discussion. 

                                                                                                          29
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


3.2 System Boundaries 

   The  system  boundaries  selected  determine  what  processes  and  activities  are  included  in 
the overall LCA. Many sub‐processes, such as the manufacture of equipment, could potentially 
be  included  and  their  inclusion/exclusion  can  strongly  influence  the  outcome  of  the  study. 
Various  approaches  to  setting  boundaries  have  been  proposed  and  are  described  in  more 
detail below. 


3.2.2     LCA boundary selection: EU Guidelines  

   The EC has published a guide for good LCA practice, and recommends that all the important 
processes  and  activities  are  included,  with  only  processes  of  minor  importance  excluded.  It 
warns  against  misleading  results  due  to  cut‐off  criteria  are  that  are  weak,  irrelevant,  not  in 
accordance  with  the  intended  application,  or  when  they  focus  on  a  single  flow  without  due 
consideration of all their individual environmental impacts. Another potential problem area is 
if there is a lack of proper screening and iteration in the LCA methodology, which may lead to 
the  exclusion  of  activities  without  justifying  whether  they  are  significant  or  not,  leading  to 
misleading conclusions (EC, 2010). 
   Article 17 in the 2009 Renewable Energy Directive deals with the sustainability criteria for 
biofuels, and states that raw materials for biofuels should not come from protected land (e.g. 
land  with  high  biodiversity).  This  implies  the  system  boundaries  should,  where  possible,  be 
drawn back to include extraction of raw materials from the earth (EC, 2009). 


3.2.3     LCA boundary selection: RMEE method 

   One proposed method to systematically and quantitatively set the system boundaries is the 
Relative Mass, Energy, and Economic value (RMEE) protocol. In this protocol, the relevant data 
about individual processes is gathered before the system boundary is drawn. A predefined cut‐
off  ratio  is  then  applied  to  the  functional  unit  on  the  basis  of  mass,  energy  and  economic 
value.  Starting  with  the  process  units  closest  to  the  functional  unit,  the  RMEE  ratios  are 
calculated  for  each  input,  and  if  larger  than  the  cut  off  ratio,  it  is  included  in  the  system 
boundary. This is repeated until all upstream processes are below the cut off threshold. This 
helps  reduce  the  subjectivity  inherent  in  LCAs  (Sander  and  Murthy,  2010,  Raynolds,  et  al., 
2000a, Raynolds, et al., 2000b).  




                                                                                                            30
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


3.2.4    Allocation guidelines 

   Allocation of the various input and output streams credited to any co‐products created is 
considered  one  of  the  weaknesses  of  current  biofuel  LCAs.  Co‐  or  by‐products  are  any 
products that are obtained from the process in addition to the desired product.  
   The  ISO  recommends  avoiding  allocation  if  possible,  preferring  to  divide  the  unit  process 
into  sub‐processes  or  expanding  the  system  to  include  the  functions  of  the  co‐products.  If 
allocation  is  necessary,  it  should  reflect  the  physical  relationship  between  co‐products  (or  if 
not possible, other relationships such as the economic value), reflecting the way in which the 
inputs  and  outputs  are  changed,  although  not  necessarily  in  proportion  to  simple 
measurements such as the mass flow (ISO, 1997, SAIC, 2006). 
   These guidelines can be broken down into several concrete methods of allocation. One is 
the use of direct substitution, where the by‐product (i.e. heat) from a process can be directly 
used  elsewhere;  thereby  replacing  what  would  otherwise  have  been  used.  This  method  is 
useful when there is a direct use for the by‐product, but in situations when the by‐product is 
viewed  as  waste  is  less  useful.  Other  methods  exist,  such  as  allocation  on  an  arbitrary  basis 
(i.e.  equal  value),  or  on  the  basis  of  economic,  calorific  value  or  mass.  Each  has  advantages 
and disadvantages; for example, allocation based on market value is highly variable over time 
and in some cases, where one product far outweighs another, may also be impractical (SAIC, 
2006, Stephenson, et al., 2010).  


3.2.5    Impact Assessment 

   Numerous impact categories can be assessed. The most common ones selected are: 
   • Greenhouse gas emissions:   
   • Energy  use:  any  energy  recovered  from  waste  is  historically  given  as  the  higher  heating 
        value (HHV) of the materials being burned 
   • Water use: impact on water, including: 
           o Water consumed during process 




                                                                                                          31
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


           o Waterborne  emissions:  discharges  into  any  receiving  waters  after  treatment, 
               measured  as  a  value  of  the  biological  oxygen  demand  (BOD),  chemical  oxygen 
               demand (COD), or suspended/dissolved solids 
   • Solid waste: any waste sent to landfills 
   • Land use  
   Economics of the process (Heijungs, et al., 1992): 
    
Generally  speaking  it  is  desirable  that  the  outcome  should  be  quantitative  given  in  either  a 
range  of  values,  or,  depending  on  the  information  available,  cover  a  variety  of  different 
production methods (Heijungs, et al., 1992, Boguski, et al., 1996).   




                                                                                                        32
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



      

4. Review of micro‐algae LCA  
Despite  a  high  level  of  interest,  no  industrial  scale  processes  designed  specifically  for  micro‐
algal  biofuel  production  yet  exist.  Only  a  limited  number  of  LCA  have  been  conducted,  and, 
because of the lack of data from operating plant, they are somewhat speculative. A systematic 
review  of  the  literature  in  late  2010  identified  7  LCA  assessments,  listed  in  Table  4.1.  For 
reference,  a  detailed  description  of  each  study  is  provided  in  Annex  2.  No  life  cycle 
assessments of macro‐algae production were found. 
     This  chapter  reviews  the  main  features  of  the  studies  –  i.e.  choice  of  functional  unit, 
boundaries,  allocation  strategies,  etc.  A  discussion  of  each  of  each  of  these  aspects  is  also 
provided. The basis of this discussion is comments and criticisms that have been made in the 
literature, and information gathered from stakeholders. Input from stakeholders was elicited 
using  a  questionnaire  and  semi‐structured  interviews.  (Stake  holders  consulted  are  listed  in 
Annex 3; the questionnaire used to elicit their input is described in Annex 4.)  

                             Table 4.1: LCA studies on algae derived fuels 

 Author & year          Description 
                         
 Kadam                  This study compares a conventional coal‐fired power station with one in which 
 2002                   coal is co‐fired with algae cultivated using recycled flue gas as a source of CO2. 
                        The system is based in the southern USA, where there is a high incidence of 
                        solar radiation. 

 Lardon et.al.          This study considers a hypothetical system consisting of an open pond raceway 
 2009                   covering 100ha, and cultivating Chlorella vulgaris. Two operating regimes are 
                        considered:  normal levels of nitrogen fertilisation, and low nitrogen 
                        fertilisation. The stated objective was to identify obstacles and limitations 
                        requiring further research.  

 Clarens et.al.         This study compares algae cultivation with corn, switch grass and canola.  The 
 2010                   study was based in Virginia, Iowa and California in the US, each of which have 
                        different levels of solar radiation and water availability five impact categories: 
                        energy consumption (MJ), water use (m3), greenhouse gas emissions (kg CO2 
                        equivalent), land use (ha), and eutrophication (kg PO4) 




                                                                                                              33
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


Jorquera et al.       This study compares the energetic balance of oil rich microalgae production. 
2010                  Three systems are described: raceway ponds, tubular horizontal PBR, and flat‐
                      plate PBRs. 
                      No specific location was assumed, and the study only considers the cultivation 
                      stage and the system energetics 

Sander & Murthy       This was a well‐to‐pump study that aimed to determine the overall 
2010                  sustainability of algae biodiesel and identify energy and emission bottlenecks. 
                      The primary water source was treated wastewater, and this was assumed to 
                      contain all the necessary nutrients except for carbon dioxide. Filtration and 
                      centrifugation were compared for harvesting. Lipids were extracted using 
                      hexane, and then transesterified.  
Stephenson et. al.    This study is a well‐to‐pump analysis, including a sensitivity analysis on various 
2010                  operating parameters. Two systems were considered, a raceway pond and an 
                      air‐lift tubular PBR. The location of the study is in the UK, which has lower solar 
                      radiation than the other studies. 

Campbell et.al.       This study looked at the environmental impacts of growing algae in raceway 
2010                  ponds using seawater. Lipids were extracted using hexane, and then 
                      transesterified. The location of this study was in Australia, which has a high 
                      solar incidence, but limited fresh water supply. 



4.1 Functional Unit 

The function units used in the LCA studies are listed in Table 4.2. It can be seen that a diverse 
range  of  units  has  been  used.  Although,  as  (Clarens,  et  al.,  2010)  notes,  the  choice  of 
functional unit may not be that important for an individual study, as it is only used to assess a 
given aspect of a life cycle. Nevertheless, the widespread use of incomparable units prevents 
easy comparison between studies. (Benemann, 2010b) recommends a functional unit of “CO2 
emissions  per  gallon  of  biodiesel  or  similar  biofuel  delivered  to  the  plant  gate”.    Fonseca 
(Fonseca,  August  2010)  goes  further  and  suggests  that  the  calculation,  unit  capacity  and 
conditions  should  be  standardized  across  studies;  he  recommends  the  following  functional 
units: “for assessing the energetic balance ‐ energy produced/1 unit of energy consumed in the 
whole process, and for environmental balance – GHG emissions/1 unit of energy produced (of 
the whole process, and of each relevant step)”. 




                                                                                                        34
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                         Table 4.2: Function units used in the LCA studies 

    Author & year           Functional     Note 
                            unit 
                             
    Kadam                   1MW            Of electricity 
    2002 
    Lardon et.al.           1MJ            Of fuel used in a diesel engine (assumed to be identical 
    2009                                   to other biofuels) 
    Clarens et.al.          317 GJ         Equivalent to the approximate per capita primary 
    2010                                   energy consumption of one American 
    Jorquera et al.         100,000 kg     Biomass dry weight per annum 
    2010 
    Sander & Murthy         1000 MJ        Energy in the form of algal biodiesel produced using 
    2010                                   existing technology at a filling station (equal to 24kg dry 
                                           algal biomass) 
    Stephenson et. al.    1 Tonne          Biodiesel blended with conventional diesel, delivered to
    2010                                   a UK filling station and used in an average UK car 
    Campbell et.al. 2010  0.89 MJ          The diesel fuel equivalent to transport one tonne of 
                                           freight one kilometre in a an articulated truck (the most 
                                           common form of freight transport in Australia) 


4.2 System boundaries 

The  studies  all  adopt  different  approaches  to  setting  the  system  boundaries.  For  example, 
(Jorquera,  et  al.,  2010)  only  considers  the  cultivation  phase,  whereas  Clarens  et  al.  (2010) 
considers both cultivation and harvesting. Sander & Murthy (2010) adopt the RMEE protocol 
(described in Chapter 4) to define their system boundaries, and this means that they are the 
only study to consider the production of algae inoculums. Stephenson et al. (2010) found that 
the manufacture of equipment (PVC lining and the PBR tubes) required a large energy input, 
yet many of the studies did not include this aspect.  
   Production processes can only be fairly compared if the system boundaries are the same. 
Nevertheless,  there  may  be  good  reasons  for  varying  the  selected  boundary.  Greenwell 
(2010), for example, argues against making a standardized system, as a local consortium in a 
developing  country  will  have  different  considerations  (environmental,  economic,  energetic, 
and societal) to a large company in the U.S. 


4.3 Allocation strategies 

Only two of the studies, Sander & Murthy (2010) and Stephenson et al.(2010), consider how 
impacts should be allocated to products and co‐products. Sander & Murthy (2010) show how 

                                                                                                          35
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


the  choice  of  co‐products  could  have  a  major  impact  on  the  final  GHG  emissions  and 
energetics  of  the  system,  while  Stephenson  et  al.(2010)  demonstrated  the  potential 
importance  of  using  the  residual  biomass  for  methane  production.  Neither  deals  exclusively 
with one form of allocation, although Stephenson et al.(2010) did show that alternative uses 
of minor co‐products (glycerol) – which consequently change the allocation method – did not 
make a big difference overall. It may be argued that Campbell et al. (2010) should be included 
in  this  list  as  includes  electricity  generation  from  the  algal  cake.  More  generally,  there  are 
numerous  of  previous  assessments  of  biofuels  that  have  shown  how  important  allocation 
calculations are on the final outcome (Gnansounou, et al., 2009). 
   Different  experts  prefer  different  methods  of  allocation  and  there  is  little  consensus.  For 
example Clarens (2010b) and Fonseca (2010) prefer market valuation, while Greenwell (2010) 
prefers the simplest option. 
   Benemann (2010b) argues that biofuels should be considered a co‐product of wastewater 
treatment and not the  other way around, and eventually that biofuels should be  a separate 
business.  Biomass  from  algae  grown  for  feeds  would  have  a  higher  market  value  sold 
elsewhere than they would from biofuels, so co‐products would not be generated and there 
would be no need to allocate. However, a survey undertaken by the EABA (2010) shows that 
many members of the industry are interested in producing energy in conjunction with some 
other product.  


4.4 Sources of data 

There  is  significant  variation  in  the  parameter  values  used  in  the  studies.  The  majority  are 
based  on  pilot  or  lab  scale  values  and  different  methods  have  been  used  to  estimate  how 
these values scale to a full size system. Many studies use data which is over 15 years old; for 
example, one of the most frequently cited papers is a one by (Benemann and Oswald, 1996), 
which  discussed    the  various  possibilities  for  algae  production.  Other  commonly  used  data 
sources for the studies include the EcoInvent database, various LCI databases, and GREET.  
   One of the major criticisms of the current studies is their lack of transparency about data 
sources,  and  the  lack  critical  thinking  about  how  reliable  the  sources  and  assumptions  are 
(Benemann,  2010b;  Greenwell,  2010).  For  the  most  part  the  studies  do  credit  their  sources, 
however,  many  refer  to  their  own  earlier  work  (e.g.  Campbell  et  al.  bases  his  system  on  a 
previous paper written in 2009).  



                                                                                                          36
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    Some experts also believe that scope for technical advance is significant. Consequently, the 
literature  may  be  outdated  and  the  assumptions  unduly  negative,  or  incorrectly  chosen.  As 
Fonseca (2010) says:  
    “Available options for optimization in each step of the technology are many, but just few 
have been analysed in the referred LCA. The negative values some LCA demonstrate for algae 
biotechnology  do  not  mirror  reality  because  the  initial  conditions  and  technological  options 
were not correctly chosen”. 
    Another consideration to keep in mind about the data use is that some of the authors may 
be LCA experts, but not experts in the field of algae cultivation. Greenwell (2010) sums this up 
by saying:  
    “[LCA studies] tend to be conducted by either LCA specialists who are not specialists in the 
technology,  or  do  not  have  enough  aspects  of  the  process  covered.    For  example,  palm  oil 
would  look  pretty  good  by  energetic  or  economic  LCA,  but  societal  pressures  prevented  its 
take‐up”.   
    Clearly,  due  to  the  hypothetical  nature  of  the  current  work,  arguments  about  the  values 
used  are  bound  to  happen,  and  until  an  actual  system  is  created,  basing  the  work  on  pilot 
systems with critical thinking of the effects of scaling up is the best that studies can do. 


4.5 Algae composition and strain assumptions 

The  major  components  of  algal  biomass  are  carbohydrates,  proteins  and  lipid.  Each  species 
differs  in  their  physiological  composition  of  these  components.  The  relative  proportion  of 
components  will  also  depend  upon  the  growth  regime.  The  values  used  in  the  studies  are 
shown in Table 4.3. It can be seen that the lipid varies from 17.5‐43%, carbohydrate from 20‐
53%,  and  protein  from 5.5‐32%.  These  composition  assumptions  may  significantly  affect  the 
final result. It should also be noted that a high lipid content will usually comes at the cost of 
lower  productivity,  and  this  will  also  affect  the  result  of  the  LCA.  High  lipid  content  will  not 
necessarily  always  be  beneficial,  however,  as  Greenwell  (2010)  argues:  “many  [LCA]  do  not 
address  the  problem  that  biodiesel  only  can  use  a  very  limited  range  of  the  oil  produced  in 
algae. [This is usually ignored] because the production chemists usually have no input into the 
LCA” (Greenwell, 2010). 
 
 
 

                                                                                                              37
                                                AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                   Coordination Action 
                                                   FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                        Table 4.3: Algae composition assumption in LCA studies  


                               Lardon et al. 
                                                  Jorquera     Clarens       Sander    Stephenson    Campbell
                     Kadam 
                                                     et al.      et al.     & Murthy       et al.     l et al. 
                              Normal     Low
                                 N         N 
                                                  Nanno‐ 
                                 Chlorella                                              Chlorella 
     Algae strain     ND                         chloropsis      ND           ND                        ND 
                                  vulgaris                                              vulgaris 
                                                     sp. 
        Lipids       30.0     17.5      30.0        29.6           ‐         30.0        45.01          43 
 Carbohydrates       20.0     49.5      52.9          ‐            ‐         31.0         49.3           ‐ 
      Proteins       32.0     28.2       6.7          ‐            ‐         37.5          5.5           ‐ 
1 
 Original study assumed 40% TAG, and 5% free fatty acid 
ND = Not defined in study 


4.6 Productivity assumptions 

The productivity estimates used in the LCA studies are compared in Table 4.4. These estimates 
illustrate the range of optimism about possible algae growth rates, and describe a range from 
26‐112  t/ha/a,  with  an  average  of  ~54  t/ha/a.  For  comparison  a  number  of  other  estimates 
that can be found in the literature are also shown (Chisti, 2008b; Griffiths & Harrison, 2009; 
Sawayama et al., 1999). These studies indicate a less optimistic maximum annual productivity 
of ~60t/ha/a. 
     It should be noted, however, that some studies report productivity per unit volume rather 
than  per  unit  area.  Moreover,  the  length  of  the  growing  season  assumed  is  not  necessarily 
transparent.  Consequently,  some  manipulation  of  the  figures  provided  in  the  papers  is 
required before they can be compared on an equal basis.  
     From the perspective of conducting comparable LCA in the future, the best choice of unit is 
probably the average annual productivity, expressed per unit area. 

                     Table 4.4: Algae productivity assumptions used in LCA studies 

                                              Production rate quoted in study
                                                                              Normalised annual 
Study                                         Per day          Per annum 
                                                                              production ratea  (t/ha/a)
                                              (g/m2/d)         (t/ha/a) 
                     2001                           17.1            33.17              42.75b 
Kadam 
                     2002                           45.0             104               112.50 
                     Normal N                       24.8              ‐                 61.88 
Lardon et al 
                     Low N                          19.3              ‐                 48.13 
                                                                                                                  38
                                                    AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                       Coordination Action 
                                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                 California                             12.9e                  47.1                      32.26 
                  c
Clarens et al.   Virginia                               11.0 e                 40.2                      27.53 
                 Iowa                                   14.1 e                 34.5                      35.35 
                 Raceway                                10.5 e                 38.5                      26.36 
Jorquera et al.  Flat‐plate PBR                         27.0 e                 98.6                      67.50 
                 Tubular PBR                            25.5 e                 92.9                      63.64 
Sander & 
                 n/a                                       ‐                     ‐                          ‐ 
Murthy 
Stephenson et  Raceway                                  27.4 e                                           68.49 
                                                                               100 
al.              PBR                                    27.4 e                                           68.49 
                 Low                                    15.0                  54.8                       37.50 
Campbell et al. 
                 High                                   30.0                  109.6                      75.00 
LITERATURE                                                                              
                  Chlorella vulgaris                    16.0                     ‐                       40.00 
Griffiths & 
                  Nannochloropsis                       15.0                     ‐                       37.50 
Harrison 
                  Average                               24.0                     ‐                       60.00 
Chisti                                                  25.00                    ‐                       62.50 
Sawayama et 
                  B. braunii                             4.11                   15                       10.27 
al.d 
   a
         unless  otherwise  stated,  it  is  assumed  that  the  quoted  annual  production  rate  is  for  365  days.  The 
normalised  production  rate assumes  250 days  of  production  per year,  corresponding  to  a  May  to October  in  a 
seasonal country where winter inhibits growth. 
   b
       Normalised value assumes 100% of culture area is productive, whereas original study assumes only 86% of 
area is productive. 
   c
       Clarens et al. varied their production values over the year (the average is given here) 
   d
       Chisti  (2008b)  questions  the  validity  of  this  productivity  estimate,  claiming  it  is  only  16%  of  current 
production in the tropics. 
   e 
       Value calculated from figures presented in the original study.  

    
   There is a general consensus among the experts questioned that algae growth rate in terms 
of  biomass  productivity  and  lipid  productivity  are  far  too  optimistic  and  do  not  take  into 
account  the  losses  that  would  occur  with  scaling  up  the  process.  It  is  assumed  that  the 
productivity values given are based on the year average, for, as Greenwell (2010) points out:  
“comparing mean productivity on a given day is not the same as averaging over a whole year”. 


4.7 Global Warming Potential 

Comparisons made to conventional biofuels and fossil fuels depend on the reference systems 
used and direct comparison is not straightforward. An overview of the relative GWP savings 
claimed in the reviewed studies is shown in Table 4.5. Caution is required, however, because 

                                                                                                                          39
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


the  studies  use  very  different  boundary  and  allocation  assumptions.  Nevertheless,  it  can 
clearly  be  seen  that  there  is  a  wide  range  of  estimates  ranging  from  significant  savings  to 
additional emissions.  

        Table 4.5: Overview of Global Warming Potential claims in algae biomass LCA. 

   Author & year          Reference system           CO2 balance 
   Kadam                  Electricity from coal      ‐36.72%  (direct injection of the flue gas) 
   2002                   firing                     ‐2.46% (monoethanolamine (MEA) extraction of 
                                                     CO2 from flue gas 
   Lardon et.al.          Diesel                     ‐25% 
   2009 
   Clarens et.al.         Corn / canola /            +244% / +189%  / +233% 
   2010                   switchgrass 
   Jorquera et al.        NA                         NA 
   2010 
   Sander & Murthy        Gasoline                   ‐117% (dewatering using filter press)a 
   2010                                              +14% (dewatering using centrifuge) 
   Stephenson et. al.     Diesel                     ‐ 78% (Raceway ponds)  
   2010                                              + 273% (PBR) 
   Campbell et.al.        Diesel per freight         ‐66% 
   2010                   km.Tonne                   ‐122% 
   a 
    This study assumes that co‐produced algal residue displaces animal feed.  


4.8 Other critiques levied at algae LCA 

Other,  more  general  critiques  levied  at  algae  LCA  include  concerns  about  the  quality, 
representativeness,  and  application  of  the  studies.  As  illustrated  by  the  following  comments 
from expert stakeholders: 

   • LCA as a very complex tool to use on such a young industry… [Fonseca (2010)] 
   • “LCAs should at least mention the temporary nature of the production pathways in use, or 
       possibly  assess  the "representativity  gap" of  other  LCAs  performed  on  experimental 
       pathways but intending to derive findings applicable to algae production for biofuels”. 
       [Vernon 2010.] 
   • LCA studies cannot so easily be adapted to such a new industry, and do not give a holistic 
       view  of  the  whole  sustainability  (the  “global  wrapping”),  including  the  use  of  land, 
       water, etc.  [Leu (2010) ] 
       • From an industry point of view, it is happening the worst possible thing; a pollution of 
       publications on microalgae production LCA which refer to each other and in many cases 
       are careless and get strange conclusions (which are interesting to publish)”. (Vieira, 
       2010) 

                                                                                                        40
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


        • [Referring to the Clarens et.al. 2010 report] The report was based upon obsolete data 
        and grossly outdated business models, and overlooked tremendous improvements in 
        technology and processes across the production cycle. [These] obsolete data and faulty 
        assumptions seriously undermine the credibility of the study’s conclusions. (ABO, 2010)  
    • “The fundamental problem here is that biofuels are subsidized and therefore we get into 
        the  quandary  of  converting  low  price  fossil  fuels  into  high  price  subsidized  biofuels, 
        which  is  why  we  now  have  to  do  LCAs.    Actually,  a  better  measure  may  be  process 
        sustainability over a 100 year period, in which all non‐renewable inputs are accounted 
        for.  For example for algae, use of phosphates has a very small impact on LCAs but a 
        potentially  very  large  impact  on  sustainability,  as  phosphate  mining  is  a  rapidly 
        depleting  resource.      If  this  is  not  accounted  for  as  a  major  factor  in  an  LCA,  which 
        currently focuses mainly on greenhouse gases, it is not useful”. [Benemann ] 

4.9 Conclusions on the existing LCA studies 

    This review of existing LCA supports the following conclusions: 
•   The  studies  reviewed  here  consider  a  wide  range  of  conceptual  designs,  but,  with  the 
    exception  of  the  study  by  (Stephenson,  et  al.,  2010),  they  all  provide  only  partial 
    descriptions of algal biofuel production systems. Studies such as (Kadam, 2001) which only 
    consider the production stage, will naturally provide a more positive energy balance than 
    studies that include subsequent energy intensive processing steps.  
•   Comparison is also hindered by the use of inconsistent boundaries and functional units.  
•   The  studies  use  a  range  of  allocation  methods,  some  of  which,  it  may  be  argued,  are 
    overcomplicated given the immaturity of the industry.  
•   It  is  also  evident  that,  in  the  absence  of  commercial  production  facilities  there  is  little 
    primary  data  upon  which  process  assumptions  can  be  based.  The  production  processes 
    analyzed  appear  to  be  assembled  from  component  parts,  rather  than  designed  as 
    integrated systems. 
•   The validity of some of the results and the usefulness are called into question, by experts 
    in the field. Prominent causes of concern include the hypothetical nature of the LCA, and 
    that  without  more  detailed  information  about  the  system,  the  strain  used,  and  the 
    possible amount of oil that can be extracted, the conclusions that may be drawn from the 
    existing LCAs are tenuous at best. 




                                                                                                            41
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



    

5. Meta‐analysis of micro‐algae production systems 
Comparing the results of the existing LCA studies is challenging because of the inconsistencies 
in boundaries, allocation strategies etc. used in the different studies (Described in Chapter 5). 
To enable a comparison of algae production systems in terms of 1) the energy produced, and 
2) the energy required to construct and operate the system, an LCA meta‐model was built and 
populated  using  data  from  the  original  studies.  This  chapter  describes  the  meta‐modelling 
approach, and the results obtained. 


5.1 Meta‐model approach and assumptions. 

The  objectives  of  the  meta‐model  were  two‐fold;  firstly,  to  enable  a  more  detailed 
examination  of  the  assumptions  used  in  the  existing  LCA,  and  secondly,  to  compare  the 
studies in terms of the energy produced and consumed. The model was built in Excel using a 
simplified,  but  complete,  description  of  the  processes  involved  in  cultivation,  harvesting  of 
algal biomass, and extraction of algal oil. 
   The modelling approach (shown in Figure 5.1) was undertaken in three stages. Firstly, the 
data  and  assumptions  contained  in  the  original  studies  were  identified  and  transcribed. 
Secondly, the units were normalized. Lastly, the process descriptions were normalized to fit a 
consistent  system  boundary,  and  to  allow  comparison  using  a  single  functional  unit.  An 
overview  of  the  assumptions  used  to  normalize  the  studies  are  described  below,  detailed 
assumptions for the normalization of each study are described in Annex 5 & 6.  




                                                                                                      42
                                                 AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                    Coordination Action 
                                                    FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                                   Figure 5.1: Algae LCA meta‐modeling approach 




                                                                                                                  

5.1.2       Meta‐model system description and boundaries 

   The meta‐model process system is shown in Figure 5.2. In Stage 1, the algae are cultivated 
and  harvested.  At  this  stage  both  raceway  pond  and  closed  (PBR)  systems  are  included  for 
comparison. For each study the efficiency with which nutrients and CO2 are captured is based 
on the original study. The residence time of the algae strain in the cultivation system – where 
algae cell has to accumulate the lipid (TAG) to a certain level for biodiesel production – also 
follows  the  original  studies.  The  boundaries  include  the  manufacture  of  the  principal 
equipment  (e.g.  the  PVC  lining  for  the  raceway  pond  systems  and  system  maintenance  and 
operations).  
   In Stage 2, the slurry of mature algae cells is transported to a dewatering and drying stage. 
The amount of drying required is determined by the oil extraction process (Stage 3). Most of 
the  LCA  studies  adopt  hexane  extraction  as  they  assume  algal  oil  extraction  will  be  very 
similar to soybean oil extraction 2. This process requires that the paste has to be dried up to a 
solid content of ~90% before being processed in oil mill 3. In order to achieve this a belt dryer 



   2
       It should be noted that some experts contest this assumption
   3
       A belt dryer, usually is used for wastewater treatment plant sludge, is assumed as it is one of the less energy
demanding drying process. Heating supplied in the system comes from natural gas combustion.
                                                                                                                     43
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


was  chosen  as  the  preferred  technology  for  biomass  drying  based  on  data  presented  in 
Lardon et al., (Lardon, et al., 2009). 
    
   Stage  3  is  oil  extraction.  The  extraction  efficiencies  are  based  on  the  data  from  original 
studies. Co‐products from oil extraction – mainly carbohydrate and protein – are assumed to 
be used as feedstock to produce biogas in Stage 4 (Sialve, et al.). This biogas is then used in a 
gas boiler to generate heat for the drying process. Any excess gas is converted into electricity, 
which is also used for system operations.  

                               Figure 5.2: Description of meta‐model process 

    
         Nutrients; Carbon                1. Harvesting
         dioxide; Energy                  (Raceway ponds / PBR)




                                                Algae

               Flue gas;
               nutrients

                                           2. Dewatering;
                                               drying                      Flocculant;
                                                                           Energy
               4. Biogas
            production and
              combustion
                                              Algae Cake



               Residue                      3. Oil extraction
            (Carbohydrate,                                                  Hexane;
               Protein)                                                     Energy



                                             Algae Lipid




                                                                                                         44
                                                 AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                    Coordination Action 
                                                    FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


5.1.3        Functional Unit and basis for comparison 

The  functional  units  selected  for  comparing  energetic  performance  were  1MJ  dry  algal 
biomass and 1MJ algal lipid. Alternative processes were compared in terms of the Net Energy 
Ratio (NER) of biomass and lipid production, defined in Figure 5.3. If the NER is greater than 
unity, the process consumes more energy than it produces. 

                                   Figure 5.3: Definition of Net Energy Ratio (NER) 




                                                                                                             
       
To  calculate  the  NERBiomass  three  processes  stages  are  considered:  algal  biomass  cultivation, 
drying and dewatering and oil extraction. No co‐product allocation is applied and we assume 
that  the  energy  content  of  the  dry  biomass  is  equal  to  the  lower  heating  value  of  the  algal 
biomass  specified  in  the  original  LCA  studies.  For  those  studies  that  didn’t  specify  heating 
values,  estimates  were  made  by  summing  the  heating  values  of  the  biomass  compositions 
given. 
      Primary Energy Inputs were assumed to include the energy content of the fossil fuel inputs 
only; i.e. the embedded energy from the production of the fossil fuel itself is excluded from 
the  boundary.  The  energy  associated  with  building  the  plant  was  also  included  (assuming  a 
20yr lifetime for concrete and 5yrs for PVC (Stephenson, et al., 2010)). 
      For illustrative purposes, the CO2 emissions for algae biomass cultivation are estimated by 
multiplying  the  primary  energy  inputs  by  the  default  emissions  factors  described  in  the  EU 
renewable energy directive (2009/28/EC) 4. 


4
    The default emissions factors outlined in the renewable energy directive(2009/28/EC) are – diesel:
83.80gCO2.MJ-1; electricity: 91 gCO2.MJ-1; Heat: 77 gCO2.MJ-1. The emissions factor for the embodied energy in
fertiliser and for production of PVC lining (in the case of raceway ponds) and tubes (in the case of PBRs) was
assumed to be the same as for heat.
                                                                                                           45
                                              AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                 Coordination Action 
                                                 FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


 
The  calculation  of  the  NERLipid  assumes  that  co‐products  are  treated  by  anaerobic  digestion. 
Anaerobic  digestion  is  appropriate  for  processing  high  moisture  content,  such  as  80%~90% 
moisture organic wastes. (Two of the existing LCA studies took anaerobic digestion for algal 
residual  application) 5.  It  has  been  estimated  that  the  conversion  of  algal  biomass  into 
methane  could  recover  as  much  energy  as  obtained  from  the  extraction  of  cell  lipid,  while 
leaving  a  nutrient  rich  waste  product  which  could  be  recycled  into  a  new  algal  growth 
medium.  
    In  the  normalized  case,  we  assume  anaerobic  digestion  could  convert  60%  of  the  algal 
residue to methane (on an energy basis) (Sialve, et al.). This methane is then fed into a gas 
boiler to generate heat and offset natural gas demand for the drying process. The efficiency of 
the  gas  boiler  is  assumed  to  be  75%  (Stephenson,  et  al.,  2010).  In  the  Stephenson  et  al’s 
study,  they  took  homogenization  before  lipid  extraction:  this  means  that  the  algae  biomass 
could  have  higher  moisture  content  in  the  subsequent  processing  stage  and  that  not  all 
residue  was  required  to  produce  heat  for  the  biomass  drying  and  dewatering  process. 
Consequently,  we  applied  another  scenario  to  normalize  Stephenson  et  al’s  case,  assuming 
that the gas boiler was replaced by a gas‐engine combined heat and power system (CHP). The 
generated heat and electricity is then used to offset fossil fuel used in the production process 
(34% efficiency in electricity generation; 41% efficiency in heat generation; overall efficiency is 
75%) (Macadam, 2010). 


5.2 Results 

The  seven  studies  describe  eleven  alternative  processing  systems.  The  primary  energy  input 
for biomass production for each alternative system, before and after normalization, is shown 
in  Figure  5.4,  It  can  be  seen  that  in  all  cases  the  primary  energy  input  for  the  normalized 
process  is  equal  to,  or  less  attractive  than,  the  original  case.  It  is  also  noticeable  that  the 
closed systems, especially tubular PBR, demonstrate poor energetic performances compared 
to raceway ponds.  
    Six,  out  of  eight,  of  the  raceway  pond  systems  have  a  Primary  Energy  Input  less  than  1, 
suggesting that a positive energy balance may be achievable for these systems, although this 
benefit  is  marginal  in  the  normalized  case.  The  normalized  Primary  Energy  Inputs  for  PBR 
systems are all greater than 1. The best performing PBR is the flat‐plate system. This appears 


    5
        Sander and Murthy (2010) and Stephenson et al(2010)
                                                                                                             46
                                                    AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                       Coordination Action 
                                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


to  outperform  tubular  systems  as  it  benefits  from  a  large  illumination  surface  area  and  low 
oxygen build‐up.  

                  Figure 5.4: NER Biomass production: comparison of published values with 
                                    normalised values for algal biomass production. 




                                                                                                                      
NC: Normal Cultivation; LN: Low Nitrogen Cultivation; FP: Filter Press; C: Centrifuge; Flat‐plate PBR: Flat‐plate 
Photobioreactor; Tubular PBR: Tubular Photobioreactor. RP: Raceway Pond 
*=Normalised system boundary 

 
The energy inputs to raceway pond systems are shown in Figure 5.5, expanded to show the 
energy input into the different stages. 
    The  three  studies  where  normalisation  has  the  greatest  impact  are  Kadam,  Jorquera  and 
Campbell. Originally these studies only considered the cultivation stage; the addition of drying 
and dewatering processes and lipid extraction changes the NER from ~0.05‐0.1 to 0.5‐0.75. For 
these  studies,  even  if  drying  and  lipid  extraction  were  excluded,  the  normalised  value  for 
cultivation  is  less  favourable.  This  is  because  the  original  studies  did  not  include  system 
construction.  (The  normalised  system  also  includes  transport  of  fertiliser  (data  from 
Campbell),  and  the  embodied  energy  in  the  fertiliser,  but  these  factors  are  comparatively 
insignificant.)  
    Sander  &  Murthy  use  high  values  for  the  energy  required  for  algae  culture,  drying  and 
harvesting,  and  these  systems  will  deliver  less  energy  output  that  they  require  input.  The 
                                                                                                                         47
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


original  assumptions  about  the  algal  species  and  its  productivity  are  unclear  but  the  data 
appears to come from studies completed in the 1980’s, and so may not be representative of 
more recent designs. 
   Stephenson et.al is the only LCA that gives a complete description of  the cultivation, and 
harvesting  process,  and  so  normalisation  makes  no  difference  in  this  case.  The  energy 
demands of the cultivation stage are higher than other studies because the authors assume 
more  electricity  is  required  at  this  stage  to  overcome  frictional  losses  (which  they  estimate 
from  first  principles).  Less  energy  is  required  for  drying  than  other  studies  because,  in  a 
subsequent step, the authors assume the use of an oil extraction process that can accept wet 
biomass (homogenisation with heat recovery).  
   Another source of variation is that each study selects a different composition for the algae 
produced and a different productivity for the growth phase; this affects the energy required 
per functional unit produced. If the productivity of the algae is assumed to be low, then, all 
else  being  equal,  it  follows  that  the  energy  required  to  produce  1MJ  dry  biomass  will  be 
greater (as the mixing requirement per unit time etc. will not be reduced). One complicating 
factor  is  that  growing  the  algae  under  lower  productivity  conditions,  such  as  nitrogen 
starvation, may allow the algae to accumulate more lipid and so may result in a higher calorific 
value for the biomass overall. It is clearly important that productivity and composition values 
correspond with one another. 




                                                                                                        48
                                                                                                                                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                                                                                                                                       Coordination Action 
                                                                                                                                                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                                      Figure 5.5: Net Energy Ratio for biomass production in raceway ponds: comparison 
                                                                                                                   of published values with normalised values. 

                                                        2.50
        Primary Energy Input(MJ/MJ Dry Algal Biomass)




                                                        2.00




                                                        1.50
                         NER Biomass




                                                        1.00




                                                        0.50




                                                        0.00




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Centrifugation


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Centrifugation*
                                                                                              Normal Cultivation


                                                                                                                     Normal Cultivation*




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Filter Press
                                                                                                                                                            Low Nitrogen *
                                                               Raceway Pond




                                                                                                                                                                             Raceway Pond




                                                                                                                                                                                                            Raceway Pond




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Raceway Pond
                                                                                                                                           Low Nitrogen 




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Filter Press*
                                                                              Raceway Pond*




                                                                                                                                                                                            Raceway Pond*




                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Raceway Pond*




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Raceway Pond*




                                                               Kadam(RP)                      Lardon(NC)                                   Lardon(LN)                        Jorquera(RP)                   Cambell(RP)                                                   S
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Stephenson(RP) Sander&Murthy(FP) ander&Murthy(C )


                                                         Lipid Extraction                                          Biomass Drying and Dewatering                                                                           Algae Cultivation and Harvesting
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
NC: Normal Cultivation; LN: Low Nitrogen Cultivation; FP: Filter Press; C: Centrifuge; RP: Raceway Pond 
*=Normalised system boundary 

 
At the cultivation stage, the most important contributions to the energy demand come from 
the  electricity  required  to  circulate  the  culture  0.02‐0.79MJ/MJdrybiomass,  and  the  embodied 
energy  in  system  construction  0.05‐0.14MJ/MJdrybiomass  (8‐70%).  The  embodied  energy 
contained  in  the  nitrogen  fertiliser  ranges  from  0.02‐0.09  MJ/MJdrybiomass  (6‐40%)  (this  range 
excludes the Kadam study which includes a fertiliser value of 0.05g nitrogen per kg dry algae (a 
value  that  appears  infeasably  low  given  that  this  study  assumes  the  biomass  contains  >30% 
protein). 
 
The  energy  inputs  to  PBR  systems  are  shown  in  Figure  5.6  All  the  normalised  systems 
consume  more  energy  than  they  produce.  Biomass  drying  and  de‐watering  are 
proportionately less important than the energy consumed in cultivation and harvesting. This is 


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 49
                                                                                                   AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                                                                      Coordination Action 
                                                                                                      FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


partly  because  greater  algal  biomass  concentrations  can  be  achieved  in  PBR  systems,  and 
partly because PBRs consume more energy for cultivation and harvesting than raceway ponds.  
    In the tubular PBRs, the electricity used to pump the culture medium around the system 
and  overcome  frictional  losses  accounts  for  2.5‐5.0MJ/MJdrybiomass  (~86‐92%  of  the  energy 
input to the cultivation and harvesting stage) (0.22MJ/MJdrybiomass (22%) for the flat‐plate PBR). 
System  construction  accounts  for  the  majority  of  the  remainder:  0.34‐0.36MJ/MJdrybiomass  (6‐
12%).  

                                                        Figure 5.6: Net Energy Ratio for biomass production in photobioreactors PBRs: 
                                                              comparison of published values with normalised values for algal biomass 
                                                                                                           production. 

                                                       6.00
     Primary Energy Input (MJ/MJ Dry Algal Biomass)




                                                       5.00



                                                       4.00
                      NER Biomass




                                                       3.00



                                                       2.00



                                                       1.00



                                                       0.00
                                                               Flat‐plate PBR    Flat‐plate PBR*    Tubular PBR     Tubular PBR*   Tubular PBR    Tubular PBR*

                                                                      Jorquera(FP PBR)                   Stephenson(T  PBR)              Jorquera(T PBR)

                                                      Lipid Extraction          Biomass Drying and Dewatering           Algae Cultivation and Harvesting
                                                                                                                                                                  
    FP PBR: Flat‐plate Photobioreactor; T PBR: Tubular Photobioreactor 
    *Normalised system boundary 

 
The carbon dioxide emissions associated with algal biomass production are shown in Figures 
5.7  and  5.8.  The  results  essentially  mirror  the  results  for  the  energy  consumption  and  the 
majority of emissions are associated with the drying phase and the consumption of electricity. 
Notably, emissions associated with algal biomass production in raceway ponds are comparable 

                                                                                                                                                                     50
                                                                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                                                            Coordination Action 
                                                                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


with the emissions from the cultivation and production stages of rape methyl ester biodiesel. 
Production in PBRs, however, demonstrates emissions greater than conventional fossil diesel. 
An important caveat to this analysis is that the carbon emissions are highly dependent on the 
emissions  factors  used  for  the  different  energy  inputs  into  the  system  (and  in  particular 
electricity) and generic factors may not be appropriate in all situations.  

                          Figure 5.7: Illustrative estimates for carbon dioxide emissions from algal biomass 
                                                                                  production in raceway ponds 

                          200




                          150
       Carbon Emissions
          gCO2e.MJ‐1




                                                              Diesel ‐ RED 2009/28/EC 
                                                              default value 
                          100

                                Rape Biodiesel ‐ RED 
                                2009/28/EC default value 
                                (cultivation & production) 




                          50




                            0




                                                                                                   System
                                                                      Oil extraction                Drying          Cultivation
                                                                                                                                   
NC: Normal Cultivation; LN: Low Nitrogen Cultivation; FP: Filter Press; C: Centrifuge; RP: Raceway Pond 
*=Normalised system boundary 

 




                                                                                                                                      51
                                                                              AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                                                     Coordination Action 
                                                                                     FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                         Figure 5.8: Illustrative estimates for carbon dioxide emissions from algal biomass 
                                                                 production in photobioreactors PBRs. 


                               600




                               500




                               400
            Carbon Emissions
               gCO2e.MJ‐1




                               300
                                                                                      Diesel ‐ RED 2009/28/EC 
                                                                                      default value 



                               200

                                                                     Rape Biodiesel ‐ RED 
                                                                     2009/28/EC default value 
                                                                     (cultivation & production) 
                               100




                                0
                                     Jorquera(FP PBR) Jorquera(FP PBR)* Stephenson(T PBR)              Stephenson(T    Jorquera(T PBR)   Jorquera(T PBR)*
                                                                                                           PBR)*


                                                                                             System
                                                Oil extraction                             Drying                       Cultivation

                                                                                                                                                             
     FP PBR: Flat‐plate Photobioreactor; T PBR: Tubular Photobioreactor 
     *Normalised system boundary 

 
The  impact  of  expanding  the  system  boundary  to  include  lipid  production  (and  energy 
recovery  from  residues)  is  shown  in  Figures  5.7  and  5.8,  for  raceway  and  PBR  systems.  As 
might be expected, the NER for lipid production is less favourable than for biomass production 
as there are losses in the conversion of the residue to heat and electricity and all the burdens 
of the system are allocated to the lipid 6. 
     Only  two  normalised  systems,  Stephenson  et  al  (Stephenson,  et  al.,  2010)  and  Kadam 
(Kadam,  2001)  yield  more  energy  in  the  lipid  than  they  consume.  It  is  also  apparent  that 
NERlipid  and  NERbiomass  values  do  not  vary  by  a  constant  proportion;  this  is  due  to  reported 
differences  in  the  composition  of  the  algae.  For  example,  the  NERbiomass  for  the  Stephenson 




6
    The energy reported for lipid extraction in the various studies is ~0.04-0.06MJ/MJdry algal biomass. This compares
with an energy demand of ~0.5-0.7MJ/MJdry algal biomass for production in a raceway pond and ~1-6MJ/MJdry algal
biomass   in a PBR.
                                                                                                                                                                52
                                                  AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                      Coordination Action 
                                                      FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


and Lardon systems is similar, but Stephenson’s system is preferable 7 for producing biodiesel 
because the lipid proportion is greater. Another factor that contributes to the difference is the 
oil extraction efficiency (for example, Lardon assumes ~70% oil extraction efficiency, whereas 
Sander and Murthy assume ~90%).  
      Overall, these results indicate that producing biodiesel as the main product is likely to have 
limited benefits, if assessed in terms of the system energetics. These results also illustrate the 
importance of comparing systems within consistent boundaries, and it should be noted that 
an  alternative  allocation  system,  for  example,  producing  high  value  protein  for  animal  feed 
and allocating the impacts on the basis of market value, could change this result.  

                Figure 5.7: Net Energy Ratio for biomass and lipid production in raceway ponds: 
                                             comparison of normalised values. 




                                                                                                            
NC: Normal Cultivation; LN: Low Nitrogen Cultivation; FP: Filter Press; C: Centrifuge; RP: Raceway Pond 
*Normalised system boundary 
 




7
    I.e. it has a lower NERlipid
                                                                                                               53
                                                                                 AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                                                    Coordination Action 
                                                                                    FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                             Figure 5.8: Net Energy Ratio for biomass and lipid production in PBRs: comparison 
                                                                                    of normalised values  


                                                            Net Energy Ratio in Photobioreactor
                                               14
                                               13
         Primary Energy Input (MJ/MJ output)




                                               12
                                               11
                                               10
                  Net Energy Ratio




                                               9
                                               8
                                               7
                                               6
                                               5
                                               4
                                               3
                                               2
                                               1
                                               0
                                                          Jorquera(FP PBR)*              Stephenson(T  PBR)*             Jorquera(T PBR)*

                                                    Net Energy Ratio (NER) for Oil production   Net Energy Ratio (NER) for Biomass production
                                                                                                                                                 
FP PBR: Flat‐plate Photobioreactor; T PBR: Tubular Photobioreactor 
*Normalised system boundary 



5.3 Conclusions 

The LCA studies that are accessible in the literature describe a range of production systems, 
but the results are difficult to compare. The normalized model presented in this chapter allows 
the energetic performance of these systems to be examined on a more consistent basis and 
provides some insight into the assumptions used in each of the studies. We consider that this 
analysis supports the following conclusions: 
   • Raceway  Pond  Systems consistently  demonstrate  a  lower  (more  desirable)  NER  for  both 
        biomass and lipid production than PBR Systems  
   • The  NER  for  biomass  and  lipid  production  in  the  normalized  system  described  is 
        unattractive,  or  at  best,  marginal.  This  suggests  that  algae  production  may  be  most 
        attractive where energy is not the main product.  
   • The  carbon  emissions  from  algae  biomass  produced  in  raceway  ponds  is  comparable  to 
        the emissions from conventional biodiesel. 
   • The carbon emissions from algae biomass produced in PBRs is greater than the emissions 
        from  conventional  diesel.  The  principle  reason  for  this  is  the  electricity  used  for 
        pumping the algal broth around the system. 

                                                                                                                                                    54
                                      AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                         Coordination Action 
                                         FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


• The most optimistic values for algae production in the literature come from the systems 
    that are the least complete. The addition of additional process steps makes the NER less 
    attractive in all cases.  
• While  the  meta‐model  includes  some  additional  process  steps,  others  might  also 
    reasonably  be  included  in  a  complete  system.  These  include:  the  energy  embodied  in 
    chemical  flocculant,  and  hexane  loss  during  harvesting  and  lipid  extraction.  In  hot 
    climates  PBRs  may  also  require  cooling.  The  addition  of  these  processes  would  make 
    the NER less attractive. 
• There is a significant variation in the energy consumed in the cultivation and harvesting 
    phase per MJ algae (biomass or lipid) produced. Key assumptions that affect this are the 
    productivity of the algae, its calorific value and lipid content. (As discussed in Chapter 5, 
    assuming both a high productivity and high lipid content may be over optimistic.) 
• Assumptions  in  the  original  studies  are  often  obscure,  or  open  to  interpretation.  For 
    example, the study by Kadam includes less nitrogen as an input than is contained in the 
    algae anticipated as an output. This may be an oversight, or the authors may have made 
    some additional assumption that is not explicit: it is possible that the missing nitrogen 
    may be recycled or come from some other source. 
• Algae production requires a number of energy demanding processes. However, within the 
    LCA  studies  considered  here  there  is  no  consistent  hierarchy  of  energy  consumption. 
    Aspects  that  will  need  to  be  addressed  in  a  viable  commercial  system  include:  the 
    energy  required  for  pumping,  the  embodied  energy  required  for  construction,  the 
    embodied energy in fertilizer, and the energy required for drying and de‐watering.  




                                                                                                 55
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


 

6. Environmental impacts of micro‐algae production 
Algae  production  could  have  a  wide  variety  of  environmental  impacts  beyond  the 
consumption  of  energy  in  the  production  process.  Impacts  will  vary  depending  on  the 
production  technology  and  location,  and  may  be  positive,  e.g.  contributing  to  water 
remediation, or negative e.g. emissions of hexane or fertilizer. This chapter reviews the major 
environment impacts which could influence sitting decision for the cultivation of micro‐algae. 


6.1 Water Resources 

A  reliable,  low  cost  water  supply  is  an  important  factor  in  the  overall  success  of  biofuel 
production from micro‐algae. Per litre re of biofuel, a minimum 1.5 litres of water are required 
(assuming a lipid content of 50%) (René H and Maria J, 2010). In practice, however, water use 
in  production  systems  will  be  much  larger:  fresh  water  needs  to  be  added  to  raceway  pond 
systems  to  compensate  water  evaporation;  water  is  also  used  for  cooling  Closed  Systems 
(PBRs). 
    Evaporation  may  be  particularly  high  in  raceway  pond  systems  that  are  shallow  and 
mechanically mixed (Lundquist, et al., 2010). The evaporation rate may also affect the “blow 
down rate (BDR)”, which is defined as the quantity of water discharged divided by the quantity 
of water supplied to the pond (Lundquist, et al., 2010). In normal operation the BDR is set to 
ensure that the water salinity does not exceed a certain optimal point for algae production. 
    One suggestion is that algae cultivation could utilize water with few competing uses, such 
as  seawater  and  brackish  water  from  aquifers.  Brackish  water,  however,  may  require  pre‐
treatment  if  the  chemical  constituents  of  the  water  could  inhibit  algae  growth.  This  pre‐
treatment could raise the energy demand of the process (Darzins, et al., 2010). 
    The distance to the water source is also an important factor in locating the cultivation site, 
as 100 meters elevation could mean that 6% of the energy produced by the algae would be 
used for pumping (Lundquist, et al., 2010). Consequently, coastal regions are more obviously 
suitable for sustainable large scale algae production systems.  
    Using  algae  with  wastewater  treatment  is  another  option  for  algae  cultivation  that  has 
been greatly discussed. Clarens et al. (2010) considers the different types of wastewater that 
can be used, and argue that that using wastewater can greatly improve the final outcome of 
the  LCA.  (Benemann,  2010b)  argues  that  the  final  use  of  wastewater  will  be  limited,  and 
Greenwell  (2010),  suggests  that  the  best  choice  in  the  end  would  be  seawater,  as  “once 
                                                                                                       56
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


wastewater becomes the basis of a process, it is then no longer waste and will begin to have a 
value”. “Waste,” he considers, “will be useful in micro‐scale operations or where remediation 
is important”. An important consideration in the use of waste water is the acceptability of the 
co‐products  for  large  markets  such  as  animal  feed.  In  Europe,  for  example,  the  Animal  Feed 
Regulation bans the use of wastewater and all derived products in animal feed. 
   Campbell  et  al.  (2010)  and  Kadam  (2001)  use  marine  water,  but  do  not  expand  on  the 
implications  of  this  (i.e.  whether  it  would  need  desalination  and  what  the  environmental 
consequences of this would be). 
   Stephenson et al. (2010) (and to a lesser extent Clarens et al. (2010)) are the only studies 
that consider the country specific nature of the water usage and shows that it would be lower 
in open systems in the UK due to higher rainfall than it would in other countries. None of the 
LCA studies reviewed in the report consider the implications of using freshwater: where this 
water  would  be  sourced  from,  the  consequences  on  nearby  agriculture  (or  if  it  could  be 
recycled  within  the  local  system),  and  the  consequences  of  using  it  in  water‐scarce  areas. 
Although most experts agree this is the least favourable option for water supply. Neither do 
any  of  the  LCA  studies  consider  the  added‐value  that  could  be  achieved  by  algae  helping  to 
treat wastewater. 


6.2 Land Use 

One of the suggested benefits of algae production is that it could use marginal land, and thus 
would  entail  little  additional  competition  on  land  required  for  food  production.  Land  use 
change has non‐obvious life cycle impacts, however, physical constrains from topography and 
soil  could  limit  the  land  availability  for  the  raceway  pond  system:  such  as  the  installation  of 
large  shallow  ponds  requires  relatively  flat  terrain;  Soil  issues  also  have  to  be  concerned  as 
their  porosity/  permeability  could  affect  the  need  for  pond  lining  and  sealing,  which  could 
contribute to the environmental burdens (Lundquist, et al., 2010). 
   Clarens  et  al.  (2010)  shows  that  algae  requires  less  land  than  other  biofuels,  while 
Stephenson et al. (2010) and Campbell et al. (2010) both mention that non‐arable land can be 
used,  but  none  of  the  studies  truly  take  into  account  the  impact  of  this  and  quantitatively 
shows  how  this  compares  to  first  generation  biofuels  which  require  cropland.  This  is  an 
important  feature  of  algae  growth,  and  is  one  of  the  arguments  in  favour  of  the  overall 
sustainability, yet is not demonstrated in the LCA studies.  



                                                                                                            57
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


6.3 Nutrient and Fertilizer Use 

Algae  cultivation  requires  several  fertilizers,  primarily  Nitrogen  (N),  Phosphorus  (P)  and 
Potassium (K). The requirement for fertilization cannot be avoided as the algal biomass itself 
consists  of  ~7%  Nitrogen  and  ~1%  Phosphorus.  Substituting  fossil  fuels  with  algal  biomass 
would require a lot of fertilizer (René H and Maria J, 2010). For instance, if the EU substituted 
all  existing  fuels  with  from  algae  biofuels  this  would  require  ~25  million  tonnes  of  Nitrogen 
and 4 million tonnes of Phosphorus. Supplying this would double the current EU capacity for 
fertilizer production (van Egmond, et al., 2002).  
   Recycling  nutrients  from  waste  water  could  potentially  provide  some  of  the  nutrients 
required. Also, locating large algae cultivation system near waste water treatment could help it 
holds the potential both for fuel production and waste water remediation. 


6.4 Carbon fertilisation 

Currently,  large  point  sources  of  CO2  are  concentrated  close  to  major  industrial  and  urban 
areas.  Research  from  the  IPCC  on  Carbon  Capture  and  Storage  (CCS)  identifies  that,  a  small 
proportion of large CO2 sources are close to oceans, which are potential storage locations for 
CO2  and  are  likely  to  be  the  preferred  location  for  algal  biofuel  production  (Darzins,  et  al., 
2010).  The  proximity  of  the  cultivation  to  a  carbon  source  has  been  identified  by  various 
experts as one of the possible limitations for growth. If we assume that a minimum of 1.8 ton 
of CO2 is needed to produce 1 ton of algal biomass (Kliphuis, et al., 2010), ~1.3 billion ton of 
CO2  would  be  required  to  produce  the  0.4  billion  m3  of  biodiesel  needed  to  supply  the  EU 
transport market (European Environment Agency, 2008). The distance across which CO2 may 
need  to  be  transported  to  the  cultivation  site  may  be  a  concern  as  long  CO2  transport 
distances could increase the emission and energy consumption dramatically. Campbell et al. 
(2010)  is  the  only  LCA  study  to  explore  the  implications  of  this,  showing  that  transporting 
(liquefied) carbon greatly reduces the overall sustainability of the project, while using flue gas 
or carbon from industry is more beneficial. It should be noted that separating CO2 from flue 
gas is a highly energy consuming process (~4MJ.kg‐1) (Gambini, 2000) and so the direct use of 
flue  gas  would  be  preferable.  While  the  studies  generally  considered  flue  gas  as  the  main 
carbon  source  this  needs  further  investigation  as  it  may  limit  the  areas  of  growth  (a  large 
amount  of  land  would  have  to  be  available  near  a  power  plant).  Power  plants  also  produce 
CO2 24 hours per day, but algae will only consume it during daylight, an algal system, therefore 
will only ever be able to use a small proportion of the CO2 produced from a power plant.   


                                                                                                           58
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    The EU 2009 Renewable Energy Directive does not give any incentive to use CO2 emissions 
(or wastewater), although if PBRs could capture 80% of the CO2 fed to them, they could fall 
under the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), resulting in financial incentive for industry to 
partake in algae production (Vernon, 2010). There is a danger, however in viewing algae as a 
sequestration method as CO2 use by algal cultures is not CO2 sequestration – that comes from 
algal biofuels replacing fossil fuels” (Benemann, 2010a). Campbell et al. (2010) differentiated 
between  the  carbon  released  from  fossil  fuels  (which  would  add  new  carbon  to  the 
atmosphere)  and  that  by  biomass  burning  (which  only  re‐releases  carbon  previously 
captured): this is an important differentiation to make. 


6.5 Fossil Fuel Inputs 

As  discussed  in  the  previous  chapter,  the  majority  of  the  of  the  fossil  fuel  inputs  to  algae 
cultivation  come  from  electricity  consumption  during  cultivation  sector  and  natural  gas 
consumption from the biomass drying process. Algae are quite sensitive to temperature, and 
maintaining  a  high  level  of  productivity  could  also  require  temperature  control.  If  required, 
both heating and cooling could require additional fossil fuel. The environmental performance 
could,  however,  be  improved  by  system  integration  that  to  utilize  the  waste  heating  from 
power generation for drying the algal biomass. 


6.6 Eutrophication 

Nutrient  pollution  is  termed  eutrophication  and  can  lead  to  highly  undesirable  changes  in 
ecosystem structure and function, including:  
      • Increased biomass of freshwater phytoplankton and periphyton 
      • Changes in vascular plant production, biomass, and species composition  
      • Reduced water clarity 
      • Decreases in the perceived aesthetic value of the water body 
      • Taste and water supply filtration problems 
      • Possible health risks in water supplies 
      • Elevated pH and dissolved oxygen depletion in the water column 
      • Increased probability of fish kills (Lardon, et al., 2009). 
 



                                                                                                          59
                                               AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                  Coordination Action 
                                                  FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


The  impact  of  algal  aquaculture  on  eutrophication  could  be  positive  or  negative.  Negative 
impacts  could  occur  if  residual  nutrients  in  spent  culture  medium  are  allowed  to  leach  into 
local  aquatic  systems.  On  the  other  hand,  positive  impacts  could  occur  if  algae  production 
were  to  be  integrated  into  the  treatment  of  water  bodies  already  suffering  from 
eutrophication. For example, Agricultural Research Service scientists found that 60%~90% of 
nitrogen runoff and 70%~100% of phosphorus runoff can be captured from manure effluents 
using an algal turf scrubber (ATS) (AquaFUELs, 2011a). Remediation efforts of polluted water 
bodies  suffering  from  algal  blooms  may  also  provide  significant  amounts  of  free  waste 
biomass, and this could be used for biofuel production. 
   In the case of macro‐algae, it has been suggested that cultivating it close to fish farms and 
shrimp  ponds  could  reduce  nitrate  and  phosphate  pollution  from  the  farm  and  provide  a 
source of agar (Troell, et al., 1997). 


6.7 Genetic Modified Algae 

In the search for algae that can deliver both a high biomass productivity and a high oil content, 
genetic modification is one possible option (Lundquist, et al., 2010). Applications of molecular 
genetics range from speeding up the screening and selection of desirable strains, to cultivating 
modified algae on a large scale. Traits that could be desirable include herbicide resistance to 
prevent  contamination  of  cultures  by  wild  type  organisms.  The  legal  status  of  genetically 
modified  algae  is  somewhat  unclear.  In  the  U.S,  there  is  question  about  whether  applicable 
laws  and  regulations  constrain  the  use  of  Genetic  Modified  Algae(GMA)  for  biofuel 
production, and there is the possibility that some companies may go ahead and use of GMA in 
open  systems  under  current  regulation  (or  their  absence)  (Lundquist,  et  al.,  2010).  Open 
systems present a particular challenge in terms of containment, as some culture leakage and 
transfer  (e.g.  by  waterfowl)  is  unavoidable.  Closed  bioreactors  may  appear  more  secure  but 
Lundquist et al., (2010) comments that PBRs are only cosmetically different from open ponds 
and culture leakage is unavoidable. 
In the European Union the use of genetically modified organisms is closely regulated and if 
algae were genetically modified they would come under the control of European legislation 
aiming to prevent the release genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and their entry into the 
food chain 8. There are, however, a number of projects that seek to deliver value added 

    8
        Key legislation includes:
    •     Directive 2001/18, as amended by Directive 2008/27/EC on the deliberate release into the environment
          of genetically modified organisms;
                                                                                                             60
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


products through genetic engineering in the EU including the Framework Programme 7 ‐ 
Genetic Improvement of Algae for Value Added Products (GIAVAP) project. 


6.8 Algal toxicity 

Algal toxicity may be a concern where co‐products are used to produce food. Many algae 
species can produce a wide variety of toxins ranging from simple ammonia to physiological 
active polypeptides and polysaccharides. Effects can range from acute effects (e.g. the algae 
responsible for paralytic shellfish poison may cause death) to the chronic (e.g. the toxins 
produced in red tides – carrageenans – can induce carcinogenic and ulcerative tissue changes 
over long periods of time). Toxin production is species and strain specific and may also 
depend on environmental conditions. The presence or absence of toxins is thus difficult to 
predict (Collins, 1978) (Rellán, et al., 2009).  
   From the perspective of producing biofuels, perhaps the most important issue is that 
where co‐products are used in the human food chain producers will have to show that the 
products are safe. Where algae are harvested from the wild for human consumption the 
principal concern is contamination from undesirable species. From an economic perspective 
algal toxins may be important and valuable products in their own right with applications in 
biomedical, toxicological and chemical research. 


6.9 Conclusions 

Micro‐algae  culture  can  have  a  diverse  range  of  environmental  impacts.  Many  of  these 
impacts  are  location  specific,  e.g.  water  and  land  use.  Impacts  such  as  the  use  of  genetic 
engineering  are  uncertain,  but  may  affect  what  systems  are  viable  in  particular  legislatures. 
The  impacts  presented  here  are  the  ones  identified  as  most  important  in  the  existing 
literature, but should not be considered exhaustive. In any algae cultivation scheme it should 
be  anticipated  that  environmental  monitoring  will  play  an  important  role  and  will  be  an 
ongoing requirement.   




    •   Regulation (EC) No 1830/2003 concerning the traceability and labelling of genetically modified
        organisms and the traceability of food and feed products produced from genetically modified
        organisms;
    •   Directive 2009/41/EC on the contained use of genetically modified micro-organisms.
    •
                                                                                                       61
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



 

7. Review of macro‐algae LCA  
    In  the  1970’s  the  Energy  Research  and  Development  Authority  and  the  American  Gas 
Association  took  over  the  Marine  Biomass  Concept  programme  working  on  cultivation  and 
bioconversion of the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (extensive review and discussion in Bird & 
Benson (1987)). The project was largely unsuccessful and research subsequently abandoned. 
In  1994,  Gao  &  McKinley  then  published  a  paper  entitled  ‘Use  of  macroalgae  for  marine 
biomass production and CO2 remediation: a review’ (Gao and McKinley, 1994). Little research 
was stimulated until recently when resurgence of interest in the potential of algal biofuels has 
become  intense.  Thus,  in  spite  of  the  relative  longevity  of  the  idea,  and  much  current 
speculation  about  possibilities,  there  are  very  few  published  studies  relating  to  the  social, 
economic,  environmental  (including  energy  balances)  and  technical  challenges  of  using 
macroalgae  as  a  third  generation  biofuel  feedstock.  To  our  knowledge  no  full  Life‐Cycle 
Analyses (LCA’s) exist in the published literature, in part this is due to lack of data with which 
to populate the models.  
 
Testimony to the fact that there is still very little available data, there are a number of recent 
publications addressing algal biofuels in which macro‐algae are given scant mention, and often 
only in the context of stressing the lack of information ( see for example, Chung et al. 2010; 
Singh et al. 2011; John et al. 2011; Singh & Olsen 2011).  
      One partial LCA study on macro‐algae has been completed by Aresta et al. {, 2005 #600}. 
These  authors  report  on  the  development  of  computing  software  for  a  macro‐algal  biofuel 
production LCA and give some preliminary outputs of the model. They claim that the model 
can be adapted to assess biofuel from either micro‐ or macroalgae and is summarised in Table 
7.1.  They  state  preliminary  results  of  analysis  for  Chaetomorpha  linum  and  Pterocladiella 
capillacea  grown  in  ponds  and  lipid  extracted  by  scCO2.  In  the  best  case  there  was  a  net 
energy  gain  in  the  order  of  11000MJ/t  dry  algae,  which  compared  to  9500MJ/t  dry,  gasified 
microalgae.  They  state  that  distribution  of  separated  CO2  was  more  energetically  favourable 
than  the  distribution  of  flue  gas,  and  that  the  application  of  fresh  nutrients  (as  opposed  to 
wastewater/aquaculture  recycled  nutrients)  gave  a  barely  positive  energy  balance,  if  not 
negative.  


                                                                                                          62
                                                  AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                     Coordination Action 
                                                     FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    A recent hypothetical analysis, was carried undertaken by Goh & Lee (2010) on the macro‐
algal  production  capacity  in  Sabah,  Malaysia.  Along  with  figures  for  carbohydrate  yields, 
fermentation efficiencies and net calorific value for ethanol derived from literature, this gave a 
total available energy estimate of 6.50 x 106 GJ per year. The authors go on to discuss some 
challenges and constraints but in this case none of these are quantified 

                  Table 7.1: Summary of Aresta et al. (2005) study of macro‐algae LCA 

    Aim                    To establish the energetic benefits of biofuel production from macroalgae 
    Assumptions            •   The ponds/bioreactors are situated at the coast 
                           •   Nutrients are recycled from wastewater or an associated fishery 
                           •   Gas transport is within the range of 100km 
    CO2 Capture            •   Considers capture from power plants ranging in size from 100‐600MW 
                               and powered by coal, oil or natural gas. 
                           •   Transport of either flue gas (if algae are resistant to NOx, SO2) or 
                               separated pure CO2 
    Production System           Temperature, salinity, irradiance, aeration, stirring, fertilisation 
    Harvest                     Not elucidated 
    Drying                      By solar energy or recovered heat 
    Conversion             Considers a range of processes: combustion; extraction by supercritical CO2 
                           or organic solvents, pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction, anaerobic 
                           fermentation 

    Source: {Aresta, 2005 #600} 
     
     
Despite the paucity of studies, there are a number of ongoing research projects, the outputs 
of which will include LCA for macro‐algae. These are listed below. 
 
BioMara ‐ http://www.biomara.org/ 
    Sustainable Fuels from Marine Biomass is a joint UK and Irish Interreg IVA Project. Socio‐
economic outputs will include a microeconomic cost‐benefit analysis; a macroeconomic study 
of  the  impacts  of  the  development  of  a  mari‐fuels  industry  in  Scotland  and  the  North  of 
Ireland;  a  techno‐economic  evaluation  of  systems  and  options  including  biorefinery,  energy 
scenarios  and  infrastructure.  Macroalgae  outputs  will  include  an  Environmental  Impact 
Assessment  (EIA);  optimisation  of  methane  yield  from  anaerobic  digestion  and  scaling  up; 
bioethanol production and scaling up. 
     
                                                                                                          63
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


Energetic Algae ‐ http://www.nweurope.eu/index.php?act=project_detail&id=4124 
   An  Interreg  IVB  Project  running  from  2009‐2015.  The  project  aims  to  establish  an  up  to 
date  inventory  of  current  and  planned  pilot  cultivation  sites  with  information  sharing  and 
establishment  of  best  practice.  It  will  also  identify  political,  economic,  social  and  technical 
opportunities to exploit algal biomass in North West Europe. 
    
SuperGen ‐ http://www.supergen‐bioenergy.net/ 
   Supergen  II  is  the  second  phase  of  a  UK  based  bioenergy  research  consortium  funded  by 
the  EPSRC.  ‘Systems’  is  one  of  the  Supergen  II  themes  and  includes  resource  assessment; 
technical,  economic,  environmental  and  social  systems  analyses;  multi‐criteria  assessment; 
pathways,  policies  and  impacts.  ‘Technical  performance,  economic  feasibility,  environmental 
impact and social implications of entire Bioenergy systems are to be evaluated over their full 
life‐cycle.’ Marine biomass is included as a sub‐theme within the Resources theme. 
 

7.1 Conclusions  

No LCA for macro‐algae are available in the literature, although a number of research projects 
are expected to publish on this subject in the near future. It is thought that LCAs will improve 
the  rationale  behind  each  step  of  biofuel  production  and  therefore  give  a  key  to  the  least 
harmful and most efficient way of producing biofuel from macroalgal biomass. 
   The  environmental  impacts  of  macro‐algae  production  are  also  uncertain,  despite 
cultivation on artificial structures having been undertaken for decades now in SE Asia. Unlike 
micro‐algae cultivation, water use is not considered a major obstacle. In cultivated systems the 
most significant impacts are likely to be the provision of nutrients, and competition for the use 
of the near‐shore area. Where macro‐algae are harvested from the wild, overharvesting may 
risk damage to ecosystems that are dependent on macro‐algae as the bottom trophic level.  
   Specific environmental impacts include the following issues: 
       •   Land‐Based Tank cultivation offers the advantage of possible integration of seaweed 
           into  systems  as  biofilters  with  terrestrial  aquaculture/wastewater,  however  land 
           availability may be an issue for the scale required in biofuel production. 
       •   Kelp  harvesting  has  been  the  main  source  of  seaweed  biomass  in  Europe  so  far. 
           Despite the resilience of kelp beds, resources are limited and the effect of harvesting 
           on associated biological communities is uncertain. 

                                                                                                         64
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    •   Harvesting  macroalgal  blooms  in  European  coastal  localities  mitigates  a  high 
        environmental  cost  (risk  of  anoxia,  decomposition  and  nutrient  release,  noxious 
        gases).  The  removal  of  large  quantities  of  biomass  and  associated  sediment  (mostly 
        sand) might have some impact on coastal erosion however, latest techniques aim at 
        harvesting the biomass before it is stranded on beaches. 
 
 




                                                                                                    65
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



 

8. Environmental impacts of macro‐algae production 
Four  alternative  scenarios  can  be  envisaged  for  harnessing  macro‐algal  production  for 
biofuels: cultivation at sea; tank‐based cultivation on land; harvest of the wild resource, and 
harvest  of  nuisance  bloom  species.  The  potential  impacts,  both  positive  and  negative,  vary 
between  these  alternatives  methods;  they  will  also  be  affected  by  scale.  There  is,  however, 
very  little  published  data  relating  to  the  environmental  impacts  of  cultivated  macro‐algae 
production  for  biofuels.  In  light  of  this,  this  chapter  simply  aims  to  summarise  what  little 
published  data  is  available,  and  give  reference  to  other  related  studies  that  may  highlight 
future research needs and direction. The impacts of each cultivation scenario are considered 
in terms of land and sea‐surface area required, water, fertiliser and nutrients, and ecosystem 
effects.   


8.1 Land use and near‐shore area use 


8.1.2     Cultivation at sea 

Laminaria production occurs both on land and at sea. The hatchery phase, where spores are 
released, gametophytes cultivated, culture rope seeded and seedlings grown to transplant size 
however  requires  relatively  little  space  due  to  the  minute  nature  of  the  early  stages  – 
seedlings  are  transplanted  to  sea  when  they  are  between  3‐15mm.  Large‐scale,  commercial 
production of kelps is only carried out in Asia but taking an example from Saccharina japonica 
cultivation  in  China,  36kg  of  gametophytes  was  produced  over  a  3  month  period  (from  an 
initial inoculation of 0.75kg) using 100 x 20l bottles. This would be sufficient to produce 400 
million sporelings, enough to seed 1300 hectares (Zhang, et al., 2008). Even at this scale it is 
clear that this could be easily accommodated within the space of a normal laboratory (30‐50m 
shelf space). Somewhat more space is required in order to seed the rope used to transfer the 
seedlings to sea. This is hard to predict as it depends on longline set‐up, type of culture rope 
used, nursery facilities etc. but based on extrapolations from pilot scale work in Ireland, a tank 
of 1 cubic meter would be sufficient to produce enough seeded rope for 200m of longline, or 
enough  seeded  string  for  a  minimum  of  1000m  of  longline.  Over  one  hectare  this  would 
require 25 cubic meter tanks for seeded rope or 5 tanks for seeded string.  
     

                                                                                                        66
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


8.1.3    Tank based cultivation on land  

Cultivation  in  tanks  is  more  appropriate  for  small,  fast‐growing  species  that  need  repeated 
harvesting in order to maintain an appropriate stocking density, such as Ulva sp. Bruhn et al. 
(2010)  achieved  a  maximum  biomass  production  of  45t  dry  weight  ha‐1yr‐1  under  ambient 
(outside)  light  conditions  and  with  minimal  fertiliser  input  (latitude  56°N).  They  cite  other 
studies reporting energy intensive cultivation yields of 74 t dry weight ha‐1yr‐1, and non‐energy 
intensive  yields  of  26  t  dry  weight  ha‐1yr‐1  (Ryther  et  al.  1984,  in  (Bruhn,  et  al.,  2010)). 
Obviously  yields  will  vary  according  to  methods  of  cultivation;  the  figures  here  just  serve  to 
give an idea of the area of land that might be required for cultivation of bioenergy significant 
yields.  Due  to  the  necessity  of  a  salt‐water  supply,  any  tank‐based  system  must  be  coastally 
located. Conflict with other land‐ or resource‐users is more likely to be in the form of the coast 
as a shared landscape/leisure amenity, rather than in direct competition with agricultural or 
industrial interests. 


8.1.4    On‐shore facilities for sea and tank cultivation, wild harvest and bloom harvest 

Land  is  not  required  on  a  large‐scale  for  macro‐algae  production  except  in  the  case  of  land‐
based  tank  production.  However,  because  of  the  seasonality  of  algae  production,  some 
method of storage is required. The state in which the algae are stored (wet, semi‐dry or dry) 
will affect the type of storage facility and space required.  
   All macroalgae production systems will also require on‐shore facilities in terms of offices, 
warehouses  and  perhaps  seaweed  drying  facilities.  Harbour  and  pier  facilities  are  required 
with  space  for  unloading  large  quantities  of  seaweed,  as  are  bio‐refinery  facilities,  including 
fermentation/digestion, separation and purification units. It is not envisaged that any of these 
features  will  require  more  shore  area  than  a  normal  aquaculture  operation  and  processing 
facility  requires.  Besides,  the  required  land‐space  does  not  require  arable  land,  is  not  in 
competition  with  agricultural  land,  and  therefore  the  land  area  required  for  macro‐algae 
cultivation can reasonably be excluded from the land for food vs energy debate. 


8.2 Use of Near‐shore/Off‐shore space   

Space  in  the  near‐shore  coastal  environment  is  likely  to  be  limited,  particularly  in  Europe 
where  there  is  intense  competition  for  coastal  resources.  Realistic  projections  of  potential 
yields  (e.g.  maximum  30  dry  tonnes  hectare‐1,  based  on  repeated  annual  harvests  of 
Saccharina  japonica  in  China)  give  some  idea  of  the  area  required  depending  on  the  size  of 
biorefinery/biofuel installation intended. 
                                                                                                          67
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


   Further  offshore  space  is  less  limited  and  this  has  been  suggested  as  a  potential  solution 
(e.g.  (Buck  and  Buchholz,  2004)),  but  there  are  a  number  of  technical,  environmental  and 
economic questions to resolve before this becomes a reality.  


8.3 Freshwater Use 

Freshwater  requirements  for  production  of  marine  macroalgae  are  absolutely  minimal  and 
limited to equipment care and maintenance.  


8.4 Fertiliser and nutrients 


8.4.2    Cultivation at sea:  

In Europe cultivation at sea has been practiced on a very small‐scale. The use of fertilisers has 
not been carried out/assessed, even experimentally ‐ all growth/biomass estimates reported 
being  those  naturally  attained.  The  FAO  Culture  of  Kelp  Manual  states  that  the  need  for 
fertiliser  depends  on  the  minimum  N  growth  requirements  of  kelp  and  the  hydrodynamic 
regime of the farm area (FAO, 1989). Key considerations are the ability of the water body to 
distribute nutrients, and the continual influx of non‐nutrient depleted water. The FAO states a 
general  requirement  (for  Saccharina  japonica)  of  20  mg  NO3‐N.m‐3,  but  as  little  as  6‐10  mg 
NO3‐N.m‐3  will  still  support  production  of  30  d.t.ha‐1  where  there  is  rapid  water  exchange. 
They give an annual fertiliser input of 2250 kg ha‐1, although what fertiliser is used, or the total 
N content is not stated.  
   While kelps grow and survive well in nutrient poor waters (for example, exposed locations 
on  the  west  coast  of  Ireland  support  80  wet  t.ha‐1),  N  uptake  is  positively  correlated  with 
characteristics  such  as  heat  tolerance  /  decay  resistance  and  sorus  (gamete)  formation,  and 
can therefore be central to extending the growth season (and therefore the final yield of the 
crop), or to producing high quality reproductive sporophytes. Maximising the growth season 
has been found to dramatically enhance yield and so the importance of this point should not 
be underestimated.  
   Every  site  will  also  be  different.  The  Nitrates  Directive  /  Water  Framework  Directive 
(Directive  2000/60/EC)  gives  no  specific  protocol  or  criteria  for  fertilisation  at  sea  although 
provides  a  comprehensive  format  for  monitoring  of  biological  and  physico‐chemical  water 
quality aimed at attaining or maintaining/improving ‘good’ status in water bodies. Criteria are 
such  that  fertilisation  in  certain  water  bodies  might  not  be  out  of  the  question  in  terms  of 


                                                                                                          68
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


compliance with the directive, but the public response would also need to  be considered in 
terms of acceptability.   
 
There are other options for providing sufficient nutrients for luxuriant kelp growth that have 
been proposed and in some cases experimentally, or commercially, verified. The high capacity 
of  kelps  to  remove  inorganic  N  and  P  from  the  environment  makes  them  potential  nutrient 
‘scrubbers’  from  environments  receiving  a  high  nutrient  loading  or  from  those  that  are 
eutrophic.  There  is  quite  a  large  body  of  work  that  has  started  to  elucidate  the  capacity  of 
various  macro‐algae  to  remove  nutrients  from  wastewater  sources,  or  from  other  forms  of 
higher trophic level aquaculture (Integrated Multi‐Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) concept – e.g. 
(Abreu,  et  al.,  2009),  or  see  Chopin  et  al.  (2001)  for  review).  While  the  nutrient  budgets  of 
each aquaculture installation will be site and species specific, as an example, Sanderson (2006) 
estimated that the area of S. latissima needed for remediation of a 500 tonne salmon farm in 
Scotland, over the two year growth cycle, would be between 20 and 100 hectares, dependent 
on the exact N incorporation into the seaweed. Based on δ15N isotope tracking, the effect of 
fish farm nitrogen was detected at 500m+ (Sanderson, 2006) and up to 1350m (Handley, et al., 
2004) from the source, suggesting that a macroalgae farm of sufficient size could be located 
within the area directly impacted.  
    Likewise,  remediation  of  eutrophic  areas  resulting  from  land‐based  nutrient  inputs  is  a 
possibility; however, while this may ameliorate an existing problem it does not provide a full 
solution.  Moreover,  the  Water  Framework  Directive  is  aiming  to  remove  the  source  of  the 
eutrophication  problems.  The  ideal  future  situation  must  be  that  there  is  no  eutrophication 
problem  to  remedy  in  the  first  place.  Where  it  is  deemed  suitable  as  a  mitigation  method, 
however,  Fei  (2004)  identified  four  pre‐requisites  in  order  that  macroalgae  fulfils  the 
mitigation role: that there is the possibility of  large scale aquaculture in the eutrophic area; 
that  scientific  and  technical  problems  of  cultivation  are  solved;  that  there  are  no  harmful 
ecological side‐effects; that cultivation is economically attractive. In Europe, all four of these 
questions remain at least partially unanswered.  
     
The feasibility of offshore macro‐algal production has been demonstrated at a concept level, 
with  carrier  structures  able  to  withstand  offshore  conditions  (  >8  nautical  miles  from  the 
coast, fully exposed to all oceanographic conditions – (Buck and Buchholz, 2004) – in this case 
6  m  wave  height  and  over  2  m.s‐1  current  speed  (Buck  and  Buchholz,  2004)  (Buck  and 
Buchholz, 2005). Seaweed (Saccharina latissima) grew in fully and partially exposed locations 
                                                                                                           69
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


although  no  biomass  yield  was  reported  for  the  fully  exposed  sites,  and  yields  of  4kg 
wet.weight.m‐1 was achieved at the partially exposed location. Optimisation of yield was not 
the objective of this study, so, although the yield seems rather low, future improvements may 
be possible. However, nutrient distribution in the offshore environment is both spatially and 
temporally  variable,  and  oceanic  waters  are  predominantly  oligotrophic  so  it  may  be  that 
some  form  of  fertilisation  is  necessary  in  order  to  achieve  economically  viable  yields. 
Proposals  include  integration  with  offshore  aquaculture,  possibly  itself  integrated  into 
offshore  wind  farms  e.g.  (Buck,  et  al.,  2008),  in  order  that  the  infrastructure  and 
technical/maintenance costs are shared. Artificial up‐welling of nutrient rich deep water has 
been suggested as a method of fertilising the relatively nutrient poor surface waters and this 
has been successfully trialled in circumstances related to enhancing primary productivity e.g. 
Masuda  et  al.  (2010)  (Japan),  and  in  Norwegian  fjords  to  enhance  primary  production  and 
thereby carrying capacity for mussel cultivation (Aure, et al., 2007). Filgueira et al. (2010) also 
incorporated  up‐welling  into  a  model  of  aquaculture‐environment  interactions  and  carrying 
capacity. Technical and biological/ecological research into up‐welling systems is in its infancy 
and the environmental consequences of this are unknown. 
   Another possibility is the reduction of the need for fertiliser input through strain selection. 
There  is  the  possibility  of  enhancing  nutrient  uptake characteristics  by  selective  breeding  or 
careful  selection  of  parent  source  populations  –  e.g.  Macrocystis  pyrifera  in  California 
(Kopczak,  et  al.,  1991).  Successful  breeding  of  heat‐tolerant  strains  allowing  growth  over  a 
longer season has also been carried out, e.g. Zhang et al. (2011). 


8.4.3    Land‐based tank cultivation 

As for sea cultivation, tank cultivation can also be integrated into other aquaculture systems in 
order to bio‐remediate the waste‐water of fed aquaculture at the same time as producing a 
valuable crop. There are many examples of this on experimental/pilot scales (e.g. Neori et al. 
(2003) – Ulva lactuca with gilthead seabream, (Rodruigeza and Montaño, 2007)‐ Kappaphycus 
spp. (carrageenophytes), with the milkfish Chanos chanos). In this case cultivation has a clear 
environmental benefit, but care must be taken with release of cultivation water back into the 
environment  and  continual  monitoring  will  be  necessary  as  nutrient  rich  cultivation  water 
released into environment could stimulate a eutrophic event. 




                                                                                                       70
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


8.5 Macro‐algal Domestication and Genetic Engineering 

Agronomically,  macroalgae  cultivation  is  in  its  infancy  by  comparison  with  terrestrial  crops. 
Domestication  of  kelp  began  in  earnest  in  China  during  the  mid  1950’s  when  the  summer 
sporeling method was introduced (FAO, 1989) and strain selection began to be developed in 
the early 1960’s (Zhang, et al., 2011). Strain selection has led to dramatic increases in yields in 
recent years and is considered vital to development of an economically viable industry. In spite 
of  this,  there  are  potentially  negative  consequences  of  large‐scale  release  into  the 
environment  of  modified  crops.  Byrne  &  Stone  (2011)  state,  in  relation  to  terrestrial  biofuel 
crops:  ‘The  biosecurity  risks  of  biomass  feedstock  production  for  bioenergy  need  to  be 
evaluated  since  the  functional  traits  for  bioenergy  crops  are  also  typical  of  weed  species.’ 
Escape  outside  of  the  cultivation  environment  and  establishment  in  the  wild  can  lead  to 
establishment of environmental weeds which may impact on the ‘structural and compositional 
features of biodiversity in agricultural landscapes’ (ibid.) as well as on ecosystem services. The 
authors  propose  a  risk  assessment  formula  for  assessing  invasiveness,  potential  impact  of 
establishment  (of  either  selectively  bred,  or  genetically  modified  organisms),  and  risks  of 
genetic pollution for transgenic organisms. Genetic pollution relates to hybridisation between 
domesticated and native crops (both between species, and within cultivars/populations). The 
impacts  relate  to  expression  of  hybrid  vigour  and  introgression  of  foreign  genes  (e.g. 
(Bergelson,  et  al.,  1998)  –  ‘genetic  engineering  can  substantially  increase  the  probability  of 
transgene escape) or through out‐breeding depression and reduction of reproductive output. 
Several  authors  stress  that  the  consequences  of  genetic  pollution  are  hard  to  evaluate  and 
advise  extreme  caution  (e.g.  Latham  et  al.  (2006),  also  see  articles  in  Current  Opinion  in 
Environmental Sustainability 2011, Vol.3, pp. 1‐112). There are numerous examples of escapes 
and  establishment  of  transgenic  organisms  including  some  having  long‐term  environmental 
and  economic  costs,  for  example  the  escape  of  Sorghum  halepense,  an  introduced  forage 
grass in the USA (see Raghu et al. (2006)), and Agrostis stolonifera (creeping bentgrass), also in 
the  USA  (see  Moon  et  al.  (2010),  also  for  discussion  of  strategies  of  biocontainment  of 
transgenes  for  sustainable  use  of  biotechnology).  Having  said  this,  while  transgenic  kelp  is  a 
reality (see Qin et al. (2004, , 2005, , 1999), it has been limited to closed systems which the 
authors stress must remain the case (Qin, et al., 2005).  
   Further to the above, problems common to large‐scale monocultures, particularly of non‐
native  species  are  those  of  pest  and  disease  introduction  or  enhancement  and  the  risk  of 
transfer to wild populations. These also have the potential to affect yield and therefore should 
be considered in environmental and economic projections.  

                                                                                                         71
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


   Sheppard  et  al.  (2011)  conclude:  ‘We  believe  these  future  threats  posed  by  a  large  new 
non‐food agricultural sector driven by the bioeconomy have not been given adequate thought 
or  acceptance  by  industry  and  policy  makers  and  in  many  cases  have  gone  ignored.’  As  the 
macroalgal  cultivation  industry  is  in  the  very  early  stages,  the  opportunity  to  ensure  full 
consideration of unresolved issues, and incorporate knowledge from terrestrial systems need 
not be missed.  


8.6 Ecosystem Effects 


8.6.2    Cultivation at Sea 

Again there is little published data. Effects on the benthos have been demonstrated by Eklof et 
al. (2005) (2006). Both these are tropical examples and relate to off‐bottom cultivation above 
seagrass beds. Physical and biological changes were documented in sediment quality (became 
finer),  decreased  sediment  organic  matter,  decreased  macroalgae  and  seagrass  diversity, 
decreased  abundance  and  biomass  of  macrofauna,  and  a  shift  in  seagrass  community 
structure  –  these  changes,  via  speculated  mechanisms  of  shading,  emergence  stress  and 
mechanical abrasion, are typically associated with a decrease in ecological quality. In the same 
tropical  system,  Bergman  et  al.  (2009)  (2001)  demonstrated  changes  (trophic  identity, 
abundance, species richness and community composition) in fish assemblages associated with 
seaweed cultivation that were regarded as positive in some cases and negative in others. The 
observed  differences  between  lagoons  were  thought  to  be  due  to  farming  intensity  and 
substratum character. 
   Flow modification on a bay scale have been predicted by Grant & Bacher (2001), in Sungo 
Bay,  China.  The  bay  occupies  approximately  140km2  with  a  maximum  depth  of  15m  and 
virtually  the  whole  bay  is  taken  up  with  aquaculture  of  the  kelp  Laminaria  japonica  (3300 
hectares in 1994) and the scallop Chlamys farreri (1333 hectares in 1994). A model of altered 
current speeds and particle exchange was developed which predicted a 54% reduction in flow 
and  41%  reduction  in  particle  exchange  rate  within  the  main  cultivation  area.  The  authors 
state  that  ‘disregard  for  physical  barriers  associated  with  culture  will  result  in  a  serious 
overestimation of the particle renewal term and thus an overestimation of carrying capacity.’ 
They also acknowledge the need for field measurements to validate and refine the model.   
    
Productivity of Laminaria forests is high and has been estimated, based on biomass, to be in 
the range of 800‐1900 gCm‐2 (Sjotun, et al., 1995), 603‐1750 gCm‐2 (Mann, 1973). Productivity 
                                                                                                       72
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


is  actually  greater  than  would  appear  based  on  biomass  alone  because  of  the  continual 
attrition of the lamina which results in a steady supply of particulate organic matter (POM), in 
addition  to  exudation  of  excess  fixed  carbon  contributing  to  the  supply  of  dissolved  organic 
carbon (DOC) in the system. Abdullah & Fredriksen (2004) (2004) estimated total productivity 
of L. hyperborea, i.e. including DOC (estimated at 26% of fixed carbon) and POM, to be as high 
as 3000 gCm‐2. This large supply of organic matter subsidises trophic systems outside the kelp 
ecosystem itself. For example, in South Africa, kelp derived detritus accounted for 65% of POM 
in  the  intertidal  zone  –  consumers  in  the  intertidal  were  shown  to  be  dependent  on 
productivity in the sub‐tidal and this effect was important even at sites along the coast where 
there was no immediate kelp forest (Bustamante and Branch, 1996). Steneck et al. (2002) cite 
further studies demonstrating carbon contributions to intertidal, offshore, shallow and deep 
soft‐sediment,  and  terrestrial  ecosystems.  Large‐scale  macroalgal  cultivation  will  therefore 
also contribute to the DOC and POM in the local ecosystem (although regular harvesting will 
alter the overall dynamics) and this will perhaps be a positive effect. However quantification 
of  the  contribution  of  organic  matter  and  the  impact  on  the  ecosystem  has  not  so  far  been 
studied.  


8.6.3    Land‐based Tank Cultivation 

There is limited potential for effects due to the semi‐enclosed nature of the system, except for 
the potential stimulation of a eutrophication event by release of nutrient enhanced water.  


8.6.4    Wild Harvest 

Kelp forest ecosystems have a high intrinsic ecological stability (Steneck, et al., 2002) meaning 
that  in  themselves  they  are  relatively  resilient  and  can  withstand  considerable  physical 
disturbance, including that of harvesting. However, kelp individuals and ecosystems support a 
very diverse and abundant flora and fauna e.g. Christie et al. (2003), Norderhaug et al. (2003) 
and  studies  have  shown  that  the  resilience  of  the  associated  communities  tends  to  be  less 
than  that  of  kelp  forest  itself  and  the  recovery  times  post‐harvest  slower  than  for  the  kelps 
(Christie, et al., 1998). Further to this, multi‐trophic interactions are largely unknown, but see 
Lorentsen et al. (2010) for a comprehensive study of trophic interactions between kelps and 
associated fauna and consequences of harvesting.  
    High  productivity  means  that  kelp  ecosystems  tend  to  provide  trophic  subsidies  to  other 
inter‐related ecosystems (e.g. (Abdullah and Fredriksen, 2004) (Jørgensen and Christie, 2003)) 
so  de‐stabilisation  of  kelp  ecosystems  has  the  potential  to  have  far‐reaching  consequences. 
                                                                                                          73
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


The  effect  will  be  very  much  dependent  on  scale  of  the  harvest.  Norway  has  experience  of 
long‐term  kelp  harvesting  with  apparent  stability  (Vea  and  Ask,  2010)  but  a  recent  paper 
suggests  that  the  effects  of  the  harvest  (in  terms  of  local  and  offshore  ecosystems)  are  not 
fully appreciated at present and may be more detrimental than previously thought (Lorentsen, 
et al., 2010). 
    For a full discussion  of  the potential effects of  harvesting see Ratcliff (Ratcliff J (in press), 
2010). 


8.6.5     Harvest of blooms 

Liu et al. (2009) found large‐scale porphyra aquaculture in combination with a eutrophic water 
body  stimulated  a  massive  (400km2)  Enteromorpha  prolifera  bloom  in  China.  Removal  of 
bloom  biomass  is  important  to  prevent  the  formation  of  the  anoxic  conditions  that  follow 
during  the  degradation  of  the  biomass,  which  can  be  extremely  detrimental  to  other 
organisms.  Bloom events resulting  from eutrophic water bodies are not uncommon and can 
result  in  substantial  quantities  of  biomass  however,  they  may  be  unpredictable  in  terms  of 
time and space which results in logistical difficulties for harvesting and processing, particularly 
in terms of transport of a wet, bulky material, which will impact the GHG emissions budget for 
the process. Further to this, as mentioned above, the ideal is that the eutrophication initially 
stimulating  the  bloom  is  dealt  with  in  the  first  place  rather  than  attempting  to  mitigate  the 
effects of a different problem.  
 


8.7 Environmental Contamination 

During the nursery stage of cultivation antibiotics (chloromycetin) and germanium dioxide are 
sometimes  used  in  order  to  control  contamination  of  the  gametophyte  and  juvenile 
sporophyte  cultures  with  alginic  acid  decomposing  bacteria  and  diatoms  (respectively).  In 
terms  of  contamination,  standard  laboratory  procedures  avoiding  release  of  these  agents  to 
the  environment  should  be  sufficient  to  avoid  potential  negative  environmental 
consequences. 
    Solid  waste  will  be  mainly  in  the  form  of  ropes,  buoys  and  structural  components  of  the 
farm. Longevity is of obvious importance from an economic perspective however, particularly 
in  terms  of  rope  requirements,  which  over  a  large‐scale  farm  will  amount  to  a  substantial 
quantity,  consideration  of  materials  will  be  important.  In  China,  seeding  has  predominantly 
been  carried  out  on  palm‐fibre  rope  which  is  biodegradable.  However,  in  Europe,  trial 
                                                                                                          74
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


cultivation projects have tended to use synthetics – either polypropylene or polyvinyl alcohol 
based vinylon fibre. Potential for re‐use or recycling should be assessed.  
   Airborne emissions during both production (above the macro‐algal crop) and storage have 
not been measured. However, kelps are known to emit volatile short‐lived organic compounds 
like organo‐iodines and molecular iodine which play a major role in the iodine biogeochemical 
cycle.  The  emissions  are  significant  especially  when  kelps  are  subjected  to  stress  such  as 
emersion,  exposure  to  ultraviolet  radiation  or  elevated  ozone.  These  volatile  organic 
compounds  could  contribute  to  marine  aerosol  formation  and  have  a  direct  effect  on  the 
earth’s climate (see Carpenter et.al. (2000)). Emissions of H2S during wet storage would also 
need to be quantified and monitored.  


8.8 Conclusions 

The  environmental  impact  of  macro‐algae  production  for  biofuels  has  yet  to  be  assessed. 
Nevertheless,  there  is  evidence  that  this  source  of  biomass  is  associated  with  a  range  of 
impacts.  In  cultivated  systems  the  most  significant  impacts  are  likely  to  be  the  provision  of 
nutrients,  and  competition  for  the  use  of  the  near‐shore  area.  Where  macro‐algae  are 
harvested from the wild, overharvesting may risk damage to ecosystems that are dependent 
on macro‐algae.  

9. Conclusions and recommendations 
This  report  examines  the  available  literature  on  biofuel  production  from  micro‐algae  and 
macro‐algae,  focusing  on  the  life  cycle  and  environmental  impacts  reported,  and  the 
methodologies that have been used to assess them. This examination was supplemented with 
information gathered from experts and stakeholders.  


9.1 Conclusions for micro‐algae LCA, and environmental impacts 

   The  impacts  of  micro‐algal  biofuel  production  have  been  assessed  using  a  variety  of  life 
cycle  assessment  (LCA)  approaches.  These  studies  share  a  common  aspiration  to  identify 
production  bottlenecks  and  help  steer  the  future  development  of  algae  biofuel  technology. 
Clarens (2010b), for example, claims that one of the strengths of LCA is that it “can provide a 
quantitative  road  map,  and  when  it  is  combined  with  financial  modelling  can  provide  an 
excellent barometer for how to develop algae bioenergy”. Yet, the extent to which the studies 
meet this aspiration appears to be somewhat limited.  

                                                                                                         75
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    Issues of concern include: 
        • The conceptual, and often incomplete, nature of the systems under investigation, and 
            the absence of coherent and well designed processes.  
        • The limited sources of primary data upon which process assumptions are based, and 
            the  extrapolation  of  laboratory  data  to  production  scale.  The  transparency  of 
            assumptions is also poor. 
        • The  validity  of  specific  assumptions,  particularly  those  relating  to  the  biomass  and 
            lipid productivity, has been called into question, and may be over optimistic.  
        • The  use  of  inconsistent  boundaries,  functional  units  and  allocation  methodologies 
            impedes comparison between studies.  
     
Despite  these  shortcomings,  and  the  concerns  voiced  by  stakeholders  about  the  extent  to 
which  the  existing  LCA  can  be  considered  representative,  this  examination  of  LCA  studies 
suggest that: 
        • The  net  energy  ratio  (NER)  for  biomass  or  lipid  production  in  a  simplistic  but 
            normalized  system  is  unattractive,  or,  at  best,  marginal.  This  suggests  that  algae 
            production may be most attractive where energy is not the main product. 
        • Carbon  emissions  from  algae  biomass  –  calculated  using  default  emission  factors  – 
            produced  in  raceway  ponds  are  comparable  to  the  emissions  associated  with 
            conventional biodiesel. The carbon emissions from algae biomass produced in PBRs 
            are  greater  than  the  emissions  associated  with  conventional  diesel.  The  principle 
            reason for this is the electricity used to pump the algal broth around the system.  
        • Raceway Pond Systems consistently demonstrate a more attractive energy ratio than 
            PBR  Systems  (it  should  also  be  borne  in  mind  that  a  commercial  system  may 
            combine elements of both). 
        • Algae production requires a number of energy demanding processes. However, within 
            the  LCA  studies  considered  here  there  is  no  consistent  hierarchy  of  energy 
            consumption. Aspects that will need to be addressed in a viable commercial system 
            include:  the  energy  required  for  pumping,  the  embodied  energy  required  for 
            construction, the embodied energy in fertilizer, and the energy required for drying 
            and de‐watering.  
 


                                                                                                       76
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


An important caveat to these conclusions is that they reflect the state of the existing academic 
literature,  and  this  is  inevitably  an  imperfect  reflection  of  systems  being  evaluated  by 
companies.  It  is  quite  possible  that  many  of  the  challenges  identified  have  been  addressed, 
but  that  the  information  about  how  this  has  been  achieve  is  yet  to  make  it  into  the  public 
domain.  
    In  the  absence  of  commercially  operating  systems,  attempts  to  assess  the  lifecycle  and 
environmental  impacts  of  algae  production  are  necessarily  based  on  assumed  process 
descriptions. This does not negate the value of these studies, but it does mitigate in favour of 
a  cautious  approach  to  their  interpretation.  Future  LCA  are  can  be  improved  if  these  issues 
identified  above  are  addressed,  but  perhaps  the  greatest  opportunity  for  improvement  lies 
obtaining good quality primary data from pilot scale systems and improving the extrapolation 
of this data to full scale systems. 
 
Looking  at  the  environmental  impacts  of  algae  production,  it  is  apparent  that  micro‐algae 
culture can have a diverse range of environmental impacts, but, that depending on how the 
system  is  configured,  these  may  be  positive  or  negative.  Other  than  the  energy  balance, 
possibly  the  most  important  environmental  aspect  of  micro‐algae  culture  that  needs  to  be 
considered  is  water  management:  both  the  water  consumed  by  the  process,  and  the 
emissions to water courses from the process.  


9.2 Conclusions for macro‐algae LCA and environmental impacts 

No LCA for macro‐algae are available in the literature, although a number of research projects 
are expected to publish on this subject in the near future. 
    The  environmental  impacts  of  macro‐algae  production  are  also  uncertain.  Unlike  micro‐
algae cultivation, water use is not considered a major obstacle. In cultivated systems the most 
significant impacts are likely to be the provision of nutrients, and competition for the use of 
the near‐shore area. Where macro‐algae are harvested from the wild, overharvesting may risk 
damage to ecosystems that are dependent on macro‐algae as the bottom trophic level.  




                                                                                                         77
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


 

10. References 
ABDULLAH, M. and FREDRIKSEN, S. (2004) Production, respiration and exudation of dissolved 
organic matter by the kelp Laminaria hyperborea along the west coast of Norway. Journal of 
the Marine Biological Association of the UK, 84, 887‐891. 

ABO (2010) Algal Biomass Organization Questions Accuracy of University of Virginia Algae Life 
Cycle  Study  [Internet],  Algal  Biomass  Organisation  (ABO),  available  from: 
<http://www.algalbiomass.org/media‐center/news‐press‐releases/abo‐press‐releases/algal‐
biomass‐organization‐questions‐accuracy‐of‐university‐of‐virginia‐algae‐life‐cycle‐study‐2/>  
[Accessed: 13 May 2011]. 

ABREU,  M.,  VARELA,  D.,  HENRÍQUEZ,  L.,  VILLARROEL,  A.,  YARISH,  C.,  SOUSA‐PINTO,  I.  and 
BUSCHMANN, A. (2009) Traditional versus Integrated Multi‐Trophic Aquaculture of Gracilaria 
chilensis  C.J.  Bird,  J.  McLachlan  &  E.C.  Oliveira:  Productivity  and  physiological  performance. 
Aquaculture 293: 211‐220. . 

AMIN, S. (2009) Review on biofuel oil and gas production processes from microalgae. Energy 
Conversion and Management, 50, 1834‐1840. 

APT,  K.  E.  and  BEHRENS,  P.  W.  (1999)  COMMERCIAL  DEVELOPMENTS  IN  MICROALGAL 
BIOTECHNOLOGY. Journal of Phycology, 35, 215‐226. 

AQUAFUELS (2010) Project Info [Internet], available from: <http://www.aquafuels.eu/project‐
info.html>  [Accessed: 16/7/2010,  

AQUAFUELS (2011a) Report on Biology and Biotechnology of algae with indication of criteria 
for strain selection. 

AQUAFUELS (2011b) Task 1.9 Mapping of natural resources in artificial, marine and freshwater 
bodies. 

AURE, J., STRAND, Ø., ERGA, S. and STROHMEIER, T. (2007) Primary production enhancement 
by artificial upwelling in a western Norwegian fjord. Marine Ecology Progress Series 352, 39‐
52. 

BARSANI, L. and GUALTIERI, P. (2006) Algae Anatomy, Biochemistry, and Biotechnology. Boca 
Raton, FL. CRC Press. 

BENEMANN, J. R. (2010a) Microalgae Biofuels and Animal Feeds: An Introduction. 

BENEMANN, J. R. (2010b) Questionnaire about LCA on Microalgae. 

                                                                                                       78
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


BENEMANN,  J.  R.  and  OSWALD,  W.  J.  (1996)  Systems  and  economic  analysis  of  microalgae 
ponds for conversion of CO2 to biomass. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology 
Center. 

BERGELSON, J., PURRINGTON, C. and WICHMANN, G. (1998) Promiscuity in transgenic plants. 
Nature, 395. 

BERGMAN,  K.,  SVENSSON,  S.  and  ÖHMAN,  M.  (2009)  Influence  of  algal  farming  on  fish 
assemblages. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 42 1379‐1389. 

BIRD,  K.  and  BENSON,  P.  (1987)  Seaweed  Cultivation  for  Renewable  Resources.,  Elsevier 
Science Publishers. 

BOGUSKI, T. K., HUNT, R. G., CHOLAKIS, J. M. and FRANKLIN, W. E. (1996) Environmental Life‐
Cycle Assessment. New York, London, McGraw‐Hill. 

BRENNAN, L. and OWENDE, P. (2010) Biofuels from microalgae—A review of technologies for 
production,  processing,  and  extractions  of  biofuels  and  co‐products.  Renewable  and 
Sustainable Energy Reviews, 14, 557‐577. 

BRUHN, A., DAHL, J., NIELSEN, H., NIKOLAISEN, L., RASMUSSEN, M., MARKAGER, S., OLESEN, 
B.,  ARIAS,  C.  and  JENSEN,  P.  (2010)  Bioenergy  potential  of  Ulva  lactuca:  biomass  yield, 
methane production and combustion. Bioresource Technology. 

BUCK, B. and BUCHHOLZ, C. (2004) The offshore‐ring: A new system design for the open ocean 
aquaculture of macroalgae. Journal of Applied Phycology, 16, 355‐368. 

BUCK,  B.  and  BUCHHOLZ,  C.  (2005)  Response  of  offshore  cultivated  Laminaria  saccharina  to 
hydrodynamic forcing in the North Sea. Aquaculture, 250, 674‐691. 

BUCK, B., KRAUSE, G., MICHLER‐CIELUCH, T., BRENNER, M., BUCHHOLZ, C., BUSCH, J., FISCH, 
R., GEISEN, M. and ZIELINSKI, O. (2008) Meeting the quest for spatial efficiency: progress and 
prospects  of  extensive  aquaculture  within  offshore  wind  farms.  Helgoland  Marine  Research, 
62, 269‐281. 

BUSTAMANTE,  H.  and  BRANCH,  G.  (1996)  The  dependence  of  intertidal  consumers  on  kelp‐
derived  organic  matter  on  the  west  coast  of  South  Africa.  Journal  of  Experimental  Marine 
Biology and Ecology, 196, 1‐28. 

BYRNE, M. and STONE, L. (2011) The need for ‘duty of care’ when introducing new crops for 
sustainable agriculture. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 3, 50‐54. 

CARLSSON,  A.  S.,  VAN  BEILIN,  J.  B.,  MOLLER,  R.  and  CLAYTON,  D.  (2007)  Micro‐  and  Macro‐
algae: Utility for Industrial Applications., University of York, CPL Press. 

                                                                                                    79
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                             Coordination Action 
                                             FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


CARPENTER,  L.,  MALIN,  G.,  LISS,  P.  and  KUPPER,  F.  (2000)  Novel  biogenic  iodine‐containing 
trihalomethanes  and  other  short‐lived  halocarbons  in  the  coastal  East  Atlantic.  Global 
Biogeochemical Cycles, 12, 1191‐1204. 

CHEN,  F.  (1996)  High  cell  density  culture  of  microalgae  in  heterotrophic  growth.  Trends  in 
Biotechnology, 14, 421‐426. 

CHEN,  F.  and  JOHNS,  M.  (1995)  A  strategy  for  high  cell  density  culture  of  heterotrophic 
microalgae with inhibitory substrates. Journal of Applied Phycology, 7, 43‐46. 

CHEN,  F.  and  JOHNS,  M.  R.  (1996)  Heterotrophic  growth  of  Chlamydomonas  reinhardtii  on 
acetate in chemostat culture. Process Biochemistry, 31, 601‐604. 

CHISTI, Y. (2007) Biodiesel from microalgae. Biotechnology Advances, 25, 294‐306. 

CHISTI,  Y.  (2008a)  Biodiesel  from  microalgae  beats  bioethanol.  Trends  in  Biotechnology,  26, 
126‐131. 

CHOPIN, T., BUSCHMANN, A., HALLING, C., TROELL, M., KAUTSKY, N., NEORI, A., KRAEMER, G., 
ZERTUCHE‐GONZÁLEZ, J., YARISH, C. and NEEFUS, C. (2001) Minireview. Integrating seaweeds 
into  marine  aquaculture  systems:  A  key  toward  sustainability.  Journal  of  Phycology,  37,  975‐
986. 

CHRISTIE,  H.,  FREDRIKSEN,  S.  and  RINDE,  E.  (1998)  Regrowth  of  kelp  and  colonization  of 
epiphyte  and  fauna  community  after  kelp  trawling  at  the  coast  of  Norway.  Hydrobiologia, 
375/376, 49‐58. 

CHRISTIE,  H.,  JORGENSEN,  N.,  NORDERHAUG,  K.  and  WAAGE‐NIELSEN,  E.  (2003)  Species 
distribution  and  habitat  exploitation  of  fauna  associated  with  kelp  (Laminaria  hyperborea) 
along  the  Norwegian  coast.  Journal  of  the  Marine  Biological  Association  of  the  UK,  83,  687‐
699. 

CLARENS,  A.,  RESURRECCION,  E.,  WHITE,  M.  and  COLOSI,  L.  (2010)  Environmental  Life  Cycle 
Comparison  of  Algae  to  Other  Bioenergy  Feedstocks.  Environmental  Science  Technology,  44, 
1813‐1819. 

COLLINS, M. (1978) Algal Toxins. Microbiological reviews, 42, 726‐746. 

DARZINS, A., PIENKOS, P. and EDYE, L. (2010) Current Status and Potential for Algae Biofuels 
Production. [Available from: <Error! Hyperlink reference not valid.. 

DE SMET, B., WHITE, P. R. and OWENS, J. W. (1996) Environmental life‐cycle assessment. New 
York, McGraw‐Hill. 


                                                                                                      80
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


DEMIRBAS,  A.  (2009)  Progress  and  recent  trends  in  biodiesel  fuels.  Energy  Conversion  and 
Management, 50, 14‐34. 

EC  (2009)  Directive  on  the  promotion  of  the  use  of  energy  from  renewable  sources  and 
amending  and  subsequently  repealing  Directives  2001/77/EC  and  2003/30/EC.  IN  E. 
COMMISSION (Ed.). Brussels, Belgium, European Commission. 

EC (2010) ILCD Handbook: General guide for Life Cycle Assessment ‐ Detailed guidance. Joint 
Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability,European Commission. 

EKLÖF,  J.,  DE  LA  TORRE  CASTRO,  M.,  ADELSKÖLD,  L.,  JIDDAWI,  N.  and  KAUTSKY,  N.  (2005) 
Differences  in  macrofaunal  and  seagrass  assemblages  in  seagrass  beds  with  and  without 
seaweed farms. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 63, 385‐396. 

EKLÖF,  J.,  HENRIKSSON,  R.  and  KAUTSKY,  N.  (2006)  Effects  of  tropical  open‐water  seaweed 
farmin on seagrass ecosystem structure and function. Marine Ecology Progress Series 352, 73‐
84. 

EUROPEAN ENVIRONMENT AGENCY (2008) Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and Projections 
in Europe 2008. European Environment Agency, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

FAO  (1989)  Culture  of  kelp  (Laminaria  japonica)  in  China.  Training  manual  89/5.  Food  and 
Agriculture  Organization  of  the  United  Nations  (FAO).  [Available  from:  < 
http://www.fao.org/docrep/field/003/AB724E/AB724E00.htm >]. 

FEI, X. (2004) Solving the coastal eutrophication problem by large scale seaweed cultivation. 
Hydrobiologia, 512, 145‐151. 

FILGUEIRA,  R.,  GRANT,  J.,  STRAND,  Ø.,  ASPLIN,  L.  and  AURE,  J.  (2010)  A  simulation  model  of 
carrying  capacity  for  mussel  culture  in  a  Norwegian  fjord:  Role  of  induced  upwelling. 
Aquaculture, 308, 20‐27. 

FONSECA, D. (August 2010) Questionnaire about LCA on Microalgae. 

GAO, K. and MCKINLEY, K. (1994) Use of macroalgae for marine biomass production and CO2 
remediation: a review. Journal of Applied Phycology, 6, 45‐60. 

GNANSOUNOU, E., DAURIAT, A., VILLEGAS, J. and PANICHELLI, L. (2009) Life cycle assessment 
of biofuels: Energy and greenhouse gas balances. Bioresource Technology, 100, 4919‐4930. 

GRAHAM, L. E. and WILCOX, L. W. (2000) Algae. Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice Hall Inc. 

GRANT,  J.  and  BACHER,  C.  (2001)  A  numerical  model  of  flow  modification  induced  by 
suspended aquaculture in a Chinese bay. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 
58, 1003‐1011. 
                                                                                                       81
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


GRAVERHOLT,  O.  and  ERIKSEN,  N.  (2007)  Heterotrophic  high‐cell‐density  fed‐batch  and 
continuous‐flow  cultures  of  &lt;i&gt;Galdieria  sulphuraria&lt;/i&gt;  and  production  of 
phycocyanin. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 77, 69‐75. 

HANDLEY, L., DAVIES, I., ROBINSON, C., RAVEN, J. and HADFIELD, B. (2004) Fish‐farm nitrogen: 
It’s  area  of  biological  impact  (a  scoping  study).  Final  Project  Report  to  The  Crown  Estate. 
[Available from: <www.thecrownestate.co.uk/aqua_fish_farm_nitrogen.pdf>]. 

HASE,  R.,  OIKAWA,  H.,  SASAO,  C.,  MORITA,  M.  &  WATANABE,  Y.  (2000)  Photosynthetic 
production of microalgal biomass in a raceway system under greenhouse conditions in Sendai 
city. Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering, 89, 157‐163. 

HEIJUNGS, R., GUINEE, J. B., HUPPES, G., LANKREIJER, R. M., UDO DE HAES, H. A., WEGENER 
SLEESWIJK,  A.,  ANSEMS,  A.  M.  M.,  EGGELS,  P.  G.,  VAN  DUIN,  R.  and  DE  GOEDE,  H.  P.  (1992) 
Environmental life cycle assessment of products: Guide LCA. Centre of Environmental Science 
(CML), Unilever, Leiden, The Netherlands. 

IEA,  B.  (2010)  Algae  –  The  Future  for  Bioenergy?  Summary  and  conclusions  from  the  IEA 
Bioenergy ExCo64 Workshop. 

ISO (1997) Environmental management‐life cycle assessment‐principle and framework. ISO. 

JØRGENSEN,  N.  and  CHRISTIE,  H.  (2003)  Diurnal,  horizontal  and  vertical  dispersal  of  kelp‐
associated fauna. Hydrobiologia 503, 69‐76. 

JORQUERA,  O.,  KIPERSTOK,  A.,  SALES,  E.  A.,  EMBIRUÇU,  M.  and  GHIRARDI,  M.  L.  (2010) 
Comparative  energy  life‐cycle  analyses  of  microalgal  biomass  production  in  open  ponds  and 
photobioreactors. Bioresource Technology, 101, 1406‐1413. 

KADAM,  K.  L.  (2001)  Microalgae  production  from  power  plant  flue  gas:  Environmental 
implications on a life cycle basis. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. 

KLIPHUIS, A. M. J., DE WINTER, L., VEJRAZKA, C., MARTENS, D. E., JANSSEN, M. and WIJFFELS, 
R.  H.  (2010)  Photosynthetic  efficiency  of  Chlorella  sorokiniana  in  a  turbulently  mixed  short 
light‐path photobioreactor. Biotechnology Progress, 26, 687‐696. 

KOPCZAK,  C.,  ZIMMERMAN,  R.  and  KREMER,  J.  (1991)  Variation  in  nitrogen  physiology  and 
growth  among  geographically  isolated  populations  of  the  giant  kelp  Macrocystis  pyrifera 
(Phaeophyta). Journal of Phycology, 27, 149‐158. 

LARDON, L., HELIAS, A., SIALVE, B., STEYER, J. P. and BERNARD, O. (2009) Life‐Cycle Assessment 
of Biodiesel Production from Microalgae. Environmental Science & Technology, 43, 6475‐6481. 



                                                                                                       82
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                             Coordination Action 
                                             FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


LATHAM, J., WILSON, A. and STEINBRECHER, R. (2006) The Mutational Consequences of Plant 
Transformation. Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology. 1‐7. 

LIU, D., KEESING, J., XING, Q. and SHI, P. (2009) World’s largest macroalgae bloom caused by 
expansion of seaweed aquaculture in China. Marine Pollution Bulletin 58, 888‐895. 

LORENTSEN,  S.‐H.,  SJOTUN,  K.  and GRÉMILLET,  D.  (2010)  Multi‐trophic consequences  of  kelp 
harvest. . Biological Conservation, 143, 2054‐2062. 

LUNDQUIST,  T.  J.,  WOERTZ,  I.  C.,  QUINN,  N.  W.  T.  and  BENEMANN,  J.  R.  (2010)  A  Realistic 
Technology  and  Engineering  Assessment  of  Algae  Biofuel  Production.  Energy  Biosciences 
Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California. 

MACADAM,  J.  (2010)  Combined  Heat  &  Power  and  District  Heating:the  urban  context.  A 
lecture to the MSc Course in Sustainable Energy Futures, Imperial College London. London. 

MANN, K. (1973) Seaweeds: Their productivity and strategy for growth. Science 182, 975‐981. 

MASUDA, T., FURUYA, K., KOHASHI, N., SATO, M., TAKEDA, S., UCHIYAMA, M., HORIMOTO, N. 
and ISHIMARU, T. (2010) Lagrangian observation of phytoplankton dynamics at an artificially 
enriched subsurface water in Sagami Bay, Japan. Journal of Oceanography, 66, 801‐813. 

METEOTEST database Meteonorm. 

MOLINA GRIMA, E., BELARBI, E. H., ACIEN FERNANDEZ, F. G., ROBLES MEDINA, A. and CHISTI, 
Y.  (2003)  Recovery  of  microalgal  biomass  and  metabolites:  process  options  and  economics. 
Biotechnology Advances, 20, 491‐515. 

MOON,  H.,  ABERCROMBIE,  J.,  KAUSCH,  A.  and  STEWART,  J.  C.  (2010)  Sustainable  Use  of 
Biotechnology for Bioenergy Feedstocks. Environmental Management, 46, 531‐538. 

NECTON (1990) Estudo de localização de unidade industrial para produção de microalgas em 
portugal. 

NEORI, A., MSUYA, F., SHAULI, L., SCHUENHOFF, A., KOPEL, F. and SHPIGEL, M. (2003) A novel 
three‐stage  seaweed  (Ulva  lactuca)  biofilter  design  for  integrated  mariculture.  Journal  of 
Applied Phycology, 15, 543‐553. 

NORDERHAUG, K., FREDRIKSEN, S. and NYGAARD, K. (2003) Trophic importance of Laminaria 
hyperborea  to  kelp  forest  consumers  and  the  importance  of  bacterial  degradation  to  food 
quality. Marine Ecology Progress Series 255, 135‐144. 

OILGAE (2010) Algae Cultivation. 


                                                                                                     83
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


PATIL, V., TRAN, K. Q. and GISELRØD, H. R. (2008) Towards sustainable production of biofuels 
from microalgae. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 9, 1188‐1195. 

PULZ,  O.  (2001a)  Photobioreactors:  production  systems  for  phototrophic  microorganisms. 
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 57, 287‐293. 

PULZ,  O.  (2001b)  Photobioreactors:  production  systems  for  phototrophic  microorganisms. 
Appl Microbiol Biotech, 57. 

QIN,  S.,  JIANG,  P.  and  TSENG,  C.  (2004)  Molecular  biotechnology  of  marine  algae  in  China. 
Hydrobiologia 512, 21‐26. 

QIN, S., JIANG, P. and TSENG, C. (2005) Transforming kelp into a marine bioreactor. Trends in 
Biotechnology, 23, 264‐268. 

QIN,  S.,  SUN,  G.‐Q.,  JINAG,  P.,  ZOU,  L.‐H.,  WU,  Y.  and  TSENG,  C.‐K.  (1999)  Review  of  genetic 
engineering  of  Laminaria  japonica  (Laminariales,  Phaeophyta)  in  China.  Hydrobiologia 
398/399, 469‐472. 

RAGHU,  S.,  ANDERSON,  R.,  DAEHLER,  C.,  DAVIS,  A.,  WIEDENMANN,  R.,  SIMBERLOFF,  D.  and 
MACK, R. (2006) Adding Biofuels to the Invasive Species Fire? Science 313, 1742. 

RATCLIFF  J  (IN  PRESS)  (  2010)  Evaluation  of  the  existing  and  future  biomass  potential  of  the 
wild kelp resource in the UK and Ireland. Proceedings of Bioten ‐ Engaging UK Bioenergy. 

RAYNOLDS,  M.,  FRASER,  R.  and  CHECKEL,  D.  (2000a)  The  relative  mass‐energy‐economic 
(RMEE)  method  for  system  boundary  selection  Part  1:  A  means  to  systematically  and 
quantitatively select LCA boundaries. The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 5, 37‐
46. 

RAYNOLDS,  M.,  FRASER,  R.  and  CHECKEL,  D.  (2000b)  The  relative  mass‐energy‐economic 
(RMEE)  method  for  system  boundary  selection.  Part  2:  Selecting  the  Boundary  Cut‐off 
Parameter  (ZRMEE)  and  its  Relationship  to  Overall  Uncertainty.  The  International  Journal  of 
Life Cycle Assessment, 5, 96‐104. 

RELLÁN, S., OSSWALD, J., SAKER, M., GAGO‐MARTINEZ, A. and VASCONCELOS, V. (2009) First 
detection of anatoxin‐a in human and animal dietary supplements containing cyanobacteria. 
Food and Chemical Toxicology, 47, 2189‐2195. 

RENÉ H, W. and MARIA J, B. (2010) An Outlook on Microalgal Biofuels. Science, 329, 796‐799. 

RODRUIGEZA,  M.  and  MONTAÑO,  M.  (2007)  Bioremediation  potential  of  three 
carrageenophytes  cultivated  in  tanks  with  seawater  from  fish  farms.  Journal  of  Applied 
Phycology, 19, 755‐762. 

                                                                                                          84
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


SAIC (2006) Life Cycle Assessment: Principles and Practice. Scientific Applications International 
Corporation  (SAIC).  National  Risk  Management  Research  Laboratory,  U.S.  Environmental 
Protection Agency, Cincinnati, USA. 

SANDER, K. and MURTHY, G. S. (2010) Life cycle analysis of algae biodiesel. The International 
Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 1‐11. 

SANDERSON,  J.  (2006)  Reducing  the  environmental  impact  of  seacage  fish  farming  through 
cultivation of seaweed. Scottish Association of Marine Science,  

SCHENK, M. P., THOMAS‐HALL, S. R., STEPHENS, E., MARX, U. C., MUSSGNUG, J. H., POSTEN, 
C.,  KRUSE,  O.  and  HANKAMER,  B.  (2008)  Second  Generation  Biofuels:  High‐Efficiency 
Microalgae for Biodiesel Production. Bioenergy Research, 1, 20‐43. 

SETAC  (1993)  Guidelines  for  Life‐Cycle  Assessment:  a  ‘Code  of  Practice'  from  the  workshop 
held at Sesimbra, Portugal, 31 March ‐ 3 April 1993 Society of Environmental Toxicology and 
Chemistry (SETAC) Journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research  

SHEEHAN,  J.,  CAMOBRECO,  V.,  DUFFIELD,  J.,  GRABOSKI,  M.  and  SHAPOURI,  H.  (1998a)  Life 
cycle inventory of biodiesel and petroleum diesel for use in an urban bus. Golden, CO (US). 

SHEEHAN,  J.,  DUNAHAY,  T.,  BENEMANN,  J.  &  ROESSLER,  P.  (1998b)  A  Look  Back  at  the  US 
Department  of  Energy’s  Aquatic  Species  Program—Biodiesel  from  Algae.  U.  D.  O.  ENERGY., 
Golden, CO. 

SHEPPARD, A., GILLESPIE, I., HIRSCH, M. and BEGLEY, C. (2011) Biosecurity and sustainability 
within the growing global bioeconomy. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 3, 4‐
10. 

SIALVE,  B.,  BERNET,  N.  and  BERNARD,  O.  (2009)  Anaerobic  digestion  of  microalgae  as  a 
necessary  step  to  make  microalgal  biodiesel  sustainable.  Biotechnology  Advances,  27,  409‐
416. 

SJOTUN,  K.,  FREDRIKSEN,  S.,  RUENESS,  J.  and  LEIN,  T.  (1995)  Ecological  studies  of  the  kelp 
Laminaria hyperborea (Gunnerus) Foslie in Norway In Ecology of Fjords and Coastal Waters., 
Elsevier Science. 

STENECK, R., GRAHAM, M., BOURQUE, B., CORBETT, D., ERLANDSON, J., ESTES, J. and TEGNER, 
M. (2002) Kelp forest ecosystems: biodiversity, stability, resilience and future. Environmental 
Conservation 29, 436‐459. 

STEPHENSON,  A.  L.,  KAZAMIA,  E.,  DENNIS,  J.  S.,  HOWE,  C.  J.,  SCOTT,  S.  A.  and  SMITH,  A.  G. 
(2010) Life‐Cycle Assessment of Potential Algal Biodiesel Production in the United Kingdom: A 
Comparison of Raceways and Air‐Lift Tubular Bioreactors. Energy & Fuels, 100‐112. 
                                                                                                        85
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


TREDICI, M. R. (2010) Photobiology of microalgae mass cultures: understanding the tools for 
the next green revolution. Biofuels, 1, 143‐162. 

TROELL,  M.,  HALLING,  C.,  NILSSON,  A.,  BUSCHMANN,  A.  H.,  KAUTSKY,  N.  and  KAUTSKY,  L. 
(1997)  Integrated  marine  cultivation  of  Gracilaria  chilensis  (Gracilariales,  Rhodophyta)  and 
salmon cages for reduced environmental impact and increased economic output. Aquaculture, 
156, 45‐61. 

VAN  EGMOND,  K.,  BRESSER,  T.  and  BOUWMAN,  L.  (2002)  The  European  Nitrogen  Case. 
AMBIO: A Journal of the Human Environment, 31, 72‐78. 

VEA, J. and ASK, E. (2010) Creating a sustainable commercial harvest of Laminaria hyperborea, 
in Norway. Journal of Applied Phycology. 

VIEIRA, V. V. (2010) Personal communication about LCA on Microalgae. 

WANG, B., LI, Y., WU, N. and LAN, C. Q. (2008) CO2 bio‐mitigation using microalgae. Applied 
Microbiology and Biotechnology, 79, 707‐718. 

XU,  H.,  MIAO,  X.  and  WU,  Q.  (2006)  High  quality  biodiesel  production  from  a  microalga 
Chlorella  protothecoides  by  heterotrophic  growth  in  fermenters.  Journal  of  Biotechnology, 
126, 499‐507. 

ZHANG,  J.,  LIU,  Y.,  YU,  D.,  SONG,  H.,  CUI,  J.  and  LIU,  T.  (2011)  Study  on  high‐temperature‐
resistant and high‐yield Laminaria variety “Rongfu”. Journal of Applied Phycology. 

ZHANG,  Q.,  QU,  S.,  CONG,  Y.,  LUO,  S.  and  TANG,  X.  (2008)  High  throughput  culture  and 
gametogenesis  induction  of  Laminaria  japonica  gametophyte  clones.  Journal  of  Applied 
Phycology, 20, 205‐211. 
 
 
 




                                                                                                        86
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



 

11. Annex 1: Heterotrophic Microalgae 

Heterotrophic  microalgae  are  grown  in  closed  culture  systems  that  are  equivalent  to 
conventional  fermentation  technologies  (Apt  and  Behrens,  1999).  In  these  systems, 
heterotrophic  algae  use  organic  Carbon  as  their  sole  source  of  energy  and  Carbon.  This 
removes  the  issue  of  light  limitation  that  dominates  most  aspects  of  photobioreactor  and 
raceway  pond  design.  However  since  heterotrophic  microalgae  are  grown  on  organic 
material  that  could  itself  be  used  for  biofuel  production,  it  is  incorrect  to  view  this  as  a 
primary  biomass  production  system.  Heterotrophic  cultivation  of  microalgae  should  be 
viewed as an alternative technology platform for conversion of biomass into biofuels, which 
can  produce  biodiesel  from  carbohydrate  feedstocks.  The  fundamental  design  of 
heterotrophic bioreactors consists of a closed vessel that contains algae and their nutrients in 
optimal conditions to maximise productivity. Vessels can range in size from 1‐500,000 litres 
and their shape is dictated by economic and structural factors, unlike photobioreactors which 
must maximise their surface area for the penetration of light (Apt and Behrens, 1999). The 
culture medium is similar to that used for photobioreactors, with nutrients such as Nitrogen 
and  Phosphorous  added  in  the  correct  proportions  for  the  specific  algal  strain.  However 
heterotrophic  bioreactors  also  introduce  carbohydrates  into  the  culture  medium.  Typical 
carbohydrates  that  are  used  as  a  substrate  for  heterotrophic  microalgal  growth  can  be 
glucose, acetate or corn powder hydrosylate (Xu, et al., 2006). Sterile air is introduced into 
the culture medium at high pressure and flow rate to ensure appropriate gas exchange and 
optimal  conditions  are  maintained  by  constant  monitoring  and  control  of  temperature,  pH 
and dissolved O2 and CO2 within the culture medium (Apt and Behrens, 1999).  

    It  is  possible  to  cultivate  heterotrophic  microalgae  in  either  batch‐based  or  continuous 
culture systems. Batch based systems provide a fixed amount of culture medium and organic 
substrate to grow a batch of microalgae, which are completely harvested after a fixed period. 
The  major  challenge  of  batch  cultivation  is  to  provide  sufficient  supply  of  nutrients  and 
substrate  to  ensure  high  cell  density,  without  exceeding  concentrations  that  inhibit  algal 
growth (Chen, 1996). This issue can be addressed using fed‐batch cultivation, which introduces 
culture  medium  and  substrate  in  response  to  demand  signals  such  as  increased  oxygen 
tension  (Graverholt  and  Eriksen,  2007).  Continuous  culture  of  heterotrophic  algae  is  usually 

                                                                                                           87
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


performed in a chemostat, where fresh medium is introduced at the same rate as the culture 
is harvested (Chen and Johns, 1996). This maintains the culture volume and cell concentration 
at  a  steady  state  to  optimise  productivity.  Alternative  continuous  culture  systems  include 
membrane bioreactors. These are essentially the same as chemostat cultures apart from the 
addition  of  a  selectively  permeable  membrane  that  retains  algae  in  the  main  vessel  while 
allowing  some  culture  medium  to  wash  through  (Chen  and  Johns,  1995).  This  prevents 
inhibitory  compounds  such  as  sodium  from  accumulating  and  reducing  the  stability  of  the 
culture (Chen, 1996). 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
     




                                                                                                   88
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



    

12.  Annex 2: Review of existing micro algae LCA Studies  

12.1     Kadam 2001/2  

Kadam  (2001;  2002)  compared  a  a  conventional  coal‐fired  power  station  with  one  in  which 
coal was co‐fired with algae cultivated from recycling power plant flue gas as a source of CO2. 
The system is based in the southern USA, where there is a high incidence of solar radiation.  


12.1.2   Functional Unit and System Boundaries 

   The functional unit considered was the quantity of coal and algae necessary to produce 1 
MW of electricity. The system boundaries are shown in Figure 10.1 

         Figure 10.1: General system boundaries for the comparison of electricity production 
                            via coal firing vs. coal/algae co‐firing in Kadam’s study 

    




                                                                                            

   Source: (Kadam, 2002) 


12.1.3   Source of Data 

   Primary data was used where possible for algae cultivation, while the US EPA and literature 
data  was  used  for  the  other  processes.  According  to  Kadam’s  own  analysis,  the  data  was 
                                                                                                  89
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


reliable  and  complete  at  the  time  of  writing.  The  system  was  run  using  TEAM®  (v  3.0) 
software. 


12.1.4   Process 

   The  algae  cultivation  was  assumed  to  take  up  1000  ha,  using  approximately  60%  of  the 
emitted CO2 of a 50MW plant. Two potential pathways were investigated: direct injection of 
the  flue  gas,  and  monoethanolamine  (MEA)  extraction.  The  former  process  includes 
compression,  dehydration  and  transportation  of  the  CO2  to  the  algal  ponds,  with  a  final 
concentration of 14%. The latter process includes MEA extraction, compression, dehydration 
and  transportation,  and  produces  a  final  concentration  of  almost  100%.  Marine  water  was 
provided as the water supply. 
   The  microalgae  production  system  is  shown  in  10.2.  Algae  was  grown  in  raceway  ponds, 
and used solar drying to achieve a biomass that could be used for co‐firing. 

             Figure 10.2: Simplified flow diagram for microalgae production in Kadam’s study 




                                                                                                   

   Source: (Kadam, 2002) 


    
    



                                                                                                      90
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


12.1.5    Results 

   Four  impact  assessment  categories  were  evaluated:  greenhouse  warming  potential, 
depletion of natural resources, air acidification potential, and eutrophication potential. Algae 
co‐firing was shown to have lower greenhouse potential than a coal fired power plant, as well 
as a lower air acidification potential. The CO2 emitted was lower, as well as the SOx and NOx, 
particulates, methane, and the fossil energy consumption. However, the depletion of natural 
resources (more gas and oil is necessary) and eutrophication potential (due to the fertilizer) 
was much higher for algae co‐firing. As such, any final decision on the usefulness of algae co‐
firing would have to find the correct balance between these factors (Kadam, 2001; 2002). 


12.1.6    Discussion 

   This study does not focus on algae for biofuels, but does provide a useful look at possible 
linkages that could be formed between algae production and industry – especially in the use 
of using flue gas from power stations to grow algae.  
   Many  of  the  individual  assumptions  in  this  study  have  been  called  into  question  (such  as 
productivity  values)  (Benemann,  2010b),  while  the  use  of  solar  drying  remains  a  large 
question, as it may not be possible (certainly not in all parts of the world) and experts agree 
that  it  probably  won’t  be  feasible  in  large  scale  processes  (Sander  &  Murthy,  2010;  Clarens, 
2010b).  Dewatering  was  not  shown  to  be  a  large  factor  in  the  design,  even  though  other 
studies show that it is.  
   Also,  the  study  discusses  the  eutrophication  potential,  but  unlike  agriculture,  algae 
cultivation is done under controlled circumstances which limit the possibility of a run‐off (Leu, 
2010). 


12.2      Lardon et al. 2009  

Lardon  et  al.  (2009)  state  that  since  this  LCA  is not  based  upon  actual  systems,  it  should  be 
used more to identify possible bottlenecks and: 
   “The  key  objective  of  this  study  is  not  to  offer  a  LCA  of  the  current  microalgal  biodiesel 
technology, but to identify the obstacles and limitations which should receive specific research 
efforts to make this process environmentally sustainable.” 
   No specific location was used as a basis for this study.             




                                                                                                           91
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


12.2.2   Functional Unit and System Boundaries 

   The functional unit was the combustion of 1MJ of fuel in a diesel engine (assumed to act 
the same way as other biofuels), and the boundaries included the extraction and production 
of  raw  materials,  facility  construction  (assuming  a  30  year  lifespan  of  buildings,  10  years  for 
electrical engines, etc), and biofuel elaboration and use in the engine.  


12.2.3   Source of Data 

   Due to the lack of large scale commercial algae producers, the data was extrapolated from 
laboratory scale experiments. The data was collected from industrial partners, inventory data 
of similar processes, the EcoInvent database and literature reviews.  
   The required nitrogen inputs, as well as the heating value of the oil were calculated based 
upon the algae composition, and standard practices from pilot scale systems were adapted as 
necessary  to  fit  the  larger  system  (i.e.  centrifugation  works  well  on  small  scale  but  is  too 
expensive for larger scales). 


12.2.4   Process 

   The  hypothetical  system  is  shown  in  10.3,  and  consists  of  an  open  pond  raceway  system 
covering 100ha, using Chlorella vulgaris. Two methods of operation were considered: normal 
levels  of  Nitrogen,  and  low  N  fed  to  the  system.  Harvesting  is  done  by  use  of  continuous 
circulation  of  the  algae  through  a  thickener,  and  then  the  flocculated  stream  is  dewatered. 
Two methods of oil extraction were evaluated, namely: advanced drying followed by hexane 
extraction (as used for soybeans) (dry), or direct extraction from the wet algal paste (wet). 
    




                                                                                                           92
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                            Figure 10.3: Process chain overview from Lardon’s study  




                                                                                              

   Source: (Lardon et al., 2009) 


12.2.5    Results 

   The LCI was done without any allocation, but reflects the actual flows in the process chain, 
as  shown  in  Table  10.1.  A cumulative  energy  analysis  was performed  to  find  the cumulative 
energy demand (CED), which showed that only the wet extraction on low‐N grown algae has a 
positive balance. Reducing the amount of nitrogen fed to the system improves the CED by 60% 
(due to the lower fertilizer requirements), whereas wet extraction only increases the CED by 
25% (since it needs larger production due to the lower extraction yield). 




                                                                                                  93
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


     Table 10.1: Most important material and energy flows generated by the production  
                              of 1kg of biodiesel from Lardon et al’s study 

                                Normal                                Low N 
                                Dry              Wet                  Dry         Wet 
       Algae culture and harvesting 
       Algae (kg)               5.93             8.39                 2.7         3.81 
       CO2 (kg)                 10.4             14.8                 5.32        7.52 
       Electricity (MJ)         7.5              10.6                 4           5.7 
       CaNO3, as g N            273              386                  29.4        41.6 
       Drying 
       Heat (MJ)                81.8                                  37.1         
       Electricity (MJ)         8.52                                  3.9          
       Oil extraction 
       Heat (MJ)                7.1              22.4                 3.2         10.2 
       Electricity (MJ)         1.5              8.4                  0.7         3.9 
       Hexane loss (g)          15.2             55                   6.9         25 
       Oil transesterification 
       Methanol (g)             114              114                  114         114 
       Heat (MJ)                0.9              0.9                  0.9         0.9 
       Total Energy 
       Consumption (MJ)         106.4            41.4                 48.9        19.8 
       Production (MJ)          103.8            146.8                61          86 
       Balance (MJ)             ‐2.6             105                  12          66 


   Source: (Lardon et al., 2009) 


   The  impact  analysis  was  done  and  focused  on:  abiotic  depletion  (AbD),  potential 
acidification  (Ac),  eutrophication  (Eu),  global  warming  potential  (GWP100  (time  horizon  100 
years)), ozone layer depletion (Ozone), human (HumTox) and marine (Mar Tox) toxicity, land 
competition (Land), ionizing radiations (Rad) and photochemical oxidation (Photo). The results 
are shown in 10.4.  
   Algae was compared to other biofuels, and shown to be better for eutrophication, and land 
use, but worse for ionizing radiation, photochemical oxidation and marine toxicity. The energy 


                                                                                                   94
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


demand is also shown to be highly dependent on the process used, which should be kept in 
mind for future designs (Lardon et al., 2009).  

                   Figure 10.4: Comparison of impacts categories in Lardon et al ’s study 




                                                                                                

   Source: (Lardon et al., 2009) 


12.2.6    Discussion 

   This  study  clearly  shows  that  drying  is  one  of  the  most  energy  intensive  steps.  It 
demonstrates what a difference in nutrient supply would mean to the final outcome, as well 
as some of the different possibilities in downstream processing of the algal biomass. However, 
experts have been critical about this study, since many of the values were based on pilot scale 
systems, and would not be wholly applicable to industrial cultivation (Leu, 2010). 
    


12.3     Clarens et.al. (2010)  

   In this study, the life cycle of the cultivation  of algae was compared to corn, switch grass 
and canola. The study was based in Virginia, Iowa and California in the US, each of which have 
different levels of solar radiation and water availability. 


12.3.2    Functional Unit and System Boundaries 

   The functional unit was 317 GJ, equivalent to the approximate per capita primary energy 
consumption of one American.  
                                                                                                   95
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


   The system was limited to cultivation and harvesting only, with the final product being dry 
biomass.  It  was  assumed  that  the  biomass  was  burned  directly  so  the  higher  heating  value 
(HHV) was used to calculate the energy obtained. This was done because of the uncertainties 
surrounding the choice of conversion process and the final product (electricity vs. liquid fuels). 
The manufacture of the equipment used was considered negligible and not included.   


12.3.3   Source of Data 

   Data was collected from previously published pilot‐scale demonstration projects, climactic 
records,  the  EcoInvent  database,  and  various  other  sources  (as  far  as  possible  based  in  the 
United States), and input using the Crystal Ball® predictive modelling suite. For example, the 
dry biomass yields were calculated based upon radiation and meteorological data for the last 
30 years, as well as empirical estimates for the radiation use efficiency (RUE).  


12.3.4   Process 

   The  chosen  cultivation  method  for  the  algae  was  open  raceways  with  paddle  wheels  for 
mixing,  with  harvesting  done  by  flocculation  and  centrifugation.  Three  different  types  of 
wastewater effluent were considered as nutrient sources: activated sludge, source‐separated 
urine, and biological nitrogen removal. The process, as well as those of the other feedstocks 
considered, is shown in Figure 10.5. 




                                                                                                       96
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                         Figure 10.5: Schematic of system considered in Clarens study 




                                                                                                   

   Source: (Clarens et al., 2010) 


12.3.5    Results 

   The output of the model was five impact categories: energy consumption (MJ), water use 
(m3), greenhouse gas emissions (kg CO2 equivalent), land use (ha), and eutrophication (kg PO4 
eq.). Algae cultivation was found to emit more GHG’s than it sequesters, requiring more fossil‐
based carbon to produce the same amount of bioenergy, while corn, canola and switch grass 
had  a  net  uptake  of  CO2.  Water  use  for  algae  was  also  considerably  higher  than  the  others. 
Energy production is positive for all of the studied biofuels in that they generate more energy 
than they consume. Algae was however approximately 3.3–5 times more efficient in the land 
use than the competitors. It is calculated that it would only require 13% of the USA’s land area 
to meet the country’s total energy needs.  The eutrophication (calculated on the basis of any 



                                                                                                        97
                                                 AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                       Coordination Action 
                                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


potential leakages/spillages and any contributions from fertilizers) was also considerably lower 
for algae. The values of a system based in Virginia, USA, are shown in Table 10.2. 

         Table 10.2: Life cycle burdens of Algae, Corn, Canola, and Switch grass in Virginia  

                                                                                   3
                                        Energy (MJ)         GHG  (kg  CO2  Water (m )          Eutrophication 
                    Land (ha)               4
                                        x 10                equiv.) x 104  x 104               (kg PO4 equiv) 
    Algae                 0.4 ± 0.05       30 ± 6.6             1.8 ± 0.58      12 ± 2.4          3.3 ± 0.86 
    Corn                  1.3 ± 0.3        3.8 ± 0.35           ‐ 2.6 ± 0.09    0.82 ± 0.19       26 ± 5.4 
    Canola                2.0 ± 0.2        7.0 ± 0.83           ‐ 1.6 ± 0.10    1.0 ± 0.14        28 ± 5.8 
    Switch grass          1.7 ± 0.4        2.9 ± 0.27           ‐ 2.4 ± 0.18    0.57 ± 0.21       6.1 ± 1.7 


   Source: (Clarens et al., 2010) 


   Sunlight  and  water  availability  was  not  shown  to  have  such  a  large  impact  on  the  final 
outcome (California, as the sunniest was shown to have a slightly lower land requirement than 
the  other  places,  but  a  slightly  higher  energy  requirement).  The  principle  burden  of  algae 
cultivation is the fertilizers (about 50% of energy use and GHG emissions).  
   The potential of co‐firing with coal power plants, as Kadam suggested, could provide large 
reduction  in  the  GHG,  but  would  require  large  scale  cultivation,  which  would  increase  the 
fertilizer demand such that it would still be larger than that of corn, canola, or switch grass. 
   Using  wastewater  to  supplant  the  need  for  chemical  fertilizers  (as  well  as  water  use) 
substantially reduced the environmental impact of algae cultivation as well as the treatment of 
the  wastewater  itself  (meaning  there  is  incentive  for  both  algae  producers  and  wastewater 
treatment plants to work together) (Clarens et al., 2010).  


12.3.6      Discussion 

   This  is  one  of  the  more  widely  known  LCA  studies  on  algae,  so  there  has  been  more 
discussion surrounding it. Criticisms were made of the paper by Subhadra (2010), Benemann 
(2010b) and others, including: 
    •       The  rationale  of  using  Radiation  Use  Efficiency  (RUE)  instead  of  the  absolute  bio‐
            productivity is not clear; 
    •       The choice of functional unit (1MJ of algae biomass is not equivalent to 1MJ of switch 
            grass biomass as the former can be more easily converted to biofuels); 
    •       The age of the data; 
                                                                                                                 98
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                Coordination Action 
                                                FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


     •    High  fertilizer  energy  input  as  compared  to  other  studies,  as  well  as  high  cost 
          estimation of CO2 usage; 
     •    Clarens et al. assumed that photobioreactors would not give a better land footprint, 
          but would give a higher life cycle burden – these assumptions were not fully justified 
          in his study; 
     •    As with Kadam (2001), the eutrophication potential is limited in algae production as it 
          is a controlled, closed system; 
     •    The  manufacturing  burdens  should  decrease  in  the  future  as  electricity,  the 
          manufacturing  process,  and  the  know  how  all  becomes  better  and  more 
          environmentally sustainable; and, 
     •    The LCA performed does not take a holistic view of the system, but views each factor 
          as mutually exclusive (i.e. not taking into account that algae can produce co‐products, 
          etc.).  
   Subhadra (2010) concludes by stating:  
   “The investors are eagerly reviewing the feasibility status of various feedstocks, so studies 
such as this are crucial. However, defining a comprehensive LCA boundary with an integrated 
account of indirect GHG emission, energetic costs, and other sustainability indexes would yield 
more meaningful comparisons”. 
   Clarens  (2010a)  responded  to  these  criticisms  by  stating  that  although  the  actual  system 
boundaries  used  can  be  disputed,  overall  is  should  not  make  a  great  difference  to  the  final 
result. He justifies not including the co‐products in his LCA because of the varied nature and 
amount  of  these  co‐products,  which  would  not  fit  in  with  the  generic  LCA  performed.  He 
justifies  the  data  by  saying  he  updated  it  as  necessary,  as  well  as  only  focusing  on  existing, 
rather than emerging technologies which could be more sustainable. He defends the choice of 
open ponds over PBRs by claiming (as others have done) that PBRs are not yet commercially 
viable.  The  eutrophication  potential  is  calculated  on  the  basis  of  the  possibility  of  a  leakage 
from the closed system, not from continuous run‐off. Finally, he states that individual aspects 
would  not  alter  the  overall  outcome  of  the  LCA,  as  shown  by  sensitivity  analysis  that  he 
performed in the LCA. 
   This study does not paint algae in the most positive light (as other biofuels are considered 
more sustainable), but has received a lot of attention in the media, especially when taken out 
of context. This could be damaging to the industry as a whole (Greenwell, 2010). 



                                                                                                            99
                                             AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                 Coordination Action 
                                                 FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


12.4     Jorquera et.al. (2010) 

The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  compare  the  energy  life‐cycle  of  the  production  of  oil  rich 
microalgae, using the net energy ratio (NER) as a comparison factor, where NER is given as: 


                                                                                    (Eqn 1.) 

   The  study  did  not  look  at  the  final  GHG  emissions,  only  at  the  energy  requirements.  No 
specific location was used for the study. 


12.4.2   Functional Unit and System Boundaries 

   The functional unit was a production level of 100,000 kg of biomass (dry weight) produced 
under various production methods. The assessment was performed using the GaBi® software, 
which estimates the output of a particular process (in this case biomass produced and energy 
generated) from the input of the energy costs associated with each process (i.e. the price of 
raw materials, transportation, and equipment used).  
   Each  systems  unit  (shown  in  Figure  10.6)  was  considered  to  be  made  up  of  the  raw 
materials required, the transport, and the manufacturing of the equipment.  The inoculation 
steps, oil extraction, and conversion to biofuels were not considered. 

                                Figure 10.6: System Process in Jorquera’s study 




   Source: (Jorquera et al 2010). The red line indicates the system boundary 

                                                                                                     100
                                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                            Coordination Action 
                                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


12.4.3      Results 

   The results of the analysis are shown Table 10.3.  

     Table 10.3: Comparative analysis of three cultivation methods from Jorquera’s study 

     Variable                                                     Raceway Ponds     Flat‐plate PBR    Tubular PBR 
     Annual biomass production (kg/yr)                            100,000           100,000           100,000 
                                      3
     Volumetric productivity (kg / m   day)                       0.035             0.27              0.56 
                          2
     Space required (m )                                          25,988.25         10,147.00         10,763.20 
                          3
     Reactor volume (m )                                          7,827.79          1,014.71          489.24 
                                               3
     Flow rate to maintain dilatation rate (m  / day)             782.79            101.47            48.9 
     Relative oil content (%)                                     29.6              29.6              29.6 
                      3
     Net oil yield (m  / yr)                                      32.9              32.9              32.9 
                              3
     Oil yield per area (m  / ha year)                            12.65             31.6              30.56 
                                  3
     Energy consumption (W / m )                                  3.72              53                2500 
     Energy consumption (W)                                       29,119.37         53,779.80         1,223,091.98 
     Total energy consumption (KWh / months)                      8,735.81          16,133.94         366,927.6 
     Total energy consumption (GJ / year)                         378.45            698.94            15,895.8 
     Total energy content in biomass (GJ / year)                  3,155.30          3,155.30          3,155.30 
     NER for oil production                                       3.05              1.65              0.07 
     NER for biomass production                                   8.34              4.51              0.20 


   Source: (Jorquera et al., 2010) 


   Due  to  evaporation,  the  water  consumption  for  raceway  ponds  is  more  than  16  times 
higher  than  tubular  PBRs,  and  7  times  higher  than  flat  plate.  The  productivity  and  biomass 
concentration is also significantly higher in the PBR systems, while the land requirements are 
lower. However, the energy requirement, and final NER is quite a bit lower for raceway ponds, 
as well as the construction and materials costs.  
   The  results  indicate  that  raceway  and  flat‐plate  PBR  systems  had  a  NER  >  1,  and  are 
therefore economically viable. However, since the extraction and conversion was not included, 
this  could  significantly  add  to  the  costs  and  energy  requirements.  It  is  clear  from  this  study 
that tubular PBR systems are not currently feasible at a large scale (Jorquera et al., 2010). 


12.4.4      Discussion 

   This is a relatively unknown study, and quite limited in its scope. A major flaw of this study 
is  that  it  only  focuses  on  the  cultivation,  and  only  looks  at  the  energetics  without  due 
consideration of the GHG emissions, economics, etc. As the other studies show, harvesting is a 
                                                                                                                      101
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


major  component  of  the  final  energy  balance,  and  the  overall  downstream  processing  will 
have a large impact on the final energy consumption.  
   It shows the comparative land requirements to produce the same amount of biomass for 
the three systems (showing how raceway ponds would need almost 2.5 times more land than 
PBR systems). However, the data was based on pilot scale information, so does not take into 
account the economies of scale. 


12.5      Sander& Murthy (2010) 

This was a well‐to‐pump study, done to determine the overall sustainability of algae biodiesel. 
The objective of the study is given:  
   “Understanding  the  environmental  burdens  of  the  algal  biodiesel  production  will  allow 
insight  into  inherent  sustainability.  Information  from  this  LCA  will  be  useful  in  identifying 
energy  and  emission  bottlenecks  in  the  process.  This  information  can  be  used  to  provide 
impetus  for  further  technological  advancement  of  algal  biodiesel  and  reduce  overall  energy 
use and environmental impact of a future algal biodiesel process” (Sander & Murthy, 2010). 
   Since a lot of the data was based in the US, it is assumed that that is the location of the 
study. 


12.5.2    Functional Unit and System Boundaries 

   The  functional  unit  was  1,000  MJ  energy  from  algal  biodiesel  using  existing  technology 
(which is equivalent to 24kg of algal biodiesel).  
   The system boundaries were determined by the RMEE protocol, discussed earlier, using a 
cut off ratio of 5%, and shown in Figure 10.7. 
   This  LCA  deals  with  co‐product  allocation  by  using  the  system  expansion  method.  It 
assumes that the carbohydrate and protein in the algal biomass will be used as feedstock for 
ethanol  conversion  process,  and  by  doing  so,  offset  currently  used  feedstock  (corn).    It  is 
assumed to have the same ethanol yield as wheat straw due to the similar glucan content. 


12.5.3    Source of Data 

   Data  was  gathered  from  the  Greenhouse  Gases,  Regulated  Emissions  and  Energy  use  in 
Transportation (GREET) model, the US LCI database, as well as the 1998 Sheehan et al. report 
and  a  1988  Borowitzka  &  Borowitzka  paper  for  information  from  the  growth  to  separation 
stage, as well as a few other specialized papers. 
                                                                                                      102
                                        AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                           Coordination Action 
                                           FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


12.5.4   Process 

   The process was based on the current state of the art technology upon which it is assumed 
future  systems  will  base  themselves  on.  The  process  starts  with  inoculum  grown  in  PBRs, 
which is then transferred to an open pond raceway. Treated wastewater is the given medium, 
presumed  to  provide  all  the  necessary  nutrients  except  for  carbon,  which  is  provided 
separately (flue gas sparging is not considered in this study). Separation and dewatering then 
occurs, with two methods considered: filtration and centrifugation. The final steps are hexane 
extraction, with the resulting transesterification occurring at a different site and following the 
same method as previously reported soybean conversion to biodiesel. Finally, the biodiesel is 
transported to the pump, as described by the GREET model.  The process diagram is given in  
   . 


12.5.5   Results 

   The energy requirements and emissions for each step are given in Error! Reference source 
not found.. It is clear that using a centrifuge requires more energy, while the most energy and 
GHG emission intensive step is that of harvesting. Natural gas drying of the algal cake requires 
69% of the total energy input – solar drying can significantly reduce this but is impractical at a 
large scale and is not suitable for all climates. It is clear to see that the downstream processes 
are important for the final sustainability of the system, and improvements must be made to 
enhance the performance of algae as biofuels (Sander & Murthy, 2010). 




                                                                                                 103
                                    AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                       Coordination Action 
                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                  Figure 10.7: Process flow diagram from Sander & Murthy’s study 




                                                                                     


Source: (Sander & Murthy, 2010) 

                                                                                    104
                                   AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                      Coordination Action 
                                      FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


 


           Figure 10.8: Energy and Emissions associated with unit process in Sander & 
                                         Murthy’s study 




                                                                             




                                                                                 

Source: (Sander & Murthy, 2010) 


 
 

                                                                                         105
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


    


12.5.6   Discussion 

   One  of  the  strengths  of  the  Sander  &  Murthy  (2010)  study  was  a  detailed  overview  of 
where they obtained their data values from, as well as a systematic approach to defining the 
system  boundaries.  They  clearly  indicated  what  values  were  used,  and  described  the 
limitations and changes they made to the data. However, as with the other studies discussed, 
a major issue is the validity of the assumptions used (some of the papers are 22 years old, and 
the data from the LCI databases are not specialized for algae cultivation). 


12.6     Stephenson et.al. (2010) 

This study is a well‐to‐pump analysis, with sensitivity analysis on various operating parameters 
included. The basis of the study is in the UK, which has lower solar radiation than the other 
papers considered. 


12.6.2   Functional Unit and System Boundaries 

   The functional unit of this system was 1 ton of biodiesel, blended with conventional diesel 
for a use in a compact sized car.  
   The boundaries include all the background systems, or homogenous markets, providing the 
materials  and  energy  to  the  main  process.  It  was  assumed  that  the  land  used  would  be 
derelict, so there would be no system that the algae cultivation is replacing. The lifetime of the 
equipment was assumed to be 20 years, and maintenance impacts were considered negligible. 
   By‐products  of  the  system  include  algal  residue,  glycerol  and  potassium  phosphate.  The 
algal residue is assumed to be anaerobically digested onsite to generate methane and satisfy 
the heating requirements of the process, with excess sent to generate electricity. In this case, 
direct substitution for the electricity was used. The glycerol can be used by the pharmaceutical 
industry, using the market price as an allocation method. Another possibility is using it for the 
generation of heat, where direct substitution could be used. The last by‐product is relatively 
small in quantity, so the market price was used as an allocation method. 




                                                                                                  106
                                         AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                            Coordination Action 
                                            FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


12.6.3   Source of Data 

   Certain assumptions were made based on commercial and pilot scale systems currently in 
use,  as  well  as  previous  experience  of  the  authors  in  growing  algae.  Other  values  were 
obtained from literature. 


12.6.4   Process 

   The basic system is shown in Figure 10.9. Two systems were considered, a raceway pond 
and an air‐lift tubular PBR. For each system, there were two stages of production – the first 
stage under a nutrient‐sufficient environment to achieve a dense culture, and a second stage 
with  no  nitrogen  supply  to  increase  the  triacylglycerides  (TAG)  content  of  the  culture  to 
approximately 40%. Once cultivated, the algae is dewatered by flocculants (using Aluminium 
Sulphate),  with  the  spent  medium  returned  to  the  cultivation.  The  biomass  then  undergoes 
homogenization to break open the cells, and the lipids are extracted using hexane. This would 
then be refined using the same method to recover rapeseed oil, before being transported to a 
facility to convert it, via transesterification, to biodiesel, which is then transported for final use 
in a car. It is assumed that the conversion to biodiesel occurs in a pre‐existing plant (previously 
described in other papers) that can produce 250,000 tons of biodiesel per year. The aqueous 
waste stream would be anaerobically digested to convert it into methane. 
   Various modifications to this system were considered. These include altering some of the 
operating  parameters,  the  TAG  content,  and  changing  the  mode  and  distance  of  transport 
required between process units. 




                                                                                                   107
                                        AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                           Coordination Action 
                                           FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


            Figure 10.9: Process chain for production of 1 ton biodiesel in Stephenson et al’s 
                                                    study 




                                                                                       

   Source: (Stephenson et al., 2010) 


12.6.5   Results 

   The results of the base case are shown in Figure 10.10. It is clear that tubular PBR requires 
more energy, and as such has a higher Global Warming Potential (GWP). Compared to fossil‐
derived  diesel,  the  energy  requirements  and  GWP  are  85  and  78%  lower  respectively  for 
                                                                                               108
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


raceway ponds, but 362 and 273% higher respectively for tubular PBRs. It is also clear to see 
that cultivation is the largest component of energy usage, with the electricity accounting for 
85%  of  the  energy  use  (including  manufacture)  for  the  air‐lift  tubular  PBRs.  For  raceway 
systems,  this  was  74%  of  the  energy  use  for  that  process  unit,  with  the  manufacture  of  the 
PVC lining the biggest single contribution. 

           Figure 10.10: LCA results for base case production of biodiesel from Stephenson et 
                                                     al’s study 




                                                                                                          

   Source: (Stephenson et al., 2010) 


   Water  usage  was  estimated  at  3.8  and  13.7m2/ton  of  biodiesel  for  raceways  and  PBR 
systems.  Raceway  systems  are  assumed  to  need  less  water  as  the  amount  of  rainfall  in  UK 
exceeds  the  expected  evaporation.  In  other  countries,  the  expected  water  usage  would 
therefore be higher.  
   Modifications to the operating parameters showed where savings could be made as well: 
i.e. lower velocities and recycling of the nutrients would lower the GWP burden, while use of 
enzyme disruption would increase it. Some factors, such as the method of oil extraction, the 
distribution of the biodiesel, and the final use of glycerol has little impact on the final results 9 
(Stephenson et al., 2010). 


   9


                                                                                                       109
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


12.6.6    Discussion 

   This system is localized for the UK, which gives a better view of the country impacts on the 
algae  growth  (i.e.  the  water  usage).  This  differs  from  other  studies,  which  tended  to  focus 
more on sunnier climates and areas of less rainfall. This was the only study to focus on some 
of the possible operating parameters that could be improved upon (although there are many 
more  to  be  considered),  which  is  useful  for  future  considerations  of  the  design  of  a  facility. 
This was also the only study which used primary data for the system, but limited the pond size 
to  100m2,  which  limits  the  final  outcome.  However,  it  did  mean  that  the  assumptions  were 
based  more  firmly  on  what  is  possible  rather  than  hypothetical,  and  many  of  the  experts 
consulted agree that this study uses more valid assumptions (Benemann, 2010b; Greenwell, 
2010). 


12.7      Campbell et.al. (2010) 

This study looked at the environmental impacts of growing algae in ponds. The location of this 
study was in Australia, which has a high solar incidence, but limited fresh water supply. 


12.7.2    Functional Unit and System Boundaries 

   The functional unit was the “the combustion of enough fuel in an articulated truck (AT; the 
most common form of freight transport in Australia) diesel engine to transport one tonne of 
freight one kilometre, i.e. a tonne kilometre (t km or tkm). This has previously been calculated 
to require the equivalent of 0.89 MJ of diesel fuel, which is 23.057 ml of ULS diesel” (Campbell 
et al., 2010). 
   The  system  boundaries  exclude  the  production  facilities  and  construction,  partly  because 
detailed  information  about  all  the  subsystems  is  not  yet  readily  available  (and  is  also  rarely 
considered in analysis of fossil fuels). For the rest, the study looks to do a complete cradle to 
grave analysis, with the waste algal biomass used to generate methane. 


12.7.3    Source of Data 

   The  data  for  the  system  was  gathered  from  literature,  and  is  mainly  based  on  the  1996 
Benemann and Oswald paper, as well as a paper in 1983 by Regan and Gartside (outlining the 
design). Other literature, as well as the Australian LCI and the relevant Australian authorities 
(such as the department of energy), were consulted for details and updating of the system. If 


                                                                                                          110
                                                   AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                        Coordination Action 
                                                        FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


data  was  not  available,  the  closest  information  available  from  the  EcoInvent  database  was 
used. The system was run using SimaPro 7® software.  


12.7.4     Process 

   The  proposed  system  covers  400  ha  of  raceway  ponds  over  500  ha  of  (non‐arable,  arid) 
coastal  land  (the  current  usage  of  these  lands  is  not  mentioned  or  considered),  with  water 
supplied directly from the ocean (after use and treatment, it is then returned to the ocean). 
After  cultivation,  chemical  flocculants  are  added  to  the  system,  followed  by  dissolved  air 
flotation to concentrate the sludge. It is then heated and centrifuged to extract the lipids and 
concentrate the solution. The lipids are then transesterified in a process similar to that used 
for canola (and other vegetable oils). For this reason, an algal species with similar lipid content 
to canola was chosen (approximately 43% (Barthet, 2010)). The remaining algal mass is then 
anaerobically digested to produce methane, which is then used to generate electricity. 
   Various scenarios were run using this model, including two different productivities (a base 
case,  and  an  optimistic  case),  and  different  methods  of  introducing  the  CO2.  This  includes 
direct  injection  from  an  ammonia  plant,  flue  gas  from  a  power  plant,  or  a  liquefied  form 
bought commercially. 


12.7.5     Results 

   The results for the two different productivities are given in Table 10.5. As a comparison, the 
values for canola and ultra low sulphur (ULS) diesel, which is the standard of diesel used at the 
time of the study, is included.  

               Table 10.5: GHG emissions (kg CO2 equivalent) for 1 ton km truck use  

                          Biodiesel, algal,    Biodiesel, algal,    Biodiesel, algal, 
                          100% CO2             15% CO2 (flue        100% CO2           Biodiesel, 
Impact category                                                                                      ULS diesel 
                          (ammonia             gas) power           (truck             canola 
                          plant)               station              delivered) 

15 g/m2/d 
GHG gas (total fossil)    ‐15.648              ‐10.524              18.164             35.856        81.239 
GHG (total fossil 
                          ‐16.118              ‐10.994              17.695             35.386        19.213 
upstream) 
GHG (total fossil 
                          0.470                0.470                0.470              0.470         62.026 
tailpipe) 
GHG (total upstream)  ‐16.037                  ‐10.913              17.719             35.465        19.241 

                                                                                                                   111
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


GHG (total tailpipe)      62.028     62.028                62.028      62.028    62.026 
GHG ‐ CO2 (fossil 
                          ‐16.742    ‐11.477               16.594      33.437    18.040 
upstream) 
GHG ‐ CO2 (fossil 
                          0.001      0.001                 0.001       0.001     61.557 
tailpipe) 
GHG ‐ CH4 (total)         0.102      ‐0.033                0.364       0.984     1.156 

CHG ‐ N20 (total)         0.990      0.984                 1.138       1.431     0.486 
GHG ‐ CO2 (total 
                          ‐16.689    ‐11.562               16.470      33.659    18.047 
upstream) 
GHG ‐ CO2 (total 
                          61.559     61.559                61.559      61.559    61.557 
tailpipe) 
GHG ‐ other (total)       0.001      0.001                 0.068       0.004     0.000 

Total cost (Aus  )        4.3        3.9                   4.8         4.2       3.8 

30 g/m2/d 

GHG gas (total fossil)    ‐27.560    ‐23.019               8.298       35.856    81.239 
GHG (total fossil 
                          ‐28.030    ‐23.489               7.828       35.386    19.213 
upstream) 
GHG (total fossil 
                          0.470      0.470                 0.470       0.470     62.026 
tailpipe) 
GHG (total upstream)  ‐27.949        ‐23.408               7.852       35.465    19.241 

GHG (total tailpipe)      62.028     62.028                62.028      62.028    62.026 
GHG ‐ CO2 (fossil 
                          ‐28.563    ‐23.797               6.861       33.437    18.040 
upstream) 
GHG ‐ CO2 (fossil 
                          0.001      0.001                 0.001       0.001     61.557 
tailpipe) 
GHG ‐ CH4 (total)         0.030      ‐0.181                0.250       0.984     1.156 

CHG ‐ N20 (total)         0.971      0.957                 1.117       1.431     0.486 
GHG ‐ CO2 (total 
                          ‐28.547    ‐23.987               6.657       33.659    18.047 
upstream) 
GHG ‐ CO2 (total 
                          61.559     61.559                61.559      61.559    61.557 
tailpipe) 
GHG ‐ other (total)       0.001      0.001                 0.068       0.004     0.000 

Total cost (Aus  )        2.8        2.2                   3.0         4.2       3.8 


Source: Campbell et al 2010 




                                                                                           112
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


   Note:  Fossil  emissions  are  from  the  combustion  of  fossil  fuels  and  add  extra  GHG  to  the 
atmosphere. Non‐fossil emissions are those that come from burning biomass, and are simply 
releasing  Carbon  that  had  been  previously  fixed  by  the  biomass  –  as  such  they  add  no  new 
Carbon  to  the  atmosphere.  Upstream  emissions  are  those  released  during  processing,  while 
tailpipe emissions come from combustion in the truck. 
   The  negative  emissions  are  because  the  biomass  is  anaerobically  digested  to  produce 
methane, then electricity, directly substituting electricity generation from other sources. The 
results show that biodiesel from algae is better than canola and standard diesel, with savings 
between 63.1 and 108.8 g / ton / km to ULS possible. 
   The study also looked at the economic considerations, although this is rife with uncertainty 
(due  to  changing  fuel  prices,  possible  tax exemptions,  changing  landscape  of  the  legislation, 
etc.). The amortization rate was given at 15%, with the capital costs accounting for 43‐64% of 
the annual operating costs. The conclusion is that under the right conditions, biodiesel from 
algae is economically and sustainably feasible. 


12.7.6    Discussion 

   This is the only other LCA study (other than Kadam) that uses marine water (fresh water is 
scarce in Australia). However, a major disadvantage is that the environmental considerations 
of desalinating and then treating this water are not considered (Greenwell, 2010). The study is 
specific  to  Australia,  as  it  has  the  distinct  advantages  of  receiving  more  sun  than  other 
countries,  while  also  having  more  land  available  for  such  facilities  without  a  big  impact  on 
biodiversity.  
   Although  the  economic  considerations  are  very  basic  calculations,  with  the  assumptions 
subject to change, it does give a favourable view of the economic feasibility of algae under the 
right  conditions,  and  is  the  only  study  to  look  at  this  aspect  as  well  as  the  technical  side.




                                                                                                          113
                                            AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                               Coordination Action 
                                               FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


 

13. Annex 3: Expert Stakeholders participating in this study 

        Name             Association     Position and experience            Type of response 
                                         Researcher – formerly with         Personal communication 
        John            Benemann 
                                         the NREL, many years of            and completed 
        Benemann        Associates, USA 
                                         experience in algae                questionnaire 
                        Institute of 
                                         Researcher – current projects 
        Tomas           Chemical                                            Completed life cycle 
                                         include bioethanol from 
        Branyik1        Technology,                                         inventory spreadsheet 
                                         algae 
                        Czech Republic 
                        University of    Researcher – lead author of a 
        Andres Clarens                                                      Completed questionnaire
                        Virginia, USA    recent LCA study 
                                         Researcher – previous work 
        Chris           Durham           includes feasibility studies on 
                                                                            Completed questionnaire
        Greenwell2      University, UK  algae, industry consultant, 
                                         and various (EU) projects 
                        Necton –         Chemical Engineer ‐ has 
        Diana Fonseca1  AlgaFuel,        design and production              Completed questionnaire
                        Portugal         experience with algae 
                        Ben Gurion       Researcher – experience with 
                                                                            Personal communication 
        Stefan Leu      University,      biotechnology and 
                                                                            and discussion 
                        Israel           sustainability 
                        Necton –         R&D Manager at Necton with 
        Vitor                                                               Personal communication 
                        AlgaFuel,        experience in microalgae 
        Verdelho1                                                           and discussion 
                        Portugal         biotechnology 
                        European         Project Manager – 
        Pierre‐Antoine                                                      Personal communication 
                        Biodiesel Board  experience in lobbying for 
        Vernon1,2                                                           and discussion 
                        (EBB)            legislation with biofuels 
    1
         Member of AquaFUELs 
    2
         Member of EABA 
     
     
     
     
     
     




                                                                                                      114
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                             Coordination Action 
                                             FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



14. Annex 4: Questionnaire  

Current LCA studies 
We have identified only 7 major LCA studies that provide an overview of the energy balance 
for algal biofuels (listed above)  
    •   Please list any important studies that you think we have missed.  
    •   Are  you  familiar  with  any  of  the  studies,  Do  you  have  any  concerns  about  their 
        credibility – and if so what are they? 
    •   Do you think these LCA provide a good reflection of the merits of algal biofuels 
                         o If yes – how could they be improved 
                         o If no – why not? 
Click here to enter text. 
What, in your view, are the main strengths and weaknesses of LCA (for algae)? 
Click here to enter text. 
            

Algae for biofuels 
Which production pathway (cultivation through to final conversion to biofuel) do you believe 
is  most  likely  to  be  commercial,  and  why?  Should  all  the  various  production  pathways  be 
considered in LCAs?  
   Click here to enter text. 
            
Current LCA studies identify water consumption for algae cultivation to be an important issue, 
and recommend using wastewater. Do you think this will help determine where algae biofuels 
can  be  grown  and  which  water  source  do  you  think  has  the  greatest  potential  (i.e.  fresh, 
marine or waste)? 
   Click here to enter text. 
            
    •   What other factors will determine where the production plants are located (what land 
        constraints are there in terms of proximity to a carbon, water, solar radiation source, 
        type of land) 
        Click here to enter text. 
                                                                                                    115
                                           AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                              Coordination Action 
                                              FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


                   
What, in your view, are the most important technical challenges that have to be overcome for 
successful commercial cultivation of algae for biofuels?  
    Click here to enter text. 
               

LCA on algae 
Is there currently a lack of good quality data and does this affect the overall reliability of a LCA 
(current studies use theoretical data based on lab/pilot scale)? 
        •   Are  there  currently  too  many  unknowns  to  make  LCA  results  useful  for  guiding 
             decisions? 
    Click here to enter text. 
     
The inputs for current LCAs are estimated based on the composition of the algae – whereas 
inefficiencies are more likely in scaled up production processes.  Does this mean that current 
studies too optimistic?   
    Click here to enter text. 
               
Co‐products  and  services  can  improve  the calculated sustainability of algae – how  are these 
best incorporated in LCA studies (i.e. if algae are concurrently used for wastewater treatment 
and biofuel production)?  
•       Which are the most likely co‐products to be used and for what? 
•       Do you have a preferred method of allocation, and if so, why? 
    Click here to enter text. 
               
“CO2 use by algal cultures is not CO2 sequestration – that comes from algal biofuels replacing 
fossil  fuels”.  There  is  some  debate  about  the  carbon  credits  that  can  be  assigned  to  algae 
cultivation,  with  policy  makers  taking  the  position  that  carbon  captured  by  algae  growth  is 
later released anyway, so does not count as carbon sequestration. Under what circumstances 
do you think CO2 credits for sequestration can be attributed to algal biofuels?  
    Click here to enter text. 
     
                                                                                                      116
                                          AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                             Coordination Action 
                                             FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


Different  LCAs  adopt  different  functional  units,  such  as  impacts  per  1000MJ,  the  amount  of 
biofuel to transport 1 tonne by 1 km, algae grown in 1 ha, etc. Given the uncertainty of the 
production pathway, which is the most logical functional unit that can be adopted for future 
LCAs  in  order  to  maintain  consistency  between  studies,  and  how  important  is  it  to  have  a 
consistent functional unit between studies? 
   Click here to enter text. 
    
Different LCAs use different system boundaries ‐  – is there any merit to adopting a standard 
practice (i.e. Relative Mass Energy and Economics method proposed by Raynolds) for all future 
LCAs – or where do you see the logical system boundary should be? 
   Click here to enter text. 
            
Are there any further issues you think should be considered when using LCA to guide policy 
decisions in the future? 
       Click here to enter text. 




                                                                                                    117
                                                  AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                       Coordination Action 
                                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1


 

15. Annex 5: Assumptions of Normalized Modelling 
         Primary Energe Usage                                  Assumptions
         1.Algae Cultivation and Harvesting
                                                               Electricity consumption from the cultivation system
         Electricity used in Cultivation System
                                                               operation is based on original LCA study
                                                               Nitrogen fertilizer demand is based on original LCA study;
                                                               Energy Content of the Nitrogen fertilizer is based on
         Nitrogen fertilizer                                   Fehrenbach (2008)"GHG Accounting Methodology and
                                                               Default Data according to the Biomass Sustainability
                                                               Ordinance (BSO)"
                                                               Diesel tractor used in harvesting algae (Based on
         Tractor Fuel usage
                                                               Campbell et al 2009)
                                                               Tubular manufacture and PVC lining (Based on
         System Construction
                                                               Stephenson et al 2010)
         2. Biomass Drying and Dewatering
                                                               Studies which assumed certain heat input in the Biomass
                                                               drying and dewatering stage still follow their original
         Heat
                                                               assumptions; Studies which exlude the extraction process
                                                               are normalised by Lardon et al's assumption
                                                               Studies which assumed certain electricity input in the
                                                               Biomass drying and dewatering stage still follow their
         Electricity
                                                               original assumptions; Studies which exlude the extraction
                                                               process are normalised by Lardon et al's assumption
         3.Lipid Extraction
         Electricity (Homogenization for Cell disruption)      Only applied on the Stephenson et al(2010)'s study
                                                               Studies which assumed certain electricity input in the
                                                               extraction stage still follow their original assumptions;
         Electricity( Extraction)
                                                               Studies which exlude the extraction process are
                                                               normalised by Steohenson et al's assumption
                                                               Studies which assumed certain heat input in the extraction
                                                               stage still follow their original assumptions; Studies which
         Heat
                                                               exlude the extraction process are normalised by
                                                               Steohenson et al's assumption
         Totals
         1.Algae Cultivation and Harvesting                    Sum up all the energy input in this stage
         2.Biomass Drying and Dewatering                       Sum up all the energy input in this stage
         3.Lipid Extraction                                    Sum up all the energy input in this stage
         Biomass Yield                                         Based on original LCA study
         Biorefinery                                           Based on original LCA study
         Volumetric Fuel yield                                 Based on original LCA study
         Energetic fuel yield                                  Based on original LCA study
         Total Heat Input                                      Sum up all the Heat Inputs
         Total Electricity Input                               Sum up all the Electricity Inputs
          Total Input energy                                   Sum up all the Energy Inputs

                                                               Energy content in the algal oil plus Energy output from
          Total Energy Output (on Mass Basis)
                                                               Gas boiler. (on the mass basis)
                                                               Energy content in the algal oil plus Energy output from
          Total Energy Output (on Energy Basis)
                                                               Gas boiler. (on the energetic basis)
                                                               Studies which had assumed Heating value of the biomass
         Energy content in Biomass( Heating value of           are still follow their original assumptions; Studies which
         Biomass)                                              didn't mention the value, the energy content of the biomass
                                                               is calculated by Illman et al(2000) 's results
                                                               Studies which had assumed Heating value of the lipid are
          Subtotal Energy Output in Lipid(Heating value of     still follow their original assumptions; Studies which didn't
         algal oil)                                            mention the value, the energy content of the lipid is
                                                               calculated by Illman et al(2000) 's results
                                                               Energy content in the Algal biomass minus energy content
          Subtotal Energy Output in Residual
                                                               from the algal lipid
          Energy Content in Methane(Anaerobic
                                                               Methane yield is based on Sialve et al (2009)
         Digestion)(60%)
          Generated heat from Boiler(Assuming 75%              Efficiency of the Gas boiler is based on Stephenson et al
         efficiency)                                           2010
          Heat Generation From CHP(41%)                        Only applied on Stephenson et al 2010: System Efficiency
          Electricity Generation From CHP(34%)                 is based on John Macadam (2010)
                                                               Studies which had assumed Heating value of the lipid are
                                                               still follow their original assumptions; Studies which didn't
          Reported HV of Algal Lipid
                                                               mention the value, the energy content of the lipid are
                                                               calculated by Illman et al(2000) 's results
                                                               Studies which had assumed Heating value of the biomass
                                                               are still follow their original assumptions; Studies which
          Reported HV of Biomass
                                                               didn't mention the value, the energy content of the biomass
                                                               are calculated by Illman et al(2000) 's results


                                                               All the Primary Energy Input minus Energy content of
          Net Energy Ratio (NER) for Lipid production          coproducts, then divided by Energy content of lipid fraction
                                                               All the Primary Energy Input divided by Energy content of
          Net Energy Ratio (NER) for Biomass production
                                                               dry biomass
                                                                                                                                

                                                                                                                                   118
                                                    AQUAFUEL FP7 – 241301‐2 
                                                       Coordination Action 
                                                       FP7‐ENERGY‐2009‐1



16. Annex 6: Example of data normalization  
    Algae Cultivation and          Original Unit               Original        Normalized Unit               Normalized 
    Harvesting                                                 Value                                        Value 
    Electricity Consumption       (MJ/kg Biodiesel)             7.50     (MJ/MJ Dry Algal                   0.0521  
                                                                         Biomass) 
    Land Use                      (m2)                         1000000. (m2)                                1000000.00 
                                                               00  
    Transportation of inputs  (km)                              100.00   (km)                                100.00  
    to farm 
    Nitrogen fertilizer       (g/kg Biodiesel)                  273.00        (MJ/MJ Dry Algal              0.093  
                                                                              Biomass) 
    Phosphorus fertilizer         (g/kg Dry Biomass)            9.90          (g/kg Dry Biomass)            9.90  
    CO2 Source                    (kg/kg Algal Biomass)         1.80          (kg/kg Algal Biomass)         1.80  
    Tractor Fuel usage            (MJ/kg Dry Algal              NR            (MJ/MJ Dry Algal               NR  
                                  Biomass)                                    Biomass) 
    System Construction           (MJ/kg Biodiesel )            NR            (MJ/MJ Dry Algal               NR  
                                                                              Biomass) 
1:  Original  data  in  Lardon  et  al  2010:  lipid  ratio:  17.5%;  extraction  efficiency:  70%.  For  every  kg  biodiesel 
produced , 8.163kg biomass is required, data for electricity consumption was allocated to biodiesel production 
which  is  7.5MJ/kg  Biodiesel,  after  normalization  as  all  the  electricity  consumption  allocated  to  biomass 
production, the result will be 0.9188 MJ/kg biomass, the heating value of the biomass in Lardon et al’s study is 
17.5  MJ/kg  biomass  for  normal  Nitrogen  cultivation  case,  so  we  can  get  0.052MJ/MJ  biomass  after  data 
normalization.( all the data with yellow colored are had been normalized) 

 




                                                                                                                          119

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:21
posted:9/14/2012
language:Unknown
pages:120