Poetry Vocabulary - Download as PowerPoint by os8lO1GE

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									Poetry
Vocabulary
              Poetry

• Poetry is literature that uses a few
  words to tell about ideas, feelings
  and paints a picture in the readers
  mind.
• Most poems were written to be
  read aloud.
• Poems may or may not rhyme.
              Form

• The form of a poem is the way
  that it looks on the page.
  What a poem looks like:

        Bad Hair Day
I looked in the mirror line
with shock and with dread         Stanza

to discover two antlers     Rhyming words


had sprung from my head.
              Lines

• The way that poets arrange words
  into lines.
• The lines may or may not be
  sentences.
                        Stanzas

• Groups of lines in traditional
  poetry.
 What Bugs Me
 When my teacher tells me to write a poem.
 When my mother tells me to clean up my room.
 When my sister practices her violin while I’m watching
 TV.
 When my father tells me to turn off the TV and do my
 homework.
                                                           Stanza
 When my brother picks a fight with me and I have to go
 to bed early.
 When my teacher asks me to get up in front of the class
 and read the poem I wrote on the school bus.
          Free Verse

• Poems that do not usually rhyme
  and have no fixed rhythm or
  pattern. They are written like a
  conversation.
            Sound Devices

• Elements of poetry that use one
  type of sound related
  characteristic.
•   Rhyme
•   Rhythm
•   Onomatopoeia
•   Meter and more.......
                 Meter
A pattern of stressed and unstressed
syllables.
Meter occurs when the stressed and
unstressed syllables of the words in a
poem are arranged in a repeating pattern.
When poets write in meter, they count out
the number of stressed (strong) syllables
and unstressed (weak) syllables for each
line. They repeat the pattern throughout
the poem.
               Rhyme
• Sounds that are alike at the end of
  words, such as snow and crow.
• There are several types of rhyme
  such as end rhyme like “run and
  fun.” Internal rhyme such as:
     Once upon a midnight dreary, while I
           pondered weak and weary.
 Near Rhyme- words that do not exactly rhyme
 such as “rose and lose.”
Sample Rhyme scheme
The Germ       by Ogden Nash

   A mighty creature is the germ,
                                       A
Though smaller than the pachyderm.
                                       A
    His customary dwelling place       B
  Is deep within the human race.       B
 His childish pride he often pleases   C
 By giving people strange diseases.    C
                                       A
  Do you, my poppet, feel infirm?
   You probably contain a germ.        a
           Alliteration
• Consonant sounds repeated at the
  beginnings of words

 If Peter Piper picked a peck of
 pickled peppers, how many pickled
 peppers did Peter Piper pick?
         Onomatopoeia
• Words that imitate the sound they
  are naming
               BUZZ
• OR sounds that imitate another
  sound

     “The silken, sad, uncertain,
 rustling of
        each purple curtain . . .”
            Rhythm

• The beat of the poem.
• These are made up patterns of
  strong and weak syllables.
           Repetition
• The repeating of sounds, words,
  phrases, or lines in a poem.
           I like popcorn!
             I like candy!
             I like chips!
          I like ice cream!
     I need to brush my teeth!
  Figurative Language and
    other poetic devices
• Figurative language
• Simile
• Metaphor
• Hyperbole
• Idiom
• Personification
    Figurative Language

• Words and phrases that help the
  reader picture things in a new
  way.
Example:
She heard music when he kissed
  her.
            Imagery
• Words or phrases that appeal to
  the five senses: sight, hearing,
  smell, taste, and touch.
• Imagery is what helps you paint a
  picture or imagine what is
  happening or what the poet is
  feeling.
• Example: The hamburgers sizzled
  on the grill……
              Simile

• A comparison of two things using
  the words like or as.
Her smile was bright like the sun!
The peach was as delicious as a kiss.
My dog is as mean as a snake.
            Metaphor

• A comparison of two things
  WITHOUT using “as or like”

• His face is a puzzle to me, I can
  never figure out what he is
  thinking.
       Personification

• Giving an animal or an object
  human qualities.
• My dog smiles at me.
• The house glowed with happiness.
• The car was irritated when she
  pumped it full of cheap gas.
               Tone

• The writer's attitude toward his
  readers and his subject; his mood
  or moral view. A writer can be
  formal, informal, playful, ironic,
  and especially, optimistic or
  pessimistic.
            Assonance
• Repeated VOWEL sounds in a line or
  lines of poetry
Examples of ASSONANCE:
 “Slow the low gradual moan came in the
                  snowing.”
                          - John Masefield

 “Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet
                  sleep.”
                   - William Shakespeare
                Symbolism
• When a
  person,               = Innocence
  place,
  thing, or
  event that
  has
  meaning               = America
  in itself
  also
  represents
  , or stands
  for,
  something             =Peace
  else.
              Idiom

• An expression where the literal
  meaning of the words is not the
  meaning of the expression. It
  means something other than what
  it actually says.

• Ex. It’s raining cats and dogs.
           Hyperbole

• obvious and intentional
  exaggeration
• EX: There are a million people in
  here!
• I could sleep for a year!
• I have a ton of homework
  tongight!
No Where Near the End!!!

• There is so much more to
  poetry....we have only scratched
  the surface.....

								
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