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the Cheney Parks Recreation City of Cheney

VIEWS: 3 PAGES: 52

									   City of Cheney
Comprehensive Parks and
        Recreation Plan

                 May 2006
                                                                                         Table of Contents
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................................................. 4
  Purpose and Intent..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
  Public Involvement.................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
  Demographics............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 4
  Park System Inventory .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 4
  Departmental and Contracted Services .................................................................................................................................................................................. 5
  Parks and Recreation Needs..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
  Parks and Recreation Goals ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
  Implementation .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
  Recommendations...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
  Project Priorities ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
Section 1. Setting................................................................................................................................................................................. 7
  Purpose and Intent..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
  Study Area .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 7
  Geography and Climate ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 7
  History......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8
  Economy...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
  Demographics........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
     Population Characteristics ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 10
  Land Use ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
  Management and Operations................................................................................................................................................................................................. 11
     City Organization............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11
     Parks and Recreation ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Section 2. Planning Process............................................................................................................................................................. 13
  Methodology ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 13
  Public Participation.................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 14
    Questionnaire Feedback .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Section 3. Existing Parks and Recreation System ....................................................................................................................... 17
  City Facilities ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 17
     Local Parks .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18
     Neighborhood Parks.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 23
     Large Urban Parks ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 25
  Other Facilities.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
     Wren Pierson Community Center ................................................................................................................................................................................... 28
  State Facilities ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28

2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                                                                                                                                                  Table of Contents              i
     Columbia Plateau Trail State Park ................................................................................................................................................................................... 28
     Fish Lake Trail State Park.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 28
     Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge .................................................................................................................................................................................. 29
     Trolley Trail......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
     Eastern Washington University ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
     Kennedy Memorial Library .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 29
  Recreational Programs ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 29
     City Programs ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30
     County Programs ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30
     Community Resources ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30
Section 4. Needs and Goals............................................................................................................................................................. 31
  Physical...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 31
  Management ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 31
  Rehabilitation............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 32
  Rehabilitation Rationale.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 32
  Park and Facility Needs .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 33
  Facility Needs ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34
  Acquisitions .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 36
  Planning Policies ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36
  Goals and Objectives ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36
Section 5. Implementation .............................................................................................................................................................. 40
  Programs and Services ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 40
  Management ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 40
  Annual Evaluation and Update ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 41
  Projects....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
  Prioritizing ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 43
     Criteria ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 45
  Capital Improvement Plan...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 45
  Possible Funding Sources ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 49




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                                                                                                                                                Table of Contents               ii
                                                                                     Tables and Figures
Table 1. Cheney Age Distribution ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 10
Table 2. Population Growth 1920-2000............................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Table 3. Cheney WA Demographics for 2000 .................................................................................................................................................................. 11
Table 4. Land Use Percent ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Table 5. Important Facilities to Community ...................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Table 6. Program Popularity .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 14
Table 7. Amenities Important to Non-Users ....................................................................................................................................................................... 15
Table 8. Teen Survey Results .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 16
Table 9. Parks and Facilities in Cheney Area.................................................................................................................................................................... 17
Table 10. City of Cheney Parks............................................................................................................................................................................................. 18
Table 11. City Park.................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Table 12. Hagelin Park............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20
Table 13. Moos Field ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 21
Table 14. Salnave Park ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 21
Table 15. Sutton Park .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 23
Table 16. Centennial Park ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24
Table 17. Hibbard Park............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 25
Table 18. Additional Open Space Available.................................................................................................................................................................... 25
Table 19. Supply of Facilities .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 27
Table 20. Cheney Schools...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Table 21. State Sites ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 27
Table 22. City Activities ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30
Table 23. Cheney Parks and Land Needs ......................................................................................................................................................................... 33
Table 24. Summary of Open Space .................................................................................................................................................................................... 33
Table 25. Cheney Facility Needs.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 35
Table 26. Parks Projects........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
Table 27. Project Prioritizing Matrix....................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
Table 28. Capital Projects 2006 - 2011 ................................................................................................................................................................................ 46
Table 29. Capital Projects 2012 – 2026 By Relative Expense and Priority .................................................................................................................. 47
Table 30. Capital Projects 2006-2026 By Location........................................................................................................................................................... 48

Figure 1. Historic Cheney.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Figure 2. Cheney & EWU Population Comparison .......................................................................................................................................................... 11
Figure 3. Cheney Parks Locator Map ................................................................................................................................................................................. 17



2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                                                                                                                                       Tables and Figures            iii
Executive Summary
                    Purpose and Intent
                    This plan establishes policies for park and recreation services, and it identifies park and recreation facility needs
                    for the City of Cheney. It also updates the 1997 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan and strives to balance
                    community needs with the financial realities of the City’s parks and recreational program. By making the plan
                    sensitive to Cheney’s current conditions and needs, the plan helps to position the City to win grant funds for park
                    improvements and to target capital and operational spending more strategically.

                    Public Involvement
                    Public participation in plan development is both crucial to plan success and is required by the State of
                    Washington. Cheney sought out public participation as part of this plan update by conducting focused
                    interviews with representatives of parks and recreation user groups, by working very closely with its Parks and
                    Recreation Advisory Committee and by designing and administering a citizen survey of parks and recreation
                    needs and desires. More than 320 Cheney households responded to the parks questionnaire, helping the City
                    identify and prioritize specific park system improvements and operational policies. A charette, on October 13,
                    2005, helped confirm wants and needs of the community by several processes; presentations, voting, comment
                    cards and group projects.

                    Demographics
                    Cheney contains a population focused on education. Table 2 lists population demographics, showing that 83% of
                    the community is white, with more than 5% identifying themselves as Asian and 4% Hispanic. Over the past 45
                    years, Cheney’s population has grown by almost 22%. Since 2000, population has increased from 8,832 to 10,070
                    in 2005, an increase of more than 14%. Most of that growth has coincided with increased enrollment at Eastern
                    Washington University, plus increased industrial activity in the West Plains area. Cheney expects to have almost
                    13,800 people within its urban growth area by the year 2025.

                    Park System Inventory
                    The Parks and recreation budget is funded through a 4.75% tax on Natural Gas and Utilities, funding the
                    acquisition, development and maintenance of parks facilities, and the operation and management of the City’s
                    recreational programs. Impact fees from growth and development also generate revenue that is dedicated
                    specifically for new capitol projects. There are also neighboring County and State parks in the surrounding area
                    that serve Cheney residents, including the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, Columbia Plateau Trail State Park,
                    Fish Lake Park and Trolley Trail Conservation Area (between Fish Lake Trail and the Centennial Trail). Table 10
                    in Section 3 lists the community’s parks, and the text in that section describes the parks. Table 9 provides a


                    2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                            Executive Summary     4
comprehensive list of park facilities in all; the city park system includes 44 acres of developed parkland and 50
acres of undeveloped parkland.

Departmental and Contracted Services
Cheney’s recreational services offer a summer outdoor pool, after school program, summer day camp, special
events, adult and youth classes, adult and youth sports, senior classes and activities, and other community
resources. The City also contracts with various non-profit youth athletic organizations to round out its program
offerings. Eastern Washington University is another partner, collaborating with the City on the joint siting and
use of various recreational facilities.

Parks and Recreation Needs
This plan identifies Cheney’s various parks and recreation issues into physical, management, program and
service, and rehabilitation issue categories. Section 4 describes those issues in detail, emphasizing the need for
rehabilitation and maintenance of parks facilities as well as the need for acquiring and developing new sites to
serve a growing population. Table 25 identifies Cheney Parks and Land Needs this plan is intended to address.

Parks and Recreation Goals
Cheney is striving to achieve physical, rehabilitation, operational and program-related goals, as stated in this
plan. The goals are intended to address Cheney’s parks and recreational issues, deficiencies, needs and
aspirations. They propose:

    •   To provide adequate parks and recreation facilities for the community with emphasis on the adopted
        standards, goals and objectives outlined in this document and in accordance with the policies of the
        Cheney Board of Park Commissioners.
    •   To provide parks and recreational facilities through cooperative efforts with other governmental
        agencies.
    •   To provide a sound fiscal basis for the funding of future facility acquisition and development.
    •   To achieve the most comprehensive parks and recreation delivery system possible within the greater
        Cheney area, utilizing all available resources of the community in a consistent and professional manner.
    •   To provide recreational program offerings for as many constituents of the geographic area of Cheney
        School District as possible.
    •   To provide recreation and park services in the most energy-efficient manner possible which offer youth
        and adults a broad variety of passive, active and organized recreation opportunities.

Each goal is also attached to several objectives that elaborate on and help quantify the goal statement. The plan’s
objectives and policies are found in the Parks and Recreation element in the Comprehensive Plan.


2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                            Executive Summary      5
Implementation
Section 5 details the implementation strategy for the parks and recreation plan, outlining and identifying specific
tasks the City can pursue in terms of its management, program offering, facility provision, citizen participation,
and interagency coordination efforts. This section emphasizes the cooperative nature of providing
comprehensive recreational services, identifying specific administrative actions the City can take, or continue to
take, to ensure that its provision of services continues to attain the high levels of resident satisfaction even as the
community continues to grow.

Recommendations
Table 26 represents recommendations for new park facilities, and much of the text following that table outlines
specific project actions the City may consider for each of its park facilities.

Project Priorities
Cheney has limited funds to expend on park and recreation system improvements, so it needs to prioritize the
various projects by relative importance. In some cases, however, it is difficult to compare different types of
projects to each other, resulting in an “apples vs. oranges” type of quandary. This section of the plan proposes a
prioritizing process that helps to compare different projects. It identifies six criteria against which table 27
presents the score of projects.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                               Executive Summary    6
Section 1. Setting
                     Purpose and Intent
                     This plan establishes policies for park and recreation services, and identifies facility needs for the City. Updating
                     the 1997 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan, the goal is to balance the community’s needs and the financial
                     realities of the City’s parks and recreation program.

                     State and federal grants are a major source of funding for parks and recreation in Cheney. This plan and its
                     preparation conform to Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation (IAC). In Washington, the IAC
                     administers most state and federal recreation-oriented grant programs. According their guidelines, local park
                     and recreation plans must be updated once every six years. The City park planning process has incorporated the
                     6 elements required by the IAC including:

                          •   Goals, & objectives
                          •   Inventory
                          •   Public involvement
                          •   Demand and needs analysis
                          •   Capital Improvement Program
                          •   Adoption

                     This plan follows a process that uses existing population, facilities, and programs, while involving the community
                     to update the design. While complying with IAC requirements, the process includes: stakeholder interviews, a
                     field inventory, policy review, public outreach, capital programming, public review, and adoption.

                     Study Area
                     Cheney’s current urban growth area and city limits encompass approximately 3,175 acres. Since Cheney is a
                     rather solitary city in a sparsely settled rural area, the parks and recreation planning area extends well beyond the
                     urban growth area, capturing the surrounding rural population that uses Cheney’s parks and recreation facilities
                     and programs.

                     Geography and Climate
                     Cheney is blessed with a four-season climate. The dry climate produces about 16 inches of precipitation a year.
                     Winters are brisk, with low temperatures averaging 25 Degrees F (November-February). Snowfall averages 38
                     inches for the entire winter season with an average snow depth of 3 inches. Summers are dry and hot with high
                     temperatures averaging 80 Degrees F over the summer months. Southwest winds are common, with no more


                     2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                                 Section 1 - Setting 7
than a light breeze for the majority of the year and a change of wind direction with a slight increase in intensity to
the northeast throughout the winter months.

Cheney lies approximately 2,400’ above sea level and has a flat to gently rolling terrain. It slopes southeast
toward State Route 904, the railroad tracks, and the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge. The soil is a light wind
blown or lake bottom sediment over a basalt layer with Palouse soils to the Northwest consist of sand, silt, and
clay.

History
In 1858, the last Indian uprising occurred in Eastern Washington. Because isolated Eastern Washington was an
area of this Indian unrest during the early part of the territorial period, it was not until the late 1860s and early
1870's that settlers made homes here. In the latter part of the 1870s, settlers attracted by plentiful water and
timber and the promise of a railway line made their homes near a group of springs bubbling through a willow
copse from the bank where the Burlington Northern Depot now stands.

The name of the little community was Willow Springs, and then became Depot Springs, because of its ties to the
railroad. The community’s name changed to Billings, in honor of a president of the Northern Pacific Company,
and finally Cheney, in honor of Benjamin P. Cheney, a Director of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

Benjamin was the eldest son of a blacksmith who was born in 1815 at Hillboro, New Hampshire. Mr. Cheney
donated $10,000 to establish the Benjamin P. Cheney Academy in town. The railroad donated eight acres of land
so that an educational facility could be built. In 1880 the railroad was graded through the town, and in 1883 the
town was incorporated with the streets laid out in the shape of a triangle with the base parallel to the tracks. The
railroad tracks were not in a true east-west line, however, so the original town is askew with the map; the newer
part of Cheney was built more to the compass.

                                               Figure 1. Historic Cheney




               Madison, Wis., J. J. Stoner, 1884. Col. map 24 x 51 cm Reference: LC Panoramic maps (2nd ed.), 967

2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                                          Section 1 Setting   8
After a stormy series of boundary changes caused by legislative acts, Spokane County was created with a
permanent County seat still to be selected. Contenders for the honor were Cheney and Spokane Falls (now
Spokane). Cheney received a majority of the votes, but because of alleged irregularities at the polls, Spokane Falls
won the election. When this was taken to court, a circuit court judge agreed to a ballot recount. However, when
a recount failed to materialize, the citizens of Cheney took matters into their own hands.

On a night when most of the residents of Spokane Falls were at a gala wedding celebration, a delegation of armed
Cheney residents invaded the Auditor's office, took possession of the books, did their own ballot recount which
showed Cheney the victor, and made off into the darkness with the records. The "Grand Steal" was not contested
and was confirmed by a court decision in 1881. Cheney remained the county seat until 1886 when the faster
growing Spokane Falls again brought the issue to a vote and regained the seat. From this point on, the history of
Cheney revolved around the growth of the State Normal School, later Eastern Washington College of Education,
later Eastern Washington State College and finally Eastern Washington University.

When Washington became a state in 1889, Cheney was able to obtain legislation establishing one of the state
normal schools, mandatory under the Enabling Act, in Cheney. Its most convincing argument was that it already
had the physical beginnings of a normal school in the Benjamin P. Cheney Academy.

Disagreement between legislators and governors resulted in three appropriation vetoes for the NormalSchool in
the next 25 years, but in each case, the citizens of Cheney somehow raised the funds to keep the college going
until the next legislative session.

The creation of "Special Interest Groups" was an increasing interest in the social circle. Participating in "proper"
social activities became the forefront in Cheney for creating a character all its own. In the past, keeping the Small
Town character was an important issue, and today Cheney citizens still share that same ideal and vision for
Cheney's future.

Incorporated in 1883, the City of Cheney is located in central Spokane County, approximately four miles
southeast of Interstate 90 and 12 miles south of the City of Spokane. Now home to more than 10,000
people, Cheney is proud of its small town nature, which is enhanced by the diverse influence of Eastern
Washington University. Cheney developed into the city it is today because of its strong ties to education, rail,
and agriculture. (Source: City of Cheney, WA website: www.cityofcheney.org)

Economy
Once a booming railroad town and County seat, Cheney has become one of many small towns surrounding the
regionally dominant city of Spokane. Interstate 90 creates an easy commute from Cheney to Spokane. Cheney
residents commute to Spokane for work and shopping while half of EWU's attendants commute from Spokane to

2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                                Section 1 Setting   9
                                        Cheney for college. Although Cheney contains its own distinguishing characteristics, its fortunes are closely tied
                                        to Spokane through economic, social and political linkages. Eastern Washington University is the single largest
                                        employer in Cheney followed by the public school district and local government. In the private sector, health
                                        care dominates the employment base. Farming and agriculture are also a substantial part of the economy in
                                        Cheney with grain, wheat and hay as lead crops.

     Table 1. Cheney Age                Demographics
          Distribution
                                        Population Characteristics
              1990         2000
                                        Between 1920 and 2000 Cheney grew by about 7,580 people. This represents an average population increase of
  Age      Total   %    Total     %
                                        just over 28%. For Cheney’s future population this Parks Plan is conforming to the City’s population forecast of
                                        13,800 people in the UGA for the year 2025.
  0 to 4    440    6%     473      5%
  5 to 9    435    5%     428      5%
 10 to 14   436    5%     521      6%
                                        Historically, Cheney’s population has grown with that of Eastern Washington University. This trend is slowly
 15 to 19  1168 15% 1585          18%   changing, however, primarily due to industrial growth in the West Plains area. Cheney is now growing faster
 20 to 24  2251 28% 2335          26%   than EWU. Figure 2 illustrates the close relationship the community and university share. Table 2 provides the
 25 to 29   604    8%     720      8%   community’s population history next to EWU’s enrollment.
 30 to 34   380    5%     406      5%
 35 to 39   422    5%     379      4%
                                        Cheney’s demographics show that the majority of the population is White and Asian. Hispanics comprise 4% of
 40 to 44   388    5%     451      5%
 45 to 49   278    4%     403      4%
                                        the population (Table 3). Age group distribution in Cheney is unique for Spokane County, most likely because of
 50 to 54   266    3%     238      3%   the concentration of university students attending EWU. Approximately 48% of the population is between the
 55 to 59   212    3%     205      2%   ages of 20 and 44. Over half of the population is under the age of 25. Elderly residents age 65 and over comprise
 60 to 64   169    2%     210      2%   about 7% of the population and 10% are under the age of nine (Table 1).
 65 to 69   130    2%     135      2%
 70 to 74   131    2%     155      2%
 75 to 79   109    1%     120      1%   Land Use
 80 to 84    65    1%     135      2%
                                        The Parks and Recreation planning area includes the area within Cheney’s city limits (approximately 2,635
85 and up    51    1%      73      1%
   Total   7935          8972
                                        acres/4.12 square miles) plus surrounding unincorporated lands within the Urban Growth Area (3175 acres/4.96
     Source: 1990 & 2000 Census         sq. mi total). The city limits stretch from Paradise Road on the north to just below the intersection of two tracks
                                        of the Union Pacific rail line.




                                        2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                              Section 1 Setting   10
                                                                        Table 2. Population Growth 1920-2000
Figure 2. Cheney & EWU Population Comparison                                                      %       EWU       %
                                                                          Year        City
                                                                                                Change Enrollment Change
                   Comparison of Cheney/EWU Population
                                                                           1920       1,252        4%
                                                                           1930       1,335        7%
                 15000                                                     1940       1,551        16%




    Population
                 10000                                      Cheney **      1950       2,797        80%
                  5000                                      EWU*           1960       3,173        13%
                     0                                                     1970       6,358       100%         6801
                                                                           1980       7,630        20%         8333         0.23




                      ar

                     74

                     81

                     88

                     95

                     02
                                                                           1990       7,723        1%          8402         0.01




                  Ye

                  19

                  19

                  19

                  19

                  20
                                Year                                       2000       8,832        14%         8597         0.02
                                                                         Source: Office of Financial Management-Population History.
                                                                                             EWU enrollment office

Sources: **Census Data, other years estimated by OFM. *Fall headcount
                                                                        Table 3. Cheney WA Demographics for
from EWU Enrollment Services Office                                     2000
                                                                                                              People     % Total
Table 4. Land Use Percent                                               Total:                                 8,972
           Land Use                        Acres             % Total        Not Hispanic or Latino:            8,587      96%
                                                                               White alone                     7,468      83%
         Commercial                        321.02             12%
                                                                               Black or African
   Critical Areas Limited
                                           320.80              12%             American alone                   175        2%
          Residential
                                                                               American Indian and
    General Residential                    681.58              25%
                                                                               Alaska Native alone              125        1%
           Industrial                      454.57              16%             Asian alone                      492        5%
          Mixed Use                        20.48                1%             Two or more races                327        4%
   Multi Family Residential                291.88              11%          Hispanic or Latino:                 385        4%
             Public                        326.09              12%             White alone                      200        2%
           University                      346.01              13%             Black or African
                                                                               American alone                   12       0.10%
Approximately 36% of the area is for residential uses, 12%                     Some other race alone            144        2%
for commercial, 16% for industrial uses and roughly 12% is                     Two or more races                29       0.30%
devoted to public uses.                                                                       Source: 2000 Census



Management and Operations
City Organization
The City operates under the strong Mayor-Council form of government. Cheney’s operation is organized under
the City Administrator through several departments including:


2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                                           Section 1 Setting     11
• Building Department
• Finance Department
• Fire Department
• Light Department
• Municipal Court
• Parks & Recreation Department
• Planning Department
• Police Department
• Public Works

Regularly scheduled interdepartmental meetings are held as a means of coordinating the various activities of the
city government.

The City Council makes final decisions regarding policy and fiscal matters. Several advisory committees assist
the City Council and staff. They include:

    •   The Planning Commission: Composed of seven members who are chosen by the City Council and
        Mayor dealing with matters affecting long range planning and policies related to urban growth
    •   Parks Board: Composed of seven members appointed by the Mayor and City Council for identifying
        recreation needs in the community, recommending policies related to park and recreation operations and
        reviewing proposals presented by the staff.
    •   Youth Commission: Composed of high school and junior high school students, this commission advises
        the Council on youth-related issues and service needs.
    •   Historic Preservation Commission: A seven-member commission that was appointed by the Mayor and
        City Council. This commission identifies and preserves the communities cultural resources through the
        inventory and registry of historic places.

Parks and Recreation
The Public Works Department is in charge of parks and recreation. There is a separate division that manages
recreational programs, while street and maintenance staff maintain parks facilities. During the summer, seasonal
employees are hired to assist with maintenance, recreation program delivery, and swimming pool operations.
Volunteers assist with various recreational programs and limited park maintenance. City employees conduct
most recreation programs.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                            Section 1 Setting   12
Section 2. Planning Process
                      Methodology
                      The planning process for this Parks and Recreation Plan Update involved:

                          •   Interviews – Early in the process, the consultants interviewed community stakeholders to get a feel
                              for parks and recreation issues and to learn about specific facility improvements that might be
                              planned in the near future and the availability of community resources to assist project identification,
                              installation and maintenance.
                          •   Facilities assessment – The consultant and City staff evaluated all Cheney parks and recreation
                              facilities, formulating recommendations on specific improvements for each. Section 3 presents the
                              findings of that assessment.
                          •   Mail questionnaire- The Parks and Recreation survey was included in the June 2005 utility bill to all
                              residents in Cheney, resulting in over 4,000 surveys being distributed. Of those, 323 were returned
                              for a return rate of around 8%. The survey was structured to gather input on park facilities as well as
                              the recreation and programming function of the park department. Individual returns were collected
                              via mail as well as a drop box that was located at city hall. The returned surveys were then entered
                              manually into a database and responses analyzed. A separate document provides a transcribed
                              listing of all respondents’ written comments.
                          •   Park Board workshop – At the halfway point in the planning process, the Park Board provided
                              guidance and direction in response to the findings of the community survey, suggesting specific plan
                              formatting and helping establish criteria for the charette.
                          •   Charette – Approximately 60 people attended the parks and recreation charette, reviewing site plans
                              for the various city park facilities and making recommendations on what to do with each one.
                              Participants also sat down in groups to consider the Betz Road property and to make
                              recommendations on that property’s disposition.
                          •   Project identification – City staff and the consultant identified a range of projects to address the
                              community’s demonstrated deficiencies in park facilities. These projects included rehabilitation of
                              existing facilities as well as construction of new ones, all intended to enhance the community’s level
                              of service.
                          •   Project prioritizing – All of the identified projects were compiled into a single list and ranked
                              according to priority and level of funding commitment. Section 5 describes that process in more
                              detail, but the end result is a listing of projects with more highly prioritized ones appearing as early
                              implementation items.




                      2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                  Section 2 Planning Process   13
Subsequent sections of this plan detail the condition and scope of Cheney’s current parks and recreation
facilities and the various projects proposed to address system deficiencies. The balance of this section focuses
on the public involvement process and how the community feels about parks and recreation in Cheney.

Public Participation
Public involvement plays a crucial role in the planning process. This plan was not only developed from
inventory and previous park planning efforts, but also included an extensive mail questionnaire. This was
mailed to all utility billing addresses in the City of Cheney. The questionnaire covered general preferences
for facilities and programs, asked for specific ideas shown through a park locator map, and delved into
specific user preferences.

Questionnaire Feedback

Park Facilities
Of the approximately 323 surveys returned, nearly 80% stated that they use Cheney’s park facilities on some
level. It should be cautioned that the survey results might be skewed by the fact that the heaviest users of
both facilities and programming are also the most likely to respond to a survey requesting input. In general,
of those that responded, the majority indicated that they lived in the newer subdivisions in the northern
section of the city, or the more established neighborhoods near the center. As expected, most respondents
also felt that these areas should be targeted for development of new parks or the improvement of existing
ones.
Table 5. Important Facilities to Community           Table 6. Program Popularity
  Count               Type of Facility                     Count                     Type of Program
   105                   Restrooms                          71                          Open swim
   104                     Trails                           57                      Aquatics program
    88           Pool/Water-based facilities                51                     Exercise and leisure
    80                 Natural areas                        44                        Athletics/Sports
    65                 Picnic areas                         36                     Outdoor recreation
    61                 Playgrounds                          33                       Adult programs
    60                 City gardens                         32                Children's programs (ages 3-6)
    60             Amphitheater/Stage                       32                 Youth programs (ages 7-12)
    53             Neighborhood parks                       17                        Arts and crafts
    50                  Skate parks                         16                 Teen programs (ages 13-18)
    38                  Sports fields                       15                         Educational
    35                  Play courts                         14                   Senior Citizen programs
    27              Community centers                        9                             Other
    11                     Other
    11                  Don't know


2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                  Section 2 Planning Process   14
                             Use and Quality
                             Overall, the respondents ranked the parks they used the most during the spring and summer months. The
                             top three included Hagelin Park/Swimming Pool, Salnave Park, and Sutton Park. When asked to rate the
                             quality of the parks in Cheney’s system, the same three were named [Sutton Park, Salnave Park, and Hagelin
                             Park]. It is important to note that each respondent will have his or her own measure and criteria for what
                             represents quality. Still, there appears to be a consistent belief in the user community that not only are
                             these three the most used by residents, but also represent the best quality in the Cheney system. Perceived
                             quality was lowest for Moos Field, Cedar St. Tennis Courts, and Hibbard Park.

                             For respondents who answered ‘yes’ that they do use Cheney’s park facilities (users), there was strong
                             support for a number of park elements. Tops on the list included restrooms, pools, park facilities,
                             playgrounds, and trees and landscaping. When asked a follow-up question of what facilities they would like
                             to see added, the ‘users’ ranked restrooms and pools at the top, but offered trails, natural areas, and
Table 7. Amenities
                             playgrounds as next in line in terms of most desirable features. In contrast, those respondents who answered
Important to Non-Users
                             that they do not use Cheney’s facilities (non-users) desired a different mix of park facilities. These included
Count      Facility Type     trails, natural areas, restrooms, city gardens, and picnic areas. Pools and water-based facilities ranked quite
 20            Trails        low on this group’s list. This contrast points to a desire by the ‘non-user’ group for facilities that are more
 15         Restrooms        passive and are not based on a particular activity like swimming or skateboarding. In fact, the number one
 14        Natural areas     reason given by ‘non-users’ was that “their personal yard and home fill most of their needs.”
 12        City gardens      Non-users may not be realizing a strong enough benefit from Cheney’s parks, as there is nothing that
 10     Neighborhood parks   differentiates the parks from what they find in their backyards. Therefore, the ‘non-user’ group may prefer a
                             system that provides more unique aesthetic features rather than activity-based ones.
 10        Picnic areas
  8         Skate parks
                             Swimming Pool
  7     Amphitheater/Stage   Respondent opinions on Cheney’s swimming pool are evenly divided. Across all the returned surveys less
         Pool/Water-based
                             than half (46%) felt the swimming pool was inadequate in some way and needed improvements. Even
  6           facilities
                             among self-declared heavy park users, this value increased to only 52%. For non-users it dropped even
  6     Community centers    further showing that only 25% believe the pool to be inadequate in meeting the community’s needs.
  5         Play courts
  5        Playgrounds       Regardless of whether the respondent is a user or non-user the general consensus is that it is too small. 32%
  5         Don't know       of the respondents to the survey felt that if any improvements or upgrades were made to the pool they
  3        Sports fields     should focus on expansion. Next in line (users) had a desire for improvements that make for easier entry,
  2           Other          while non-users sought upgrades to the dressing rooms and showers at the pool.




                             2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                 Section 2 Planning Process   15
                                            Programming and Recreation
                                            A complementary feature of Cheney’s park system is the programming and recreation opportunities it offers
                                            its residents. Overall, the respondents were closely divided between those that use recreation programming
                                            (52%) and those who do not (43%). Over 80% of those respondents who do not use the programming felt that
                                            the reasons were because of limited time and a lack of interesting programs. There is a definite need for teen
                                            programming. Non-users of park facilities desired more adult programs, exercise and leisure, and youth
                                            programs, while showing little interest in aquatic programs, open swim, and athletics/sports. This reinforces
                                            the earlier finding of the survey that this group is more interested in passive facilities. They are clearly not
                                            pool users and certainly not heavy users of the recreation programming where 90% of the non-users of parks
                                            said they don’t use any recreation programming.

                                            In contrast, there is a strong connection between park users and recreation users in Cheney. 60% of the park
                                            users said they participate in Cheney’s programs and activities. For this group the most frequently used
                                            programming was open swim, aquatics programming, athletics/sports, and exercise and leisure. Over 70%
                                            of the respondents use water-based programming frequently, while the less frequently used programs were
                                            arts and crafts, educational, and senior citizen programming. This leads one to infer that active park users
                                            make active recreation users, or that possibly active recreation users make active park users. The park users
                                            also want to see more exercise and leisure, outdoor recreation, and teen programs, while showing less interest
                                            in arts and crafts, educational, and senior citizen programs. Overall, support for more aquatics, athletics,
                                            educational and senior citizen programs is lacking.

                                            Program Funding
                                            The preferred funding scenario of Cheney parks and recreation programming depends upon whether the
                                            respondent is a user of the park facilities or not. Over 45% of the respondents felt that existing fees should
                                            remain the same, and 50% of park facility users felt the same. Not surprisingly, 41% of non-users of parks felt
                                            that recreation fees should be increased to ensure costs are covered, while 30% felt they were affordable and
                                            should remain the same.
Table 8. Teen Survey Results
Facility Preference  Female Male Combined   Teen Survey
                        %     %     %       As part of a long-term community-planning project for the city of Cheney, Washington, a survey on youth
Multi-Use Recreation   28    39*    33      preferences for a community recreation facility was conducted in July of 2005. The participants in the survey
Skate/BMX Park         11    15     13      included 582 7th-10th-grade students at Cheney Middle School and Cheney High School. This survey showed
Swimming
                                            that the participants’ overall top preference is for a swimming facility/ water park with a multi-use
facility/Water Park    54*   25    40*
Youth/Teen/Family                           recreational facility as the second choice. Gender differences were evident in the preferences of females who
Center                  3     2      3      preferred the swimming facility/water park at both the middle and high school level. Males preferred the
Other                   4    19     11      multi-use recreational facility at the high school level and were divided between a swimming facility/water
* Top percentage in category                park, multi-use recreation facility, and a skate/BMX park at the middle school.



                                            2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                  Section 2 Planning Process   16
Section 3. Existing Parks and Recreation System
                      City Facilities
                       The City’s Park system consists of two neighborhood parks, five local parks, memorial park areas, and one
                      undeveloped large urban park. Categories of public parks and recreation facilities within the area include land
                      owned by the State of Washington, Spokane County, and the City of Cheney. There is one county regional park
                      trail. Land owned by the state consists of the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, two state Trail parks and
                      Eastern Washington University.
                                  Figure 3. Cheney Parks Locator Map                        Table 9. Parks and Facilities in Cheney
                                                                                            Area
                                                                                            Parks and
                                                                                            Facilities              Acres     No. of Sites
                                                                                                        City Parks and Facilities
                                                                                            Neighborhood
                                                                                            Parks                   10.18          2
                                                                                            Local Parks             29.52          5
                                                                                            Memorials                3.79          1
                                                                                            Undeveloped
                                                                                            Park                      50           1
                                                                                            Total Open
                                                                                            Space                   93.49         10
                                                                                            Parks and
                                                                                            Facilities              Acres     No. of Sites
                                                                                                           County Park Sites
                                                                                            Regional Park
                                                                                            Trail                    12.34         1
                                                                                            Total County Park
                                                                                            Land                    12.34          1
                                                                                            Parks and
                                                                                            Facilities              Acres     No. of Sites
                                                                                                             State Park Sites
                                                                                            Park/Refuge             17,908         1
                                                                                            Trail State Parks     46 Miles*        2
                                                                                                                   17908 +
                                                                                            Total State Park         46mi          3
                                                                                              * Represent Length of Trails in Linear Miles




                       2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                    Section 4 Needs and Goals   17
Table 10. City of Cheney Parks
Site                 Type                   Acres    Activity/facilities
City Park            Local Park             1.28     Barbecue, playground, and restrooms
                                                     Picnic shelter, barbecue, playground, soccer fields (2),
Centennial Park      Neighborhood Park      8.93
                                                     horseshoe pit, and restroom.
                                                     Picnic shelters, barbecues (2), playground, swimming pool,
Hagelin Park         Local Park             5.54     volleyball courts, sports court, cedar street tennis courts (4)
                                                     and restrooms.
Hibbard Park         Neighborhood Park      1.25     Basketball court, and playground.
Moos Field           Local Park             3.48     Baseball field, softball field and restrooms
                                                     Picnic shelters, barbecues (6), playground, baseball fields
Salnave Park         Local Park             16.36    (2), softball field, soccer fields (2), tennis courts (6), and
                                                     restrooms.
                                                     Picnic shelters, barbecues (2), playground, horseshoe pits
Sutton Park          Local Park             2.86
                                                     (4), restrooms and gazebo.

 Local Parks
Local parks usually provide court games, children's play, sitting out areas, a landscaped environment and
possibly playing fields for households within about 1,200 feet of the park. Cheney’s local parks combined consist
of approximately 40 acres on seven separate park locations. Tables 11-15 detail overall park condition and
facilities status for local parks.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 4 Needs and Goals      18
Table 11. City Park                                                 1.28 Acres


Overall Condition      This is the first park constructed in the city of Cheney and contains many mature trees and a
                       formal war memorial. New playground equipment is needed. Upgrades to restrooms and
                       shelter should take place in the near future.
Playgrounds            Consider the viability and appropriateness of a tot play structure and/or sand play area in
                       the area noted above.
Support Facilities     The park has restroom facilities that are in okay conditions, upgrades needed. Moveable
                       picnic tables are available and in good repair.
                       Information kiosks in good condition.
Parking and Access Parking is available on street. Sidewalks are available to the memorial and restrooms.
                       Consider improving street parking-to-sidewalk transition
Irrigation Systems     Irrigation system present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray
                       onto walks and parking areas.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 4 Needs and Goals    19
Table 12. Hagelin Park                                              3.79 Acres
(Including Pool Site)
Overall Condition      The park has a good location between school and residential property. Overall, condition is
                       average, yet is not far from being in good shape. Main issues include a dated, poorly
                       maintained tot playground, of which should be replaced, a drainage problem in the turf
                       area, and the maintenance of the pool landscape planting beds and parking lot. The
                       restrooms and shelter should be replaced. A new walking trail should be considered.
Playgrounds            The playground adjacent to Betz Elementary School was recently installed with equipment
                       and safety surfacing in excellent condition. Safety surfacing should be spread evenly on a
                       regular basis. Play equipment and swings here are designed for older children. The tot
                       playground adjacent to the pool facility requires a detailed evaluation to identify potential
                       safety issues and a course of corrective action or replacement.
Fields/Courts          Adjacent fields are utilized as part of the park facility when not housing programmed events.

Support Facilities The park has operational restroom facilities, a picnic shelter with picnic tables, and a fully
                   accessible drinking fountain.
                   Information kiosks in good condition.
Pool Facility      A large outdoor pool and wading pool area in good condition.
Parking and Access Parking is available at the school when not in session, at the pool facility, and along the
                   street. Pool facility parking is in need of weed and surface maintenance. Sidewalks are
                   available to the older kids’ playground area, but not to the tot playground or the picnic
                   shelter.
                   Accessibility is limited as there are no ramps into wading pool or visible transfer stations into
                   the large pool.
Irrigation Systems Irrigation system present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray
                   hard surfaces and support facilities.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                     Section 4 Needs and Goals   20
Table 13. Moos Field                                                                3.48 Acres


Overall Condition  This park is in good condition and consists of two (2) softball fields and a restroom facility
                   (that should be replaced) with some passive viewing opportunities.
Fields/Courts      The fields are in good condition with some weeding needed in the softball in fields. Each
                   field includes a backstop and a pair of functional bleachers.
Support Facilities The park includes a bus stop and restroom facility. The restroom facility should needs
                   assistance; the urinal in the men’s restroom does not work: the best outcome would be
                   replacement of the restrooms. The drinking fountain is in working condition.
Parking and Access A small parking lot along with on street parking is available. Sidewalks are limited to one side
                   of the park, but do connect the parking, bus and restroom facilities.
Irrigation Systems Irrigation system present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray
                   hard surfaces and support facilities.



Table 14. Salnave Park                                                               City Owned: 7 Acres
                                                                                     School Dist. Owned/City
                                                                                     Developed: 9.36
                                                                                     Total: 16.36 Acres

Overall Condition      This is the largest currently developed park in Cheney. The park is in average to poor overall
                       condition and shows signs of heavy use with some of its amenities in need of repair or
                       renovation. Poor ADA accessibility stands out here. A new playground is needed, and
                       shelter and restroom upgrades need to take place. A walking trail would be beneficial.
Playgrounds            The tot playground is in poor overall condition. Its location away from roads and in a thickly
                       treed area has resulted in much of the outdated equipment being vandalized. The
                       equipment and its depleted safety surfacing are in need of replacement and perhaps
                       relocation.
                       The swings near the tot playground are in good condition, but the safety surfacing area
                       needs to be increased forward and back of the swing traveling path to two times the height
                       of the horizontal beam in both directions. The safety surface retaining system is in need of
                       repair.
                       The slide adjacent to the swing does not comply with several modern safety standards and
                       should be replaced.
                       The playground adjacent to the school on the other side of the park is heavily used and in
                       average overall condition. Older and newer equipment is both present here. Some safety
                       surface replacement is needed along with attention to a drainage issue in the southwest
                       corner and some minor equipment repair.
Fields/Courts          Three softball fields show signs of use are in varying condition. Each has a drinking fountain,
                       backstop, storage box and bleachers. Each field has on-going, infield weed maintenance
                       issues.

2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                       Section 4 Needs and Goals   21
                       One field is sponsored and includes a concession booth, scoreboard, and lighting.
                       Of the other two, one needs backstop repair and the other needs drinking fountain repair.
                       Two soccer fields are in good condition without netting on one set of goals – the smaller
                       field.
                       Five tennis courts are in good condition and are available for public use when unlocked and
                       not during hours reserved for Cheney High School.
                       A basketball court is available near the school and is in average condition with new nets
                       needed.
Support Facilities     The park has restroom facilities in average condition, both permanent and temporary, a
                       large picnic shelter with some roof repair needed including many picnic tables, BBQs and
                       available power outlets. Nearby lighting is vandalized and in need of repair. Drinking
                       fountains designed for ADA are available along with those not ADA compliant.

                   The permanent restroom facilities are operational and in need of some repair to the men’s
                   portion.
                   Information kiosks in good condition.
Parking and Access Parking lots are available and in good condition along with on-street parking. Sidewalks are
                   in need of some repair along roadway and adjacent to the park.
Irrigation Systems Irrigation system present, at times posing a tripping hazard. Test and adjust to obtain proper
                   coverage and minimize overspray hard surfaces and support facilities.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                    Section 4 Needs and Goals    22
Table 15. Sutton Park                                                             2.86 Acres

Overall Condition This park is located near the Eastern Washington University campus and receives regular use.
                      The overall condition of this park is good with restroom facilities playground equipment, many
                      mature trees, picnic tables, a gazebo, and picnic shelter.
Playgrounds           The playground includes an older, possibly partially updated play structure and swings.
                      Additional safety surfacing materials are needed and on-going maintenance insuring
                      adequate coverage should be employed. The equipment should be considered for
                      eventual replacement.
Support Facilities    The restroom facilities are in good condition and stand out from others in the system in their
                      use of glass bricks to bring in light.
                      The picnic shelter with picnic tables is in good condition and features a BBQ and ADA
                      drinking fountain.
                      A unique gazebo is in excellent condition. The gazebo is a historic building which was
                      originally located at Fort George Write. It was moved to Cheney and Restored in 1984.
                      Information kiosks in good condition
Parking and           Parking is available on the street. Sidewalks are available along park edge, but lack
Access                connection to other park facilities.
Irrigation Systems    Irrigation system present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray
                      hard surfaces and support facilities.

Neighborhood Parks
Neighborhood parks include a playground and park designed primarily for non-supervised, non-organized
recreation activities. In Cheney, they are generally small in size (3-7 acres) and serve a radius of approximately
one-half mile. At average residential densities, this amounts to about 5,000 to 7,500 residents in that service area.
Since these parks are located within walking and bicycling distance of most users, the activities they offer become
a daily pastime for neighborhood children. While it is not necessarily the rule, neighborhood parks sometimes
provide space for organized community events.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 4 Needs and Goals   23
Table 16. Centennial Park                                                        6.2 Acres

Overall Condition  This area of the park is welcoming and surrounded by homes, apartment buildings and new
                   construction. The overall condition is average, as the park needs some renovation,
                   maintenance, and repairs. The playground needs replaced and the restroom and helter
                   should be upgraded. The plantings and fields are in good overall condition. And a new trail
                   would benefit the community.
Playgrounds        The playground is accessed by a sidewalk and is in fine condition. The playground
                   equipment, safety surfacing, and safety surface curbing are all in need of replacement.
                   There is one bench available and at least one more should be added.
Fields/Courts      Two (2) soccer fields show signs of use and are in good condition with bare spots found only
                   at the goals of the northernmost field. There is a set of bleachers present. Goal netting is
                   damaged, but operational on the northernmost field and missing on the southernmost field.
                   Replacement of netting may increase use of southernmost field.
                   Horseshoe pits have good location without conflicts with other uses and are require ongoing
                   weed control and sand replacement.
Support Facilities The park has restroom facilities, a picnic shelter with picnic tables, BBQ, and power outlet.
                   Also available is a horseshoe pit and drinking fountains. The ADA accessible drinking
                   fountain adjacent to the parking lot is leaking and in need of repair – achieving balanced
                   water pressure between the two nozzles should be possible. The restroom facilities are
                   operational with the exception of the structure’s drinking fountain – it is damaged and does
                   not work; the restroom should be renovated. Sinks in the restrooms are difficult to operate
                   and not ADA accessible. Both the restroom and picnic structure needs paint and minor roof
                   repair.
Parking and Access Parking lot is available and in excellent condition. Sidewalks are available to the playground
                   area, the picnic shelter, and drinking fountain designed for ADA access.

Irrigation Systems    Irrigation system present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray
                      hard surfaces and support facilities.
Centennial Park (undeveloped)                                                    2.73 Acres

Overall Condition  This area of the park is currently utilized as a pedestrian pass-through between
                   neighborhoods with twenty (20) community-garden plots in use.
Parking and Access Parking is available on the street.
Irrigation Systems No irrigation system noted.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                    Section 4 Needs and Goals   24
Table 17. Hibbard Park                                                            1.25 Acres


Overall Condition  This is the newest Cheney park. Complete with playground, basketball court and picnic
                   areas, it is in excellent condition.
Playgrounds        Both toddler and grade-school-level playground equipment with associated safety surfacing
                   are in excellent shape.
Fields/Courts      Full-court basketball court is in good condition needing replacement nets.
Support Facilities The park includes an ADA accessible drinking fountain and a picnic area.
Parking and Access Ample parking is available in the adjacent parking lot.
Irrigation Systems Irrigation system present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray
                   hard surfaces and support facilities.

Large Urban Parks
Large urban parks are designed to serve the entire community. They are similar to a community park but much
larger. They provide a wide variety of specialized facilities such as large picnic areas, water related activities,
indoor recreation facilities, and sports fields. They require more support facilities such as parking, restrooms, and
play areas because of their size and facilities offered. They usually exceed 50 acres in size and should be designed
to accommodate a large number of people. This is what the large undeveloped Betz area is intended to become.

Table 18. Additional Open Space Available
Cedar Street Tennis Courts                                                       1.75 Acres

Overall Condition  The tennis courts are being renovated and new lighting will be provided. Curbing is
                   damaged in several areas around the site and the main entry to the tennis courts is unkempt
                   and in need of renovation. Nets and cyclone fencing are down for construction equipment
                   access. Site ADA accessibility is limited.
Fields/Courts      Aside from general site clean up after construction, the tennis courts are in need of
                   resurfacing. Unsightly cracks and asphalt patching may pose a tripping hazard to some
                   tennis players. Turf around courts in need of repair.
                   Sand volleyball court is in good condition, but requires some ongoing maintenance of weeds
                   encroaching on play area. A second court is planned for construction at this site.
Parking and Access Parking is available on street. Uneven tennis court entry along with lack of curb ramps and
                   sidewalks in places make ADA accessibility poor.
Irrigation Systems Irrigation present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray onto
                   roads and/or courts.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 4 Needs and Goals   25
Memorials (memorials not defined as parks)                                       3.79 Acres

Overall Condition  The memorial grounds are in average overall condition with attention needed to the turf in
                   places. The memorials themselves are simple signs (one wood, the other metal) leaving
                   much to be desired. One of the memorial signs is overgrown by a shrub.
Parking and Access Parking is limited but available on the street.
Irrigation Systems Irrigation system present. Test and adjust to obtain proper coverage and minimize overspray
                   hard surfaces and support facilities.
Betz Park Property                                                               50 Acres

Overall Condition      The site of a major future community park, complete with an aquatic center, playgrounds,
                       courts and fields, etc
                       Currently in agricultural use.

Other Facilities
There are other facilities available to the Cheney community. The County has one area recreation site that is
mostly undeveloped. The State has four locations. These range from the very large conservation area of Turnbull
National Wildlife Reserve, two trail parks, one in construction, and Eastern Washington University’s campus.
Schools are also an important resource for recreation and open space (Table 20) and there are 11.23 acres of school
district land available for public use. City Parks and Recreation extensively uses school district facilities for
recreation programs. This includes fields for outdoor sports, gymnasiums for volleyball and basketball, and
classrooms for special interest groups. The table on the left shows the current supply of some facilities in Cheney.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                     Section 4 Needs and Goals   26
          Table 19. Supply of Facilities             Table 20. Cheney Schools
          Facilities                Current Supply                       Schools
                Softball Fields                       Elementary Schools       Middle Schools
                       Youth              1
                                                                             Cheney Middle
                       Adult              1          Betz Elementary
                                                                             School
               Baseball Fields
                                                     Reid Elementary         Senior High Schools
                       Major              2
                       Minor              3                                  Cheney High
                                                     Salnave Elementary
               Swimming Pool                                                 School

                   Outdoor                1
                                                                             Three Springs High
                       Indoor             1          Sunset Elementary
                                                                             School
                   Wading                 1
                                                     Windsor Elementary
                 Playgrounds              6
                   Tot Lots               5                                  Eastern Washington
                Picnic Areas
                                                     College                 University
                       Minor              5
                                                     Table 21. State Sites
                       Major              1
                                                     State Parks             Acres/Miles
                  Restrooms               6
            Community Center              0.5        Coulumbia Plateau
                                                                       23 miles
                                                     Trail State Park
                 Golf Course              0
                Tennis Courts             10         Fish Lake Trailhead
                                                                             23 miles
                Exercise Trail            1          State Park

                Soccer Fields             5
                                                     Turnbull National
             Recreation Center            1                                  17,908 Acres
                                                     Wildlife Refuge
              Basketball Courts
                                                     Trolley Trail           12.34 miles
                   Outdoor                2

            Senior Citizen Center         0          Total                   17,908ac/58 mi




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                 Section 4 Needs and Goals   27
Wren Pierson Community Center
This community center is where numerous community meetings and actions take place. This building holds:

•    Recreation Program Office
•    Senior Center
•    Meeting rooms
•    Community Events & Programs
•    Kitchen
•    Youth Center
•    Private Facility Rental Opportunities

If the building is remodeled, it will be maintained by the city and there would be increased potential. Hopes are
to make it available for community use for potential groups such as the Cheney Hang Out or Youth Commission.

State Facilities
The state facilities consist of two State Trail Parks, a very large wildlife refuge site and Eastern Washington
University which includes Kennedy Library.

Columbia Plateau Trail State Park
Columbia Plateau Trail State Park is a rail-trail that passes through the Spokane and Lincoln Counties. This
begins in the southern reaches of Washington and will eventually follow a scenic route all the way from Spokane
to East Pasco, some 130 miles. The trail passes through spectacular landscape created by the Ice Age floods and
along the north bank of the Snake River. About 23 miles of the trail are presently open for public use. This trail
has potential for connection with the CentennialTrail and with the Ironhorse Trail that begins in Washington's
western reaches of the Puget Sound. (Image Source: www.accessibletrails.com/NE_Wa/images/cpt_fishlake1_lg.jpg)

Fish Lake Trail State Park
This park lies south-southwest of Spokane, between Cheney and Spokane. Most of the trail follows an
abandoned rail line from Spokane's west end to Fish Lake. At Fish Lake, the turn-around point, one may elect to
continue on the paved surface all the way to Cheney and Eastern Washington University. Someday when the
trail is completely paved, it may become a major bike commuter route. Two charming lakes, rolling hills and
pines, along with numerous rock cliffs, tunnels, and bridges give this area a protected and rural quality. Grades
are gentle and wildlife is abundant. The trail has 20.9 miles of gravel rail bed and 3.5 miles of pavement. The
Fish Lake trailhead (milepost 365) has parking, a picnic shelter and tables, restrooms and an informational kiosk.
(Image Source: www.accessibletrails.com/NE_Wa/images/cpt_fishlake2_lg.jpg)




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                       Section 4 Needs and Goals   28
Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge
This refuge, only 9 miles from Cheney, was established to support migratory birds, nesting waterfowl, and to
maintain habitat for endangered and threatened species. Wheelchair accessible treks and auto tour routes to view
the wildlife are large attractions. There are about 5 trails in the refuge with two designated ADA trails that are
the .5-mile Blackhorse Lake trail and the short Windmill pond trail near head office. There are a variety of
different habitats in which to observe wildlife. In the many wetlands, you can see sixteen species of duck, and
sixty-three species of migratory birds. Herds of elk are visible along with whitetail deer, coyotes, Columbian
ground squirrels, red squirrels, badgers and porcupines in upland areas. In wetland areas, an occasional beaver,
muskrat or mink may be sighted. Springtime adds brilliant wildflowers in the meadows and there are more than
ten lakes to be viewed. (Image Source: packyourgear.com/Washington/Turnbull-National-Wildlife-Refuge.aspx)

Trolley Trail
This 12.34-acre property is just over one linear mile by one hundred feet of hard-packed trail that was the
Washington Water Power/Medical Lake Railroad bed. It includes wooded areas and is adjacent to a 200+ acre
wooded tract of state land. The trail located in the West Plains area, along with two future donations, will
connect with the Fish Lake Trail and the Centennial Trail.

Eastern Washington University
The EWU athletic fields are available as well. There is a three party agreement between EWU, the City, and
School District. Cheney residents as well as students attending college and living in surrounding areas, such as
Spokane, often use these areas.

Kennedy Memorial Library
This library, located on the EWU campus contains an extensive collection which is heavily used by EWU
students, the community of Cheney and surrounding areas. This three-story building contains a multitude of
resources ranging topics include non-fiction, fiction, government documents, and if they do not have what you
need, there are online resources available as well.


Recreational Programs
The Cheney Parks Department Provides a variety of programs for different ages and activity levels ranging from
fitness, special events and trips.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                    Section 4 Needs and Goals    29
Table 22. City Activities        City Programs
Youth Activities                 The City of Cheney has a wide variety of recreational programs available in addition to the youth activities listed
Gymnastics                       in table 22; the summer season offers more programs. These include, a Track and Field Clinic, Summer Day
Goju -Ryu Karate                 Camp, and a Day Camp Junior Counselor Program.
Cheney Youth Basketball
League
                                 County Programs
ECHO After school Program
                                 Youth programs that are in cooperation with Skyhawks: Soccer, Basketball, Mighty-Hawk Basketball, Mini-Hawk
Cheney Outdoor Pool
City resident open swim          (soccer, baseball & Basketball), Volleyball, and Cheerleading
Non resident open swim
Lap swim                         Community Resources
Swimming Lessons                 There are several other resources available to the community. This short list shows some other exciting amenities
Swim Team                        offered to the community.
Water aerobics
Private pool rentals             •   EWRA Hurricane Swim Team
Fitness & General Classes        •   Cheney Cooperative Preschool
Winter activities                •   West Plains Little League Association
Spring and Summer activities
                                 •   Spokane Youth Sports Association
Fall activities
Special Events
                                 •   Weight Watchers
Summer Concert & Movies In the   •   Hunter Safety Courses
Park                             •   Cheney Outreach
Adult & Senior Programs          •   Boy Scouts/Cub Scouts
The City of Cheney Recreation    •   Girl Scouts
Department has a variety of      •   Chamber of Commerce
programs available for Adults
                                 •   Cheney Library
and Seniors throughout the
year.                            •   Pavlish Preschool
Senior/Adult Trips               •   Community Water Aerobics (EWU Indoor Pool)
Senior Holiday Light Tour        •   Pathways to Progress
Collette Vacations Trips




                                 2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                     Section 4 Needs and Goals   30
Section 4. Needs and Goals
                     Most of the newer housing developments in Cheney have occurred within the existing city limits in the
                     Northwest corner of Cheney. There is presently no new construction in the Urban Growth Boundary.
                     Neighborhoods are well served by parks, although many sites are old and showing signs of deterioration.
                     Replacing these older parks is not financially feasible or desirable because the City invested considerable time
                     and money to develop and maintain them. To abandon a site or completely construct a new park on an existing
                     site makes little sense when the basic infrastructure is already in place.

                     The extent of city investment is not the only thing at stake in focusing on rehabilitation. The community habits,
                     patterns of development, and orientation are all affected by the direction of development that Cheney chooses.

                     Physical
                         •   The City of Cheney has a wide range of recreation facilities, including neighborhood and community
                             parks, & specialized recreation areas.
                         •   The City has a strong neighborhood park system providing park area within walking distance of most
                             neighborhoods.
                         •   Many of the existing parks in the City have older facilities with problems related to deteriorating
                             equipment or lack adequate support.
                         •   Most parks are not barrier-free and do not meet the accessibility requirements for all people with
                             disabilities.
                         •   Older play equipment has features that do not currently meet safety standards, including slides with
                             insufficient run-out and equipment without a soft landing area.
                         •   Many of the parks need improvements in accessibility to site amenities such as playgrounds, drinking
                             fountains, tables and benches.
                         •   Paint is needed for some courts and other paved activity areas.

                     Management
                         •   The City’s park and recreation budget has fluctuated greatly over the past 10 years with a period of time
                             when the budget was cut completely.
                         •   Close coordination between parks and recreation operations and other city operations now exists through
                             a departmental management organization.




                     2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                     Section 4 Needs and Goals    31
Rehabilitation
    •   While many of the parks are old, they still have the basic infrastructure in place and are conveniently
        located to most neighborhoods.
    •   Rehabilitating parks in some of the older neighborhoods will indicate a positive effort by the City to
        upgrade facilities in those neighborhoods.
    •   Many of the older parks need only minor improvements to bring them to an acceptable level.
    •   In general, the types of rehabilitation needs in existing parks are:

            o   A few playground equipment renovations (ongoing)
            o   Some old irrigation
            o   Drinking fountains are needed in most parks
            o   Picnic tables and benches need replacing
            o   Site lighting is needed
            o   Bathroom maintenance
            o   Shelters

Rehabilitation Rationale
Rehabilitating the park and recreation system in Cheney can have an important impact on the community.
Impacts include:

    •   Upgrading a specific park indicates a positive attempt to improve the living environment in that
        neighborhood.
    •   Most of the parks needing rehabilitation are found in the older neighborhoods. This will directly affect
        the appearance and livability of the neighborhood.
    •   Rehabilitation can create new recreation opportunities and reduce the need to travel to other park sites.
    •   Rehabilitation can result in a more enjoyable recreation experience by providing new and more
        interesting facilities.
    •   Rehabilitation indicates an attempt to preserve a facility rather than discard it.

For the most part, the City is well served by its existing facilities. Neighborhood parks are found close to most
residents, and the community centers serve the resident needs. However, many of these facilities are old, and
many of the parks do not have all of the elements traditionally found in parks.

Rehabilitation of existing facilities is much more cost-effective than complete replacement because the basic
infrastructure is already in place. Rehabilitation looks at preserving as much as possible and only replacing items
that have either lived beyond their useful life or are not serving their intended function. Rehabilitation is an
ongoing process that is scheduled to continue, creating an expanding but maintainable parks system for Cheney.

2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                     Section 4 Needs and Goals    32
The process of rehabilitation has begun in Cheney; many parks and buildings, because of age, contained facilities
that outlived their useful life. Generally, rehabilitation needs include: the installation of new playground
equipment; the renovation of turf areas, (including irrigation and reseeding); the installation of new security
lighting and the renovation of restrooms. Rehabilitation efforts have been confined to park and recreational
facilities within the Cheney city limits, although some State and County facilities are in need of rehabilitation too,
the responsibility for renovation to these areas will fall to those agencies.

Park and Facility Needs
Identifying recreation demand and need is a very important part of a park and recreation plan. It is also a
difficult task because many different variables influence public recreation participation. What is common in one
community may not be common for another. Underestimating the need can result in over-utilization of facilities,
while overestimation results in expenditures for unneeded facilities.

Based on the total community park standard of 10 acres of land per 1000 population, the presently owned city
and school district 106.47 acres falls short of the needed acreage even if all of the lands were developed. At the
present time the city owns 50 acres (Betz Property), which is currently undeveloped, and Centennial Park has 2.73
acres not yet developed. Therefore, the current deficit in developed park and recreational lands is 51.75 acres.



Table 23. Cheney Parks and Land Needs
                                                                 Table 24. Summary of Open Space
Parks and Recreation Land Availability/Needs     Acres
Total Community Parks and Recreational lands 106.47              Site                                        Acres
Total Developed Parks and Recreational lands 54.72               City Park                                   1.28
                                                                 Centennial Park                             8.93
Current need for Parks and Recreation lands      100.76
                                                                 Hagelin Park                                5.54
                                                                 Hibbard Park                                1.25
Based on a population of 10,076 (2004) x 10 acres/1000           Moos Field                                  3.48
                                                                 Salnave Park                                16.36
Current park lands deficit (Acquisition)         0
                                                                 Sutton Park                                 2.86
Current park lands deficit (Development)         46.04           Cedar Street Tennis Courts                  1.75
                                                                 Memorials                                   3.79
Based on estimates of growth through the year 2025,
                                                                 Betz Park Property                          50
Cheney will have a population of 11,794
                                                                 School District Open Space                  11.23
Total parks and recreational land needs will be 117.94
                                                                 Total Community Open Space                  106.47
Anticipated acquisition deficit in 2025
(Assuming no new acquisitions)                   11.47

2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                       Section 4 Needs and Goals    33
Neighborhood Park Needs
There are two neighborhood park sites in the planning area. Hibbard Park is fully developed and Centennial
Park is not.

Local Park Needs
There are five local park sites in the Cheney planning area. These City-owned parks are fully developed yet need
some attention. These parks include: City Park, Hagelin Park, Moos Park, Salnave Park and Sutton Park. While
they provide the facilities and functions of a community park, they also serve the needs of their immediate
neighborhood and provide, in addition, facilities that also serve needs of the entire community.

Major Community Park Needs
Betz Park Property is one large major community park in the planning area that is not yet developed. It is
important to recognize the great potential opportunity this location provides to the community and its
surrounding area.

Regional Park Needs
While Cheney has no regional parks, it is near state facilities that help address regional recreation needs. Those
facilities, however, do not provide all of what might be considered regional recreational facilities, offering no
athletic fields or other large-scale activity facilities. It is possible that the Betz Road property could be developed
as a regional park, filling that particular need by providing a range of facilities designed for regional use.

Facility Needs
The inventory of current facilities can be compared to current population estimates and the future population
forecast. To determine if these facilities adequately serve the Cheney population it is necessary to use the
established level of service standard. Table 25 illustrates how the current level of service standard relates to the
community’s current supply, current facilities deficit, and forecast deficit based on 2025 population forecasts.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                        Section 4 Needs and Goals    34
Table 25. Cheney Facility Needs
Facilities                     Standard             Current Supply Current Demand    Current Deficit   2025 Deficit
Softball Fields
  Youth                       1 per 3,000                1               3.4               2.4              3.6
  Adult                       1 per 3,000                1               3.4               2.4              3.6
Baseball Fields
  Major                       1 per 2,500                2               4.0               2.0              3.5
  Minor                       1 per 2,000                3               5.0               2.0              3.9
Swimming Pool
  Outdoor                     1 per 10,000               1               1.0               **               0.4
  Indoor                      1 per 15,000               1               0.7               0.3               *
  Wading                      1 per 5,000                1               2.0               1.0              1.8
Playgrounds                   1 Per 1,500                6               6.7               **               3.2
Tot Lots                      1 per 1,500                5               6.7               1.7              4.2
Picnic Areas                                                                                                0.0
  Minor                       1 per 1,500                5               6.7               1.7              4.2
  Major                       1 per 4,000                1               2.5               1.5              2.5
Restrooms               1 per 1,500 or 1 per park        6               6.7               0.7              3.2
Community Center              1 per 10,000               0.5             1.0               0.5              0.9
Golf Course                   1 per 25,000               0               0.4               0.4              0.6
Tennis Courts                 1 per 1,500                10              6.7               **               **
Exercise Trail                1 per 1,500                1               6.7               5.7              8.2
Soccer Fields                 1 per 1,500                5               6.7               1.7              4.2
Recreation Center             1 per 10,000               1               1.0                *               0.4
Basketball Courts
  Outdoor                     1 per 2,000                2               5.0               3.0              4.9
Senior Citizen Center         1 per 10,000               0.2             1.0               0.8              1.2
*Denotes acceptable level of facilities
** Denotes acceptable number of facilities, but major improvement to or replacement of facility needs.

Tot Park: Typically a smaller fenced in play area with toys suited for younger children.
Minor Picnic Area: Would consist of one or two picnic tables.
Major Picnic Area: Would consist of several picnic tables with the possibility of a covered shelter area.



2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 4 Needs and Goals     35
Acquisitions
It should be noted that additional acquisition and development will be needed whenever new residential areas
are developed in the community. As we are already facing a deficit in facilities, this will only be increased as the
community grows.

Possible locations for acquisition include:

    •   Area west of N. 6th Street and south of Betz Road.
    •   South of Salnave Road, west of Presley Drive and north of S.R. 904 (west of Caldwell Addn.).

Research should also continue as to the feasibility of acquiring land for the establishment of a golf course in the
Cheney area. While this is a low priority of the citizenry at this time, demand may increase as the population
grows. The use of reclaimed water should be emphasized in this development. Secondary priorities should be
given to acquisition of mini-parks and expansion of district park sites.

Planning Policies
The development of new park facilities necessitates more specific criteria. These policy guidelines create the
general standards for new parks and also can be used to look at existing park development and rehabilitation.
Ultimately, these are only guides with specific sites requiring specific design. The policies have several purposes:

    •   Guide day to day behavior to help achieve objectives
    •   Prioritize and guide investment and programming
    •   Assist budgeting
    •   Create expectations
    •   Terms for interagency coordination

Goals and Objectives
The City has a deficit of developed parkland situation, and as it continues to grow, additional lands will have to
be acquired as well as developed. These lands should be based on the calculated demands of the citizenry for
parks and recreation areas. The timelines of these acquisitions will depend on the growth rate of the City. At this
time high priority must also be given to adequately developing all of the lands currently owned by the City.
These goals are statements of the City’s aspirations as they relate to park and recreation services. Goals are long
range and usually remain unchanged throughout the practical life of the plan. Objectives are working and
measurable targets that, when achieved, indicate goal fulfillment. Individual goals may contain several
objectives. These criteria assist the City’s decisions regarding future plans and implementation.



2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 4 Needs and Goals     36
A. Physical-Provide physical facilities that offer youth and adults a broad variety of passive, active and organized recreation opportunities.
                                                                   Objectives
1. Maintain a capital improvement program, which specifies a six-year schedule for acquisition and development of park and recreation lands.
2. Establish a neighborhood parks system that serves all viable residential areas of Cheney.
3. Develop large community parks to serve the various regions of the City (i.e. East Cheney, Central Cheney, North Cheney and West Cheney).
4. Encourage private sector development to share in the provision of recreation facilities that serve specialized community or regional interests.
5. Preserve recreational opportunities afforded by unique natural or man-made features of the environment.

B. Rehabilitation-Maintain and rehabilitate park and recreation facilities to provide the highest quality of service level to the community
                                                                      Objectives
1. Enact a maintenance program that maximizes the service life of parks and recreation facilities.
2. Rehabilitate or replace existing facilities that cannot be maintained at desired service levels.

C. Management and Operations- Establish and maintain a planning area and process within which the coordinated delivery of parks and
recreation facilities may occur.
                                                                Objectives
1. Establish a joint park planning agreement with schools and EWU.
2. Amend the Tri-Agency Agreement to ensure continuity and coordination between the City of Cheney, Spokane County and the Cheney
School District.

D. Programs and Services-Operate recreational programs that allow opportunity for participation by all citizens of Cheney.
                                                                  Objectives
1. Provide organized recreation programs for men and women in both youth and adult ages.
2. Assist citizen groups and organizations within the greater Cheney area with the design of programs for special population groups such as
the handicapped and disabled.


Neighborhood Park Policies and Development Criteria
1. A neighborhood park should be provided when the area it serves reaches 60% developed (measured by either land mass or population).
2. As a practical point, the City may be forced to accept smaller parcels for neighborhood parks in those areas where little vacant land is left.
3. In portions of the planning area where population densities are lower (i.e. 2-3 dwelling units/acre), the service area of a neighborhood park
   should be extended to a mile radius.
4. At least 50% of the site should be flat and usable and provide space for both active and passive uses.
5. Facilities can include: practice fields for softball, soccer, and youth baseball, lighting, children’s playground, unstructured open play area for
   pick-up games, paved games court, picnic area with shelter building, trail system, natural open space, and trees.
6. Location criteria: be central to the area it serves, be adjacent to a green belt or trail system, be walking distance, 1/2 mile, for the area it
   serves, avoid the need to cross major arterial streets or other physical barriers, be readily visible from adjoining streets, access site via a local
   residential street, or if on a busy arterial street, utilize appropriate fencing and other safety precautions.
                                                                                                                     Section 3 Needs and Goals 37
Local Park Policies and Development Criteria
 1. A local park should be developed when the area it serves reaches about 70% developed.
 2. Acquisition of local park sites should occur far in advance of actual need.
 3. Minimum size should be 15 acres with the optimum being about 25 acres.
 4. At least ten acres of the site should be usable for active recreation use.
 5. Facilities can include: formal lit ball fields-softball, baseball, and soccer, tennis courts, open free play area, restrooms, picnic facilities, paths
    and trail systems, landscaped areas, outdoor basketball courts, children’s playgrounds (if needed to also serve the neighborhood), natural
    open space, indoor recreational areas, outdoor sand volleyball courts, and space for special outdoor events
 6. Parking requirements: dependent upon the activities.
 7. Location criteria: be reasonably central to the area it serves, be located on an arterial or collector street, some of the site should have a natural
    area or heavy landscape setback to help buffer active uses from residential areas, environmentally sensitive sites can be included if protected
    from active uses.

Major Parks Policies and Development Criteria
1. A large urban park can be designed to meet a wide range of activities and interests but should emphasize the one feature that makes it
   unique.
2. Facilities can include: viewpoints, trail systems, special facilities for the physically disabled, picnic areas, open play areas, group picnic areas,
   formal ball fields – softball, baseball, soccer, etc., tennis courts, open free play area, restrooms, children’s playground, indoor recreational
   areas, outdoor sand volleyball courts, and space for special outdoor events.
3. Parking requirements: dependent upon the activities offered, but access should be from an arterial street if traffic volumes will be high
4. Location criteria: features should determine location and if the site attracts large volumes of traffic and access should be via a collector or
   arterial street.

Regional Parks Policies and Development Criteria
1. The Regional Park can be designed to meet a wide range of activities and interest but should emphasize the one feature that makes it unique.
2. Facilities can include: viewpoints, trail systems, special facilities for the physically disabled, picnic areas, open play areas, nature
   interpretative areas, and group picnic areas.
3. Parking requirements: dependent upon the activities offered.
4. Location criteria: determined by the features it can offer, access from arterial street if high traffic volumes are expected, environmentally
   sensitive sites are appropriate if protected from active visitor use or from potential visitor damage.




                             2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                          Section 4 Needs and Goals   38
Trails Policies and Development Criteria
 1. Trails should provide access and be interesting and attractive to the user. Trails traversing scenic or landscaped areas provide an interesting
    and enjoyable user experience.
 2. Trails should be looped and interconnected to provide a variety of trail lengths and destinations including small and large loops for a broad
    range of experiences and ability levels.
 3. Trail routes should take into account soil conditions, surface drainage and other physical limitations that may impact or cause over-use.
 4. Bicycle trails should provide opportunities for recreation, touring, and commuters.
 5. Bicycle routes and paths should minimize the conflicts between motorists, bicyclists and other user groups.
 6. Trails should be routed to provide visual and physical access to natural areas.

Special Use Areas Policies and Development Criteria
 1. Prior to the addition of any special landscaped area, the City should prepare a detailed maintenance cost analysis to determine its impact
    upon the maintenance system.




                            2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 4 Needs and Goals   39
Section 5. Implementation
                     Some important ideas and steps should be kept in mind to make this a successful plan. The following points will
                     help in implementing the ideas developed here.

                     Programs and Services
                     Program Evaluation - The Department should continue evaluation of recreation programs and make changes
                     based on interests and varying instructor ability.

                     Encourage Other Recreation Providers - The City cannot and should not provide all recreation services
                     demanded by the public. To meet this demand, the City should be the lead coordinating agency in encouraging
                     other public and quasi-public agencies to assist in meeting these needs.

                     Development of Private Sector Recreational Facilities - The City of Cheney does not accomplish all the
                     recreation needs in the community. Private clubs and commercial interests could provide some recreation
                     opportunities including tennis and swim clubs, racquet clubs, golf clubs, bowling alleys, and health and fitness
                     clubs. Unfortunately, not all Cheney residents can afford these facilities. Ways to build affordable private
                     facilities can include construction of private facilities on public land, subsidized operations, and franchise
                     operations.

                     Evaluate the Fee Schedule - From time to time the City should evaluate its policy on fees and charges.

                     Management
                     Responsibility for management of Cheney’s parks and recreation programs is divided between the Public Works
                     department and the Recreation Office. Public Works Department is responsible for park maintenance and park
                     capital projects. Recreation staff coordinates recreation programs and are the primary citizen contact point for
                     parks-related issues. This structural organization is a creature of the relatively recent abolition of the City’s parks
                     department, but it appears to work well and efficiently for Cheney. The following recommendations are offered
                     for the City’s consideration as it works to refine its provision of parks and recreation services under this new
                     structure.

                     Department Policies – A policy manual may help maintain a level of consistency, dealing with the various parks
                     and recreation operations managed by the Public Works Department. Currently, policies have been developed
                     for certain activities but do not cover the entire operation. Once in place, they will help the staff to administer the
                     various programs it offers.



                     2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                          Section 5 Implementation   40
Park Maintenance Management System -The City may create a systematic park maintenance program by
developing an operations program that schedules work on a yearly basis. It should include a complete inventory
of each park site, establish maintenance and performance standards, develop cost reporting systems, identify
maintenance priorities, and prepare a yearly work schedule. By approaching park and facility maintenance on a
systematic basis, crisis planning can be reduced and maintenance tasks spread out more evenly over the year
resulting in higher maintenance levels at a lower cost.

Annual Report - An annual report may be prepared describing the activities, participation levels and changes,
and other operating information that occurred over the past year. This document should be prepared in a
professional manner and widely distributed. It is an important document to have available at budget time.

City/County Cooperation - The City of Cheney has the responsibility for providing recreational areas, facilities,
and programs within the incorporated areas of the City. Spokane County has the responsibility for providing
recreational areas, facilities, and programs in the unincorporated suburban and rural areas of the county. The
County’s responsibility shows the need for cooperation between the City of Cheney and Spokane County for park
and recreation provisions within the area.

City/School District Cooperation - Cooperation for joint use of areas and facilities between the City and the
Cheney School District is good. The school district has assisted in providing indoor facilities to support the City’s
winter recreation programs as well as playground areas for outdoor athletic leagues.

City/EWU Cooperation – The Tri-Agency Agreement outlining the roles and responsibilities between the City,
School District and EWU has been working well. There have been some complaints of limited facility availability,
but the comparative cost of providing fully redundant recreation facilities between the three agencies would be
prohibitive. The City and EWU may wish to review the agreement and the availability of facilities to ensure the
students and city residents continue to feel well served, particularly in light of the University’s recent plans to
construct a new student recreation facility.

Periodic Evaluation of Goals and Objectives - Because values and economic conditions change, the City should
periodically reevaluate the goals and objectives described in the leisure services program offered by the City.

Annual Evaluation and Update
The park and recreation program should be annually evaluated in terms of its services and response to
community needs, including:

    1.   Annual goals and objectives should be prepared for parks and recreation during the budget preparation
         process to guide the Department and measure its success during the year


2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                       Section 5 Implementation   41
    2.   Evaluate and update the capital improvement program based on the progress made during the previous
         year, changes in funding, and other factors
    3.   Develop a citizen feedback system for measuring public attitudes about the park and recreation program
         in the form of a short survey conducted by telephone and/or an evaluation form given to everyone
         participating in a recreation program. This information should be evaluated at the end of each year for
         determining additions or deletions of programs, changes in approach to existing programs, changes in
         management or instructors, changes in fee structure, and other issues.
    4.   Hold a public meeting to obtain comment about the present program and future needs.
    5.   Evaluate the policy statements in the Park and Recreation Plan and make changes as necessary.
    6.   Update the facility plan indicating new acquisition, developments or changes in park sites.

Projects
Fifty projects made it on to the list. Those projects are shown below by park site, illustrating what projects are
anticipated at which location. Where applicable, Table 26 also includes notes pertaining to project status.

Table 26. Parks Projects
Project                           Park                  Notes
Aquatic park                      Betz Road
Disc golf course                  Betz Road
Multi-use sport court             Betz Road
Open space picnic area            Betz Road
Playground                        Betz Road
Skate park                        Betz Road
Soccer fields                     Betz Road
Softball/baseball complex         Betz Road
Walking path (ADA accessible)     Betz Road
Volleyball/grounds upgrade        Cedar Street Tennis   Recently re-surfaced tennis courts and replaced lighting
Additional bleachers              Centennial Park
Perimeter walking trail           Centennial Park
Playground replacement            Centennial Park
Shelter roof replacement          Centennial Park
Restroom renovation/replacement   Centennial Park
New picnic shelter                City Park
Playground replacement            City Park             Equipment is purchased and ready for installation.
Restroom renovation/replacement   City Park
Mini park (8,000 sf)              Golden Hills          Funds have been budgeted in 2006.
New picnic shelter                Hagelin Park
New playground                    Hagelin Park
New Restrooms                     Hagelin Park
                                                        Ex: Showers, changing facilities, lockers, pumps/filters, deck
Pool upgrade                      Hagelin Park          surfacing, pool structure, admin. facility, fencing, lighting/electrical.
Walking trail                     Hagelin Park


2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                              Section 5 Implementation       42
Project                           Park                 Notes
Increased lighting                Hibbard Park
Playground equipment              Hibbard Park
Restrooms                         Hibbard Park
Picnic shelter                    Hibbard Park
Green space/garden                Kyle Pugh            Needs Volunteers
Additional bleachers              Moos Field
Restroom renovation/replacement   Moos Field
Backstop replacement              Moos Field
Baseball field upgrade            Moos Field
Additional bleachers              Salnave Park
Backstop replacement              Salnave Park
Drinking fountain replacement     Salnave Park
Field surface upgrade             Salnave Park         Funds have been budgeted in 2006
Homerun fences (Fields 2 & 3)     Salnave Park         Funds have been budgeted in 2006
Restroom upgrades                 Salnave Park
Shelter roof replacement          Salnave Park         Funds have been budgeted in 2006
Walking path (ADA accessible)     Salnave Park
Green space/garden                Sam Webb             Needs Volunteers
Drinking fountain replacement     Sutton Park
Restroom ADA replacement          Sutton Park          Funds have been budgeted in 2006
Shelter roof replacement          Sutton Park
Playground equipment              Sutton Park
Multi-use sport court             Wren Pierson
New boiler                        Wren Pierson
Park shop remodel                 Wren Pierson
Teen center                       Wren Pierson


Prioritizing
Cheney has limited funds to expend on park and recreation system improvements, so it needs to prioritize the
various projects by relative importance. In some cases it is difficult to compare different types of projects to each
other, resulting in an “apples vs. oranges” type of quandary. This section aims to aid in comparison and strategic
decision-making by establishing six criteria against which each project is judged. As some criteria are more
important than others, the scores under each are weighted to reflect relative value. In Table 27, projects are
presented in priority order based on their scores in each of the evaluation criteria.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                        Section 5 Implementation   43
Table 27. Project Prioritizing Matrix




                                                                                   Multiple




                                                                                                        Priority
                                                                                               Rehab




                                                                                                                         Conc.


                                                                                                                                  Total
                                                                     HSW


                                                                            Cost




                                                                                                                   LOS
                                                                                   use
 Project                                       Location
 Playground replacement                        City Park             15    10         6        8       10          4     2       55
 Drinking fountain replacement                 Sutton Park           12     8        10       10        8          4     3       55
 Shelter roof replacement                      Centennial Park       12     6         8       10        8          3     2       49
 Backstop replacement                          Moos Field            12    8          4       10       8           3     2       47
 Backstop replacement                          Salnave Park          12    8          4       10       8           3     2       47
 Shelter roof replacement                      Sutton Park           12     8         4       10        8          3     2       47
 Mini park (8,000 sf)                          Golden Hills           6    10         8        4        6          4     1       39
 Green space/garden                            Kyle Pugh              6    10         8        4        6          3     1       38
 Green space/garden                            Sam Webb               6    10         8        4        6          3     1       38
 Disc golf course                              Betz Road              6    10         4        2        2          2     2       28
 Teen center                                   Wren Pierson          12    10        10       10        8          4     2       56
 Playground replacement                        Centennial Park       15    10         6        8       10          4     2       55
 Drinking fountain replacement                 Salnave Park          12     8        10       10        8          4     3       55
 Restroom upgrades                             Salnave Park          12     6         8       10       10          3     1       50
 Shelter roof replacement                      Salnave Park          12     6         8       10        8          3     2       49
 Park shop remodel                             Wren Pierson           9     8        10       10        6          4     2       49
 Walking path (ADA accessible)                 Salnave Park           9     8        10        6        8          3     4       48
 Field surface upgrade                         Salnave Park          12     6         4       10       10          3     2       47
 Multi-use sport court                         Wren Pierson           9     8        10       10        6          3     1       47
 Volleyball/grounds upgrade                    Cedar Street Tennis    9     8         6       10        6          3     4       46
 New Restrooms                                 Hagelin Park           9     6         4       10       10          3     4       46
 New boiler                                    Wren Pierson          12     6         8       10        6          3     1       46
 Perimeter walking trail                       Centennial Park        9    8         10        6        8          3     1       45
 New playground                                Hagelin Park           9     8         6        8        8          4     2       45
 New picnic shelter                            City Park              9    6          8       8        8           3     2       44
 New picnic shelter                            Hegelin Park           9    6          8        8       8           3     2       44
 Increased lighting                            Hibbard Park          12     6         8        8        6          3     1       44
 Restroom ADA replacement                      Sutton Park            9     6         4       10       10          3     2       44
 Playground equipment                          Hibbard Park          12     6         6        6        8          3     2       43
 Baseball field upgrade                        Moos Field            12     6         4       10        6          3     2       43
 Skate park                                    Betz Road             15     8         4        2        8          4     1       42
 Walking path (ADA accessible)                 Betz Road             9     8         10       2        6           3     4       42
 Restrooms                                     Hibbard Park           9     6         4        8       10          3     1       41
 Open space picnic area                        Betz Road              9     8        10        2        6          3     2       40
 Homerun fences (Fields 2 & 3)                 Salnave Park           6     8         4        8        6          4     4       40
 Playground                                    Betz Road              9    10         6        2        6          3     2       38
 Soccer fields                                 Betz Road              6    8          8        2       6           3     2       35
 Additional bleachers                          Centennial Park        9     6         6        4        4          3     2       34
 Additional bleachers                          Moos Field             9     6         6        4        4          3     2       34
 Additional bleachers                          Salnave Park           9     6         6        4        4          3     2       34
 Pool upgrade                                  Hagelin Park          12     6        10       10        8          5     1       52
 Multi-use sport court                         Betz Road              9     8        10        2        8          3     2       42
 Softball/baseball complex                     Betz Road              9    6          4        2        6          3     2       32
 Aquatic park                                  Betz Road              6     4         6        2        6          2     1       27
2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                            Section 5 Implementation           44
Criteria
The following criteria create the basic framework for measuring specific projects identified in this plan. Each
project is scored on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being best under each criterion. That score is then multiplied by the
criterion’s weight, resulting in a weighted score for that particular criterion. These weighted scores are then
summed in the far right column, representing the total weighted score for each project. This allows the projects to
be prioritized according to total score and then programmed over upcoming budget years.

    •   Health, Safety and Welfare – The extent to which the proposed project is necessary to meet the public’s
        health, safety and welfare needs. Weight = 3.
    •   Resident Priority – The extent to which the project is supported by the community’s expressed recreation
        and parks preferences. Weight = 2.
    •   Cost-Effectiveness – The extent to which the project produces the most “bang for the buck.” Weight = 2.
    •   Multiple Use – The extent to which the project will serve more than one purpose. Weight = 2.
    •   Rehabilitation – The extent to which the project rehabilitates existing facilities. Weight = 2.
    •   Level of Service – The extent to which the project maintains levels of service as defined in the parks plan
        or capital facilities element of the comprehensive plan. Weight = 1.
    •   Concurrent Project – The extent to which this project will occur at the same time as other, potentially
        unrelated project(s) at the same site. Weight = 1.

Capital Improvement Plan
The following tables represent the proposed capital improvement plan for Cheney’s park facilities. Projects will
require a combination of local, state, and federal funding. Table 28 shows the projects the City can undertake
within the next six years. The first portion of the table, that area with no shading, represents projects where the
City can use a combination of city funding, possibly serving as a match for local, state and federal funding. These
projects would provide opportunity for volunteer or in-kind smaller contributions to install and maintain the
park facilities. The second element of the table, that with a very light gray shading, shows projects the City can
accommodate with more substantial funding, with the possibility of allocating certain amounts of its
departmental budget to capital projects. The third area, that with a darker gray shading, indicates those projects
where additional revenue, probably generated by grants, state or federal funding, or a community-wide bond or
increase in the energy tax, will be necessary to accomplish the project.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 5 Implementation   45
Table 28. Capital Projects 2006 - 2011
 Project                                     Location                 Score      Fund Source        Year
 Drinking fountain replacement               Sutton Park                55
 Backstop replacement                        Moos Field                 47
 Backstop replacement                        Salnave Park               47
 Mini park (8,000 sf)                        Golden Hills               39
 Green space/garden                          Kyle Pugh                  38
 Green space/garden                          Sam Webb                   38
 Teen center                                 Wren Pierson               56
 Shelter roof replacement                    Centennial Park            49
 Playground replacement                      City Park                  55
 Playground replacement                      Centennial Park            55
 Playground replacement                      Hagelin Park               45
 Playground replacement                      Sutton Park                45
 Playground replacement                      Salnave Park               45
 Drinking fountain replacement               Salnave Park               55
 Restroom upgrades                           Salnave Park               50
 Shelter roof replacement                    Salnave Park               49
 Park shop remodel                           Wren Pierson               49
 New Restrooms                               Moos Field                 41
 New Restrooms                               Sutton Park                42
 New Restrooms                               Hibbard Park               41
 Restroom upgrades                           Centennial Park            50
 Restroom upgrade                            City Park                  50
 Walking path (ADA accessible)               Salnave Park               48
 Field surface upgrade                       Salnave Park               47
 Walking trail                               Hagelin Park               50
 Multi-use sport court                       Wren Pierson               47
 Volleyball/grounds upgrade                  Cedar Street Tennis        46
 New Restrooms                               Hagelin Park               46
 New boiler                                  Wren Pierson               46
 Perimeter walking trail                     Centennial Park            45
 New playground                              Hagelin Park               45
 New picnic shelter                          City Park                  44
 New picnic shelter                          Hagelin Park               44
 New picnic shelter                          Sutton Park                47
 Increased lighting                          Hibbard Park               44
 Homerun fences (Fields 2 & 3)               Salnave Park               40
 Pool upgrade                                Hagelin Park               52

Table 29 represents the projects that should be considered for the remaining 14 years of the planning period.


2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                     Section 5 Implementation   46
Table 29. Capital Projects 2012 – 2026 By Relative Expense and Priority
 Project                                     Location                   Score     Fund Source         Year
 Disc golf course                            Betz Road                    28
 Playground equipment                        Hibbard Park                 43
 Baseball field upgrade                      Moos Field                   43
 Skate park                                  Betz Road                    42
 Walking path (ADA accessible)               Betz Road                    42
 Restrooms                                   Hibbard Park                 41
 Open space picnic area                      Betz Road                    40
 Playground                                  Betz Road                    38
 Soccer fields                               Betz Road                    35
 Additional bleachers                        Centennial Park              34
 Additional bleachers                        Moos Field                   34
 Betz Park design                            Betz Road                    45
 Multi-use sport court                       Betz Road                    42
 Softball/baseball complex                   Betz Road                    32
 Aquatic park                                Betz Road                    27

Table 30 lists the Capital Projects for the next 20 years by location for ease of reference and focus on neighborhood
improvements.




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                       Section 5 Implementation   47
Table 30. Capital Projects 2006-2026 By Location
Location             Project                         Score   Location       Project                              Score
Betz Road            Disc golf course                  28    Hibbard Park   Increased lighting                        44
Betz Road            Skate park                        42    Hibbard Park   Playground equipment                      43
Betz Road            Walking path (ADA accessible)     42    Hibbard Park   New restrooms                             41
Betz Road            Open space picnic area            40    Kyle Pugh      Green space/garden                        38
Betz Road            Playground                        38    Moos Field     New restrooms                             41
Betz Road            Soccer fields                     35    Moos Field     Backstop replacement                      47
Betz Road            Betz Park design                  45    Moos Field     Baseball field upgrade                    43
Betz Road            Multi-use sport court             42    Moos Field     Additional bleachers                      34
Betz Road            Softball/baseball complex         32    Salnave Park   Backstop replacement                      47
Betz Road            Aquatic park                      27    Salnave Park   Drinking fountain replacement             55
Cedar Street         Volleyball/grounds upgrade        46    Salnave Park   Restroom upgrades                         50
Centennial Park      Restroom upgrade                  50    Salnave Park   Shelter roof replacement                  49
Centennial Park      Shelter roof replacement          49    Salnave Park   Playground replacement                    45
Centennial Park      Playground replacement            55    Salnave Park   Walking path (ADA accessible)             48
Centennial Park      Perimeter walking trail           45    Salnave Park   Field surface upgrade                     47
Centennial Park      Additional bleachers              34    Salnave Park   Homerun fences (Fields 2 & 3)             40
City Park            Restroom upgrade                  50    Sam Webb       Green space/garden                        38
City Park            Playground replacement            55    Sutton Park    Playground replacement                    45
City Park            New picnic shelter                44    Sutton Park    New restrooms                             42
Golden Hills         Mini park (8,000 sf)              39    Sutton Park    Drinking fountain replacement             55
Hagelin Park         New Restrooms                     46    Sutton Park    Shelter replacement                       47
Hagelin Park         New playground                    45    Wren Pierson   Teen center                               56
Hagelin Park         Walking trails                    50    Wren Pierson   Park shop remodel                         49
Hagelin Park         New picnic shelter                44    Wren Pierson   Multi-use sport court                     47
Hagelin Park         Pool upgrade                      52    Wren Pierson   New boiler                                46




2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                    Section 5 Implementation   48
Possible Funding Sources
The following funding sources may help supplement locally derived revenues for parks and recreation facilities. Each source is coupled with
funding programs, and each program will have specific application and qualification requirements that the City will need to meet prior to
receiving available grants or loans. According to the questionnaire mail-out, approximately one-half of the respondents would be willing to
pay more for parks facilities. The general preference, of course, was not to increase any fee or tax, but many respondents indicated support for
slight increases to continue providing adequate and appropriate park facilities.

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition Plan--A special fund created by a coalition of recreation wildlife groups with the intent of
preserving wildlife habitats and open space and developing recreation areas. Approximately $45 million was allocated in its first year. It was
hoped that this amount would be budgeted each year for the next ten years but it is likely that will not occur. Local agencies must match the
grant amount on a 50-50 basis.

Property Transfer Excise Tax--A tax assessed on the sale of property and administered by local counties and cities.

City General Fund--General City funds allocated to the Park and Recreation Budget. A significant amount of the Department’s budget comes
from this source.

Capital Improvement Fund - Money allocated from the City’s General Fund to finance major capital projects. The City currently does not have
such a fund.

Capital Facilities Fund - Proceeds from the.5% real estate tax are deposited into this fund.

Park Impact Fees - Development fees imposed by the City for parkland acquisition and development. Fees charged to the developer are based
on a set amount per residential unit. Currently Cheney has this program in place.

Short Term Special Levy - A property tax for construction and/or operation levied for a set number of years. It is usually 1-3 years. A special
levy requires a 60% voter approval.

General Obligation Bond - Property tax for the sale of construction bonds. The tax assessment can be levied up to 30 years. Requires a 60%
majority approval of 40% of the voters who voted at the last election.

Revenue Bonds- Revenue from the operation of the facility pays for the capital cost and debt service. Does not require a vote of people unless
required by local ordinance.

Councilmanic Bonds - Bonds that can be issued by the City Council. Does not require a vote of the people but must be paid out of the City’s

                           2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 5 Implementation   49
annual operating budget.

LWCF - Grants distributed from the Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund. Grants pay 50% of the cost of acquisition and development.
At one time, this was a major funding program for recreation programs. Under the present administration, the program has been cut severely.
The Washington State IAC administers the program locally.
Park Revenue - Revenue from park operations can be used to pay for capital improvements.

HUD Grants - Grants from the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development are available for a wide variety of projects. Most are
distributed in the lower income areas of the community. Grants can be up to 100%. (CDBG)

Aquatic Land Enhancement Fund - This program, funding by the State Department of Natural Resources, will finance up to $80,000 for
acquisition and development of waterfront parks, public access sites and environmentally sensitive areas.

State Bicycle Funds - Money from a portion of state gas taxes is distributed to each city for bicycle trail development. The amount is usually
small and often used to help finance trails along existing streets.

Certificates of Participation - A lease-purchase approach in which the City sells Certificates of Participation (COPs) to a lending institution.
The City then pays the loan off from revenue produced by the facility or from its general operating budget. The lending institution holds title to
the property until the COPs are repaid. This procedure does not require a vote of the public.

Volunteer Efforts - Volunteers can be quite effective in terms of contributing cash, materials or labor. Some playgrounds have been developed
in this manner.

Transfer of Development Rights -A process wherein the development rights of a specific parcel of desired open space land is transferred to a
second parcel of land more suitable for development. The second parcel is then permitted a higher level of development. If the two parcels are
owned by two different landowners, the increased value of the second parcel is given to the owner of the first parcel.

Work Release Program - An alternative to jail time by providing community services such as working on a park maintenance crew or
providing other recreation services. Cooperative efforts should be made between the City and Adult Corrections.

Conservation Futures Levy - Counties can levy up to $.065 per $1,000 assessed valuation for the acquisition of shoreline and open space areas.
The money cannot be used for development or maintenance. Cities can apply for a share of this money through the County.




                           2006 Comprehensive Park and Recreation Plan Update                                      Section 5 Implementation   50

								
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