873MinorinGlobalMigrationStuPRECEPC120312

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					                      Proposing New CSULB Minor and Certificate Programs


1.      Program Type (Please specify any from the list below that apply—delete the others)

         State-Support
         New Program

2.      Program Identification

        a.   Campus

        Long Beach

        b. Full and exact degree designation and title (e.g. Minor in American Indian Studies,
           Certificate in Technical and Professional Writing).

        Interdisciplinary Minor in Global Migration Studies

        c. Term and academic year of intended implementation (e.g. Fall 2007).

        Fall 2012

        d. Name of the department(s), division, or other unit of the campus that would offer the
           proposed minor or certificate program. Please identify the unit that will have primary
           responsibility.

College of Liberal Arts

Minor in Global Migration Studies Advisory Board
Advisory Board: Nielan Barnes (SOC), Norma Chinchilla (SOC), Ken Curtis (HIST), Gary Hytrek
(SOC), Linda España Maram (ASAM), Heather Rae-Espinoza (HDEV), Maythee Rojas (WGSS), and
Julie Weise (I/ST)
Program Chair: Heather Rae-Espinoza (HDEV)

        e. Name, title, and rank of the individual(s) primarily responsible for drafting the proposed
           minor or certificate program.

Dr. Heather Rae-Espinoza
Assistant Professor

Dr. Julie Weise
Assistant Professor

        f.   Statement from the appropriate campus administrative authority that the addition of this
             program supports the campus mission and will not impede the successful operation and
             growth of existing academic programs. (CPEC “Appropriateness to Institutional and
             Segmental Mission”)

Attached.
        g. Any other campus approval documents that may apply (e.g. curriculum committee
           approvals).

Attached

3.      Program Overview and Rationale
        a.   Rationale, including a brief description of the program, its purpose and strengths, fit
             with institutional mission, and a justification for offering the program at this time. The
             rationale may explain the relationship among the program philosophy, design, target
             population, and any distinctive pedagogical methods. (CPEC “Appropriateness to
             Institutional and Segmental Mission”)

The Minor in Global Migration Studies will provide students with a strong foundation in migration
studies and a critical comparative framework for understanding the connection of gender, culture,
and history to migration flows. The purpose of the minor is to give students the skills to understand
many different migrant groups. Furthermore, students will develop the skills to critically analyze
questions of change and continuity between historical and contemporary migrations. A strength of
this minor is that by using existing courses that do not overenroll in a number of departments, the
minor does not create any new expenditures while providing the opportunity for students to gain
crucial skills for helping multicultural populations. This minor fits closely with the College’s mission
that “The World is Our College,” since a minor in Global Migration Studies will help students to
understand world-wide factors that shape migration flows and migrants’ experiences. The
philosophy of this minor is to allow students to focus more on the factors that different migration
flows have in common (or not) and frameworks for understanding these experiences, rather than
focusing solely on one migrant population. The organization of courses by topic area rather than the
migrant’s sending or receiving society is a design that will suit the target population of both students
continuing into applied careers that will require interacting with a multicultural migrant population
and students continuing on to graduate school.

        b. Proposed catalog description, including program description, degree requirements, and
           admission requirements.

Program Description
The Minor in Global Migration Studies is a multidisciplinary program to provide students with an
understanding of migration’s causes, effects, and impacts and a critical comparative framework for
migrant’s experiences (history, gender, and culture). The core represents courses that have a wide
survey of different migrant groups or provide a foundation for the more focused courses in the
comparative framework.

Courses used to meet the certificate requirement may, where applicable, also be used simultaneously
to meet General Education requirements or the major and minor requirements of cooperating
departments.

Degree Requirements
   1. No more than 9 units can come from the same department.
   2. 18 upper division units to be distributed as follows:

           A. Core 6 units
           --Foundation: I/ST 320I
           --Survey: AFRS / ASAM / CHLS / WGSS 319 OR SOC 358I OR GEOG 360 OR ANTH
          444
          B. Comparative Framework: 3 units from each of the groupings below for 9 units. Courses
          must address at least two different migrant populations.
          --History: ASAM / CHLS 335I, ASAM 354, ASAM 407, CHLS 350 / SOC 340, CHLS 430,
          HIST 348, HIST 362, HIST 365, HIST 370 / CHLS 300, HIST 372, HIST 410, HIST 416,
          HIST 418, HIST 428, HIST 435, HIST 440, HIST 441, HIST 443, HIST 460, HIST 469,
          HIST 470, HIST 471, HIST 473, HIST 475, HIST / WGSS 485A, HIST 486, HIST 491.
          --Gender: AFRS 454I, ASAM 354, ASAM 407, CHLS 350 / SOC 340, HIST / WGSS 485A,
          WGSS 307I, WGSS 401I, WGSS 432, WGSS 449.
          --Culture: AFRS 337, ASAM 321, ASAM 330, ASAM 331, ASAM 332, ASAM 333, ASAM
          334, ASAM / CHLS 342, ASAM 352, ASAM 354, ASAM 360, ASAM 407, CHLS 340,
          CHLS 350 / SOC 340, CHLS 352 / SOC 341.
          C. Culminating: 3 units of internship, thesis, or directed study taken with any member of the
          Advisory Board.
          Directed Study (ASAM 499, HDEV 499, I/ST 499, SOC 499, or WGSS 499) OR Internship
          (HDEV 470, I/ST 492, SOC 495, or WGSS 498).

Admission Requirements
Students should submit an application for the minor to schedule a meeting with a member of the
advisory committee. All units must be selected with the approval of a member of the advisory
committee.

4.      Curriculum
        a. Goals for the (1) program and (2) student learning outcomes. Program goals are very
           broad statements about what the program is intended to achieve, including what kinds
           of graduates will be produced. Student learning outcomes are more specific statements
           that are related to the program goals but that more narrowly identify what students will
           know and be able to do upon successful completion of the program.

(1) The goals for the program are to provide students a.) with the critical thinking skills to understand
factors that propel migration and affect migrants’ experiences and b.) with an understanding of the
role of history, culture, and gender on different migrant groups. Students who graduate with a minor
in Global Migration Studies will better serve a multicultural population and have a clear
understanding of how different disciplines approach migration.

(2) Learning objectives for the Minor in Global Migration Studies include that students:
1       demonstrate a theoretical perspective for approaching migration studies
2       provide a survey of migration experiences
3       analyze how history, gender, and culture relate to migrant experiences
4       critically evaluate descriptions of migrant experiences from different sources, including the
media and popular culture.
5       understand and work effectively with a diversity of individuals and communities
6       apply theory and research to contemporary concerns for migrant groups

        b. Plans for assessing program goals and student learning outcomes. Some planners find it
           helpful to develop matrices in which student learning outcomes and required courses are
           mapped, indicating where content related to the learning outcomes is introduced,
           reinforced, and practiced at an advanced level in required courses. (CPEC
           “Maintenance and Improvement of Quality”)

The sequence of courses in the minor will allow for the clear introduction of our learning objectives
in the core class, I/ST 320I, with the first two goals being reinforced in the rest of the core. The
course selections in the comparative framework continue to reinforce learning objectives 3, 4, 5, and
6. Each of these learning objectives will be assessed in the culminating internship or directed
research with a member of the advisory board.

           I = Introduced R = Reinforced P = Practiced

                                                      LEARNING OUTCOMES
      COURSES
                                   1             2        3       4                        5             6
I/ST 320I                          I             I        I       I                        I             I
ANTH 444 OR
                                   R                                         R
GEOG 360
AFRS / ASAM /
CHLS / WGSS 319                                  R                                         R             R
OR SOC 358I
Comparative
                                                               R             R             R             R
Framework Courses
Directed Study OR
                                 R/P          R/P              P             P             P             P
Internship

Assessment of learning objectives will include a pre-test archived from assignments in our
foundation course I/ST 320I: Migration & Modernity. After students have had the opportunity to
reinforce these learning objectives as they complete the core and comparative framework
coursework, learning outcomes will be assessed again with a member of the advisory board in a
culminating experience. This experience will involve either a directed study or internship with a
presentation to demonstrate their understanding of each of the learning objectives. At least one
member of the advisory board beyond the supervisor of the culminating experience will participate in
the assessment of the presentation for demonstrating the achievement of the minors’ learning
objectives. Assessment results will be used both to consider the continued inclusion of courses in
the program description in regards to how they meet learning objectives and to fine-tune the
guidelines for the culminating experience.

           c. Total number of units required for the minor or certificate.

18 units

           d. A list of all courses required for the minor or certificate, specifying catalog number, title,
              units of credit, and prerequisites or co-requisites (ensuring that there are no “hidden”
              prerequisites that would drive the total units required to graduate beyond the total
              reported in 4c above).

I/ST 320I. Migration and Modernity (3) Prerequisite: Completion of all GE Foundation courses.
Examines global migration from 1700s-present, putting U.S. immigration history in context and
emphasizing recent and contemporary trends. Uses history, politics, and culture (literature,
photography and film) to consider migration’s intersections with race, ethnicity, and nationalism.
Letter grade only (A-F).

           e. List of elective courses that can be used to satisfy requirements for the minor or
              certificate, specifying catalog number, title, units of credit, and prerequisites or co-
              requisites. Include proposed catalog descriptions of all new courses. For graduate
              program proposals, identify whether each course is a graduate or undergraduate offering.
Core Options: [Students select one]

AFRS / ASAM / CHLS / WGSS 319. The Ethnic Experience in the U.S. (3) Prerequisite:
Completion of GE Foundation requirements. Comparative study of race, cultures, and ethnic
relations in U.S. society with special focus on experiences of four core groups: Native Americans,
African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latino Americans. Same course as AIS 319, ASAM 319,
CHLS 319, WGSS 319. Not open for credit to student with credit in AIS 319, ASAM 319, CHLS
319, WGSS 319. (Lecture/Discussion.)

SOC 358I. The Sociology of Migration and Immigration (3) Prerequisites: Completion of GE
Foundation requirements and upper-division standing. Focuses on historical and contemporary
immigration to the United States. Examines causes and consequences of immigration; forces and
events that propel migrants to move; patterns of economic adaptation and political incorporation;
role of social institutions in immigrant adaptation, and the process by which immigrants become
ethnics. Letter grade only (A-F).

ANTH 444. Transnational Migrants (3) Prerequisites: ANTH 120 and upper-division/graduate
standing or consent of the instructor. Anthropological examination of the lives of immigrants and
refugees. Explores the way studies of migration challenge our understanding of the local context of
globalization and transnationalism. Focus on theories of culture, ethnicity, and identity as well as
theories of incorporation, adaptation and nativism and the relevance of applied anthropology
through research and advocacy. Letter grade only (A-F).

GEOG 360. Human Geography (3) Prerequisites: GEOG 100, 120, or 160. Introduces breadth of
research across subfields of human geography through examination of various contemporary topics,
such as migration, globalization, cultural landscapes, urbanization, politics, agricultural practices, and
development. Letter grade only (A-F).

Comparative Framework Options: [Students select one from each framework]

History

ASAM / CHLS 335I. Asian and Latino Immigration Since World War II (3) Prerequisites:
Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division
standing. Examines the causes of massive Asian and Latino immigration as well as major
contemporary issues in the Asian and Latino communities.

ASAM 354. Transnational Filipino Communities (3) Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing.
Recommended: ASAM 352. Examines the social, economic, political, and cultural realities in the
Philippines and their relationship with the formation of transnational Filipino/a communities.

ASAM 407. Asians in Latin America (3) Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Recommended: HIST 161 Examines the diverse histories and experiences of Asians in
Latin America. Emphases placed on patterns of labor and settlement, socio-economic development
of local and transnational communities, formation of ethnic identities, and expressive cultures. Letter
grade only (A-F).

CHLS 350 / SOC 340. The Latino Population in the United States (3) Prerequisite: Completion of
GE Foundation requirements. Survey of the comparative historical, transnational, cultural and socio-
economic experience (including class, gender, immigration and settlement patterns) of the various
Latino sub-groups in the United States. Letter grade only (A-F).
CHLS 430. The Latino Transnational Experience in the Caribbean: Empire, Reform and Revolution
(3) Interdisciplinary introduction to political, economic and social processes since the Spanish
American War in the Hispanic Caribbean. This course will focus on the relationship of imperialism,
migration and diasporic communities in the United States. Letter grade only (A-F).

HIST 348. Emancipation and Assimilation: Modern Jewish History of Western Europe (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the GE Foundation, one or more Exploration courses, and upper
division standing. Examines modern Jewish history in Western Europe. Topics include the ideas
behind emancipation, the attempts to achieve it, and efforts to reconcile Jewishness with modern
citizenship.

HIST 362. Colonial Latin America (3) Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Iberian preparation for overseas expansion, discovery and conquest in America, evolution of colonial
institutions, dynamic 18th century developments, wars of independence.

HIST 365. Brazil (3) The course surveys the history of Brazil from 1500 to the present. It covers the
colonial, imperial and republican periods, analyzing the impact of slavery on society, the myth of
"racial democracy," and contemporary economic and urbanization patterns. It also studies the 1964-
1985 dictatorship and the return to democracy, as well as the challenges of twentieth-first century
Brazil.

HIST 370 / CHLS 300. Chicano History (3) Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation
requirements. Chicanos in the settlement and development of the Southwest and in contemporary
U.S. society; Chicano experience as a U.S. minority group; emerging civil rights movement of La
Raza. Letter grade only (A-F).

HIST 372. United States: Colonial Period (3) Discovery and settlement of the new world; European
institutions in a new environment; development of colonial government, economy and social
institutions; European dynastic rivalry and colonial America.

HIST 410. Chinese Emigration/Migration in Modern Period (3) Emphasis on Chinese in SE Asia,
the Americas, and Western Europe; exploration of the implications of human migration for the
developing world, and the fluidity and contested nature of "nation states."

HIST 416. Central Asia and Afghanistan from the Mongol Era to WWI (3) Prerequisite: Upper-
Division status. Introductory survey of the history of change and continuity in Afghanistan and
Turkistan (currently Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) during the
Mongol Era of the Thirteenth Century and the World War I.

HIST 418. Central Asia and Afghanistan, Twentieth Century (3) Prerequisite: Upper-Division status.
Introductory survey of history of change and continuity in Afghanistan and Turkistan (currently
Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) during the Twentieth Century.

HIST 428. History of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (3) Prerequisites: Completion of GE
Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing. Examines
evolution of Palestinian-Israeli conflict from late nineteenth century to present. Explores how social,
economic, and political realities gave birth to competing Zionist and Palestinian national identities
evolved over time, highlighting diverse perspectives within each national community.

HIST 435. History of the Francophone World (3) Prerequisites: HIST 132, 212, or approval of
advisor. Commencing with a study of the history of French language, explores methods by which
France expanded its global presence. Themes to be covered include French colonialism, resistance to
French overseas expansion and issues relative to race and identity.

HIST 440./540. The Silk Roads (3) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 131 or consent of
undergraduate/graduate advisor. Examines the Silk Roads from the first century BCE to the end of
the fifteenth century CE from a world historical perspective. Emphasis is on economic integration,
cultural diffusion, exchange and syncretism, and comparative demographic and political
development.

HIST 441./541. Mediterranean World (3) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 131 or consent of
undergraduate/graduate advisor. Focuses on pre-modern Mediterranean world up to geographical
shift of political power and wealth to the Atlantic world with an emphasis on the exchange and
interaction of peoples and ideas. Letter grade only (A-F).

HIST 443./543. The Early Modern Atlantic World (3) Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 132 or consent of
undergraduate/graduate advisor. Examines early modern Atlantic from a world historical perspective
emphasis on cultural encounter/exchange, environmental interaction, and comparative colonial
development from early Iberian maritime expansion through Atlantic revolutions and wars of
independence. Letter grade only (A-F).

HIST 460./560. Slavery in Latin America (3) Completion of the GE Foundation, one or more
Exploration courses and upper division standing. Systems of forced labor in Latin America since
European arrival; the slave trade; slavery in economic context; resistance and negotiation; plantations
and urban slavery; slaves into the independence wars; manumission and slavery abolition; Afro-latino
Americans post slavery.

HIST 469. Ethnic Groups in Urban America: An Historical Examination (3) Examination of the
origin, migration, settlement and the assimilation of various ethnic groups in American cities since
the late 19th century. Emphasis will be on the economic, social, and political struggles encountered
by different groups adjusting to urban life.

HIST 470. American Jewish History (3) Chronological and thematic approach to American Jewish
history. Covers Sephardic, German, Eastern European, and recent Jewish immigration. Emphasis on
experiences immigrants brought with them. Critical examination of assimilation, transformation of
traditions, women, anti-Semitism, development of denominations, mobility, leadership of Diaspora.
Letter grade only (A-F).

HIST 471. History of the Westward Movement (3) Examination of the impact of American
expansion on the West: Euro-American exploration and migration, ethnic conflict and conquest,
gender and family roles on the frontier, environmental changes in the West, development of
economic institutions, and urbanization of the region.

HIST 473. California History (3) Survey of California from the 1500s to the present. Emphasis on
migration, cultural diversity, and significant social, political, and economic developments.

HIST 475. American Immigration and Ethnicity (3) Explores the history of immigration to the
United States and the experiences of immigrants in American society. Major themes include political,
social, and economic implication of immigration; push and pull factors; nativism; assimilation; and
social constructions of ethnicity.

HIST / WGSS 485A. History of Women in the U.S. Early Period (3) Prerequisite: Completion of
GE Foundation requirements. Survey of roles and activities of American women from colonial
period to 1850, with focus on slavery, immigration, family, economy, law, and politics. Only 3 units
of 485A,B may be applied to a field of concentration in U.S. history for the major.

HIST 486. History of Afro-Americans in the United States (3) Examines the roots and culture of
Afro-Americans from African origins to the present. We will explore the transformation from slavery
to freedom; segregation and racial conflict; emigraion patterns, societal interactions, and the
experiences of women.

HIST 491. Modern and Contemporary Africa (3) Conquest of Africa by European states, contrasting
colonial systems as they evolved, anti-colonial movements and progress towards self-government or
independence, problems of economic and political development, and race tensions in areas of white
settlement.

Gender

AFRS 454I. Africana Womanism: An Intellectual History (3) Prerequisites: Completion of the G.E.
foundation requirements, one or more exploration courses and upper division standing. Historical
and critical study of the major schools of thought in Africana womanism, including continental and
diasporan sources, historical evolution, cultural grounding, methodology, discourse on and with
feminism, enduring and current issues and its relevance and relation to social change.

ASAM 354. Transnational Filipino Communities (3) Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing.
Recommended: ASAM 352. Examines the social, economic, political, and cultural realities in the
Philippines and their relationship with the formation of transnational Filipino/a communities.

ASAM 407. Asians in Latin America (3) Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Recommended: HIST 161 Examines the diverse histories and experiences of Asians in
Latin America. Emphases placed on patterns of labor and settlement, socio-economic development
of local and transnational communities, formation of ethnic identities, and expressive cultures. Letter
grade only (A-F).

CHLS 350 / SOC 340. The Latino Population in the United States (3) Prerequisite: Completion of
GE Foundation requirements. Survey of the comparative historical, transnational, cultural and socio-
economic experience (including class, gender, immigration and settlement patterns) of the various
Latino sub-groups in the United States. Letter grade only (A-F).

HIST / WGSS 485A. History of Women in the U.S. Early Period (3) Prerequisite: Completion of
GE Foundation requirements. Survey of roles and activities of American women from colonial
period to 1850, with focus on slavery, immigration, family, economy, law, and politics. Only 3 units
of 485A,B may be applied to a field of concentration in U.S. history for the major.

WGSS 307I. U.S. Women and the Economy: Money, Sex, and Power (3) Prerequisites: Completion
of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Interdisciplinary examination of the economic roles of women; analysis of the sexual division of
labor and domestic work. Special focus on the origin, migration, settlement, and economic patterns
of and problems facing US women from major ethnic and racial groups.

WGSS 401I. Bodies and Borders: Feminism and Globalization (3) Prerequisites: completion of
Foundation courses, one or more Explorations course, and upper division standing Covers feminist
perspectives on contemporary globalization. Examines how we might imagine a more equitable
world and why feminism should be concerned with global perspectives. Topics include colonialism,
tourism, food production, women's labor, migration, militarism, and social movements.
WGSS 432. Women in the City (3) Examines the way women respond to urban environment, both
literally and imaginatively. Special attention paid to sexual division of space, particular needs of
immigrant and third world women, and utopian cities of sisterhood. Readings feature literary texts,
augmented by an interdisciplinary range of theoretical and empirical studies of cities.

WGSS 449. Feminism and International Human Rights (3) Prerequisite: Upper division status or
consent of instructor. Reviews feminist debates on racism, colonialism, and international human
rights. Will consider current international women’s rights issues and critiques of western feminist
perspectives on veiling, genital surgeries, gender-based persecution, violence against women in war,
sati, dowry murders, migration and trafficking.

Culture

AFRS 337. Cultures of African Peoples (3) Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation
requirement, AFRS 200 or consent of instructor. Critical presentation of a cultural map of African
people, emphasizing geography, migration and cultural similarities.

ASAM 321. Asian and Pacific American Film (3) Prerequisites: Completion of the Foundation
requirements, and upper division status. Employs films as cultural “texts” in exploring issues
including race, gender, sexuality, migrations, and the politics of representation in Asian and Pacific
American communities.

ASAM 330. Japanese American Experience (3) A study of the culture, history, and literature of
Japanese in America, emphasizing immigrant experience, agricultural contributions, World War II,
generational issues, women in transition and family.

ASAM 331. Chinese American Experience (3) A study of the culture, history, and literature of
Chinese in America, emphasizing immigrant experience, generational issues, women in transition and
family.

ASAM 332. Korean American Experience (3) Examines major historical, social, political, and cultural
themes that have shaped Korean American experiences, with attention to intersections of race,
ethnicity, gender, and class in the U.S. Emphasizes contemporary issues in local communities and
transnational connections in the Korean diaspora.

ASAM 333. Vietnamese American Experience (3) A study of the culture, history, and literature of
Vietnamese in America, emphasizing immigrant experience, generational issues, women in transition
and family.

ASAM 334. Cambodian American Experience (3) A study of the culture, history, and literature of
Cambodians in America, emphasizing refugee and immigrant experiences, generational issues,
women in transition and family.

ASAM / CHLS 342. Chicanos, Filipinos, and Popular Cultures (3) Prerequisites: Completion of the
Foundation courses and upper-division status. This course is a team-taught seminar that explores the
historical roots of politics of expressive and cultural practices among Chicanos and Filipinos. Special
attention will be paid to themes of resistance, gender, migrations, imperialism, hybridity, and post-
colonial identities and transformations.

ASAM 352. Filipino/a American Experiences (3) Focusing on social, economic, political, and cultural
dimensions of Filipino/a experiences in the United States, this course examines major issues,
including legacies of imperialism, transnational patterns of capital and labor, colonial and post-
colonial identities, resistance to oppression, and literary expressions.

ASAM 354. Transnational Filipino Communities (3) Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing.
Recommended: ASAM 352. Examines the social, economic, political, and cultural realities in the
Philippines and their relationship with the formation of transnational Filipino/a communities.

ASAM 360. Studies in Asian American Literature (3) Provides theoretical foundation for the analysis
of Asian Pacific American literature. Addresses various issues in contemporary Asian Pacific
American literary criticism including transnationalism, historical memory, gender relations, sexuality,
and the development of Asian Pacific American literary “aesthetics.”

ASAM 407. Asians in Latin America (3) Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of
instructor. Recommended: HIST 161 Examines the diverse histories and experiences of Asians in
Latin America. Emphases placed on patterns of labor and settlement, socio-economic development
of local and transnational communities, formation of ethnic identities, and expressive cultures. Letter
grade only (A-F).

CHLS 340. Latino Education in the U.S. (3) Survey of Latinos in the U.S., including topics such as
immigration, settlement patterns, employment, family, language and culture. Emphasis is on racism
and the intersections of class and gender and the heterogeneity of the Latino population. Letter grade
only (A-F).

CHLS 350 / SOC 340. The Latino Population in the United States (3) Prerequisite: Completion of
GE Foundation requirements. Survey of the comparative historical, transnational, cultural and socio-
economic experience (including class, gender, immigration and settlement patterns) of the various
Latino sub-groups in the United States. Letter grade only (A-F).

CHLS 352 / SOC 341. Central American and Caribbean Peoples in California (3) Survey of the
socioeconomic conditions and cultural life of the Central American and Spanish-speaking Caribbean
communities in California, such as Salvadoran, Guatemalan, Puerto Rican, and Cuban communities.
Similarities and differences with the Mexican-American community will be examined.

             Note: With regard to Sections 4f and 4g, a proposed program should take advantage of
             courses already offered in other departments when subject matter would have
             considerable overlapping content.

        f.   List of any new courses that are: (1) needed to initiate the program and (2) needed
             during the first two years after implementation. Only include proposed catalog
             descriptions for new courses. For graduate program proposals, identify whether each
             course is a graduate-level or undergraduate-level offering.

None

        g. Attach a proposed course-offering plan for the first three years of program
           implementation, indicating, where possible, likely faculty teaching assignments.

In any semester students can take all courses needed. Attached is a spreadsheet with courses offered
in the Spring of 2011 and Fall of 2011. It includes the census numbers for students, indicating that
there is room for more students in almost all the classes listed. In addition, it includes whether or
not enrollment was still listed as open (green) or closed (red) for all classes during enrollment. In
either the spring or the fall, students would have several options to meet any of the requirements of
the comparative frameworks and classes within the core had sufficient space for additional students.
The minor in Global Migration Studies would increase course efficiency for these classes without
taking seats away from majors. The campus already offers a breadth of courses that can successfully
meet the academic purposes of this minor with its existing offering schedule even in the current
budgetary circumstances.

           h. Admission criteria, including prerequisite coursework.

Upper-division standing

           i.   Criteria for student continuation in the program.

Minimum GPA of 2.0 in minor coursework.

           j.   Provision for meeting accreditation requirements, if applicable, and anticipated date of
                accreditation request (including the WASC Substantive Change process).

No accreditation requirements.

5.         Need for the Proposed Minor or Certificate Program
           (CPEC “Societal Need,” “Number of Existing Programs in the Field,” and
           “Advancement of the Field”)

           a.   List of other California State University campuses currently offering or projecting the
                proposed programs; list of neighboring institutions, public and private, currently
                offering the proposed programs.
           b. Differences between the proposed program and programs listed in Section 5a above.

[Sections a. and b. are discussed jointly to clarify comparisons.]

This minor program allows CSULB to occupy a vanguard position in global migration education.

At UCSD, the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies offers an undergraduate minor in
International Migration Studies. Their website announces, “This is the first undergraduate
instructional program with this focus to be offered at any university in the United States.”1 The
UCSD minor similarly begins with core coursework in a survey course to appreciate the diversity of
migrant populations in the U.S. and with coursework that offers background in global migration as
our foundation course offers. The minor at UCSD also culminates with the option of supervised
research or an internship. The Minor in Global Migration Studies at CSULB is unique in what it will
provide our students in comparison to the UCSD minor. Our framework requiring courses that
investigate migration from the comparative perspectives of history, gender, and culture assure that
our students will have an overview of different approaches to understanding migrants. This multi-
disciplinary approach has also been adopted at Yale, where the Ethnicity, Race, and Migration major,
now in its tenth year, requires students to take courses about both historical and contemporary
migrations; to cover at least two geographic regions; and to explore at least two different departments
or academic fields.2



1
    See http://ccis.ucsd.edu/programs/academic-programs/
2
    See http://yalecollege.yale.edu/content/ethnicity-race-and-migration-1
Furthermore, migration research is active at universities and presses across the country, including at
neighboring institutions. USC’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration engages in funded
research projects that both allow community development and scholarly research, but does not offer
an academic program to facilitate and develop students’ involvement. Similarly, UCLA’s North
American Integration and Development Center seeks to assist communities and further research,
offering one course a semester but no organized program of study.

Despite this intellectual foment on other campuses, and the introduction of formal programs of
study at UCSD, Yale, and elsewhere, there is no other CSU campus that currently offers a
comparable program to the proposed Minor in Global Migration Studies. While global migration
studies is part of many courses across campuses, especially in Geography, Sociology, History, and
Chicano/Latino Studies, the treatment of migration as a program of investigation is not done on any
CSU campus (according to website catalog searches). CSU San Marcos, Sonoma State University,
San Jose State University, CSU Monterey Bay and CSU Channel Islands offer a Certificate in Global
Studies. These certificates involve a focus on the globalization pressures that cause migration flows,
but they differ from the proposed minor. For one, the goal of the Global Studies Certificates
focuses more largely on understanding globalization factors such as global warming and includes
migration as a topic of study. The distinction between these certificates and the CSULB Minor in
Global Migration Studies proposed here is that this certificate offers an in-depth focus on both the
macro factors across political regimes and history along with micro factors like social and cultural
values that are necessary for understanding the daily lives of migrants. CSU Bakersfield, CSU Chico,
CSU Dominguez Hills, CSU East Bay, CSU Fresno, CSU Fullerton, CSU Humboldt, CSULA, CSU
Maritime, CSU Northridge, Cal Poly Pomona, CSU Sacramento State, CSU San Bernardino, San
Diego State University, San Francisco State University, Cal Poly, and CSU Stanislaus do not offer any
similar minors or certificates.

        c. List of other curricula currently offered by the campus that are closely related to the
           proposed program.

The International Studies program offers an interdisciplinary major focused on global studies, but the
Minor in Global Migration Studies would uniquely focus on migration as the topic of analysis.

        d. Community participation, if any, in the planning process. This may include prospective
           employers of graduates.

Currently, there has been no community participation in the planning process. However, the
development of internship and directed study with the culminating assignment will be developed in
coordination with CCE and IE to build community participation.

        e. Applicable workforce demand projections and other relevant data.

Understanding a range of migrant populations and how history, culture, and gender affect these
populations would be beneficial to any number of fields that serve the growing multi-cultural
population. Some of the fastest growing occupations projected for California will serve migrant
populations. In service fields positioned between mainstream institutions and disenfranchised
migrant populations, our students in these growing occupations will benefit from a Minor in Global
Migration Studies. Knowing the global forces that drive on economic ambitions, how cultural
differences shape career goals, and characteristics of different populations will help attorneys,
government workers, social workers, teachers, nurses, law enforcement officers, occupational
therapists, physician assistants, physical therapists, substance abuse/behavioral counselors. In
research on teaching multicultural competence (or “the ability to understand and constructively relate
to the uniqueness of each client in light of the diverse cultures that influence each person’s
perspective”), 3 there can in fact be a strengthening of stereotypes when the complexity of culture is
overlooked. With the Minor in Global Migration Studies, our students entering fields that serve
migrant populations will be equipped with a solid framework for understanding the various factors
that affect migrant populations along with a manner for understanding the factors that shape the
characteristic needs of specific populations.

For example, students in Human Development continue on to all these fields. A specialized focus
on migrant populations could benefit any of our over 500 majors. Many students indicate a passion
for social justice, and select foundational coursework within our major to specialize on social justice
for a particular population. This is often done through minors or double majors with our students.
As a major with only 33 units, our students have ample units to take on an additional 18 units in a
minor in Global Migration Studies. In fact, 9 units from the HDEV major overlap with the minor in
Global Migration Studies. For Human Development, they could take two sociocultural foundation
courses that would meet the minor in Global Migration Studies’ History Comparative Framework
with CHLS 350, Culture Comparative Framework with CHLS 340, and/or Gender Comparative
Framework with WGSS 401I. Additionally, their required HDEV internship with advisor guidance
would count as the culminating experience for the minor in Global Migration Studies. A Human
Development student would only need 6 additional units of the core, both of which would fulfill GE
requirements with I/ST 320I and selecting AFRS / ASAM / CHLS / WGSS 319 to meet the GE D2
and H requirements. A minor in Global Migration Studies would be a very efficient way for a
Human Development major to meet both departmental and General Education requirements while
gaining additional knowledge focused on serving a multicultural population.

        f.   If the program was proposed to meet society’s need for the advancement of knowledge,
             please specify the need and explain how the program meets that need.

This minor is needed to allow the interdisciplinary investigation of global migration. With limited
communication between fields and researchers increasingly becoming specialized in particular
regions, this minor uniquely allows a student to consider global migration for applied purposes such
as work with social services and policy initiatives and for pursuing graduate research. Through
offering a foundation in a number of disciplines in the core and a diverse selection of courses in the
comparative framework to address historical, cultural, and gender concerns, the Minor in Global
Migration Studies meets these needs.

             Note: Data Sources for Demonstrating Evidence of Need
             APP Resources Web http://www.calstate.edu/app/resources.shtml
             US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics
             California Labor Market Information
             Labor Forecast

6.      Student Demand (CPEC “Student Demand”)
        a.   Compelling evidence of student interest in enrolling in the proposed program. Types of
             evidence vary and may include national, statewide, and professional employment
             forecasts and surveys; petitions; lists of related associate degree programs at feeder
             community colleges; reports from community college transfer centers; and enrollments
             from feeder baccalaureate programs, for example.


3Stuart, Richard B. (2004) “Twelve Practical Suggestions for Achieving Multicultural Competence.”
Professional Psychology: Research and Practice Vol. 35 (1), 3-9.
According to the Washington Post, Global Health is a (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
dyn/content/article/2008/09/18/AR2008091804145.html) growing field of student interest because
“Students want to contribute and empower communities.” An Immigration Specialization in Human
Resources makes more than a Human Resources Generalist according to Salary.com. A Minor in
Global Migration Studies will interest students with a wide-range of future career goals. The most
compelling evidence of student interest is the likelihood of students on our campus to enroll in the
Global Migration Studies Minor. In a recent survey of I/ST 320I, over 50% of the students
expressed interest in the migration program and two thirds of I/ST 490 expressed interest. In SOC,
seventeen students expressed interest at a migration colloquium. Across the advisory board, a dozen
students work independently with the various research projects and community involvement
initiatives that members of the advisory board conduct. These students are interested as well. We
will promote the minor at SOAR, through student advising across the departments represented on
the advisory board, in the numerous sections of AFRS / ASAM / CHLS / WGSS 319, and especially
when students are selecting courses for their concentrations in I/ST. These efforts will assure
sufficient enrollment for a viable program.

         b. Issues of access considered when planning this program.
Course Availability

See attached chart entitled, “Course Distribution Grid” for listings of available seats in the Spring of
2011 and Fall of 2011. As discussed above, in each semesters students would have several options to
meet all the requirements in our minor. All classes had at least one section available to students.
Very few sections were closed. Accessibility of courses for timely completion of the minor will not
be a problem. Moreover, the minor could help in filling classes that may be in need of additional
enrollment.

Course Overlap with Existing Requirements

Students will be able to meet GE requirements easily with the minor. Our foundation course, I/ST
320I received GE certification. One of our survey requirement options, AFRS / ASAM / CHLS /
WGSS 319, is a GE course meeting human diversity requirements and D2 GE. There are a number
of Interdisciplinary courses, including WGSS 307I, WGSS 401I, I/ST / SOC 318I (which also fits
GE global issues), and AFRS 454I (which also uniquely is GE category C2b). In fact, a student
looking to meet D2 GE requirements could choose a course from any of the minor’s frameworks.
Some options are HIST 370 from the History comparative framework, WGSS 307I from Gender, or
AFRS 337 from Culture. For all majors, students are limited in the number of GE credits they can
receive within their major. For this reason, the 18-credit GE-packed minor in Global Migration
Studies is an efficient option across majors.

Moreover, the minor maps on to a number of majors, including ASAM, CHLS, HIST, and WGSS. In
addition to the HDEV majors discussed above as a major relevant to workforce demand, SOC
majors could also earn a minor in Global Migration Studies very efficiently. SOC majors take 9 units
from a specific concentration. The Interaction and Group Relations concentration 9 units could all
come from courses meeting requirements in the minor in Global Migration Studies with CHLS 350 /
SOC 340 from the History Comparative Framework, WGSS 401I from the Gender Comparative
Framework, and CHLS 352 / SOC 341 from the Culture Comparative Framework. Additionally,
SOC 495 would count for both 3 of the 6 required upper division SOC units and the culminating
experience for the minor in Global Migration Studies. This would mean a SOC major would only
need 6 more units for the minor, IST 320I which would meet a necessary I requirement and the
remaining 3 units could be met with SOC 358I or AFRS / ASAM / CHLS / WGSS 319 to meet the
GE D2 and H requirements. A SOC concentration in Social Change and Global Issues would
similarly need few additional classes, all of which could be selected to meet GE units that cannot be
taken within the major.

Even a high unit major like I/ST can be completed efficiently with a minor in Global Migration
Studies because of the great amount of course overlap, numerous course options, and the high
number of GE courses in our minor. As part of their major, they would complete the minor’s core
I/ST 320I as part of the major’s core and the minor’s culminating experience I/ST 492 as the major’s
internship. In addition, with a concentration in Culture and Identity, they can complete all three
comparative frameworks with ASAM 354, HIST 435, or HIST 435 for history, ASAM 407 for
gender, and CHLS 342 or ASAM 354 for culture. I/ST Geographic Specializations in Latin
American and the Caribbean (CHLS 300, 430, HIST 435, 460, 362, 365), Russia and Central Asia
(HIST 418, 416, 440), Middle East and North Africa (HIST 428, 435), Sub-Saharan Africa (AFRS
337, HIST 491), East Asia (HIST 410), and North America (CHLS 300, HIST 435) all offer
additional options for meeting requirements for a minor in Global Migration Studies. A student
majoring in I/ST would have several options to TAKE NO ADDITIONAL COURSES beyond
those required for their major to earn a minor in Global Migration Studies.

        c. Professional uses of the proposed program.


See Section 5 e. on workforce projections above for a discussion of professional uses of the Minor in
Global Migration Studies.

        d. The expected number of students in the year of initiation and three years and five years
           thereafter. The expected number of graduates in the year of initiation, and three years
           and five years thereafter.

We expect 5 students to begin the minor in the year of initiation, and this to expand to 10 students at
3 years and 20 students at 5 years. Those students will likely graduate 2 years later, meaning no
graduates in the year of initiation, 5 - 10 by year 3, and 10 more at five years.

7.      Existing Support Resources for the Proposed Minor or Certificate Program
        (CPEC “Total Costs of the Program”)

        Note: Sections 7 and 8 should be prepared in consultation with the campus administrators
        responsible for faculty staffing and instructional facilities allocation and planning. A
        statement from the responsible administrator(s) should be attached to the proposal assuring
        that such consultation has taken place.

        a.   Faculty who would teach in the program, indicating rank, appointment status, highest
             degree earned, date and field of highest degree, professional experience, and affiliations
             with other campus programs. For graduate programs, include faculty publications or
             curriculum vitae.
Please see attached chart “Course Distribution Grid” for a listing of faculty who typically teach these
courses. Members of the advisory board would be responsible for advising and the culminating
coursework. The requested information for the individuals who would teach the culminating
experience is listed below.
Nielan Barnes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology (Tenure-Track)
Ph.D. (2005) in Sociology, University of California, San Diego
Dr. Barnes current research examines the role of civil society in shaping Immigration and Migration
Health Policy and Programs in North America.

Norma Chinchilla, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
(Tenured)
Ph.D. (1973) in Sociology, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Dr. Chinchilla’s research focuses on social change, social stratification, women’s movements and
feminism in Latin America. She has served as an expert witness for deportation and asylum hearings.

Kenneth R. Curtis, Ph.D., Professor of History and Liberal Studies (Tenured)
Ph.D. (1989) in History, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Dr. Curtis’s research and teaching fields are in Modern African and Comparative World History.
Apart from a dual appointment in the colleges of Liberal Arts and Education, Professor Curtis had
broad experience across the CSULB campus, including service as the Chair of the International
Education Committee and as senior international officer for Academic Affairs.

Gary Hytrek, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology (Tenured)
Ph.D. (1996) in Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles
Dr. Hyrtek’s has conducted research and taught in (and on) migration in Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba,
Mexico, Cambodia, the U.S. South, and Long Beach. His teaching and research areas include
globalization, migration, community development, human rights, and social justice.

Heather Rae-Espinoza, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Human Development (Tenure-Track)
Ph.D. (2006) in Anthropology, University of California, San Diego
Dr. Rae-Espinoza conducted three years of fieldwork in Ecuador along with exploratory research in
Mexico and with the Immigration Museum for New Americans on how children psychologically
adapted and socially adjusted to parental emigration.

Maythee Rojas, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies (Tenured)
Ph.D. (2001) in English, Arizona State University
Dr. Rojas’s teaching includes coursework examining the migratory experiences of women and
children through literature. In addition, the National Association of Ethnic Studies, where I serve as
a Board member, engages issues of migration as they relate to identity formation and the field of
ethnic studies within a global context.

Julie M. Weise, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of International Studies (Tenure-Track)
Ph.D. (2009) in History, Yale University
Dr. Weise worked as a research assistant and speechwriter in Mexico’s Office of the President for
Mexicans Living Abroad at the beginning of the Vicente Fox administration, and later did
community outreach to immigrants at the public interest law firm Neighborhood Legal Services of
L.A. County.

Kristine Zentgraf, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology (Tenured)
Ph.D. (1998) in Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles
A recipient of the university’s 2004-2005 distinguished Faculty Teaching Award, Dr. Zentgraf teaches
courses on race, class and gender inequality, social stratification, sociological theory and immigration.
Currently, she is working on a project that focuses on immigrant family separation, in particular the
impact of family separation and reunification on immigrant children and their adaptation to U.S.
society. She is co-author of American Transformed: Globalization, Inequality and Power (with Gary
Hytrek).
            Note: For all proposed graduate degree programs, a minimum of five full-time
            faculty members with the appropriate terminal degree should be on the program
            staff. (Code Memo EP&R 85-20)

        b. Space and facilities that would be used in support of the proposed program.

No additional facilities will be used beyond current course offerings, which are not overenrolled.

        c. A report provided by the campus Library, detailing resources available to support the
           program (discussion of subject areas, volume counts, periodical holdings, etc. are
           appropriate).

Please see attached report.

        d. Existing academic technology, equipment, and other specialized materials currently
           available.

With no additional course offerings for this minor, the academic technology, equipment, and other
specialized materials currently available to the departments that offer the courses will be utilized.

8.      Additional Support Resources Required
        (CPEC “Total Costs of the Program”)

        Note: If additional support resources will be needed to implement and maintain the
        program, a statement by the responsible administrator(s) should be attached to the proposal
        assuring that such resources will be provided.

        a. Any special characteristics of the additional faculty or staff support positions needed to
           implement the proposed program.

None.

        b. The amount of additional lecture and/or laboratory space required to initiate and to
           sustain the program over the next five years. Indicate any additional special facilities
           that will be required. If the space is under construction, what is the projected occupancy
           date? If the space is planned, indicate campus-wide priority of the facility, capital outlay
           program priority, and projected date of occupancy.

None.

        c. A report written in consultation with the campus librarian, indicating any additional
           library resources needed. Indicate the commitment of the campus either to purchase or
           borrow through interlibrary loan these additional resources.

None.

        d. Additional academic technology, equipment, or specialized materials that will be (1)
           needed to implement the program and (2) needed during the first two years after
           initiation. Indicate the source of funds and priority to secure these resource needs.

None.

				
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