Scope and Sequence Mathematics Grade 7 by U0Q6nW

VIEWS: 18 PAGES: 6

									                                        Scope and Sequence
                                            2009-2010
                          TEXARKANA INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

                       I = Introduced         P = Practiced          M= Mastered

 111.23 Mathematics,                                                            Grading Period
        Grade 7. Middle School                                          1   2      3     4     5   6
(1) The student represents and uses numbers in a variety of
    equivalent forms. The student is expected to:
(A) compare and order integers and positive rational numbers
    •Using multiple forms of positive rational numbers, including
                                                                        I   P      P     P    M
    numbers represented as fractions, percents, decimals, positive
    and negative integers within a single problem.
(B) convert between fractions, decimals, whole numbers, and
    percents mentally, on paper, or with a calculator                   I   P      P     P    M
    Including mixed numbers
(C) represent squares and square roots using geometric models               I      P     P    M
(2) The student adds, subtracts, multiplies, or divides to solve
    problems and justify solutions. The student is expected to:
(A) represent multiplication and division situations involving
    fractions and decimals with models, including concrete objects,
                                                                        I   P      P     P    M
    pictures, words, and numbers
    Including writing or selecting the correct expression
(B) use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve
    problems involving fractions and decimals
                                                                        I   P      P     P    M
    Examples include:
    Problems where your answer choices are models
(C) use models, such as concrete objects, pictorial models, and
    number lines, to add, subtract, multiply, and divide integers and I     P      P     P    M
    connect the actions to algorithms
(D) use division to find unit rates and ratios in proportional
    relationships such as speed, density, price, recipes, and student-
    teacher ratio
                                                                            I      P     P    M
    Including:
    •Fractions and decimals
    •Cross multiply and solve for x
(E) simplify numerical expressions involving order of operations
    and exponents                                                       I   P      P     P    M
    Including negative values
(F) select and use appropriate operations to solve problems and
    justify the selections
    Examples include:                                                  IP   P      P     P    M
    •Problems with multiple operations
    •Problems with answer grids
(G) determine the reasonableness of a solution to a problem
    Including problems with the appropriate range                         IP   P   P   P    M

(3) The student solves problems involving direct proportional
    relationships. The student is expected to:
(A) estimate and find solutions to application problems involving
    percent
    Including:
                                                                                   I   P    M
    •Percent increase
    •Percent decrease

(B) estimate and find solutions to application problems involving
    proportional relationships such as similarity, scaling, unit costs,
    and related measurement units
    Including:
                                                                               I   P   P    M
    •Setting up a proportion problem from word problems
    •Using data in a table
    •Measurements using standard and metric units
    •Unit conversions
(4) The student represents a relationship in numerical,
    geometric, verbal, and symbolic form. The student is
    expected to:
(A) generate formulas involving unit conversions, perimeter, area,
    circumference, volume, and scaling
    Including:
    •Perimeter of regular polygons
    •Circumference
    •Area of squares, rectangles, triangles, circles, trapezoids
                                                                                       IP   PM
    •Volume of rectangular prism, cylinders, cubes
    •Conversion from one standard unit to another as listed on the
    formula chart
    •Conversion from one metric unit to another as listed on the
    formula chart

(B) graph data to demonstrate relationships in familiar concepts
    such as conversions, perimeter, area, circumference, volume,
    and scaling
    Including:
    •Vocabulary (i.e. independent and dependent variable)
    •Data that models a linear relationship. Example: Perimeter                        IP   M
    and conversions
    •Data that models a quadratic (second degree) relationship.
    Example: Area
    •Data that models a third degree relationship.
    Example: Volume
(C) use words and symbols to describe the relationship between the
    terms in an arithmetic sequence (with a constant rate of change)
    and their positions in the sequence
    Including:                                                              I   P    P    M
    •The nth term table
    •Finding the nth term
    •Using nth term to find a specific term
(5) The student uses equations to solve problems. The student is
    expected to:
(A) use concrete and pictorial models to solve equations and use
    symbols to record the actions                                       I   P   P    P    M
    Including equations with two variables
(B) formulate problem situations when given a simple equation and
    formulate an equation when given a problem situation
    Including prerequisites of:
    •Translating word phrases to algebraic expressions                  I   P   P    P    M
    •Translating word phrases to algebraic equations.
    Including focusing on operational vocabulary (Examples:
    difference, total, product, and quotient)
(6) The student compares and classifies two- and three-
    dimensional figures using geometric vocabulary and
    properties. The student is expected to:
(A) use angle measurements to classify pairs of angles as
    complementary or supplementary
    Including:                                                                  IP   P    M
    •Diagrams with multiple angles
    •Prerequisite: name angles with three points
(B) use properties to classify triangles and quadrilaterals
    Including:
    •Triangle vocabulary: (i.e. acute, obtuse, right (define legs and
                                                                                IP   PM   M
    hypotenuse), equiangular, isosceles, equilateral, and scalene)
    •Quadrilateral terms: (i.e. parallelogram, rectangle, square,
    trapezoid, and rhombus)
(C) use properties to classify three-dimensional figures, including
    pyramids, cones, prisms, and cylinders
                                                                                     IP   PM
    Including vocabulary (i.e. faces, edges, vertices, bases, and
    lateral face)
(D) use critical attributes to define similarity
    Include:
    All polygons
    Corresponding sides are proportional
                                                                            I   P    P    M
    Corresponding angles are congruent
    Using proportions to find missing sides
    Identifying pictorially similar figures
    •Students needing to identify corresponding angles and sides by
    a similarity statement. Example: ∆ABC similar ~ ∆DEF
(7) The student uses coordinate geometry to describe location
    on a plane. The student is expected to:
    (A) locate and name points on a coordinate plane using
    ordered pairs of integers
    Include:
                                                                        IP   P   M
    •All four quadrants
    •Vocabulary: (i.e. x-axis, x-coordinate, y-coordinate, quadrants,
    origin)
(B) graph reflections across the horizontal or vertical axis and
    graph translations on a coordinate plane
    Include all four quadrants                                               I   P    M
    •Reflection across x-axis (x,y) → (x,-y)
    •Reflection across y-axis (x,y) → (-x,y)
(8) The student uses geometry to model and describe the
    physical world. The student is expected to:
(A) sketch three-dimensional figures when given the top, side, and
                                                                                 IP   PM
    front views
(B) make a net (two-dimensional model) of the surface area of a
    three-dimensional figure
    Include figures such as:
    •Cylinders
                                                                                 IP   PM
    •Cones
    •Prisms
    •Pyramids
    •Cube
(C) use geometric concepts and properties to solve problems in
    fields such as art and architecture
    Include all two- and three-dimensional figures listed on the                 IP   PM
    formula chart and combinations of figures such as a half circle
    and rectangle pieced together.
(9) The student solves application problems involving
    estimation and measurement. The student is expected to:
(A) estimate measurements and solve application problems
    involving length (including perimeter and circumference) and
    area of polygons and other shapes
    Include:                                                                     IP   PM
    •All polygons on the formula chart
    •Using rulers on formula chart
    •Problems with answer grids
(B) connect models for volume of prisms (triangular and
    rectangular) and cylinders to formulas of prisms (triangular and
    rectangular) and cylinders                                                   IP   PM
    Including matching nets and models to appropriate formulas to
    problem solve.
(C) estimate measurements and solve application problems                         IP   PM
     involving volume of prisms (rectangular and triangular) and
     cylinders
 (10) The student recognizes that a physical or mathematical
     model can be used to describe the experimental and
     theoretical probability of real-life events. The student is
     expected to:
 (A) construct sample spaces for simple or composite experiments
     Including with and without replacement.                                               IPM
     Construct tree diagrams
 (B) find the probability of independent events
     Including:
     •Flipping a coin
     •Drawing an object from a box without looking                                         IPM
     •Compound events: Drawing an object from a box without
     looking, replacing the object, and drawing another object
     (and/or situations)
 (11) The student understands that the way a set of data is
     displayed influences its interpretation. The student is
     expected to:
 (A) select and use an appropriate representation for presenting and
     displaying relationships among collected data, including line
     plot, line graph, bar graph, stem and leaf plot, circle graph, and
     Venn diagrams, and justify the selection                                          I   PM
     Including:
     •Frequency tables
     •Vocabulary (i.e. intervals, scale)
 (B) make inferences and convincing arguments based on an
     analysis of given or collected data                                               I   PM
     Including using the data to make predictions.
 (12) The student uses measures of central tendency and range
     to describe a set of data. The student is expected to:
 (A) describe a set of data using mean, median, mode, and range                        P   M
 (B) choose among mean, median, mode, or range to describe a set
     of data and justify the choice for a particular situation
     Including problems such as:                                                       I   PM
     Given a set of data the student selects the “best” measure of
     central tendency to describe that data
(13) The student applies Grade 7 mathematics to solve problems
     connected to everyday experiences, investigations in other
     disciplines, and activities in and outside of school. The
     student is expected to:
 (A) identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
     activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and
     with other mathematical topics                                       IP   P   P   P   PM
     This student expectation can be tested in every strand including
     one or more than one TEKS at a time.
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding
     the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and
     evaluating the solution for reasonableness                         IP   P    P   P   PM
     This student expectation can be tested in every strand including
     one or more than one TEKS at a time.
(C) select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy from
     a variety of different types, including drawing a picture,
     looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting
     it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working      IP   P    P   P   PM
     backwards to solve a problem
     This student expectation can be tested in every strand including
     one or more than one TEKS at a time.
(D) select tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper/pencil,
     and technology or techniques such as mental math, estimation,      I    P    P   P   PM
     and number sense to solve problems
(14) The student communicates about Grade 7 mathematics
     through informal and mathematical language,
     representations, and models. The student is expected to:
(A) communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient
     tools, appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or
     algebraic mathematical models                                      I    P    P   P   PM
     This student expectation can be tested in every strand including
     one or more than one TEKS at a time.
(B) evaluate the effectiveness of different representations to
                                                                                      I   PM
     communicate ideas
(15) The student uses logical reasoning to make conjectures and
     verify conclusions. The student is expected to:
(A) make conjectures from patterns or sets of examples and non-
     examples
     Including:
     •Defining a concept introduced at a higher grade                        IP   P   P   M
     •Showing a pattern, examples, and/or non-examples
     •Expecting students to choose a correct response by analyzing
     the pattern, examples, or non-examples
(B) validate his/her conclusions using mathematical properties and
     relationships
                                                                        I    P    P   P   M
     This student expectation can be tested in every strand including
     one or more than one TEKS at a time.

								
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