Employment Equity

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					       Employment Equity
         Annual Report
             2010
                  Prepared by:
Dana Gillett, Employment Equity & AODA Officer
          The Diversity & Equity Office
Table of Contents

Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

Workplace Analysis: Full Report.......................................................................................................................................................................... 5

Table 1 – Academic Representation of Designated Groups by Faculty ............................................................................................................. 14

Table 2 – Staff and Faculty Hires 2010 .............................................................................................................................................................. 15

Table 3 – Staff Promotions 2010 ........................................................................................................................................................................ 16

Table 4 – Staff and Faculty Departures 2010 ..................................................................................................................................................... 17

Appendix A - Update from the Employment Equity Office ............................................................................................................................... 18

Appendix B – Contacts ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 19

Appendix C – Employment Equity Occupational Groups Definition ............................................................................................................... 20
                                                            EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The 2010 Employment Equity Report is required as part of the Federal Contractors Program (FCP) and the Certificate of Commitment
signed by Wilfrid Laurier University1. Under the Program, Laurier is required to conduct a workforce analysis to determine the degree
of under-representation of designated group members (women, Aboriginal persons, visible minorities and persons with disabilities).
Laurier’s commitment to employment equity goes far beyond that of legislative compliance, demonstrated through our policies, our
collective agreements, our inclusive practices and through the creation of the Diversity & Equity Office. Although not required under
the Federal Contractors Program, as part of Laurier’s commitment, data on sexual minorities is also collected, analyzed and included
in this report. The purpose of employment equity is to ensure that all members of our community have access to positions and
opportunities for advancement and that job qualifications are assessed in relation to the requirements of the position. Employment
equity is about ensuring that all qualified candidates are considered, that the best candidate is hired and that those who are hired have
equitable access to opportunities for development and advancement.

Employment equity data is collected from employees on hard copy self-identification surveys; it is this information that makes up this
report (data on gender is taken from employment data). For the purpose of this report, the external labour pool is drawn from data
derived from the 2006 Canadian census and the Participation and Activity Limitation Survey. Laurier positions are classified using
Employment Equity Occupational Groups2 (EEOGs) which are established by Human Resource Skill Development Centre Canada
(HRSDC). Throughout this report, in order to protect confidentiality, data is suppressed for values less than five.

As Laurier’s self-identification survey data no longer met the required 80% response rate3, an awareness and mail-out campaign was
held through the months of March and April 2011 to solicit additional surveys. Also, on-boarding practices were reviewed to ensure
all new staff and faculty received the employment equity survey. The campaign caused a slight delay in publishing this report,
however was required as the successful campaign increased the overall response rate from 74.5% to 81% with a return rate4 of 87%
(6% of returned surveys were blank as employees chose not to participate in the survey).

Overall Finding:
Women
            As approved by the FCP, this year’s data for gender is now based on employment data and not on the employment equity
             self-identification surveys. As previous years used self-identification data only, the number of women on campus has
             significantly increased; this is due to the change in data source, and not necessary based on any other factors.
1
  If Laurier is found to be in non-compliance, it may lose the right to bid on or receive future Federal Government funding valued at $25,000 or more.
2
  See Appendix C for examples of each EEOG
3
  The response rate is the percentage of self-identification surveys that were returned completed compared to the total number of employees.
4
  The return rate is the percentage of self-identification surveys returned, whether complete or blank, compared to the total number of employees.
                                                                                                                                                         1
           Overall, the University is in very good standing when it comes to representation of women in the workforce with women
            making up 60.8% of the Laurier’s workforce. However, there is a higher representation of women (69.5%) amongst staff
            when compared to academics (44.8%). Although the overall gap analysis shows a gap of +32, the gap amongst professional
            teaching is -57.2. While this negative gap seems large, when compared to other universities across Canada, Laurier’s
            female professional teaching representation is higher than average5.
           Laurier’s efforts to recruit female faculty successfully led to 21 new hires (62% of new faculty recruitment) in 2010, 15
            female faculty also left Laurier in the same year. Laurier needs to do further analysis to better understand why female
            faculty are leaving the institution.
           71% of all promotions were women with almost all promotions occurring between EEOC 2 (Middle Managers) to EEOC 7
            (Admin. & Sr. Clerical).
           Consistent with other universities across Canada, when analyzing Laurier’s faculties, the highest concentrations of women
            are found in the faculties of Education, Social Work and the Library.

Persons belonging to an Aboriginal group:

           Aboriginal persons account for 1.7% of Laurier’s overall workforce which is a decrease of 0.5%. Very few aboriginal
            persons left Laurier in 2010, however the percentage of aboriginal persons hired last year was lower than previous years.
           Overall Laurier’s internal workforce includes more Aboriginal persons then the external available workforce with a gap of
            +7. The University continues to have under-representation in the area of professional teaching; however in 2010, the long
            standing gap in professional non-teaching was eliminated. Efforts continue to be made to attract Aboriginal persons to
            Laurier and retention rates in this designated group have remained high.
           In January 2011, Aboriginal Student Services Office was officially opened (although staff was hired in the summer of
            2010). The Office services the needs of aboriginal students and brings awareness to the greater Laurier community. In early
            2011, an Aboriginal Awareness Week was held on both the Brantford and Waterloo campuses.

Persons with Disabilities:

           A total of 7.2% of the University’s workforce considers themselves to be a person with disability; which is an increase of
            2% from 2009. Although 5 new hires consider themselves a person with a disability, 4 persons with disabilities also left the
            University. The overall increase is due to the increased self-identification survey responses.



5
 Results from a university study show the following female representation: UofT – 40%, Brock – 42%, Queen’s -36.4%, University of Manitoba – 42.8%,
University of Windsor – 30.1%, Memorial university of Newfoundland – 36.9%, University of Victoria – 41.8% and UWO – 30.1 with an overall average of
38.8%.
                                                                                                                                                       2
         Persons with disabilities do make up some of the promotions at Laurier however, as with previous years; the number is less
          than 5.
         As a whole, Laurier’s number of employees with disabilities is close to being reflective of the overall available pool for
          persons with disabilities; with a gap of only -8. However representation continues to be low in the semi-professionals and
          supervisors occupational groups.
         In anticipation of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act’s Integrated Accessible Regulation (Employment
          Standard), the University is reviewing its recruitment, selection, promotion, and assessment practices to ensure they are
          inclusive for persons with disabilities.


Persons Belonging to a Visible Minority:

         Although, 8.2 % of Laurier’s workforce identifies as being a member of a visual minority, the University continues to
          struggle with the representation in this designated group with a gap of -61. Specifically, areas of concern continue to be in
          the middle and other managers, professional non-teaching, and other sales and services categories.
         For the first time in recent years, the 2010 data reveals a gap of -16 in professional teaching. As there were very few
          professional teaching staff, who identified as a visible minority, left Laurier this number may be due to the increased
          faculty self-identification return rate and not an actual change in the internal workforce make up.
         It should be noted that the accessibility pool for visible minorities increased in most occupations with the 2006 Census of
          Canada. With the 2011 Census being released sometime next year, we can expect this designated groups’ accessibility
          pool to increase, further leaving Laurier with an even bigger gap. Although Laurier hired 13 persons who identify as a
          visible minority, 8 people also left the University. Laurier had increased its recruitment efforts towards this segment of the
          population by partnering with the Waterloo Regional Immigration and Employment Network (WRIEN); however
          continued efforts must be made to attract qualified candidates who identify as visible minorities.

Persons Belonging to a Sexual and/or Gender Minority:

         As the sexual minorities are not considered a designated group under the FCP and data on sexual minorities is not included
          in the 2006 Canadian Census, it is difficult to compare the internal and external workforces. Data from a 2003 and 2005
          Canadian Community Health Survey estimates that 1.9% of adults between the ages of 18-59 identify as being gay, lesbian
          and bisexual. However these three categories do not encompass all people who would consider themselves a “sexual
          minority”. Also, it has been argued the Canadian climate has changed since 2005 and perhaps more people would be
          comfortable identifying as sexual minorities today then did 6 years ago.


                                                                                                                                      3
   Persons who identify as sexual minorities make up 2.7% of Laurier’s workforce with 4.9% of academic identifying with
    this segment. The number of sexual minorities has risen from 32 people in 2009 to 44 people in 2010, although the overall
    percentage of sexual minorities has dropped slightly compared to 3% in 2009.
   In 2010, more than 5 people identifying as sexual minorities were hired, almost exclusively in professional teaching
    positions, and no people identifying as sexual minorities left Laurier.
   Laurier continues to work with various community partners and other institutions to ensure that Laurier is a welcoming
    place for all people, including people identifying as sexual minorities.




                                                                                                                           4
Workforce Analysis: Full Report

Overview of requirements and methodology

Like most universities across Canada, Laurier’s formal commitment to employment equity started when it became a signatory to the
Federal Contractors program (FCP). The FCP was initiated in 1986 and applies to provincially regulated employers with a workforce
in Canada of 100 or more employees who receive federal government goods or services contracts of $200,000 or more. By signing a
Certificate of Commitment, Laurier agreed to carryout and keep an employment equity program. An employment equity program
must include the following6:
    1. Adopt accountability mechanisms for employment equity and assign a senior official.
    2. Communicate to employees regarding employment equity.
    3. Consult and collaborate with bargaining agents and/or employee representatives.
    4. Collect workforce information.
    5. Complete a workforce analysis.
    6. Complete an employment systems review.
    7. Establish short-term and long-term goals.
    8. Adopt measures to remove barriers.
    9. Adopt special measures, positive policies and practices and reasonable accommodation measures.
    10. Adopt monitoring procedures.
    11. Make reasonable efforts and achieve reasonable progress.
    12. Review and revise the employment equity plan.

These 12 requirements specify a number of ongoing activities in addition to the need to keep files that provide evidence of completion.
Employers who do not fulfill the requirements will be found in non-compliance with the FCP and may be placed on the List of
Ineligible
Contractors and be subject to sanctions.

This workforce analysis is meant to determine the degree of under-representation of designated group members (women, Aboriginal
persons, visible minorities and persons with disabilities) within Laurier’s workforce. According to Human Resources and Skill

6
 Human Resources Development Canada. Federal Contractors Requirement. HRSDC Labour Program
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/labour/equality/fcp/pdf/requirements.pdf

                                                                                                                                     5
Development Canada (HRSDC), a workforce analysis is essentially a comparison of two separate labour force data sets. Employers
are asked to compare their internal representation of designated group members to the representation of the designated group members
in the external labour pool.
Collection of Workforce Data:

In this report, data for the external labour pool is taken from the 2006 Canadian Census, as this is the most recent census data. This
external data is broken down using 14 Employment Equity Occupational Groups (EEOG) which is established by Human Resources
and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). In both the staff and faculty analysis, the external representation rates of persons with
disabilities are drawn from the Participation and Activity Limitation Survey which is a post-censal survey conducted by Statistics
Canada. This survey collects information about persons whose everyday activities are in some way limited by a health-related
condition of problem. Throughout this report, in order to protect confidentiality, data is suppressed for values less than three. EEOG
01 Upper Level Managers and EEOG 03 Professional Teaching are compared to national data, whereas all other EEOGs are compared
to local Kitchener Census data, unless otherwise labeled.

As required by the FCP, employment equity data is collected directly from the employee. Laurier provides a hard-copy employment
equity survey (also known as a self-identification survey) to all new employees. As individual circumstances can change over an
employment relationship, employees are able to request an additional survey at any point in time. The survey results are only
accessible to the Employment Equity & AODA Officer and are kept in a secure database. Data on gender is collected using
employment data and not the data collected in the employment equity survey. This approach has been suggested by the FCP as it best
ascertains the true number of women in the workforce. This is the first year Laurier uses employment data, therefore the appearance of
more women in the workforce can be attributed to this change.

As Laurier’s employment equity data no longer met the required 80% response rate7, an awareness and mail-out campaign was held
through the months of March and April to solicit additional surveys. Also, on-boarding practices were reviewed to ensure all new
employees were informed of the importance of the employment equity survey. The campaign was successful with the overall response
rate going from 74.5% to 81% with a return rate8 of 87% (6% of returned surveys were blank as employees chose not to participate in
the survey).

It is important to note that the FCP requires that all internal representation rates of designated groups are calculated assuming that all
non-respondents do not belong to any of the designated groups. Therefore, the actual representation at Laurier may be much higher
than is represented in this report. It is important to encourage employees to fill out the report as much as possible.



7
    The response rate is the percentage of self-identification surveys that were returned completed compared to the total number of employees.
8
    The return rate is the percentage of self-identification surveys returned, whether complete or blank, compared to the total number of employees.
                                                                                                                                                       6
Conducting the Workforce Analysis and Overall Findings

As part of the required workforce analysis, Laurier must complete the following components:
    analyze internal representation data retrieved through the workforce survey by comparing this data with appropriate external
       availability data
    analyze the concentration of the four designated groups in occupational groups by comparing their distribution with employees
       who are not members of designated groups
    analyze the salary levels of the four designated groups by comparing them with those of all employees who are not members of
       designated groups at the same Employment Equity Occupational Group (EEOG) level
    analyze the shares of hires, promotions and terminations received by designated group members in comparison to employees
       who are not members of designated groups
    prepare a narrative summary of the results of all analyses

Much of the required analysis listed above starts by first determining the internal representation rate of designated group members.
This internal representation rate is then compared to the expected external representation rate to find the representation gap. The
representation gap indicates the difference between the representation of designated group members at Laurier and their representation
in the external labour market. As indicated by the FCP, occupational groups with a gap number of -3 or greater have been identified as
having an under-representation.

The following are 3 summary tables that present data on the overall internal representation rates for designated groups (and sexual
minorities) broken down by employee group and the gap analysis based on EEOGs. Additional data can be found in Table 1 –
Academic Designated Group Representation by Faculty, Table 2 - Staff and Faculty Hires 2010, Table 3 – Staff Promotions 2010, and
Table 4 – Staff and Faculty Departures 2010.




                                                                                                                                     7
2010 Summary of Internal Representation Rates for Designated Groups (broken down by employee group)

Employment Categories    Total    Completed Surveys       Women       Aboriginal Persons Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities Sexual Minorities
                                      #        %        #      %        #           %        #        %          #            %          #        %
    Total Academic        569       429      75%      255    44.8%      6         1.1%      **      11.1%        **         4.6%         **     4.9%
        Faculty           550       412      75%      239    43.5%      6         1.1%      62      10.9%       24          5.6%        27      4.9%
       Librarian           19        17      89%       16    84.2%      0         0.0%      **      5.3%         **         10.5%        **     5.3%

      Total Staff         1046       882       84%    727     69.5%     **        2.3%       **     7.0%         46          8.1%       **        1.6%
        WLUSU              533       467       88%    410     76.9%     10        1.8%       56     9.8%         25          4.4%       11        2.1%
         CUPE              115        92       80%     43     37.4%     **        0.7%        5     0.9%          7          1.2%        0        0.0%
        UFCW               117        69       59%    100     85.5%     **        0.5%       **     0.5%          7          1.2%       **        1.7%
      Professional         179       169       94%    111     62.0%     **        0.5%        7     1.2%         **          0.7%       **        0.2%
       Brantford            96        79       82%     60     62.5%      5        0.9%       **     1.0%         **          0.5%       **        0.2%
         Other               6         6      100%      3     50.0%      0        0.0%       **     16.7%         0          0.0%        0        0.0%

    Total Workforce        1615        1311     81%     982   60.8%          28   1.7%        133    8.2%             116    7.2%            44   2.7%
* indicates less than 5 responses
NOTE: As required by the FCP, all percentages are calculated based on total employees and not on completed survey. The assumption is that all
non-respondents do not belong to any of the designated groups. The actual representation of designated groups may be much higher than indicated
in this analysis.




                                                                                                                                                  8
Workforce Analysis: Gap Analysis (1 of 2)

                                                                            Women                                          Aboriginal Persons
        Occupational Groups             WLU CCT               WLU                AP                 GAP             WLU                 AP                     GAP
                                                         #           %        #         %             #          #       %         #         %                   #
       Senior Managers (1)                   8           **          **       2      24.3%           0.1         0      0%         0       2.5%                -0.2
   Middle & Other Managers (2)              138          84         61%       54     39.2%          29.9         **      **        3       2.0%                -1.8
  Professional Non-Teaching (3)             151          84         56%       81     53.7%           2.9         **      **        2       1.1%                 0.3
    Professional Teaching (3)               566         253         45%      310     54.8%          -57.2        6      1%         11      1.9%                -4.8
  Semi-Professional & Tech. (4)             109          62         57%       57     52.6%           4.7         **      **        1       0.8%                 2.1
          Supervisors (5)                   31           22         71%       20     64.2%           2.1         **      **        0       0.7%                 0.8
 Supervisors: Crafts & Trades (6)          N/A           0          0%        0      16.2%           N/A         0      0%         0       0.6%                N/A
   Admin. & Senior Clerical (7)             156         141         90%      129     82.7%          12.0         7      4%         1       0.9%                 5.6
     Skill Sales & Service (8)               5           **          **       2      44.7%           -0.2        0      0%         0       0.7%                 0.0
    Skilled Crafts & Trades (9)             24           **          **       1       5.3%           -0.3        0      0%         0       1.3%                -0.3
      Clerical Personnel (10)               198         170         86%      145     73.2%          25.1         **      **        2       0.9%                 2.2
Intermediate Sales & Service (11)            4           **          **       3      68.6%           -0.7        0      0%         0       1.1%                 0.0
Semi-Skilled Manual Workers (12)             2           0          0%        1      26.2%           -0.5        0      0%         0       1.6%                 0.0
    Other Sales & Service (13)              215         141         66%      126     58.4%          15.4         6      3%         3       1.5%                 2.8
    Other Manual Workers (14)                8           **          **       3      33.3%           -1.7        0      0%         0       1.5%                -0.1
            Grand Total                    1615               965                933                  32             30                 23                       7

Sources: 2006 Census of Canada and 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS)
Occupational Groups based on Employment Equity Occupational Groups (EEOG)
Senior Management and Professional Teaching reflect the national external labour market; all other categories are based on the Kitchener Census Metropolitan
Area statistics
**Number is less than 5 and is suppressed to honour confidentiality.




                                                                                                                                                               9
Workforce Analysis: Gap Analysis (2 of 2)


                                        WLU                Persons with Disabilities                          Visible Minorities              Sexual Minorities
        Occupational Groups             CCT             WLU               AP           GAP             WLU                AP          GAP          WLU
                                                   #          %       #         %       #          #         %         #        %       #       #         %
       Senior Managers (1)                8        0         0%       0       3.2%      0         **         **        1      7.5%      0       0        0%
   Middle & Other Managers (2)           138       **         **      4       3.2%      -1        **         **       17     12.1%     -13      **       1%
  Professional Non-Teaching (3)          151       8         5%       8       5.0%      0         16      10.6%       31     20.3%     -15      **       2%
    Professional Teaching (3)            566       25        4%       25      4.5%      0         64      11.3%       80     14.2%     -16      28       5%
  Semi-Professional & Tech. (4)          109       **         **      6       5.1%      -4        12      11.0%       11     10.0%      1       **       3%
          Supervisors (5)                31        **         **      4      12.1%      -2        **         **        2      7.9%      0       **       6%
 Supervisors: Crafts & Trades (6)       N/A        0         0%      N/A       N/A     N/A         0       0.0%      N/A      4.7%    N/A       0        0%
   Admin. & Senior Clerical (7)          156       6         4%      N/A       N/A     N/A        10       6.4%       10      6.5%      0       **       2%
     Skill Sales & Service (8)            5        **         **      0       6.8%      1          0       0.0%        0      9.6%      0       0        0%
    Skilled Crafts & Trades (9)          24        **         **      1       5.4%      1         **         **        2      8.5%      -1      0        0%
      Clerical Personnel (10)            198       11        6%       9       4.5%      2         18       9.1%       18      9.2%      0       **       2%
Intermediate Sales & Service (11)         4        0         0%       0       6.0%      0          0       0.0%        0      9.2%      0       0        0%
Semi-Skilled Manual Workers (12)          2        0         0%       0       6.1%      0          0       0.0%        0     13.4%      0       0        0%
    Other Sales & Service (13)           215       11        5%       15      7.0%      -4         9       4.2%       24     11.3%     -15      **       0%
    Other Manual Workers (14)             8        0         0%       0       3.9%      0          0       0.0%        1     11.3%      -1      0        0%
            Grand Total                 1615             71               73            -8             137               198           -61           44
Sources: 2006 Census of Canada and 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS)
Occupational Groups based on Employment Equity Occupational Group (EEOG)
Senior Management and Professional Teaching reflect the national external labour market; AP for Persons with Disabilities EEOC 04-14 based on Ontario data
as Kitchener Census Metropolitan Area statistics not available.
**Number is less than 5 and is suppressed to honour confidentiality.



Overall Findings:

Women

       As approved by the FCP, this year’s data for gender is now based on employment data and not on the employment equity self-
        identification surveys. As previous years used self-identification data only, the number of women on campus has significantly
        increased; this is due to the change in data source, and not necessary based on any other factors.

                                                                                                                                                         10
       Overall, the University is in very good standing when it comes to representation of women in the workforce with women
        making up 60.8% of the Laurier’s workforce. However, there is a higher representation of women (69.5%) amongst staff when
        compared to academics (44.8%). Although the overall gap analysis shows a gap of +32, the gap amongst professional teaching
        is -57.2. While this negative gap seems large, when compared to other universities across Canada, Laurier’s female
        professional teaching representation is higher than average9.
       Laurier’s efforts to recruit female faculty successfully led to 21 new hires (62% of new faculty recruitment) in 2010, 15 female
        faculty also left Laurier in the same year. Laurier needs to do further analysis to better understand why female faculty are
        leaving the institution.
       71% of all promotions where women with almost all promotions occurring between EEOC 2 (Middle Managers) to EEOC 7
        (Admin. & Sr. Clerical).
       Consistent with other universities across Canada, when analyzing Laurier’s faculties, the highest concentrations of women are
        found in the faculties of Education, Social Work and the Library.

Persons belonging to an Aboriginal group:

       Aboriginal persons account for 1.7% of Laurier’s overall workforce, which is a decrease of 0.5%. Very few aboriginal persons
        left Laurier in 2010, however the percentage of aboriginal persons hired last year was lower than previous years.
       Overall Laurier’s internal workforce includes more Aboriginal persons then the external available workforce with a gap of +7.
        The University continues to have under-representation in the area of professional teaching; however in 2010 the long-standing
        gap in professional non-teaching was eliminated. Efforts continue to be made to attract Aboriginal persons to Laurier and
        retention rates in this designated group have remained high.
       In January 2011, Aboriginal Student Services Office was officially opened (although staff was hired in the summer of 2010).
        The Office services the needs of aboriginal students and brings awareness to the greater Laurier community. In early 2011 an
        Aboriginal Awareness Week was held on both the Brantford and Waterloo campuses.

Persons with Disabilities:

       A total of 7.2% of the university’s workforce identify as a person with disability; which is an increase of 2% from 2009.
        Although 5 new hires consider themselves a person with a disability, 4 persons with disabilities also left the university. The
        overall increase is due to the increased self-identification survey responses.



9
 Results from a university study show the following female representation: UofT – 40%, Brock – 42%, Queen’s -36.4%, University of Manitoba – 42.8%,
University of Windsor – 30.1%, Memorial university of Newfoundland – 36.9%, University of Victoria – 41.8% and UWO – 30.1 with an overall average of
38.8%.
                                                                                                                                                       11
      Persons with disabilities do make up some of the promotions at Laurier however, as with previous years; the number is less
       than 5.
      As a whole, Laurier’s number of employees with disabilities is close to being reflective of the overall available pool for
       persons with disabilities; with a gap of only -8. However representation continues to be low in the semi-professionals and
       supervisors occupational groups.
      In anticipation of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act’s Integrated Accessible Regulation (Employment
       Standard), the University is reviewing its recruitment, selection, promotion, and assessment practices to ensure they are
       inclusive for persons with disabilities.

Persons Belonging to a Visible Minority:

      Although, 8.2 % of Laurier’s workforce identifies as being a member of a visual minority, the university continues to struggle
       with the representation in this designated group with a gap of -61. Specifically, areas of concern continue to be in the middle
       and other managers, professional non-teaching, and other sales and services categories.
      For the first time in recent years, the 2010 data reveals a gap of -16 in professional teaching. As there were very few
       professional teaching staff that, identified as a visible minority, left Laurier, this number may be due to the increased faculty
       self-identification return rate and not an actual change in the internal workforce make up.
      It should be noted that the accessibility pool for visible minorities increased in most occupations with the 2006 Census of
       Canada. With the 2011 Census being released sometime next year, we can expect this designated groups’ accessibility pool to
       increase, further leaving Laurier with an even bigger gap. Although Laurier hired 13 persons who identify as a visible
       minority; 8 people also left the university. Laurier had increased its recruitment efforts towards this segment of the population
       by partnering with the Waterloo Regional Immigration and Employment Network (WRIEN); however continued efforts must
       be made to attract qualified candidates who identify as visible minorities.

Persons Belonging to a Sexual and/or Gender Minority:

      As the sexual minorities are not considered a designated group under the FCP and data on sexual minorities is not included in
       the 2006 Canadian Census, it is difficult to compare the internal and external workforces. Data from a 2003 and 2005 Canadian
       Community Health Survey estimates that 1.9% of adults between the ages of 18-59 identify as being gay, lesbian and bisexual.
       However these three categories do not encompass all people who would consider themselves a “sexual minority”. Also, it has
       been argued the Canadian climate has changed since 2005 and perhaps more people would be comfortable identifying as
       sexual minorities today then did 6 years ago.
      Persons who identify as sexual minorities make up 2.7% of Laurier’s workforce with 4.9% of academic identifying with this
       segment. The number of sexual minorities has risen from 32 people in 2009 to 44 people in 2010; although the overall
       percentage of sexual minorities has dropped slightly compared to 3% in 2009.
                                                                                                                                     12
      In 2010, more than 5 people identifying as sexual minorities were hired, almost exclusively in professional teaching positions,
       and no people identifying as sexual minorities left Laurier.
      Laurier continues to work with various community partners and other institutions to ensure that Laurier is a welcoming place
       for all people, including people identifying as sexual minorities.

Overall, Laurier is attracting and retaining many members of the various designated groups. Increasing the response rate from the self-
identification survey, re-establishing the University Employment Equity Advisory Committee and University Association Bilateral
Employment Equity Advisory Committee, continued or increase recruitment efforts in the areas that demonstrated gaps, and further
investigation as to why gaps exist will be Laurier’s ongoing employment equity priorities in the upcoming year.




                                                                                                                                    13
Table 1 - Academic Representation of Designated Groups by Faculty




Note: Data for Aboriginal persons and sexual minorities has not been included as the data was too small to protect the confidentiality
of respondents


                                                                                                                                     14
                                                            STAFF & FACULTY HIRES 2010

                                                                             #
                                                                                                    # Persons w
                           Census                                        Aboriginal                                           # Visible                  # Sexual
                                                  # Female                                          Disabilities
                        Complete Total                                    Persons                                             Minorities                 Minority
OCCUPATIONAL                                                                                                             %                                                   %
                                                                   %                          %                                                    %
   GROUPS

                         2007

                                2008

                                       2010

                                              2007

                                                     2008

                                                            2010




                                                                         2007

                                                                                2008
                                                                                       2010



                                                                                                    2007

                                                                                                           2008
                                                                                                                  2010



                                                                                                                              2007
                                                                                                                                     2008
                                                                                                                                            2010



                                                                                                                                                        2007

                                                                                                                                                               2008
                                                                                                                                                                      2010
    Upper Level
                         0      0      0      0      0       0     50    0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
    Managers 01
Middle Managers 02      10      3      12     0      **      6     79    0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    ** ** **             **   0      0      0      0
 Prof. Non-teaching
                        11      11     19     7      7      15     46    0      0      **     **    **     **     0      0    ** ** **             **   0      0      0      0
         03
 Prof. Teaching 03      19      26     46     13     13     21     62    **     **     0      0     **     ** **         **   **     6      **     **   **     **     5      11

Semi-Prof. Skill B 04    7      9      16     **     **     10     100   0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    0      ** **         0    0      0      0      0
 Supervisors CS&S
                         0      0      **     0      0      **     **    0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
         05
Supervisors Trade &
                         0      1      0      0      0       0     80    0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
      Prim 06
   Admin. & Sr.
                         8      3      15     **     **     12     0     **     0      **     **     0     0      0      0    0      ** **         0    0      0      0      0
     Clerical 07
 Sales & Service B
                         0      0      0      0      0       0     0     0      0      0      0.0    0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
         08
Skilled Crafts & Tr.
                         0      0      **     0      0       0     89    0      0      0      0.0    0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
         09
     Clerical 10        10      13     19     8      7      17     50    **     0      0      0     **     0      **     **   0      ** **         **   **     0      **     **

Sales & Service C 11     0      0      **     0      0      **     **    0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0

 Semi-Skilled C 12       0      0      0      0      0       0     75    0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0

Sales & Service D 13    15      7      28     10     **     21     0     0      0      **     **     0     0      **     **          ** **         **   0      0      0      0

    Manual D 14          0      0      0      0      0       0     50    0      0      0      0      0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0

       Total            80      73     160    54     40     102    64    **     **     5      3     **     **     5      3    6      15 13         8    **     ** **         4
                                                                                                                                                                                  15
Table 2 - Staff and Faculty Hires 2010

                                         STAFF PROMOTIONS 2010




Table 3 – Staff Promotions 2010
                                                                 16
                                                                                                      # Persons
                                                                                #
                                                                                                          w
                               Census                                       Aboriginal                                          # Visible                 # Sexual
                                                   # Female                                           Disabilitie
                            Complete Total                                   Persons                                            Minorities                Minorities
                                                                                                          s
    OCCUPATIONAL                               STAFF & FACULTY EMPLOYMENT DEPARTURES 2010
                                                                                   %                                                                                           %
                                                                       %                         %                                                   %
       GROUPS




                             2007

                                    2008

                                           2010

                                                  2007

                                                         2008

                                                                2010



                                                                            2007

                                                                                   2008
                                                                                          2010




                                                                                                      2007
                                                                                                             2008
                                                                                                                    2010



                                                                                                                                2007
                                                                                                                                       2008
                                                                                                                                              2010



                                                                                                                                                          2007

                                                                                                                                                                 2008
                                                                                                                                                                        2010
        Upper Level
                             0      0      **     0      0      **     **   0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
        Managers 01
    Middle Managers 02      **      **     11     **     **     5      45   0      0      0      0    0      **     0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
     Prof. Non-teaching
                            **      **     7      **     **     5      71   0      0      0      0    **     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
             03
     Prof. Teaching 03      *Faculty Movement in rank is not considered promotion

    Semi-Prof. Skill B 04   **      0      **     **     0      **     **   0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
     Supervisors CS&S
                            **      **     **     0      0      **     **   0      0      0      0    0      **     0      0    0      0      0      0    0      **     0      0
             05
    Supervisors Trade &
                             0      0      0      0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
          Prim 06
       Admin. & Sr.
                            14      **     13     13     **     12     92   **     0      **     0    0      0      **     **   0      0      **     **   0      0      **     **
         Clerical 07
     Sales & Service B
                             1      0      0      **     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    **     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
             08
    Skilled Crafts & Tr.
                             0      0      **     0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0
             09
         Clerical 10        **      0      0      **     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    **     0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0

    Sales & Service C 11     0      0      0      0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0

     Semi-Skilled C 12       0      0      0      0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0

    Sales & Service D 13     0      0      **     0      0      **     **   0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0

        Manual D 14

           Total            27      14     38     19     8      27     71   **     0      **     **   ** ** **             **   0      0      **     **   **     0      0      **
Table 4 – Staff and Faculty Departures 2010


                                                                                                                                                                                    17
                                                                               #
                              Census                                                                 # Persons w               # Visible                   # Sexual
                                                  # Female                 Aboriginal
                           Complete Total                                                            Disabilities              Minorities                  Minorities
                                                                            Persons
    OCCUPATIONAL                                                                                                          %                                                     %
                                                                      %                         %                                                   %
       GROUPS




                            2007

                                   2008

                                          2010

                                                 2007

                                                        2008

                                                               2010



                                                                           2007

                                                                                  2008
                                                                                         2010



                                                                                                     2007

                                                                                                            2008
                                                                                                                   2010



                                                                                                                               2007
                                                                                                                                      2008
                                                                                                                                             2010



                                                                                                                                                           2007

                                                                                                                                                                  2008
                                                                                                                                                                         2010
       Upper Level
                            0      **     **     0      0      0      0    0      **     0      0     0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0      0
       Managers 01
    Middle Managers 02     **      **     6      **     **     5      83   **     0      0      0     0     0      **     **   0      0      0      0.0    0      **     0      0
    Prof. Non-teaching
                            8      10     10     **     7      7      70   **     **     0      0     0     0      0      0    0      ** ** 50.0           0      **     0      0
            03
     Prof. Teaching 03     30      19     28     14     8      15     54   16     9      0      0    **     0      0      0    **     0      **     0.0    **     **     0      0
   Semi-Prof. Skill B 04   **      **     8      0      **     **     **   **     ** **         **    0     0      0      0    0      0      **     0.0    0      0      0      0
     Supervisors CS&S                                                                                                                                                           0
                            0      0      **     0      0      **     **   0      0      0      0     0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0
             05
    Supervisors Trade &                                                                                                                                                         0
                            0      **     0      0      0      0      0    0      **     0      0     0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0
          Prim 06
       Admin. & Sr.                                                                                                                                                             0
                           **      6      6      **     6      **     **   0      0      **     **    0     **     0      0    0      ** ** 25.0           0      0      0
         Clerical 07
     Sales & Service B                                                                                                                                                          0
                            0      0      0      0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0     0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0
             08
    Skilled Crafts & Tr.                                                                                                                                                        0
                            0      0      **     0      0      0      **   0      0      0      0     0     0      **     **   0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0
             09
        Clerical 10        **      8      18     **     **     15     83   0      **     0      0     0     0      0      0    ** **         0      25.0   0      0      0      0

   Sales & Service C 11     0      0      **     0      0      **     **   0      0      0      0     0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0      0

     Semi-Skilled C 12      0      0      0      0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0     0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0      0

   Sales & Service D 13    10      8      24     9      **     15     63   **     **     0      0     0     0      **     **   0      0      **     0.0    **     0      0      0

       Manual D 14          0      **     0      0      0      0      0    0      0      0      0     0     0      0      0    0      0      0      0.0    0      0      0      0

           Total           61      62     110    37     34     70     64   **     1      **     **   **     **     4      4    ** **         8       7     **     6      0      0


Appendix A

                                                 Update from the Diversity & Equity Office
                                                                                                                                                                                    18
Starting in May 2010, the Office for Student Diversity was broadened to service the needs of staff, faculty and students. As part of the
new mandate, the Diversity & Equity Office was created which includes the Employment Equity & AODA Officer. In addition to
ensuring compliance with the FCP, the Employment Equity Office is working with senior academic administrators to clarify
employment equity throughout the faculty hiring and promotions process, with HR to examine employment equity outreach
opportunities, management training and policy development, and with the community to increase the visibility of Laurier as an
equitable employer in the community.


Laurier has two committees that focus on Employment Equity, the University Employment Equity Advisory Committee (UEEAC),
which is comprised of representatives from all employee groups, including student groups, across both campuses. The second
committee is a bilateral committee, which replaces the former Joint University Employment Equity Advisory Committee (JUEEAC).
This committee comprised of three (3) representatives from WLUFA and three (3) representatives from the University. Because of
staff turn-over, these committees have not met over the last couple of years; however, the committees are being re-established and will
meet regularly starting in August 2011.




                                                                                                                                     19
APPENDIX B

                                                         Contacts



Employment Equity & AODA Officer                                    Dana Gillett         dgillett@wlu.ca   4469



                                                                    Niru Philip          nphilip@wlu.ca    3765
                                      WLUSA Representatives
                                                                    Marybeth Phillips    mphillip@wlu.ca   3086
                                      CUPE Representative           Gary Bott             gbott@wlu.ca
University Employment Equity Advisory UFCW Representative           Vacant                                 2878
Committee (UEEAC)                     Management Representative     Melanie Will          mwill@wlu.ca     2254
                                      Administration
                                                                    TBD
                                      Representative
                                                                    TBD
                                      Members at Large
                                                                    Melodee Martinuk    mmartinu@wlu.ca    3067

                                                                    Laura McDonald      lmacdona@wlu.ca    2815
                                                                    Mercedes
                                       WLUFA Representatives                            mrowinsky@wlu.ca   2835
Bilateral University-Association                                    Rowinsky
Employment Equity Advisory                                          Kate Rossiter       krossiter@wlu.ca
Committee                                                           Ginny Dybenko       dybenko@wlu.ca     3082
                                       Administration
                                                                    Jim Butler           jbutler@wlu.ca    2248
                                       Representatives
                                                                    Heather Bouillon    hbouillon@wlu.ca   5795




                                                                                                                  20
APPENDIX C

                                               Employment Equity Occupational Groups Definitions


1. Senior Managers
Employees holding the most senior positions in large firms or corporations. They are responsible for the corporation's policy and
strategic planning, and for directing and controlling the functions of the organisation.
Examples: President, chief executive officer, vice-presidents, chief operating officer, senior government officials, general managers and divisional heads, and
directors who have several middle managers reporting to them or are responsible for the direction of a critical technical function .

2. Middle and Other Managers
Middle and other managers receive instructions from senior managers and administer the organisation's policy and operations through
subordinate managers or supervisors. Senior managers, middle and other managers comprise all managers.
Examples: Managers of transport operations, communications, finances, human resources, sales, advertising, purchasing, production, marketing, research and
development, information systems, maintenance; commissioned police officers, commissioned officers in the armed forces.

3. Professionals
Professionals usually need either university graduation or prolonged formal training and often have to be members of a professional
organization.
Examples: Engineers (civil, mechanical, electrical, petroleum, nuclear, aerospace), chemists, biologists, architects, economists, lawyers, teachers, doctors,
accountants, computer programmers, registered nurses, physiotherapists, ministers of religion.

4. Semi-Professionals and Technicians
Workers in these occupations have to possess knowledge equivalent to about two years of post-secondary education, offered in many
technical institutions and community colleges, and often have further specialized on-the-job training. They may have highly developed
technical and/or artistic skills.
Examples: Technologists and technicians (broadcast, forestry, biological, electronic, meteorological, geological, surveying, drafting and design, engineering,
library, medical, dental), specialized inspectors and testers (public and environmental health, occupational health and safety, engineering, industrial instruments),
dental hygienists, midwives, ambulance attendants, paralegal workers, graphic designers and illustrating artists, announcers and other broadcasters, coaches.

5. Supervisors
Non-management first-line coordinators of white-collar (administrative, clerical, sales, and service) workers. Supervisors may, but do
not usually, perform any of the duties of the employees under their supervision.
Examples: Supervisors of administrative and clerical workers such as general office clerks, secretaries, word processing operators, receptionists, and
switchboard operators, computer operators, accounting clerks, letter carriers, tellers; supervisors of sales workers such as airline sales agents, service station
attendants, grocery clerks and shelf stockers, cashiers; and supervisors of service workers such as food and beverage workers, canteen workers, hotel
housekeeping, and cleaning workers, dry cleaning and laundry workers, janitors, grounds people, tour guides, parking lot attendants.
                                                                                                                                                               21
6. Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
Non-management first-line coordinators of workers in manufacturing, processing, trades, and primary industry occupations. They
supervise skilled crafts and trades workers, semi-skilled manual workers and/or other manual workers. Supervisors may, but do not
usually, perform any of the duties of the employees under their supervision.
Examples: Supervisors of workers in manufacturing (motor vehicle assembling, electronics, electrical, furniture, fabric, etc.), processing (mineral and metal,
chemical, food & beverage, plastic and rubber, textiles, etc.), trades (carpentry, mechanical, heavy construction equipment, printing, etc.), and primary industry
(forestry, logging, mining and quarrying, oil and gas, agriculture and farms, etc.).

7. Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel
Workers in these occupations carry out and coordinate administrative procedures and administrative services primarily in an office
environment, or perform clerical work of a senior nature.
Examples: Administrative officers; executive assistants; personnel and recruitment officers; loan officers; insurance adjusters; secretaries; legal secretaries;
medical secretaries; court recorders; property administrators.

8. Skilled Sales and Service Personnel
Highly skilled workers engaged wholly or primarily in selling or in providing personal service. These workers have a thorough and
comprehensive knowledge of the processes involved in their work and usually have received an extensive period of training involving
some post-secondary education, part or all of an apprenticeship, or the equivalent on-the-job training and work experience.
Examples: Sales: insurance agents and brokers, real estate agents, retail and wholesale buyers, technical sales specialists. Service: police officers, firefighters,
chefs, cooks, butchers, bakers, funeral directors and embalmers.

9. Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers
Manual workers of a high skill level, having a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of the processes involved in their work. They
are frequently journeymen and journeywomen who have received an extensive period of training.
Examples: Sheet metal workers, plumbers, electricians, tool and die makers, carpenters, glaziers, welders, telecommunications line and cable, installation and
repair technicians; mechanics (heavy duty, refrigeration, aircraft, elevator, motor vehicle), tailors, jewellers, oil and gas well drillers, fishing masters and officers,
paper making control operators.




                                                                                                                                                                      22
10. Clerical Personnel
Workers performing clerical work, other than senior clerical work.
Examples: General office and other clerks (data entry, records and file, accounting, payroll, administrative, personnel, library, purchasing, storekeepers and
parts, mail and postal, insurance clerks, customer service, statistics, purchasing and inventory clerks); typists and word processing operators; receptionists and
switchboard operators; computer operators; typesetters; dispatchers and radio operators; couriers and messengers; letter carriers; tellers.

11. Intermediate Sales and Service Personnel
Workers engaged wholly or primarily in selling or in providing personal service who perform duties that may require from a few
months up to two years of on-the-job training, training courses, or specific work experience. Generally, these are workers whose skill
level is less than that of skilled sales and service, but greater than that of elementary sales and service workers.
Examples: Sales: airline sales agents, non-technical wholesale sales representatives, retail salespersons. Service: dental assistants, nurses aides and orderlies,
tour and travel guides, hotel front desk clerks, correctional service officers, sheriffs and bailiffs, bartenders, nannies, aestheticians, pet groomers.

12. Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
Manual workers who perform duties that usually require a few months of specific vocational on-the-job training. Generally, these are
workers whose skill level is less than that of skilled crafts and trades workers, but greater than that of elementary manual workers.
Examples: Truck drivers, railway yard workers, longshore workers, material handlers, foundry workers, machine operators (plastics processing, chemical plant,
sawmill, textile, pulp mill, tobacco, welding), workers assembling, inspecting or testing products (motor vehicles, boats, electrical motors, furniture).

13. Other Sales and Service Personnel
Workers in sales and service jobs which generally require only a few days or no on-the-job training. The duties are elementary, and
require little or no independent judgement.
Examples: Sales: service station attendants, grocery clerks and shelf stockers, cashiers. Service: security guards, janitors, kitchen and food service helpers, dry
cleaning and laundry occupations, attendants in recreation and sport.

14. Other Manual Workers
Workers in blue collar jobs which generally require only a few days or no on-the-job training or a short demonstration. The duties are
manual, elementary, and require little or no independent judgement.
Examples: Helpers and labourers in construction and other trades (plumber assistants, carpenter helpers, refrigeration mechanic helpers, surveyor helpers),
garbage collectors, road maintenance workers, railway labourers, tobacco or fruit pickers, landscape labourers, fish farm helpers, roustabouts, labourers in
processing industry.




                                                                                                                                                               23

				
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