access to that specific part of the spectrum was a few years back reflected in Detailed Spectrum Investigations published by the European Radiocommunications Office

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access to that specific part of the spectrum was a few years back reflected in Detailed Spectrum Investigations published by the European Radiocommunications Office Powered By Docstoc
					To:
The PTT/National Regulatory Agency
In
Your country!




Concerning: Access for xxxx-ish radio amateurs to use frequencies around 70 MHz.


Referring to previous requests from our side we hereby add our detailed arguments for the possible future access
to the 70 MHz band.

Before WW II radio amateurs throughout Europe had access to the “traditional” HF bands up to the 28/29 MHz
band.
In the bands above the amateur radio service had access to the harmonic related bands.
VHF: 56 MHz, 112 MHz and 224 MHz.
UHF: 448 MHz, 900 MHz, etc.
(These bands differed from country to country)
Apart from the 112 MHz band radio amateurs in (parts of) Region 2 still have access to frequencies in, or close
to, these bands!

After WW II radio amateurs in Region 1 lost access to (most of) these bands but gained access to the 144 – 146
and 430 – 440 MHz bands.

Partly due to the “frequency gap” between 29,7 MHz and 144 MHz many European countries gained access to
the 50 MHz band throughout the last decade of the past century.

But the gap between 52 MHz and 144 MHz is percentage wise still the greatest gap between to amateur radio
bands!
This part of the frequency spectrum is at the same time the most interesting part of the frequency spectrum
regarding in propagation investigations in the F2 layer. Appearing in the 50 MHz band only around sunspot
maxima we expect this type of propagation to occur on 70 MHz as well though less frequent. It is therefore of
some importance to the amateur radio service to gain access to this part of the spectrum.

Interesting results investigating in propagations via the Ionosphere E-layer like sporadic-E, Auroral-E, Aurora
back-scatter and meteor scatter can be achieved on 70 MHz - as well as experiments with tropo scatter, FAI and
TEP will occur on a daily basis.

(Verify the latest status on countries and permissions on www.70mhz.org prior to writing the below paragraph)
The need for the Amateur Service to gain access to that specific part of the spectrum was a few years back
reflected in “Detailed Spectrum Investigations” published by the European Radiocommunications Office.
By now a number of countries in Region 1 have gained access to the 70 MHz band: Azores, Cyprus, Croatia,
Denmark, Eire, Faeroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greece, Luxembourg, Madeira, Monaco, Ireland, Portugal, Slovenia,
Somalia, South Africa and the United Kingdom plus several other Commonwealth countries. Furthermore have
the Swedish and Finnish national regulatory agencies each issued a license to an amateur radio beacon. In
addition radio amateurs in Greenland in Region 2 have also access to 70-70,5 MHz and Martinique is working
on it.

Referring to the attached IARU Region 1 bandplan the segment 70,0 – 70,3 MHz will primarily be used for
narrowband modes like CW, SSB, JT44, PSK 31, FSK 441 etc.
The segment 70,3 – 70,5 MHz is intended to be used for channellized traffic carrying analog as well as digital
signals 12,5 kHz spaced.
If only limited “channels” are available in the segment 70,0 – 70,5 MHz the lowest parts of the segment is
regarded as the most interesting to the amateur radio service and the 25 Watt mandatory for the land mobile
traffic is sufficient for initial trials.
Furthermore does the ERO for CEPT/ERC (CEPT/ECC today) in its “DSI II (Detailed Spectrum Investigation
29.7 – 960 MHz) from March 1995” pp. 114 -117 recommend to give at least 100kHz to the amateurs centered
around 70,2 MHz.

In the hope that this information can lead to an arrangement where the radio amateurs of xxx-land gain access to
the 70 MHz band at least for a trial period.

I send my best regards on behalf of “the Amateur Radio Society of XXX-land”.

                                                                     Society Representative.

				
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posted:9/14/2012
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