Docstoc

New International Student Orientation

Document Sample
New International Student Orientation Powered By Docstoc
					New International Student Orientation
           January 4-9, 2010
         Schedule and Handbook




    University Office of Global Programs (UOGP)
                 410 Boucke Building
              University Park, PA 16802
                814-865-7681/6348
                 www.global.psu.edu
            The University Office of Global Programs (UOGP)
The University Office of Global Programs (UOGP) is the voice for all global activities at Penn State, with a focus
on three key dimensions—internationals coming to Penn State, students going from Penn State to study abroad,
and cross-cultural partnerships. It has four directorates:

Directorate of International Student Advising (DISA) works closely with Penn State’s approximately
4,400 international students to ensure their well-being and compliance with U.S. government regulations.
Advisers offer academic and personal adjustment counseling, including assistance with matters such as
admissions, orientation, enrollment, emergency loans, employment, and other needs.
                       Director                                                  Administrative Support Assistant
               Masume Assaf (assaf@psu.edu)                                         Janice Brown (jib4@psu.edu)
      Initial Document Services (Before Arrival)                         Immigration Regulations and General Advising
      Pre-Arrival Coordinators: (international@ip.psu.edu)               International Student Advisers: (ISS-Adviser@ip.psu.edu)
      Michael Crandall, John Ewton, and Lisette Hickok                              Alene Bowers Patricia Coleman
                 Administrative Support Assistant:                                  Robin Kuzu         Gilbert Friedman
                        Margaret Snyder
                                                   Student Record Services
                                                    Records Manager: Sue King
                           Administrative Support Assistant: Jamie Vaughn (I-9 Employment Preparation)

                                                DISA Contact Information:
                                    Tel. 814-865-6348; E-mail: ISS-Adviser@ip.psu.edu
                                                       Office Hours:
                                    Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday: 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm
                                           Thursday, Friday: 8:30 am - 11:30 am

Directorate of Global Relations and Promotion (DGRP) handles public relations, promotion, the
sponsored student program, and programming. Staff work closely with Penn State’s International Student Council
and over 40 international student clubs and organizations to offer educational, cultural, orientation, and social
programs to ensure student engagement and inclusion in the community.
                Director                          Promotion & Programming                      Public Relations & Events
       Negar Davis (ncd10@psu.edu)               Promotion & Outreach Coordinators:             Public Relations Coordinator:
                                                  Kristin Thomas (klt16@psu.edu)           Janet Haner (jah3@psu.edu)
        Administrative Support
                                               Katie Waldeisen (kaw5016@psu.edu)                  Special Events Assistant:
              Assistant
          To Be Announced                                Program Coordinator:                Sandi Richter (smr274@psu.edu)
                                                 Tia Trueblood (tlt17@ip.psu.edu)
         Corporate Relations &
                                                    Program Coordinator Assistant:
                Recruitment
                                                Brittany Reutzel (bmr199@psu.edu)
        Corporate Relations Specialist:
       Jerri Kitchen (jlk12@psu.edu)                    Programming Assistants
                                                Natsuki Ikeda (nzi102@ip.psu.edu)
                                               Kolby Kent Nelson (kkn117@psu.edu)

                                                   DGRP Contact Information:
                                                      Tel. 814-863-1115
                                                   E-mail: Events@ip.psu.edu

Directorate of Education Abroad (EA) offers a diverse array of international academic opportunities for
Penn State undergraduates interested in studying abroad.

Directorate of General Administration and Planning (DGAP) is responsible for guiding policy making,
fostering an environment of compliance with University policies.

 PAGE 2                                    SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
      Welcome!
                                                               Nittany Lion Shrine



On behalf of the University Office of Global Programs (UOGP), we welcome you to Penn
State University and the beautiful Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. We are excited that you
decided to join us and we look forward to serving you as you pursue your academic
career. Penn State has a long and proud history of international involvement. At present,
more than 4,400 international students from over 130 countries study at Penn State. In
addition, we have many alumni in virtually every country in the world who remain loyal
and valued friends of the University and UOGP.

As a University and office, we strive to provide you and your dependents the best in
services and support through the many programs and activities offered. We want you to feel
at home and comfortable in your new environment, and we will do everything we can to
make this happen. Penn State is a large university with many rules and policies; however,
we make every effort to give you the best advice, advocacy, and leadership in order to help
you avoid unnecessary hardship.

The UOGP staff is honored to have you here and we wish you great success in pursuit of
your academic goals and career ambitions at Penn State. We look forward to meeting you
in person and welcoming you to Penn State!

Masume Assaf                                  Negar Davis
Director, International Student Advising      Director, Global Relations and Promotion
                                  Table of Contents

                               Table of Contents                                    Page
Spring 2010 Orientation Information                                            2 – 19
   Welcome to New International Student Orientation                            2-3
   Tasks to Complete on Your Own Time During Orientation                       4
   Intensive English Communication Program (IECP) Tasks & Schedule             5-6
   Spring 2010 Orientation Schedule                                            7-11
   FTCAP Student Instructions (for first-year undergraduates)                  12
   AEOCPT Information (for graduate teaching assistants)                       13
   Off-Campus & On-Campus Housing Resources                                    14
   Orientation Food Services                                                   15
   Wireless Internet Information                                               16 - 17
   Religious Services Available                                                18
   Recreation Available                                                        19
Rules, Regulations and Responsibilities                                        20 - 31
   Paying the Tuition Bill and Finalizing Registration                         21
   Address Corrections or Changes                                              22
   Immigration Rules and Regulations - Your Responsibilities                   23 - 24
   Taxes - What You Should Know                                                25 - 26
   Travel for F-1 Students                                                     27 - 28
   Travel for J-1 Students                                                     29 - 30
   Important Contact Information                                               31
Welcome to the Area - Local Information                                        32 - 52
   American Attitudes and Values                                               33 - 34
   Penn State-Recognized International & Multicultural Student Organizations   35 - 36
   State College Community General Information                                 37
   CATA Bus Guide                                                              38 - 39
   Local Specialty Restaurants and Food Stores                                 40
   Local Banking Information                                                   42
   Cell Phones in the U.S.                                                     45
   Bicycle Regulations on Campus                                               47
   Fire Safety Information                                                     48
   Penn State Judicial Affairs                                                 49 - 50
   Campus Map                                                                  51 - 52
Orientation Summary Schedule                                                   Back Page
     Spring 2010
      Orientation
     Program and
      Information
PLEASE READ the information on pages 2-13
to determine which sessions you need to attend

             SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010   PAGE 1
          Welcome to New International Student Orientation
Upon your arrival, you must visit the Orientation Leaders in the Regency Suite (Room 111) of the Days
Inn Hotel. At the Orientation Leaders Suite you will receive an appointment slip for your Document Check-In
appointment. Attendance at your Check-In Appointment is mandatory. Please be sure to report to the
Global Programs Lounge (410 Boucke Building) at your scheduled check-in time.
Please be sure to complete the tasks given on page 4 during your free time at orientation. These tasks are
all necessary to make your transition to student life at Penn State trouble-free.
In addition to the planned sessions, there are a number of volunteers available to answer your questions as
well as four Orientation Leaders. During orientation, Orientation Leaders reside at the Regency Suite. From
January 4-9, Orientation Leaders will be available from 9:00am to midnight to provide housing
assistance, local community information, and help in arranging meals and activities. Please feel free to ask
any of the Orientation Leaders or other volunteers for help.



  Orientation Housing at Days Inn

           240 South Pugh Street
          State College, PA 16801
            Phone: 814-238-8454
             Fax: 814-237-1607
  E-mail: reservations@centrehotel.com

            Cost: $53.17 per night
          Available January 4-9, 2010

                              Downtown State College Map




  Boucke Building




  Days Inn




 PAGE 2                             SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
    Welcome to New International Student Orientation (continued)

    What is Document Check-In?
    For your Document Check-In, bring your passport, I-94 card,
                                                                                 Attendance for
    I-20 or DS-2019, one photo, the passports of any
    accompanying family members, and a letter from your
                                                                              Check-In is Mandatory
    sponsor if you are a sponsored student. This process will
    take approximately one hour. Once your local residency                         During Check-in students will:
    is established, you will need to complete the required
    insurance records at the Student Insurance Office in
                                                                                    Establish a student file
    302 Student Health Center.           The deadline for
                                                                                    Verify financial arrangements
    completion is January 19, 2010. Representatives from
                                                                                    Document registration
    University Health Services will be providing
                                                                                    Begin paperwork for a Social Security
    information regarding completion of student medical                               Number (if on assistantship)
    records at the Mandatory Check-In day, January 5.                               Complete work authorization forms
    Students who are unable to attend this check-in should
    contact      University       Health     Services       at
    UHSimmcomp@sa.psu.edu to request information on
    completing medical records.


General Orientation Calendar For a more detailed schedule see pages 7-11.
                                                        January 2010
     Sun            Mon                   Tue                 Wed                       Thu             Fri             Sat
3             4                  5                      6                     7                    8           9
                   Arrival            Mandatory          Information              Information      Information Residence
                                      Document          Sessions Begin              Sessions         Sessions  Halls open
              Free Van Service         Check-In
                  Begins at           410 Boucke                                                                    FTCAP
                 10:00 am            1:00 - 4:00 pm                                                                 Advising

                                                  Planned Social Activities


10            11                 12                     13                    14                   15              16
FTCAP         Classes Begin
Advising


Spring 2010 University Calendar
                    January 4         Arrival for new international students
                    January 9         Arrival for new American students
                    January 10        Registration deadline
                    January 11        Classes begin
                    March 8-12        Spring Break - no classes, University is open, residence halls are closed
                    April 30          Classes end
                    May 1-2           Study days
                    May 3-7           Final exams
                    May 14-16         Spring Commencement


                                         SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                 PAGE 3
                      Tasks to Complete During Orientation

___ Call or Email Home
    It is important that your family members know you have arrived safely! There are pay phones at Days Inn that
    are available to students 24 hours/day. Contact an Orientation Leader for advice on the best location to purchase
    a pre-paid calling card. Email: If you already have a Penn State access account you may use the internet on cam-
    pus. Some cafes and restaurants downtown also have wireless connections and do not require a Penn State Access
    Account.

___ Obtain a Penn State id+ Card
    Go to Penn State id+ card in room 103 HUB-Robeson Center. You will need to bring a picture ID (passport, driver’s
    license, old student ID) and your student number. During Orientation, the Penn State id+ Office is open Monday
    through Friday, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm.

___ Obtain a Penn State Access Account (Penn State Email Account)
    A Penn State Access Account is a user ID and password.
    Bring your Penn State id+ card to one of the computer labs listed below and follow the instructions at the Access
    Account Signature Station. Make note of your user ID and password when they are displayed on the screen.
    Your account should be active within one business day. If you have problems using the Penn State Access Account
    Signature Station, contact computer support staff at the location of the signature station.

   Signature Stations Available January 4-8:
   Pollock Building Room 201:   January 4-8: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

   Signature Stations Available beginning Saturday January 9:
   Pollock Building Room 201:          January 9: 8:00 am to midnight; January 10: Open 24 hours
   Findlay Building Room 6:            January 9: 8:00 am to midnight; January 10: Open 24 hours
   Waring Building Room 107 & 108: January 9: 8:00 am to midnight; January 10: Open 24 hours  
   Warnock Building Room 108:          January 9: 8:00 am to midnight; January 10: Open 24 hours

___ Housing
    If you do not yet have off-campus housing plans for the semester, visit 112 Boucke Building on Thursday, November
    7 from 9:00 am to 12:00 noon. Volunteers will help you search websites for available off-campus housing.

___ Complete the Online FTCAP Testing (Freshman/First-Year Undergraduate Students Only)
    Your online FTCAP testing must be completed NO LATER THAN Thursday, January 7 at 4:00 pm. If you have
    not already taken your FTCAP placement tests in English, mathematics, and chemistry, access www.psu.edu/ftcap/
    stepbystep by January 7 to complete your tests and an Educational Planning Survey (EPS). You must start your
    placement tests by this deadline and complete them in the time allotted to you online in order to receive your results
    during the FTCAP session at 1:00 pm on Saturday, January 9 in 101 Thomas Building.

___ Schedule an Appointment for an AEOCPT Test
   (for Students with Teaching Assistantships Only)
    Schedule an appointment for your Penn State American English Oral Communicative Proficiency Test online at
    http://aplng.la.psu.edu/academicPrograms/itaProgram.php by December 18.


Optional
___ Activate a LionCash+ Account
    LionCash+ is an online, prepaid, flexible spending account accessed by your Penn State id+ card. After orientation,
    all trips sponsored by University Office of Global Programs must be paid using your LionCash+ account. For more
    information or to activate your account, visit www.idcard.psu.edu/students/lioncash.shtml.

___ Parking Permit
    If you have a car, visit the parking office located in the Eisenhower Parking Deck to purchase your parking permit
    for the semester. If you will be keeping the car on campus only during orientation, you must purchase a multi-day
    permit.

 PAGE 4                               SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
   Intensive English Communication Program

          IECP Tasks to Complete During Orientation



___    Call or Email Home: It is important that your family members know you have arrived
safely! There are pay phones in the Day’s Inn that are available to students 24 hours/day. Contact
an Orientation Leader for advice on the best location to purchase a pre-paid calling card.
Email: Check with the IECP office about using the computer lab! Your Penn State Email Account will
not be available until after the IECP Registration.

___    Obtain an IECP ID Card: Visit the IECP office in 301 Boucke Building to receive your
IECP ID card! You will need this for your Penn State Photo ID Card!

___    Obtain a Penn State Photo ID Card: Go to room 103 HUB (Hetzel Union Building) for
your photo ID card. You will need to bring a picture ID (passport, driver’s license, old student ID)
and your IECP ID card. During Orientation, the ID Office is open Monday through Friday, 8:00 am -
5:00 pm.

___    Activate a LionCash+ Account: LionCash+ is an online, prepaid, flexible spending
account accessed by your Penn State id+ card. After orientation, all trips sponsored by International
Student Services must be paid using your LionCash+ account. For more information or to activate
your account, visit www.idcard.psu.edu/students/lioncash.shtml. This is optional.

___     Housing: If you do not yet have housing plans for the semester, visit 112 Boucke Building
from 9:00-12:00 noon on Thursday, January 7. To locate housing should be your #1 Priority this week!

___    Health Insurance: Deadline: January 19, 2010 You are required to either
purchase the United Health care plan though the University, OR complete a waiver form in the
Student Health Insurance Office, 302 UHS.

____   eLion: Deadline: January 22, 2010 It is a SEVIS requirement that you register your
local address. Go to: http://elion.psu.edu/ Log in as a student and change ONLY your local, US
address. Your HOME Address should be a Foreign address from your HOME COUNTRY. Please
also add an Emergency Contact on Elion.

___    Obtain a Penn State Access Account (Penn State Email Account): A Penn State
Access Account is a user ID and password. You will complete this form at the IECP Registration on
January 5, 2010. Your Penn State Email will not be available until you complete the Access
Account agreement.

____ Complete the Signature Station: To set up your email account, you must first submit to
the IECP office the Penn State Access Account Application. Then, take your Penn State Photo ID Card
to the Access Account Signature Station located in 103 Boucke Computer Lab, and follow the
instructions. You will be asked to enter an 8 digit password. Remember your password and keep it
safe.




                                 SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                           PAGE 5
             Spring 2010 Orientation Schedule (continued)

Intensive English Communication Program Students Only
      Date           Location                   Time                                Activity
Monday        301 Boucke Building       8:00 am - 5:00 pm      Arrival Day
January 4     (IECP Office)                                    Please stop by 301 Boucke Building to receive
                                                               your IECP ID card.

Tuesday       101 Thomas Building       2:00 - 3:00 pm         IECP Orientation
January 5

              101 Thomas Building       3:00 - 3:30 pm         Tuition Payments Collected

Wednedsay     101 Thomas Building       9:30 am - 12:00 pm     Placement Test
January 6
              101 Thomas Building       2:00 - 3:00 pm         Director’s Meeting , UOGP Check-In
                                                               Bring the following documents: I-20, passport, I-
                                                               94 card, visa, for you & any dependents who have
                                                               entered the country with you.
Thursday      No activities are scheduled for IECP students. Please join UOGP Orientation programs.
January 7     If you are still looking for off-campus housing please stop by 112 Boucke Building from 9:00-12:00
              noon. Volunteers will help you search websites for available off-campus housing.

Friday        106 Boucke Building       2:00 - 3:00 pm         Computer Lab Orientation
January 8
              317 Boucke Building       3:00 - 4:30 pm         Reception/Meet your Teachers

Monday        301 Boucke Building       8:00 - 9:00 am         Registration for Returning IECP Students
January 11                                                     & Pick Up Your Class Schedules

                                        9:05 am                Classes Begin

Friday        301 Boucke Building       12:30 - 2:00 pm        Tuition Payments for Returning Students
January 15                                                     All Tuition Due




PAGE 6                         SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                              Spring 2010 Orientation Schedule
Daily Schedule for Monday, January 4, 2010 - All sessions are optional
       Time & Location                                                         Event

Beginning at 10:00 am                                Arrival and Orientation Housing Move- in
Orientation Leader Suite,                                          Free van services begins
Days Inn                                 Students may pick up the Orientation Handbook and other materials from the
                                         Orientation Leader Suite beginning at10:00 am on Monday, January 4, 2010.

12:00 noon                                                               Campus Tour
Orientation Leader Suite, Days            Take a walking tour of the University Park campus to learn your way around!
Inn

2:30 pm                                                       Shopping Trip to Nittany Mall
Orientation Leader Suite,               Join volunteers on a bus ride to the Nittany Mall shopping plaza to get necessary
Days Inn                                                             materials for your room!
                                                 Cost for bus fare: $1.25 one way (You will need exact amount.)

                                             SOCIAL ACTIVITIES IN THE EVENING
   For descriptions of social activities, please stop at Orientation Leader Suite or see the flier in your Orientation bag.

Daily Schedule for Tuesday, January 5, 2010 –Shaded sessions are mandatory
Time & Location                                                        Event
10:00 am                                                         Campus Tour
Orientation Leader                 Take a walking tour of the University Park campus to learn your way around!
Suite, Days Inn
1:00 - 4:00 pm                                International Student Document Check-in
                                                          (by appointment)
410 Boucke Building                          Attendance for your Check-in appointment is mandatory!
Global Programs                                             During check-in, you will:
Lounge
                          Establish a student file
                          Verify financial arrangements
                          Document registration
                          Begin paperwork for a Social Security Number (if on assistantship)
                          Complete work authorization forms

                          You must bring your passport, I-94 card, I-20 or DS-2019, one photo, the passports of any
                       accompanying family member, immunization records, and documents from your sponsor if you are
                                                             a sponsored student.
                                                     Items to be completed at another location:
                          Visit University Health Services at 302 Student Health Center to take care of student health
                            insurance matters. Go to www.sa.psu.edu/uhs for more information.

1:00 pm                                                          Campus Tour
Orientation Leader                 Take a walking tour of the University Park campus to learn your way around!
Suite, Days Inn
3:00 pm                         Shopping Trip to Northland Center/Colonnade Shopping Area
Orientation Leader           Join volunteers on a bus ride to the Northland Center/Colonnade shopping plazas to get
Suite,                                                   necessary materials for your room!
Days Inn                                  Cost for bus fare: $1.25 one way (You will need exact amount.)
                                             SOCIAL ACTIVITIES IN THE EVENING
   For descriptions of social activities, please stop at Orientation Leader Suite or see the flier in your Orientation bag.

                                         SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                  PAGE 7
                             Spring 2010 Orientation Schedule
Daily Schedule for Wednesday, January 6, 2010 –Shaded sessions are mandatory

  Time & Location                                                        Event
8:30 - 9:00 am                                                    Light Breakfast
410 Boucke Building
Global Programs Lounge
9:00 - 9:45 am                                                  Welcome Address
111 Wartik Building                       Dr. Michael Adewumi, Vice Provost for Global Programs, UOGP
                                        Dr. Negar Davis, Director of Global Relations and Promotion, UOGP
                                               Merrill David, Executive Director of Global Connections
                           The Vice Provost for Global Programs will personally welcome all new international students to
                               Penn State. This will be followed by presentations by Negar Davis, Director of Global
                                Relations and Promotion and Merrill David, Executive Director of Global Connections.
9 :45 - 10:00 am                                                    15-minute Break
10:00 - 11:00 am                          Government Regulations and How They Apply to
111 Wartik Building
                                                      International Students
                                         Masume Assaf, Director of International Student Advising, UOGP
                           A presentation on the visa and immigration regulations that govern international students in F-1
                                  and J-1 status and also the benefits for which international students are eligible.
11:00 - 11:15 am                                                    15-minute Break
11:15 - 12:30 pm                         Education Abroad (EA) Exchange Students Meeting
105 Wartik Building                             Alene Bowers, International Student Adviser, UOGP
EA Exchange Students                               Kelli Burns, EA Exchanges Coordinator, UOGP
Only                       Information relevant to pre-scheduled classes, academic adviser assignments, and non-degree
                               exchange status will be provided to participants on a Penn State semester or academic
                                                  year EA (Education Abroad) Exchange program.

11:15 - 12:30 pm                                  Registration Instructions and Finances
111 Wartik Building                              Gilbert Friedman, International Student Adviser, UOGP
All Other Students                                 (EA exchange students should NOT attend this session)
                              This session will focus on how to register for courses, pay Penn State tuition, manage your
                                  money, where to look for jobs on-campus, and how to protect yourself from fraud.
12:30 - 2:00 pm                                           UOGP Welcome Luncheon
Heritage Hall,               Meet the staff members of the University Office of Global Programs and interact with other
HUB-Robeson Center                               new international students at this welcome lunch!
1:30 - 2:30 pm                                                Penn State Web Tour
111 Boucke Building          Orientation Leaders will guide students in the use of important web resources such as eLion,
                                          Angel, Penn State WebMail, Off-Campus Living, LionMenus, etc.
                                             This interactive session has limited space so arrive early!
3:00 - 5:00 pm                    International Student Library Orientation, University Libraries
Mann Assembly Room,        This is an opportunity to become familiar with the University Libraries, learn about resources in
Pattee Library             your subject field, and meet with librarians. The program will begin at 3:00 pm and conclude
                                     with a tour of your subject area library. Come meet us and win some prizes!

                                             SOCIAL ACTIVITIES IN THE EVENING
   For descriptions of social activities, please stop at Orientation Leader Suite or see the flier in your Orientation bag.


 PAGE 8                                  SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                    Spring 2010 Orientation Schedule (continued)
Daily Schedule for Thursday, January 7, 2010 –Shaded sessions are mandatory
   Time & Location                                                        Event
9:00 am - 12:00 noon &                     Penn State American English Oral Communicative
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
For Graduate Teaching
                                                     Proficiency Testing (AEOCPT)
Assistants ONLY                                          For Graduate Teaching Assistants ONLY
301 Willard Building                                         See page 13 for more information.
9:00-12:00 noon                                   Off-Campus Housing Search Assistance
112 Boucke Building
                               Stop by anytime between 9:00 am and 12:00 noon. Volunteers will help you search websites for
                                                             available off-campus housing.
9:00-10:00 am                               Student Health, Mandatory Insurance, and CAPS
111 Wartik Building                             Beth Collitt, Marketing Manager, University Health Services
                                       Chris Fahey, Clinical Social Worker, Counseling and Psychological Services
                                                         Karen Kline, Manager, Student Insurance
                             This session will focus on the services available through the University Health Services, as well
                                                           as mandatory insurance requirements.
10:30 - 11:45 am                              Academic Information for Graduate Students
Graduate Students ONLY                          Dr. Suzanne Adair, Assistant Dean of the Graduate School
110 Wartik Building                                 Pat Coleman, International Student Adviser, UOGP
                               This session will provide graduate students with the information that they need to succeed
                              academically—academic integrity, tips on working with faculty/advisers, opportunities that
                                                            the Graduate School offers, etc.
10:30 - 11:45 am               Navigating Academic Resources at Penn State (for Undergraduates)
Undergraduate                                             Marie Lindhorst, Associate Director, DUS
Students ONLY                                             Gail Kamon, Program Coordinator, DUS
111 Wartik Building                                   Angelique Bacon-Woodard, Penn State Learning
                               This session will provide an introduction to Undergraduate Student Academic Advising and
                                                        Advising Centers and Penn State Learning. 
12:00 noon - 1:30 pm                                 Community Welcome Lunch for
St. Paul’s United
Methodist Church
                                                   New International Students & Families
109 McAllister St.           Hosted by Global Connections, St. Paul’s Women’s Group, and the Centre County Chapter of
                                                            the Penn State Alumni Association
                              Global Connections is a secular nonprofit organization that does not promote, endorse, nor is
                                                    allied with, any religion or religious organization.
2:00 - 3:30 pm                                          An Introduction to U.S. Culture
106 Boucke                           Markus Maier, International Programs Coordinator, Smeal College of Business
                                Participants will learn about specific cultural norms in the U.S. such as socializing, dining,
                              traveling, etc. They will be encouraged to ask questions and reflect on the ease or difficulty
                                                      with which they expect to adapt to such norms.
3:30 - 5:00 pm                                              International Coffee Hour
410 Boucke Building                  Stop in for international coffees, teas, cookies and chat with faculty and staff!
Global Programs Lounge
5:00 - 6:00 pm                                                 Penn State Web Tour
111 Boucke Building           Orientation Leaders will guide students in the use of important web resources such as eLion,
                                           Angel, Penn State WebMail, Off-Campus Living, LionMenus, etc.
                                              This interactive session has limited space so arrive early!
                                             SOCIAL ACTIVITIES IN THE EVENING
   For descriptions of social activities, please stop at Orientation Leader Suite or see the flier in your Orientation bag.

                                        SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                   PAGE 9
                      Spring 2010 Orientation Schedule (continued)
Daily Schedule for Friday, January 8, 2010 –Shaded sessions are mandatory
          Time                                                              Event

10:00 - 11:30 am                   Know the Code: A Guide to Discipline Policies and Procedures
111 Wartik Building                                  Gary Miller, Associate Director, Judicial Affairs
                               An introduction to the Student Code of Conduct, the University Discipline System, and the
                             Penn State Principles. Facilitators demystify the campus discipline process and clarify student
                                                                 rights and responsibilities.

1:00 - 2:30 pm                                       Banking in the United States and id+
108 Wartik Building                                      Dennie Fetzer, Vice President, PNC Bank
                                                            Cindy Kellerman, Manager, id+
                             The id+ Office and PNC Bank join together to offer an informal discussion on the essentials of the id+
                             card program and banking in the US. This session will provide an overview of basic banking products,
                               managing your money and credit, identity theft, web/phone banking, and the uses and features of
                                your id+ card. Learn how id+ and PNC work together to teach you how to better manage your
                                                       money, save money, and avert financial troubles.
                                             Prizes will be awarded at random for attendance and participation.
3:00 - 4:00 pm                                                   Life in State College
410 Boucke Building                                  Rachel Helwig, Education Abroad Adviser, UOGP
Global Programs Lounge          In this session, you will get some essential information about living in and enjoying State
                                College. You will be able to ask questions and talk with other students who have lived in
                                                            State College for a number of years.
                                             SOCIAL ACTIVITIES IN THE EVENING
   For descriptions of social activities, please stop at Orientation Leader Suite or see the flier in your Orientation bag.


Daily Schedule for Saturday, January 9, 2010 –Shaded sessions are mandatory
          Time                                                              Event
8:00 - 10:00 am                                         Move-Out, Residence Halls open
Days Inn Penn State             All international students will move into permanent housing. Free orientation van service is
                                                     available. The free van service ends at 10:00 am.
                                             You must schedule your move out with the Orientation Leaders.

1:00 - 4:00 pm                                                             FTCAP
For First-Year                 The results of your English, mathematics, chemistry, and basic skills testing will be provided
Undergradates ONLY            by the Division of Undergraduate Studies. Various academic materials will be discussed at
101 Thomas Building           this meeting to help prepare for course-scheduling. For more information, contact the FTCAP
                                  office at 814-865-2578. This meeting is mandatory for all first-year undergraduate
                                                                          students.
1:00 - 4:00 pm                                           FTCAP for Parents and Families
102 Thomas Building            This session is for parents and family members accompanying their students. Attendance by
                                                             family members is not mandatory

4:00 - 7:00 pm                                                      Winter Welcome
Heritage Hall,                 New first-year, change-of-campus, transfer, and new adult learners are invited to attend
HUB-Robeson Center              this interactive program designed to ease your transition to University Park. Come meet
                              other new students, learn tips for success, understand your student rights and responsibilities,
                                          learn your way around campus, and enjoy free food and give-a-ways.

 PAGE 10                                 SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                   Spring 2010 Orientation Schedule (continued)
Daily Schedule for Sunday, January 10, 2010
      Time                     Location                                                 Event
                       Course Scheduling: Academic Advising and Registration Sessions
              Students who have not finalized a schedule of courses for spring semester should attend.
              2:00 - 4;00 pm       Agricultural Sciences                        101 Agricultural Administration Building
              2:00 - 4:00 pm       Smeal College of Business                    206 Business Building
              2:00 - 4:00 pm       Communications                               204 Carnegie Building
               2:00 -4:00 pm       Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS)      111 Wartik Loboratory
              2:00 - 4:00 pm       Earth and Mineral Sciences                   14 Deike Building
              2:00 - 4:00 pm       Education                                    228 Chambers Building
              2:00 - 4:00 pm       The Liberal Arts                             121 Sparks Building
              2:00 - 4:00 pm       Liberal Arts                                 101 Sparks Building
              2:00 - 4:00 pm       Eberly College of Science                    Various Locations Based on Major:
                                                                                See Orientation Express



  4:00 - 4:30 pm       Mann Assembly Room,                           General Orientation Program Part 1
                       103 Paterno Library         University Libraries and Computer Technology - A Review of Resources

  4:30 - 5:00 pm       Mann Assembly Room,                           General Orientation Program Part 2
                       103 Paterno Library            University Health Services, Center for Counseling and Psychological
                                                                                    Services
  5:00 - 5:30 pm       Mann Assembly Room,                           General Orientation Program Part 3
                       103 Paterno Library                              Center for Women Students


  5:30 - 7:00 pm       162 Willard Building                Chemistry 110 and Chemistry 111 Credit by Examination
                                                           See www.chem.psu.edu/degree-programs for more information

 7:00 pm and later        Various Locations                                      Evening Activities
                                                                             See the Orientation Express

Daily Schedule for Monday, January 11
      Time                     Location                                                 Event

                         Various Locations                                         Classes Begin

                      Course Scheduling: Academic Advising and Registration Sessions
             Students who have not finalized a schedule of courses for spring semester should attend.

             8:00 - 10:00 am        Arts and Architecture                      104 Borland Building
             8:00 - 10:00 am        Astronomy and Astrophysics                 525 Davey Laboratory
             8:00 - 10:00 am        Engineering                                202 Hammond Building
             8:00 - 10:00 am        Health and Human Development               5 Henderson Building North
             8:00 - 10:00 am        Information Sciences and Technology 104 IST Building
             8:00 - 10:00 am        Mathematics                                104 McAllister Building

                                      SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                             PAGE 11
                             FTCAP Student Instructions


          FIRST-YEAR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
     Required First-Year Testing, Counseling and Advising (FTCAP)

Before you begin your first semester, you are required to participate in placement testing and academic
advising through the First-Year Testing, Counseling, and Advising Program (FTCAP). These activities are
crucial because they may directly affect both your long-term academic plans and what you schedule
for your first semester. Complete the mandatory testing and advising activities by doing the following:

STEP 1
Follow the instructions on page 4 to get your Penn State id+ card and Access Account and password.
Once you have your Penn State Access Account and password, you should be able to complete these
activities in any open computer lab on campus.

STEP 2
Go to http://www.psu.edu/ftcap/stepbystep. Carefully follow the instructions to complete two online
activities, the Educational Planning Survey, and placement tests.
PLEASE NOTE: If you have already completed these activities, you DO NOT need to do them again. If you
are not sure if you completed them, please contact the FTCAP Office (see our contact information below).

    You can start on these activities right away, but you must complete them no later than 4:00 pm
      on Thursday, January 7
    Please plan on spending about six to seven hours to complete these online activities:
           The survey will take about one hour or more
           The placement tests will take about three hours

STEP 3
Participate in FTCAP advising on Saturday, January 9, in Room 101 Thomas Building at 1:00 pm. The
results of your English, mathematics, chemistry, and basic skills testing will be provided by the Division of
Undergraduate Students (DUS). During this meeting, you will receive a personal copy of your test results
(Profile of Academic Abilities). These tests are necessary for course scheduling and academic advising.
Individual college meetings and registrations are listed in the Orientation Express as well as on page 11
of this booklet.

      Please bring a completed printout of the General Education Worksheet from the Web site above
        (all other materials you submit from the Web site will reach us electronically). During this meeting
        we will provide you with details on when and how you will schedule your classes.

            Questions? We can be reached at 814-865-2578 or ftcap@psu.edu
           between 8:00 am - 12:00 noon and 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Eastern Time




PAGE 12                            SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                      AEOCPT Information

                                                SPRING 2010

PENN STATE AMERICAN ENGLISH ORAL COMMUNICATIVE PROFICIENCY TESTING

            FOR PROSPECTIVE INTERNATIONAL TEACHING ASSISTANTS

WHEN:
Thursday, January 7, 2010
9:00 am – 12:00 noon and 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

WHERE:
301 Willard Building

ONLINE PRE-REGISTRATION:
International students who plan to be teaching assistants must pre-register for the Penn State American English
Oral Communicative Proficiency Test (AEOCPT) at the following web site:

http://aplng.la.psu.edu/academicPrograms/itaProgram.php

To pre-register for the test, students must input their student I.D. number. They will then choose their preferred
available times. Students will receive an e-mail within 48 hours with their scheduled test time. Those with a tem-
porary I.D. card or no I.D. card should bring their passport with the official admission letter from the Graduate
School to the test.

DEADLINE TO REGISTER: December 18, 2009

Information regarding test scores and what they mean relating to proficiency and placement can be found at:

http://aplng.la.psu.edu/academicPrograms/ita_whatIsAEOCPT.php

AECOPT is offered each semester. If students are not currently teaching assistants but are considering becoming a
teaching assistant, these students should consider taking the test in a future semester. The next session will be
held in June.




                                      SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                       PAGE 13
                                  Off-Campus Housing Resources
There are many options for off-campus housing in the State College area. It should be noted that off-campus
housing is in high demand and becomes harder to find as the school year approaches. If you plan on living off-
campus, please begin looking immediately.

Penn State Off-Campus Living
www.sa.psu.edu/ocl/

Craigslist
www.craigslist.com (click on Pennsylvania, State College, and then look in the housing section)

StateCollege.com
www.statecollege.com/classifieds/housing/
www.statecollege.com/apartments/

Facebook (make sure to join the Penn State network)
http://apps.facebook.com/marketplace/

Additional Websites
www.apartmentsstatecollege.com
www.apartmentguide.com
http://www.lionconnection.com/

Renting Information - Leases and Security Deposits
(from the Pennsylvania Office of the Attorney General website)
http://www.attorneygeneral.gov/consumers.aspx?id=405

Housing Board
There is a bulletin board on the 4th floor of Boucke Building where students often post housing availabilities or
housing needed.


                                On-Campus Housing Resources

Housing Assignment Office
201 Johnston Commons
University Park, PA 16802
E-mail: assignmentoffice@psu.edu
Phone: 814-865-7501
Fax: 814-863-8364 fax

Housing, Food Services, and Residence Life:
www.hfs.psu.edu/UniversityPark/

White Course Apartments (for graduate students):
www.hfs.psu.edu/housing/graduates/whitecourse

eLiving Website (for housing contracts):                www.eliving.psu.edu




     PAGE 14                               SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                   Orientation Food Services


        Residence Halls Dining
                                                             The following HUB-Robeson Center
        Jan. 8
        Redifer Commons                                      Eateries are open during Orientation:
        Off the Ground: 7:00 am-7:00 pm                      Jan. 4-8
        In a Pickle: 11:00 am-7:00 pm
        RR City Grill: 7:00 am-7:00 pm                       Monday to Friday
                                                             Chat’s              7:30 am - 2:00 pm
        Jan. 9                                               Chick-fil-A        closed
        Findlay Dining Halls: open for brunch and dinner     Nathan’s            10:00 am - 2:00 pm
        Pollock Dining Halls: open for brunch and dinner     Panda Express       11:00 am - 200 pm
        Waring Dining Halls: open for brunch and dinner      Panda Sushi         closed
                                                             Piccadillis         closed
        Jan. 10.                                             Wild Cactus         closed
        Dining Halls resume regular hours of operation
                                                             Jan. 9-10
                                                             Chat’s             8:00 am - 3:00 pm
  Penn State Creamery Hours:                                 Panda Express      12:00 am - 6:00 pm

  Monday - Thursday                                          Jan. 11-14
  7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
                                                             Monday to Friday
  Friday                                                     Chat’s             7:30 am - 3:00 pm
  7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.                                    Chick-fil-A        11:00 am - 3:00 pm
                                                             Nathan’s           7:30 am - 2:00 pm
  Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.                           Panda Express      11:00 am - 6:00 pm
                                                             Panda Sushi        11:00 am - 3:00 pm
  Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.                             Piccadillis        11:00 am– 3:00 pm
                                                             Wild Cactus        11:00 am - 3:00 pm
 Not only the delicious ice creams,
 you may also purchase



Penn State Bookstore Hours

East Halls:                      HUB-Robeson Center:

Jan. 4-8                         Jan. 4-8
closed                           9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Jan. 9                           Jan. 9
11:00 am - 3:00 pm               9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Jan. 10                          Jan. 10
12:00 am - 4:00 pm               10:00 am- 6:00 pm
Jan. 11-15                       Jan. 11- 15
10:00 am - 5:00 pm               8:00 am - 7:00 pm




                                      SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010              PAGE 15
                                Wireless Internet Information

                                           GO WIRELESS ON CAMPUS!
Wireless 1.0 - VPN Required
What You Need
To get connected to the Penn State Wireless 1.0 service on your laptop, you'll need:
   A Penn State Access Account (http://its.psu.edu/accounts.html)
   A laptop with an 802.11 compatible wireless network card, such as those that are wireless-ready or that have a
     PCMCIA card slot. You can purchase a wireless adapter card from the University's Computer Store.
   To obtain a list of cards, enter wireless adapter in the search field at http://computerstore.psu.edu/.
   The VPN Client Software - read below
The Penn State VPN (Virtual Private Network) is a secure network connection that uses encryption and other security
mechanisms to ensure that only authorized users access the network and that data is secure. Download and configuration
of the VPN is necessary in order to authenticate and to access the Penn State wireless 1.0 pennstate network. VPN
software clients for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X are available for download with or without an Internet connection, as
well as documentation and installation instructions for each client. Go here to download the VPN client:
http://aset.its.psu.edu/vpn/resources.html
(Note that you will need to authenticate with your Penn State Access Account userid and password to access the client.)


Unplug and Fire Up a Connection!
It's easy to get connected to Penn State Wireless 1.0. All you have to do is:
    Power up your laptop.
    Launch your VPN client software, and select the Penn State campus where you are located.
    Use the pennstate wireless network for your tasks.
    Disconnect the VPN client when you are done.
Visit the ITS Knowledge Base for setup instructions for Wireless 1.0 VPN access on the iPhone or iPod Touch:
http://kb.its.psu.edu/psu-all/hd/iphonevpn

Wireless 2.0 - No VPN Required:

What You Need
To get connected to the Penn State Wireless 2.0 service, you'll need:
   A Penn State Access Account (http://its.psu.edu/accounts.html)
   A laptop with an 802.11 compatible wireless network card.
   Instructions for Windows, Macintosh, Unix/Linux: https://www.work.psu.edu/access/dot1x/prod/


The Penn State Wireless 2.0 service incorporates recent 802.1X wireless authentication and encryption methods that are
aimed at enabling an improved level of security and improved performance. You no longer have to download a VPN or
relaunch a VPN session when moving from building to building. Just open your laptop and you'll see the psu network.

Unplug and Fire Up a Connection!
It's easy to get connected to Penn State Wireless 2.0. All you have to do is:
    Power up your laptop.
    Use the psu wireless network for your tasks.
Visit the ITS Knowledge Base for setup instructions for Wireless 2.0 access on the iPhone or iPod Touch:
http://kb.its.psu.edu/psu-all/hd/iphonewireless2.0/?searchterm=wireless



  PAGE 16                               SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                         Wireless Internet Information (continued)

Penn State Wireless Locations
Penn State Wireless covers many buildings on University Park Campus such as:
    Johnston Commons (East Halls)
    Findlay Commons (East Halls)
    Fisher Hall (East Halls)
    Food Science Building (the home of Creamery ice cream!)
    Bryce Jordan Center
    Boucke Building (the location of International Student Advising)
    HUB-Robeson Center
    Thomas Building
    Kern Graduate Building
    and many other buildings at University Park
   For a complete list, visit http://wireless.psu.edu/locations.html.
   You may also find signs on the right at various locations!

At certain locations, Penn State Wireless 2.0 is available. At these places, you no longer have to download VPN. All you
have to do is to open up your laptop and find the PSU network! (You will still need a Penn State Access Account and a
password.)
Wireless 2.0 is available at:
    *Business Building (entire building and adjacent outdoor areas)
    *Ag. Science and Industries (general purpose classrooms and portions of the ground floor, 1st, 2nd and 4th floors)
    *Food Science Building (entire building and Creamery outdoor seating area)
    *Forest Resources Building (entire building and adjacent outdoor areas)
    Willard Building (entire building and outside area between Schwab and Carnegie Buildings.)
    Life Sciences Building (ground floor-available in six general purpose classrooms, #9 through #14 only)
    Telecommunications Building (entire building)
    Thomas Building (1st and 2nd Floors, and outside plaza area between Thomas and Ritenour Buildings)

Buildings with this mark (*) are located near East Halls!

Getting Help
    Questions or requests for assistance may be directed to the ITS Help Desk at helpdesk@psu.edu.
    During the orientation, Orientation Leaders and Computer Lab Attendees will be happy to help you, too! Stop by at
    the Orientation Leader Suite at Days Inn.




       Have you called home yet? There is an
       international phone card in your orienta-
       tion bag. You need to register online to
       use your free minutes!

       Try with your computer once you set up
       VPN or visit computer labs on campus.

       Need help? Ask Orientation Leaders!




                                          SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                           PAGE 17
        Religious Services Available in the State College Area

For a list of religious services offered in the State College area, visit:
http://www.statecollegecentral.com/scc2/community/religion.html or
http://www.statecollege.com/religion or
http://www.happyvalley.com/posts.php?id=1516

Center for Ethics and Student Affairs:
http://www.sa.psu.edu/cera/
(Located in the Pasquerilla Spiritual Center on Curtin Road)

Student Organizations with Religious Missions:
http://www.sa.psu.edu/usa/studentactivities/searchresults.asp?orgcat=Religious/Spiritual




 Pasquerilla Spiritual Center
 (on Curtin Rd. across from Pattee Library)




 PAGE 18                              SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                    Recreation Available
                McCoy Natatorium                                       Penn State Ice Pavilion
           Outdoor Pool on Bigler Road                                (Greenberg Ice Pavilion)
                    865-1433                                          863-2039 or 865-4102
            $5.00 per day, no ID needed
                                                                          Cost to Skate:
        Opens May 2010: 10:30 am – 8:00 pm
                                                                          Over 18: $5.50
                                                                         18 & under: $5.00
           McCoy Natatorium Indoor Pool                                  Student ID: $4.50
                 (For lap swimming)
   During orientation, check opening hours by calling                     Skate Rental: $2.00
                       865-1433                             See details at www.pennstateicerink.psu.edu

                $5.00, no ID needed
 Hours: Mon, Wed-Thu-Fri 7:30am-9:00am (not avail Tue)               The Palmer Museum of Art
Mon-Fri11:00am-2:00pm, 5:30pm-6:30, and 8:30-10:00pm                        865-7672
    Saturday- 1:30-9:50pm; Sunday - 2:00-9:50 pm                        Old Masters Drawings
                                                                    January 4-January 31, 2010
                  White Building Pool
  During orientation, check opening hours by calling        Big Shot Shuffle: Photographs by Andy Warhol
                       867-2083                                     January 4–January 24, 2010

                    $5 per day                                  I Heard a Voice: The Art of Lesley Dill
            Mon-Fri 6:30 am -10:00 pm                               January 24–April 25, 2010
 Sat. 10:00am-12:00am; Sunday12:00pm-10:00pm
                                                               http://www.palmermuseum.psu.edu/
          HUB-Robeson Center (“The HUB”)
   During orientation, check opening hours by calling               Recreation Hall (“Rec Hall”)
                       865-2000                               During orientation, check opening hours by
Late-night movies, pool-hall, video games, arts & crafts,                 calling 865-3488
         Union Street eateries and much more!               Hours, Monday-Thursday: 6:30 am - 12:00 am
               www.latenight.psu.edu                                Friday: 6:30 am - 10:00 pm
                                                              Saturday & Sunday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
                  The State Theatre
                   814-272-0606                              Membership required: $52/spring semester
           Cost: $8 ($6 with Penn State ID)                 Squash, Racquetball, Basketball, Indoor track
          Check Web site for films and times                 First-come, first-served basis. Gyms closed
          http://www.thestatetheatre.org/                         during special events and classes.

        Intramural Building (“IM Building”)                              Recreational Sports
  During orientation, check opening hours by calling                         865-5401
                       863-3137
  Mon-Sat: 7:30 am-midnight; Sun. 8:30am-midnight             For information on intramural sports teams,
   Basketball, racquetball, volleyball, indoor track,       visit http://www.athletics.psu.edu/recsports/
                    wrestling room
                    Fitness Center:
  During orientation check opening hours by calling
                       863-3137
            Mon-Fri: 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
               Sat-Sun: 4:00pm-8:00pm
     Membership required: $52/spring semester

                                   SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                        PAGE 19
              Rules,
           Regulations,
             and Your
          Responsibilities
PAGE 20       SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
           Paying Your Tuition Bill and Completing Registration

 Step 1: Schedule Spring 2010 Classes

New students must meet with an academic adviser to decide on their course schedule for the Spring 2010 semester.


 Step 2: Receiving the Tuition Bill/Registration Confirmation

After you schedule your classes, the Bursar’s Office, located in 103 Shields Building, will send an email notification to
your official University e-mail account alerting you that your tuition bill is available to view and pay via eLion. To view
your tuition bill, go to www.elion.psu.edu, select “Students,” and enter your PSU user ID and password. Then select “Bills
Tuition/Other” from the left-hand menu.

 Step 3: Payment Methods for Completing your Registration

eCheck - Students who have a US bank account may choose to pay their tuition bill by eCheck via eLion. The eCheck
option is a fast and convenient way to pay your bill from a personal checking account. There is no charge to pay by
eCheck. To make an eCheck payment, you will need to provide the routing and checking account numbers from the
bottom of the check and the amount to be paid. Penn State will automatically deduct the amount you have entered from
your checking account so there is no need to mail a check.


Credit Card - Credit card payment is accepted online only. Students may pay their tuition bill on eLion by using
MasterCard, American Express, or Discover (NOT VISA). There will be a 2 percent Convenience Fee for each credit card
payment processed online. The Bursar’s Office will not accept credit card payments by mail, phone or in person.


Cash, Check, or Money Order - You may print a payment voucher from eLion and mail it with a check or money order
to the Office of the Bursar, 103 Shields Building, University Park, PA 16802-1200. All checks and money orders must be
made payable to Penn State University. Please be sure to include your Penn State ID number on the check or money
order. You may also visit the Bursar’s Office in 103 Shields Building weekdays between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00
pm to pay by cash, check, or money order. Please do not mail cash.


Tuition Support from Penn State University - If your tuition is paid by an assistantship, a fellowship or a scholarship
through the University and the information is not showing in the "Anticipated Student Financial Aid Detail" section of your
tuition bill, then you must provide written evidence of that support to the Bursar's Office, 103 Shields Building.
        Note: The I-20 or DS-2019 forms are not acceptable proof of funding.


Students Sponsored by Home Government or other Outside Agency Funding – If tuition charges will be paid by an
outside agency that Penn State routinely bills, a completed form entitled “Semester Bill Confirmation For Sponsored
Students” must be completed at check-in or with Jerri Kitchen in 405 Boucke Building. You may contact her at 867- 3050
or by e-mail at jlk12@psu.edu.


                                              SEVIS REQUIREMENT
 In order to meet the U.S. Government reporting requirement, all new F-1 and J-1 visa holders MUST be
  registered (not merely scheduled) for classes within 30 days of the program start date listed on either
                                        the I-20 or DS-2019 form.




                                        SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                PAGE 21
                          Address Corrections and/or Changes

Regulations require all individuals in F and J status (including dependents) to report changes in their address - both
home address and local address.

eLion

Inform Penn State of any changes or corrections to your addresses by going online at https://elion.oas.psu.edu/.

        Permanent address. You must use your foreign address in this space because the Directorate of Interna-
        tional Student Advising (DISA) is required by law to report your foreign address to the U.S. Department
        of Homeland Security through the tracking system SEVIS. If this address changes, you must update this on
        eLion. (You are required to have a foreign address if you are in the U.S. in non-immigrant status.)

        Local address. Most University mail is sent to this address so you should use your address in the State
        College area. DISA is also required by law to report your local address to the Department of Homeland
        Security (DHS) through the tracking system SEVIS.

        Work address. If you are a graduate student and have a departmental mailbox or office, use this to re-
        port your office address.

        Emergency contact. This is the person the University contacts if you are seriously ill or injured.


Penn State Libraries

For security purposes, the library requires students to update their local address by going to the circulation desk at
any University library and filling out a change of address form. Students are also able to update the address on-line.
Follow these instructions:
1. Go to www.libraries.psu.edu.
2. At the top next to Quick Links, select My Library Account.
3. On this next page, you will be prompted for your Penn State Access Account and password.
4. Under Library Account Information for: XXXXX (Your Account), you will find Update Address. Select this.
5. Complete the information and click on Update Address.




Employment

If you change your address and you are
working, you must fill out a new W-4
form at 410 Boucke Building.




                                                                                   Pattee Library

  PAGE 22                                SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
      Immigration Rules and Regulations:Your Responsibilities
The Directorate of International Student Advising (DISA) in the University Office of Global Programs in 410
Boucke Building is prepared to answer questions about foreign student status in the United States and to
interpret regulations of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of State
(DOS). It is the responsibility of the student to abide by the laws that relate specifically to "non-immigrant"
aliens in the U.S. Failure to do this may subject the alien (legal term used to describe non-US nationals) to
deportation. The DHS is responsible for enforcing immigration regulations.

Students in F-1 or J-1 status must meet certain obligations to maintain status. The student must:

1. Report any change of address to the DISA and the U.S. government within ten days after the change
   occurs.
   Students must report address changes to DISA by logging on the following Web site: elion.oas.psu.edu and
   following the instructions for students. Students must have their Penn State Access (email) Account to make
   changes.
   Since DISA reports all address changes through SEVIS, the government is informed immediately of any
   address changes. NOTE: “Special Registration” students should submit address changes while on practical or
   academic training on the AR-11SR; otherwise, DISA will report address changes through SEVIS while students
   are registered.
   The PERMANENT ADDRESS must be a foreign address. The LOCAL ADDRESS must be a local street or
   building address, not a post office box address.

2. Keep passport valid at all times. In general, passports should always have at least six months before
   expiration.

3. Attend the school the student was last authorized by the DHS to attend.

4. Maintain full-time academic status. Note: Only one 3-credit course in distance education (Independent
   Learning) may be used toward full-time enrollment each semester.
   Undergraduate students should enroll for a minimum of twelve (12) credits to fulfill DHS visa requirements.
   Generally students will enroll for fourteen (14) to nineteen (19) credits per semester to complete an
   undergraduate degree in four years. Students beginning in Summer I must be registered for twelve (12)
   credits; students beginning in Summer II must be registered for six (6) credits. Students beginning in fall must
   be registered full-time.
   Graduate students will enroll for variable credits up to fifteen (15), with nine (9) credits being the minimum
   required to fulfill DHS visa requirements for full-time enrollment. Students beginning in summer must be
   registered for five (5) credits in summer unless they have a half-time assistantship that requires only four (4)
   credits.
   Exceptions to full-time study must be cleared through an International Student Adviser in advance. All
   exceptions granted by the International Student Adviser must be reported to DHS within 21 days as well as
   the return to full-time status. NOTE: Exceptions to full-time study due to academic difficulties are limited to
   one semester during the entire program of study; documented medical illnesses are limited to one year
   during the program of study. Failure to enroll for full-time study or to obtain approval from the International
   Student Adviser in advance results in the student being automatically out-of-status. For further details see
   www.global.psu.edu/iss/pdf/less_reg.pdf.


5. Apply for an extension no later than 30-45 days before the completion date on the I-20 or before the
   completion date on the DS-2019. DISA will issue new SEVIS documents. Extensions require new financial
   documentation as well as an academic adviser form.

                                     SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                           PAGE 23
Immigration Rules and Regulations: Your Responsibilities (cont’d)
Immigration Rules and Regulations: Your Responsibilities (cont’d)
6. Apply for new documents (I-20 or DS-2019) when changing from one education level to another at
   Penn State, (e.g., from the master's to the doctoral level) or one major to another.

7. Apply for a transfer from one school to another.
   F-1 students must notify an International Student Adviser at their current school of their plan to transfer to
   another school. Only after the current school releases the student can the new school issue a new I-20. The
   student must apply for a transfer through the International Student Adviser at the new school within fifteen
   (15) days of beginning attendance at the new school.
   J-1 students transferring from one sponsor to another must notify the current sponsor of their intent to
   transfer to another school. After determining eligibility for transfer, the current sponsor will release the
   exchange visitor student to the other sponsor and only then will the new sponsor issue the DS-2019.

8. Refrain from off-campus employment without authorization.
   For F-1 visas see: http://www.global.psu.edu/iss/f1_employ.html
   For J-1 visas see: http://www.global.psu.edu/iss/j1_employ.html

9. Limit on-campus employment to a total of 20 hours per week while school is in session. Since
   regulations prohibit students from working more than 20 hours per week, three-quarter-time assistantships
   are not allowed. In addition, the benefit of working on campus requires F-1 and J-1 students to be in status
   (i.e. full-time registration, valid I-20 or DS-2019 and passport). At Penn State, the I-9 form (Employment
   Eligibility) is processed by the Directorate of International Student Advising (DISA), 410 Boucke Building, for
   all international students.

10. Obtain signatures on immigration documents from the Directorate of International Student Advising
    before traveling outside of the United States. Students may need a new visa to re-enter the U.S. For F-1
    visas see pages 38 - 39. For J-1 visas see pages 40 - 41.

11. Keep all immigration documents in a secure place. Students are required to keep all certificates of
    eligibility (for F-1 students, keep all I-20 copies together; for J-1 students, keep all DS-2019 copies
    including any previously issued DS-2019s). In addition, students are required to keep their I-94 and
    passport. Students should inform DISA if any of these documents are lost.

12. Maintain health insurance for student and all dependents (spouse, children) that satisfy Penn State
    requirements.

13. File tax returns each year by April 15 (even if there is no income, there are forms that must be
    completed).

14. Ask an International Student Adviser in the Directorate of International Student Advising, 410 Boucke
    Building, if unsure about any rules. Students are ultimately responsible for knowing the rules and
    regulations of their status while in the U.S. Not knowing the rules is not an excuse with the government, and
    not following the regulations can affect future immigration benefits.
                          DIRECTORATE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISING
                                   University Office of Global Programs
                                           410 Boucke Building
                            Tel. 814-865-6348; E-mail: ISS-Adviser@ip.psu.edu

                                              Office Hours
                             Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday: 1:30 pm - 4:30 pm
                                 Thursday, Friday: 8:30 am - 11:30 am

  PAGE 24                             SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                  Taxes - What You Should Know
There are many different kinds of taxes in the United States. Some taxes are charged by the U.S. Government,
some by the state, and others by local governments. This handout is to help you recognize the different categories
of taxes that you may need to know about while you are an international student at The Pennsylvania State
University.

Income Tax Assistance
Income tax forms (federal, state, and local) must be filed before April 15 of each year for the previous calendar year. (For
example, tax forms on income earned in 2010 must be filed by April 15, 2011.) Tax forms and information specifically for
international students will be available in 410 Boucke Building in mid-February. From mid-March to April 15, free tax
assistance will be provided by Global Connections volunteers who have been trained by the Internal Revenue Service and state
and local tax offices. Eligible students are required to use the tax software provided by the Directorate of International
Student Advising with specific passwords issued to students before seeing a tax volunteer. Students should bring the tax forms
produced by the software and all income information, including the form “W-2” (sent by the employer before January 31), the
form “1042S,” and any previously-filed tax returns as well as any letter giving information about assistantships, scholarships,
fellowships, grants, etc. that give the reason, time period, and amount of the award.


Federal Taxes
The United States Government taxes wages as well as interest on deposits or investments earned in the United States (although
non-residents for tax purposes do not pay taxes on interest). Scholarships, grants, and fellowships from U.S. sources are also
subject to U.S. federal tax. The United States agency responsible for federal taxes is called the Internal Revenue Service or the
IRS.
International Students should understand that they are either “non-residents for (federal) tax purposes” or “residents for (federal)
tax purposes.” International students in F-1 or J-1 status are non-residents for tax purposes the first five years in the U.S. When
they become “residents for tax purposes,” they are taxed on their worldwide income.
As indicated above, all international students are required to report to the IRS between January 1 and April 15 how much
money they earned or received during the previous year from a U.S. source. This procedure is called “filing a tax return” and
requires form 1040NR and form 8843. If taxes are owed to the U.S. Government, they must be paid at this time. The United
States has tax treaties with some governments which reduce the amount of taxes due. If the student had no income from a U.S.
source, then only form 8843 is sent with the student’s signature and date.
Wages earned in the United States are taxed by the U.S. Government. Employers are required to withhold a portion of each
employee’s salary to make periodic payments of each worker’s estimated tax. At the end of each year, all employers report to
the IRS and to the employee the actual wages earned and the federal tax payment that has already been made. The
employer report to employees is called the W-2. Penn State will send to all those who have earned wages from the University
the W-2 by the end of January. A 1042-S form will be received by mid-March for any qualified tuition reduction and for any
amount exempt from federal tax due to a tax treaty. Both of these forms must be included in the student’s tax return form
1040NR.
If treaty benefits are claimed, the following additional papers must be sent to the Payroll Office: form 8233, which is used to
claim treaty benefits on personal services such as wages (W-8BEN is used to claim treaty benefits on scholarships, maybe form
1001, the correct Revenue Procedure 87-8, and a photocopy of either I-20-ID or DS-2019). If additional federal taxes are
due, the employee must pay these taxes before April 15. If too much money was paid to the government during the year, a tax
refund will be sent to the employee after the tax return is reviewed by the IRS. (*Application for the withholding exemption
based on a tax treaty must be made on a form 8233 and a Revenue Procedure form 87-8 or 87-9 for the individual’s home
country. These forms must be submitted to the employer at the beginning of the employment period. They must be resubmitted
late each fall for the next tax year.)

Social Security or FICA Taxes
Social security or FICA taxes are based on the Federal Insurance Contribution Act. There are two types of exemption from FICA: (1)
F-1 and J-1 students are exempt the first five years in the United States (this exemption can be used only once in a lifetime and (2)
students employed by Penn State are exempt from paying FICA taxes as long as they are enrolled half time each pay period (see
Payroll Office for eligibility requirements).
                                  Social Security or FICA taxes continued on the following page.
                                            SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                    PAGE 25
                          Taxes - What You Should Know (continued)
Social Security or FICA Taxes (continued)
When you are required to pay Social security taxes, keep your social security card and all W-2 forms that show withheld amounts for
social security. When you retire, the amount withheld in the U.S. might be credited to your retirement account in your country. (Student
spouses, J-2 visa holders who have work permission, are required to pay social security taxes.) Social security taxes are withheld from
each employee’s paycheck by the employer. The funds are turned over to the Social Security Administration, which releases a monthly
stipend to qualified retired or disabled workers or their dependents, based on their employment history and current administrative
policies regarding social security.



State Taxes
Pennsylvania charges a state income tax on wages and other income earned within the state. The employer reports wages and
withholds and pays taxes on behalf of employees to the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. International students are not
exempt from Pennsylvania income tax and must report all sources of income from within the state by filing a state income tax
Return PA 40 Form with any payment due. International tax treaties do not pertain to the Pennsylvania income tax. Income tax
return forms and information about report procedures are usually available in 410 Boucke Building about mid-February. The
deadline for filing state income tax returns for the preceding year is April 15, just as for the federal tax return.
Pennsylvania also charges a state sales tax of 6 percent on most items you buy, except food, clothing, and medication. Some
services, such as restaurant service, are also taxed. This tax is charged at the time of purchase of the service and is not
refundable.


 Local Taxes
 The Pennsylvania Cities Emergency and Municipal Services Tax (EMST) is charged to every local employee who earns more than
 $1,000 per year. The EMST annual fee may be up to $52. In State College Borough, the employer will withhold a $5 EMST
 when wages exceed $1,000 and will withhold an additional $47 tax when wages exceed $5,200. If you change employers
 during the year, you are only responsible for paying the $52 EMST once annually. This tax is not refundable. Townships
 surrounding State College Borough assess a similar tax amount.
 The State College Earned Income Tax is an income tax on workers who live within the Borough of State College. Surrounding
 townships charge a similar tax. The employer automatically withholds this tax. Nonresidents who live in State College may
 apply for a reduced percentage rate by showing their I-94, I-20, or DS-2019, and passport with visa page.

                                           Fellowships, Scholarships, Grants
        Fellowships, scholarships, and grants from U.S. sources are taxable except for the amounts used for tuition, fees,
        and other educational expenses such as books. Funding agencies are required to withhold and make tax payments
        on U.S. source awards (14 percent on the amount that exceeds tuition, fees, and other educational expenses such
        as books). At the end of each year, the funding agency reports to the IRS and to the student the value of the
        award and how much money was withheld and paid in taxes, if any. Although some funding agencies withhold 14
        percent of the taxable portion of the award and make the tax payments, other funding agencies do not. The
        agency may issue the entire award to the student throughout the year, make the tax payments for the student, and
        then charge the student for reimbursement. Penn State puts this debt on the student’s bill. The form 1042S is sent to
        the student by mid-March to indicate the value of the award and the amount of taxes withheld and paid on the
        award in the previous year. Copy C of this form must be included with the student’s tax return, IRS form1040NR.
        To claim federal tax exemption from these taxes, based on tax treaty, IRS form W-8BEN must be submitted to the
        award issuing agency at the beginning of the award.

 In General
 Photocopy all tax forms and documents for your records. Records of income and scholarship, fellowship and grant benefits, as
 well as tax returns, should be saved for at least three years to respond to any information government authorities may require
 concerning tax issues. You may consult the “Government Offices” pages of the telephone book to find addresses and telephone
 numbers of tax offices. International students who receive wages from Penn State may call the Payroll Office for clarification of
 procedures. International students receiving fellowships, scholarships, or other grants should contact the award-issuing agency to
 clarify procedures. At Penn State, these questions may be addressed to the Office of Loans and Scholarships and the Payroll
 Office.
  PAGE 26                                   SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                        Travel for F-1 Students
                                      Before students leave the United States, they should make sure they have the
                                      following documents to re-enter the U.S. to continue their studies:

                                             valid passport
                                             valid U.S. visa
                                             valid form I-20 with signature for re-entry (signature should be within six
                                               months of re-entry date)
                                             all previous I-20s
                                             current proof of financial support
                                             transcripts (not required but recommended)
                                             proof of current enrollment, or if travel is between semesters, proof of
                                               registration for the next semester (not required but recommended)


                                                     Valid U.S. Visa
The visa, a stamp in the passport, indicates the type of visa, the expiration date, and number of entries permitted. As long
as the visa indicates F-1, is multiple-entry and has not yet expired, the student does not need to apply for a new visa if
he/she plans to re-enter the U.S. with an I-20 to study.

Students should always check with the U.S. consulate in the country in which they will apply for a visa The URL for the
State Department is travel.state.gov/travel/tips/embassies/embassies_1214.html. Each post follows U.S. laws and
regulations but has its own procedures in issuing visas. Some points to consider:

 Applicants must prove to the visa officer that they will return home. In other words, the applicant must have sufficient
ties to the home country.
 There are now three visa application forms: DS-156, DS-157, and DS-158. The DS-157 is for males only between the
ages 16 and 45. The current cost of the visa application is $131, and there are also reciprocity fees for individuals from
certain countries.
 Some countries have additional security checks that will take 28 days or more before visas can be issued.
 The U.S. government maintains a Technology Alert List (TAL) which requires clearance before visas can be issued for
certain fields of study. Certain fields in science and technology not on the TAL will require clearance by the Interagency
Panel on Advanced Science and Security (IPASS) as the government assesses sensitive areas of study.

Visas are denied for a variety of reasons; if denied, students should ask for the reason in writing. Individuals frequently
assume the visa was denied for the wrong reason. The most common visa denial is based on 214(b) of the Immigration
and Nationality Act; the visa officer is required to assume every visa applicant is an intending immigrant until the
applicant proves otherwise. People applying for non-immigrant visas must show non-immigrant intent. Other reasons for
visa denial include incomplete applications, inadmissibility, false documentation, etc. If an interruption in study is
problematic, students should carefully consider the need to travel.

                                                    Valid Form I-20
If students plan to remain at the same school after re-entering the U.S., they can use the I-20 which has been endorsed on
the back by the International Student Adviser (Designated School Official). The I-20 should be endorsed within the
semester the student is traveling or within 6 months of re-entry. If the student requires a new I-20 because the information
on the front of the I-20 has changed, students may need to re-verify their financial support.



            Please note that only staff in the Directorate of International Student Advising,
                                410 Boucke Building, can sign Penn State I-20s.
                                     Do not ask faculty or staff to sign I-20s.


                                         SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                PAGE 27
                                Travel for F-1 Students (continued)
                                                  Canadian Citizens
Canadians entering the U.S. will now need a passport. Canadians re-entering the U.S. in F-1 status do not need a visa.
F-1 students will need an endorsed I-20 and valid I-94 (for re-entry).

 Travel to Contiguous Territory (i.e., Canada, Mexico, or adjacent islands other than Cuba)
(Adjacent islands = Saint Pierre, Miquelon, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica, the
Windward and Leeward Islands, Trinidad, Martinique, and other British, French, and Netherlands territories or possessions in
or bordering on the Caribbean Sea.)

Some individuals will require visas to enter Canada or Mexico. A list of countries whose citizens require visas is available
on the Canadian and Mexican consulate Web sites:
        http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/index.asp (Canada) and
        http://portal.sre.gob.mx/washington/index.php?option=displaypage&Itemid=88&op=page&SubMenu (Mexico)

When traveling to a contiguous territory, international students do not surrender their I-94s (small white card usually
stapled in the passport); hence, students will need the I-94s to reenter the U.S. In general, to re-enter the U.S. from
contiguous territory, the student must present a valid passport with a U.S. visa stamped within (valid or expired), I-94, and
I-20 as well as financial documents. It is best to carry a transcript and current registration information.

Re-entry from contiguous territory for most students with an expired visa is possible as long as the trip has been less than
30 days, the student has not traveled to a third country from the contiguous territory, and the student was in status in the
U.S. when entering contiguous territory. This type of re-entry is referred to as automatic visa revalidation.

Students from certain countries (currently Iran, Cuba, Syria, and Sudan) may not benefit from this visa revalidation.

               Important: Applying for a U.S. Visa in Canada or Mexico – New Rules
Please note that students who apply for a U.S. visa in contiguous territory must wait until the visa is issued. These
individuals will not be able to rely on automatic visa revalidation, and if the visa application is denied, students should be
prepared to return to their home country directly from Canada or Mexico. In other words, anyone applying for a U.S.
visa in Canada or Mexico cannot use automatic visa revalidation.

Those students interested in applying for a U.S. visa in
Canada or Mexico should see the DISA handout on this
or see the Web site: http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/
without/without_1260.html


               Airport Transit Visas
The best advice is to check the consulate Web site of the
country where you will transfer planes because this
information changes frequently. DISA cannot advise on
all of the exceptions.




                                                                                       Beaver Stadium

  PAGE 28                                SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                          Travel for J-1 Students
                                Before students leave the United States, they should make sure they have the following
                                documents to re-enter the U.S. to continue their studies:

                                      valid passport
                                      valid U.S. visa
                                      valid form DS-2019 with signature for re-entry (signature should be within one year
                                          of re-entry date)
                                        all previous DS-2019s (and IAP-66s)
                                        current proof of financial support
                                        transcripts (not required but strongly recommended)
                                        proof of current enrollment, or if travel is between semesters, proof of registration
                                          for the next semester (not required but strongly recommended)


                                                      Valid U.S. Visa
The visa is the stamp in the passport. The visa indicates the type of visa, the expiration date, and number of entries
permitted. As long as the visa indicates J-1 visa type, is multiple-entry, and has not yet expired, students do not need to
apply for a new visa (if they plan to enter the U.S. with a DS-2019) before returning to the U.S.

Students should always check with the U.S. consulate in the country in which they will apply for a visa. The URL for the
State Department is travel.state.gov/travel/tips/embassies/embassies_1214.html. Each post follows U.S. law and
regulations but has its own procedures in issuing visas. Points to consider

 Applicants must prove to the visa officer that they will return home. In other words, the applicant must have sufficient
ties to the home country.
 There are now three visa application forms: DS-156, DS-157, and DS-158. DS-157 is for males only between the
ages 16 and 45. The current cost of the visa application is $100, and there are reciprocity fees for individuals from
certain countries.
 Some countries have additional security checks which will take 28 days or more before visas can be issued.
 The U.S. government maintains a Technology Alert List (TAL) which requires clearance before visas can be issued for
certain fields of study. Certain fields in science and technology not on the TAL will require clearance by the Interagency
Panel on Advanced Science and Security (IPASS) as the government assesses sensitive areas of study

Visas are denied for a variety of reasons; if denied, students should ask for the reason in writing. Individuals frequently
assume the visa was denied for the wrong reason. The most common visa denial is based on 214(b) of the Immigration
and Nationality Act; the visa officer is required to assume every visa applicant is an intending immigrant until the
applicant proves otherwise. People applying for non-immigrant visas must show non-immigrant intent. Other reasons for
visa denial include incomplete applications, inadmissibility, false documentation, etc. If an interruption in study is
problematic, students should carefully consider the need to travel.


                                                  Valid Form DS-2019
If students plan to remain at the same school after reentering the U.S., they can use the DS-2019 which has been
endorsed by the International Student Adviser (Responsible Officer or Alternate Responsible Officer). The DS-2019 should
be endorsed within one year of re-entering. If the student requires a new DS-2019, new financial support may be
requested by DISA.


            Please note that only staff in the Directorate of International Student Advising,
                                410 Boucke Building, can sign Penn State I-20s.
                                     Do not ask faculty or staff to sign I-20s.


                                          SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                 PAGE 29
                                Travel for J-1 Students (continued)

                                                  Canadian Citizens
Canadians entering the U.S. will now need a passport. Canadians re-entering the U.S. in J-1 status do not need a visa, but
they will need an endorsed DS-2019 and valid I-94 (for reentry).

 Travel to Contiguous Territory (i.e., Canada, Mexico, or adjacent islands other than Cuba)
(Adjacent islands = Saint Pierre, Miquelon, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Jamaica, the
Windward and Leeward Islands, Trinidad, Martinique, and other British, French, and Netherlands territories or possessions in
or bordering on the Caribbean Sea.)

Some individuals will require visas to enter Canada or Mexico. A list of countries whose citizens require visas is available
on the Canadian and Mexican consulate Web sites:
      http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/index.asp (Canada) and
      http://portal.sre.gob.mx/washington/index.php?option=displaypage&Itemid=88&op=page&SubMenu (Mexico)

When traveling to contiguous territory, international students do not surrender their I-94s (small white card usually stapled
in the passport); hence, students will need the I-94s to reenter the U.S. In general, to re-enter the U.S. from contiguous
territory, the student must present a valid passport with a U.S. visa stamped within (valid or expired),
I-94, and DS-2019 as well as financial documents. It is best to carry a transcript and current registration information.

Re-entry for most students with an expired visa is possible as long as the trip has been less than 30 days, the student has
not traveled to a third country from the contiguous territory, and the student was in status in the U.S. when entering
contiguous territory. This type of re-entry is referred to as automatic visa revalidation.

Students from certain countries (currently Iran, Cuba, Syria, and Sudan) may not benefit from this visa revalidation.

               Important: Applying for a U.S. Visa in Canada or Mexico – New Rules
Please note that students who apply for a U.S. visa in contiguous territory must wait until the visa is issued. These
individuals will not be able to rely on automatic visa revalidation, and if the visa application is denied, students should be
prepared to return to their home country directly from Canada or Mexico. In other words, anyone applying for a U.S.
visa in Canada or Mexico cannot use automatic visa revalidation.

Those students interested in applying for a U.S. visa in Canada or Mexico should see the ISA handout on this or see the
Web site: http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/without/without_1260.html

                                                 Airport Transit Visas
The best advice is to check the consulate Web site of the country where you will transfer planes because this information
changes frequently, DISA cannot advise on transit visas.




                                                      University Park Airport

  PAGE 30                                SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                  Important Contact Information
Bursar                                                                                  865-6528 103 Shields Building
Graduate Enrollment Services                                                            865-1795 114 Kern Building
Housing Assignments                                                                     865-7501 210 Johnston Commons
International Student Advising                                                          865-6348 410 Boucke Building
Intensive English Communication Program (IECP)                                          865-7550 301 Boucke Building
Global Connections                                                                      863-3927 404A Boucke Building
Call Center Services (including General University Information)                         865-4700 ————————
Registrar                                                                               865-6357 112 Shields Building
Student Insurance                                                                       865-7467 302 Student Health Center
Undergraduate Admissions                                                                865-5471 201 Shields
University Health Services (Advice Nurse — Available 24/7)                              863-4463 ————————
University Health Services (for appointments)                                           863-0774 Student Health Center

                                             Important Web sites
                                       University Office of Global Programs:
                                                   http://www.global.psu.edu
                                                   Global Programs home page
                                    http://www.global.psu.edu/iss/letter_request.html
                For online forms & documents for international student services, such as document request forms
                                    http://www.global.psu.edu/iss/current_students.html
                                     For information regarding current international students

                                                University Health Services
                                             http://www.sa.psu.edu/uhs/index.cfm
                                             Online Appointment Scheduling available

 U.S Citizenship & Immigration Service                                   Student Organizations at Penn State
                 http://www.uscis.gov                                               http://www.clubs.psu.edu
                                                                Lists student organizations including nationality clubs at Penn State
    Currency Exchange Services
     http://fx.sauder.ubc.ca/today.html
                                                                    U.S. International Student Organization
                                                                                     http://www.isoa.org
                     SCOLA                                  Service provider for international students throughout the United States

            http://www.scola.org
Television programming from around the world                                                    Internal Revenue Service
                          Embassies                                                               http://www.irs.ustreas.gov
                                                                                                Federal tax forms and links to tips
                       http://usembassy.org
            Lists all U.S. embassies in foreign countries
                                                                                State College Area School District
             http://www.state.gov/s/cpr/rls/dpl/
 Lists foreign missions (embassies, interest sections) in the US                           http://www.scasd.org


                                              SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                    PAGE 31
          Welcome to the
               Area -
          Local Information

PAGE 32       SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                 American Attitudes and Values
Citizens of the U.S. are proud of their democratic origins and       You will also hear people exchanging their opinions
tend to believe strongly in egalitarian ideals. You might find       on a variety of subjects, and they may ask you for
that rigid hierarchies are uncommon in this country. The             yours. Americans openly challenge one another
competitive culture of the U.S. encourages personal                  about their ideas, and this is considered an integral
accomplishments; people are viewed as individuals rather than        part of society; do not be shocked if you hear
as collective group members. Consequently, independence is a         someone say “I couldn’t disagree with your more”
highly valued characteristic and privacy (space and time to be       before launching into an impassioned speech about
alone) is considered an essential part of life.                      their own ideals.
Change is generally viewed as a positive force; mobility is          As long as criticism does not take the form of a
equated with progress. As a result, you will find that the U.S. is   personal attack, it is not considered improper.
a largely transient society in economic, social, and                 Students frequently challenge professors in the
geographic terms.                                                    classroom about something that has been said, and
Freedom of speech and the right to privacy are values                as long as questioning is done diplomatically and not
which are cherished by the majority of Americans and                 with contempt, professors generally will take the time
carefully protected under the U.S. Constitution. You will            to address the student’s query. What you may feel to
probably hear people criticizing the government and its              be a sign of open disrespect is often the norm because
leaders during your stay, and perhaps even laughing at the           many people in the U.S. do not feel restricted by
country’s weaknesses.                                                social status.



American Academic Life                                                                        Keys to Academic Success
Academic life in the United States is probably quite different       Informal attire and       Attend class regularly and
from that of your home country. Many foreign students                the omission of titles     take good notes.
comment that U.S. students are competitive but don’t seem to         in interpersonal          Ask your instructor for help if
study very hard, and that the professors are very demanding.         communication are           you feel that you are falling
Teaching styles and classroom attitudes vary widely and              common in American          behind in class or if you do
are influenced by many different factors.                            university teaching         not understand something.
                                                                     practices. However,       Keep your class syllabus and
American professors expect their students to ask questions.                                      refer to it for course
                                                                     this should not be
Class participation is important and in many cases is a part of                                  objectives, material to be
                                                                     taken to mean that
your class grade. Silence can be misunderstood for lack of                                       covered, assignment due
                                                                     your professor has
interest. Professors want their students to respect their                                        dates, examination dates and
                                                                     a relaxed attitude
knowledge and opinions, but in general prefer discussion and                                     grade determination
                                                                     toward assignments,
debate to respectful silence.                                        class attendance or         methods.
If you don’t understand something in the course materials or the     the quality of your       Visit the University’s
professor’s expectations, ask for help. Professors expect to be      work.                       Academic Writing Center if
approached for help if the student is confused or has questions.                                 you need help with your
                                                                                                 writing assignments.

Graduate Education - Assistantships
In research universities, many discussion sessions and labs are
taught by graduate or doctoral teaching assistants. These            Students will often refer to professors or graduate
assistants help relieve their professors of some of their duties.    assistants by their first name; this is not considered
Generally this includes tasks such as grading homework,              disrespectful. Students may also eat, drink, or sleep
leading a discussion group or lab, and in some cases, teaching       in class. If you have any questions about how your
                                                                     students are acting in your classes, discuss it with
a lecture.
                                                                     your professor.
If you are given a research assistantship, you’ll be expected to
assist a faculty member or a group of faculty members in their       In American universities, students are normally
research. Students on an assistantship work about 20 hours a         asked to evaluate their teachers. Your professor will
                                                                     usually keep you updated on these evaluations. A
week and often work nights and weekends.
                                                                     number of negative evaluations may result in the loss
At U.S. universities, teachers must earn the respect of their        of your teaching assistantship. Speak with your
students; it does not automatically come with their                  professor if you are uncomfortable with any of your
position. Most students will expect you to teach like their          responsibilities.
American professors.
                                          SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                 PAGE 33
                            American Attitudes and Values (continued)
American Invitations
When you are invited to someone’s house, you should                        Because many Americans maintain a busy lifestyle, eat-
arrive promptly. If you are unsure of the dress code, it is                ing out is a frequent occurrence both for social enjoy-
perfectly acceptable to ask the hostess/host about the                     ment and because cooking at home may be time-
attire: “Will the dress be casual or formal?” It is not neces-             consuming. In a restaurant in which you are waited on by
sary to take a gift to the host, but it is not inappropriate. If           a waiter/waitress, a tip (service charge) of 15 percent
you stay with someone for a few days or more, a small                      or more is expected. At a fast-food establishment, you
gift and letter of thanks is a polite way of letting your                  don’t need to leave a tip but you do need to clear your
hosts know that you enjoyed your stay.                                     table before you leave.
If you observe dietary restrictions, let your host know in                 If you are invited to dine out with friends, plan to pay
advance; cultural preferences and dietary restrictions are                 for your own meal (called “splitting the check”) unless
understood and respected. Americans like for people to                     explicitly invited to eat out at the host’s expense (this will
“make themselves at home” during visits and will generally                 be worded as “This is on me,” “I’d like to treat this time”
show a visitor all over the house and emphasize where                      or “I’d like to take you out to lunch”).
guest towels, water glasses, and other items are located. If
                                                                           Never accept an invitation unless you plan to attend. If
you are staying for a substantial length of time, you
                                                                           you cannot or do not want to go, it is polite to say,
should not expect your host/hostess to pour you a glass of
                                                                           “Thank you, but I won’t be able to go.” If you do accept
water whenever you are thirsty; you will be expected to
                                                                           an invitation and a problem arises which will prevent
get it yourself.
                                                                           your attendance, contact your host and explain.


What is Culture Shock?
Adjusting to a new culture can be daunting to say the                        Gradually, as this sense of adventure wears off, the
least. Culture Shock is not always a sudden                                  differences that once seemed to be adventurous
experience; often, it is part of a gradual process of                        suddenly seem to cause you anxiety.
adapting to a different and new culture.                                     The important thing to remember is that culture shock
The important thing to remember is that this cultural                        will gradually go away as you begin to understand
adaptation is a normal process that the majority of                          the new
internationals go through. You are not alone.                                culture. The
                                                                             more skilled
                                                                                                      Signs of Culture Shock
When you travel abroad, you not only bring your luggage                      you become in Extreme homesickness
with you, you also bring your culture. Your culture contains                 understanding     Desire to avoid social settings which
the values and pattern of behaviors that are important to                    your host           seem threatening or unpleasant
you and that are customary in your home country. The                         culture’s values Physical complaints and sleep
more that you are aware of your own culture, the more                        and customs,        disturbances
prepared you will be to understand a new culture and                         the easier it     Depression and feelings of helplessness
the differences that you will encounter.                                     will become to Difficulty with coursework and
Often, you may find that your first few months in a new                      adjust to them      concentration
culture are exciting. You are experiencing an                                and enjoy your Loss of your sense of humor
adventure full of new sights, people and situations.                         surroundings.     Boredom or fatigue
                                                                                               Hostility towards the host culture

Coping with Culture Shock
If you find yourself experiencing culture shock, try to step                      they would handle the situation and what it means
back from an experience that has been bothering you,                              in the host culture
assess it, and search for an appropriate explanation or                         Plan how you might act in this or a similar situation
response. The following techniques may help you:                                  in the future
 Observe how others are acting in the same situation                          Test the new behavior and evaluate how well it
 Describe the situation, what it means to you, and your                         works
     response to it                                                             Make a list of things that you do like about the host
 Ask a local resident or friend from the host culture how                       culture

Information on these two pages taken from: www.isa.usm.edu/handbook.html. Used with permission from the University of Southern Mississippi.

  PAGE 34                                       SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
  Penn State Recognized International Student Organizations
There are over 1300 student organizations at Penn State. In addition to the international student organizations
   listed below, there are a number of international religious, sport and performance groups at Penn State.
                  For more information, visit: www.sa.psu.edu/usa/studentactivities/search.asp
  Nationality Club                                       Contact                     Email
  African Students Association                           Aminu Nyako                 amn5085@psu.edu
  Arab Student Union                                     Hamzeh Abayounis            hma5020@psu.edu
  Armenian Student Association                           Yegishe Avetisyan           yya5003@psu.edu
  Asian Pacific American Caucus                          Roman Sandoval              rrs188@psu.edu
  Asian Pacific American Coalition                       Esther Shin                 ebs5015@psu.edu
  Association for India’s Development                    Amit Arora                  axa962@psu.edu
  Bangladesh Student Association                         Shariful Alam               sza5031@psu.edu
  Black Caucus                                           Christopher Nock            cln5031@psu.edu
  Boricua Grads                                          Rafael Diaz-Torres          rrd130@psu.edu
  Brazilians                                             Marina Aguiar               mma5028@psu.edu
  Caribbean Student Association                          Usha Omela Boodhansingh     oub102@psu.edu
  Chinese Friendship Association                         Qikun Liu                   qxl121@psu.edu
  Chinese Undergraduate Student Association              Jun Yan                     jvy5050@psu.edu
  Club Kreyol                                            Valerie Marcellus           vnm102@psu.edu
  Coalition of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and   R. Thomas Koerber           rtk138@psu.edu
  Ally Graduate Students
  Dominican Student Association                          Dahiana Tejada              dut118@psu.edu
  Eurasian Culture Society                               Daulet Torgautov            dzt5013@psu.edu
  European Student Club                                  Johanna Johnson             jej163@psu.edu
  Filipino Association                                   Marc Tedeja                 mct5027@psu.edu
  Graduate Student Association                           Alfonso Mendoza             mendoza@psu.edu
  Hindu Students Council                                 Anita Bhattacharya          axb982@psu.edu
  Hong Kong Student Association                          Chung Ho Howard-Li          chl5028@psu.edu
  Indian Graduate Students Association                   Sebastien K. Anil           axs1027@psu.edu
  Indonesian Student Association                         Alven Wihono                arw5070@psu.edu
  International Student Council                          Kolby Nelson                kkn117@psu.edu
  Iranian Student Association                            Anaram Shahravan            aus235@psu.edu
  Irish Student Society                                  Patricia Casey              pmc5074@psu.edu
  Israel Alliance                                        Yonathan Oettinger          yoo5010@psu.edu
  Italian Student Society                                Anthony Picciuto            avp5032@psu.edu
  Japanese Culture Society                               Jae Sung Han                jyh5081@psu.edu
  Japanese Friendship Association                        Yusuke Oyakawa              ywo5002@psu.edu
  Khaleeji Student Association                           Mohammed Al-Mousawi         mha5011@psu.edu
  Khmer Students Society                                 Molly Kruth                 mvk5032@psu.edu
  Korean Students Association                            Gunwoo Nam                  gun107@psu.edu
                                     SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                       PAGE 35
                 International Student Organizations (continued)

                    Nationality Club                               Contact               Email
Korean Undergraduate Student Association             Esther Shin                 ebs5015@psu.edu
Latin American Student Association                   Joseph Martinez             jam5600@psu.edu
Latino Caucus                                        Jorge Calderon              jlc5361@psu.edu
Lebanese Student Association                         Lamis Jomaa                 luj111@psu.edu
Malaysia Society                                     Amar Yasier Razli           azy5019@psu.edu
Mexican-American Student Association                 Berenice Bedolla            blb5124@psu.edu
Omani Student Association                            Basayir Hussain Al-Lawati   bha5005@psu.edu
Pakistan Student Association                         Ali Muhammad                aqm5019@psu.edu
Polish Society                                       Julia Tomaszewsky           jet5102@psu.edu
Project Haiti Student Association                    Alain Bonny                 arb5134@psu.edu
Puerto Rican Student Association                     Elena Segura                ews5037@psu.edu
Saudi Arabian Student Association                    Rayed Al Shamekh            raa194@psu.edu
Singapore Student Association                        Clifford Chow               cwc5158@psu.edu
Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers           Francisco Aguilar           fja5001@psu.edu
South Asian Student Association                      Anand Mehta                 aym5047@psu.edu
Students for Justice in Palestine                    David McLaughlin            djm5091@psu.edu
Taiwanese American Students Association              Candy Li-chia Fan           lwf5023@psu.edu
Taiwanese Student Association                        Chuan-Chien Jen             cxj215@psu.edu
Thai Student Association                             Tanit Jaisa-ard             txj146@psu.edu
Turkish Student Association                          Safakcan Tuncdemir          sut133@psu.edu
Ukrainian Society                                    Andrew Leskiw               apl5025@psu.edu
Undertones                                           Lianna Newman               lmn5042@psu.edu
Venezuelan Cultural Association                      Yair Wainberg               yxw5008@psu.edu
Vietnamese Student Association                       Loc Tran                    lvt102@psu.edu




                      Homecoming 2008

PAGE 36                                SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
               State College Community General Information
Transportation Services
                         By Airplane: The University Park Airport is located 5.5 miles from State College and the Penn
                         State University campus. Information on the University Park Airport can be found on their Web-
                         site: www.statecollegeairport.org
                       Locally By Bus: The Centre Area Transportation Authority (CATA) runs the local bus service. You
can find updated information as well as local and campus bus schedules at their Web site: www.catabus.com For more
information, please refer to page 44 of this guide.
Nationally By Bus: If you plan on traveling outside of State College by bus, the Greyhound Bus system offers services
to various locations across the county. You can find bus schedules at their Web site: www.greyhound.com. For service to
New York City, students can use the “Chinatown” bus, with service to “Chinatown,” NYC. For more information, visit
www.gotobus.com. Penn State also operates a weekly bus service to NYC, the Happy
Valley Express. Buses depart State College on Friday with return service on Monday.
For more information, visit www.transportation.psu.edu/psu2nyc/



Religious Services
There are a number of religions practiced at Penn State and in the surrounding State College community. For a list of
religious services, visit the following Web-site:

                             www.statecollegecentral.com/scc2/community/religion.html




Parks & Recreation
                             For a comprehensive guide to State College Parks, visit the
                             following Web-site:
                                  www.statecollegecentral.com/scc2/outdoors/index.html

                             The Centre Region Parks & Recreation official Web-site is the
                             source for information on parks, programs, & special events for
                             youth and adults of all ages, including sporting teams/leagues and
                             bike path maps:
                                                    crpr.centreconnect.org




Shopping
              A list of shops in the State College area can be found at:
                 www.downtownstatecollege.com/shopping.html
                        www.state-college.com/shopping.html

              To find out what American clothing size you wear, go to:
                     www.onlineconversion.com/clothing.htm

                To find out what American shoe size you wear, go to:
                   www.dancesport.uk.com/shoes/conchart.htm


                                       SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                              PAGE 37
   Centre Area Transportation Authority (CATA) Bus Guide




          Watch how‐to videos at: http://www.catabus.com/HowToVideos/index.html  
PAGE 38                   SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
Centre Area Transportation Authority (CATA) Bus Guide

                  Popular Destinations




                SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010   PAGE 39
                             Local Specialty Restaurants and Food Stores
                                      That Oriental Store (primarily Asian)    India Pavilion Exotic Indian Cuisine
                                      451 Railroad Avenue                      222 E. Calder Way
Grocery Stores                        234-3011                                 237-3400

Giant Food Stores (open 24 hours)                                              Kaarma Indian Cuisine
255 Northland Ctr. 237-1837 or                                                 120 E. Beaver Avenue
2222 E. College Ave. 861-2578         International Restaurants                238-8141

Meyer Dairy (fresh dairy products)    Alto Italian Restaurant and Bar          Kim Chi - Korean
2390 S. Atherton St.                  901 Pike Street, Lemont                  1100 N. Atherton Street
237-1849                              238-5534                                 237-2096

Walmart Superstore (open 24 hours)    Big Bowl Noodle House                    Le Papillon - French
1665 N. Atherton Pl. 237-8401 or      428 E. College Avenue, downstairs        1 Country Club Lane
373 Benner Pike 235-9306              867-1534                                 234-8000

Wegman’s (open 24 hours)              China Wok Chinese Restaurant             Mad Mex
345 Colonnade Boulevard               279 Northland Centre                     240 S. Pugh Street
278-9035                              231-8883                                 272-5656

Weis Market                           Chinese Kitchen Express                  Mario & Luigi's Restaurant
560 Westerly Parkway 238-1821 or      430 E. College Avenue                    1272 N. Atherton Street
110 Rolling Ridge Dr. 231-8397 or     238-0655                                 234-4273
1471 Martin St. 237-2500
                                      Chopstick Express                        Shalimar Indian Restaurant
                                      134 E. College Avenue                    120 E. Beaver Av.
International Markets                 237-1717                                 237-5500

The African Market                    Cozy Thai Bistro                         Peking Garden Express
121 1/2 E Beaver Ave.                 232 S. Allen St.                         2901 E. College Avenue
238-1938                              238-3005                                 238-3132

Ciao Italia Italian Market            Faccia Luna                              Q’Doba - Mexican
620 111 N. Butz St.                   1229 S. Atherton Street                  206 W. College Avenue
234-2426                              234-9000                                 861-3288

Dragon Land (Asian)                   Fuji & Jade Dragon -Chinese & Japanese   Say Sushi - Korean & Japanese
2081 S. Atherton Street               418 Wester;ly Parkway                    310 S. Allen Street
861-6110                              861-3226                                 238-2244

Far Corners Oriental Market           Golden Wok Chinese Restaurant            Seoul Garden Korean Restaurant
1101 N. Atherton Street               332 W. College Avenue                    129 Locust Lane
237-5553                              234-1102                                 237-7444

International Market                  Herwig’s Bistro - Austrian               Viet Thai Restaurant
328 S. Allen Street                   132 W. College Avenue                    146 N. Atherton Street
238-7679                              238-0200                                 238-5004

Krishan Indian Grocery Store          Hunan Wok - Chinese & Japanese           Zola - French
230A W. College Avenue                452 E. College Avenue                    324 W. College Avenue
237-4118                              278-7560                                 237-8474


  PAGE 40                            SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                        Advertisement


The University Office of Global Programs thanks CiCi’s Pizza for
        donating 50 pizzas to our Welcome Luncheon!




                   1653 North Atherton Street
                         814-237-6001
                       www.cicispizza.com

                    SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010   PAGE 41
                                       Banking in the U.S.
                                 The State College area is served by several banks, most with one or more branch
                                 offices. You may want to refer to the table below in choosing a local bank. Most banks
                                 will exchange foreign currency as long as you have an account with them. Many will
                                 charge a fee for this service, which is listed in the table below, along with the
                                 approximate time it takes to exchange currency. Generally, it will take longer to
                                 exchange U.S. dollars for another currency.
                                While you will routinely be asked for a U.S. Social Security Number (SSN) when
                                opening a bank account, local banks understand some international students will not
have this number. To open an account without an SSN, you will need to bring your passport and fill out and sign U.S.
Government Form W-8 (provided by the bank). You should notify the bank if you get a SSN. DO NOT use a temporary
housing or the International Student Advising office address to open a new bank account. You must use your
permanent local address when opening bank accounts.
                                                               Phone                   Exchange        Exchange
    Bank           Address       Other Branch Locations                   $ Exchange
                                                              Number                      Fees           Time
M&T Bank         114 South      1423 North Atherton Street    234-5151 Yes customers        varies     7-10 business
                 Allen Avenue   1330 South Atherton Street                  only                           days


Citizens Bank    122 West       1826 North Atherton Street    234-6311          Yes       $6 for non      1 week
                 College        1248 South Atherton Street                  exchanges -customers,         Euro’s,
                 Avenue         345 East Beaver Avenue                     greater than    $3 for     Canadian, and
                                                                           $200 must be customers British Pounds in
                                                                           sent certified            stock at College
                                                                                mail                  Avenue Branch

First National   117 South      366 East College Avenue       231-4541          Yes          $15       Up to 3 weeks
Bank             Allen Street   1667 North Atherton Street                                customers
                                1811 South Atherton Street                                   only
                                460 Westerly Parkway


Nittany Bank     116 East       1300 North Atherton Street    234-7320 Yes customers        varies        2-3 days
                 College        1900 South Atherton Street                  only
                 Avenue         2541 E. College Avenue
                                Near Nittany Mall

Northwest        204 West       1524 West College Avenue      237-6854          No             -              -
Savings Bank     Beaver Ave.    1767 North Atherton Street
                                611 University Drive

Penn State     102 HUB          1937 North Atherton Street    865-7728          No             -              -
Federal Credit
Union

PNC Bank         122 East       1601 South Atherton Street    231-1674          Yes         varies         varies
                 College        1408 North Atherton Street
                 Avenue
Reliance Bank 100              1824 South Atherton Street     237-1133          No             -              -
              Hawbaker
              Industrial Drive
Sovereign        216 West       1535 North Atherton Street    861-9361          Yes         varies         varies
Bank             College        1780 South Atherton Street                   customers
                 Avenue                                                         only


  PAGE 42                             SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
    Advertisement




SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010   PAGE 43
             Advertisements




PAGE 44   SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                          Cell Phones in the U.S.
The State College area is served by several cell phone services. You may want to refer to the table below in choosing a
cell phone. Please DO NOT use your orientation housing, temporary housing, or the International Student Advising
office address to open an account. You must use your permanent local address.
        Prepay Options                   Insurance         Phone Costs              Requirements                 Closest Location
                                           AT&T Wireless (www.wireless.att.com/home/)
Go-Phone – You buy a $15 to           1 year            The cost of a   Driver’s license, Social              1725 N. Atherton
$100 etc. card which lasts between    manufacturing     Go-Phone is     Security Card, physical               237-0515
30 days and 1 year. Nights and        warranty on all   between         address. Deposit of $50-
weekends are free on select plans.    phones.           $29.99 and      $1000 required if you do              Penn State Book Store
There are contractual agreement       No insurance on   $94.99          not have a social security            University Park
plans as well. You will receive       Pre-pay or Go                     card.                                 883-8032
500 free weekend minutes if you       Phone.                            Pre-pay and Go-Phones
choose at least the $39.99 a month                                      require only a debit or credit        Walmart Superstore
payment.                                                                card.                                 1665 N. Atherton Pl.
                                                                                                              237-8401
                                           Verizon Wireless (www.verizonwireless.com)
Impluse— You buy a $15 to             $4.99/month       With the        Driver’s license and social           2030 N. Atherton St. 231
$150 card which lasts 30 days to      No insurance      Prepaid or      security card for contract            -3948
one year. Nights and weekends         available on      Impulse Plan,   plans. A valid government
are free on select plans. There are   Pre-pay plans     phone costs     issued ID is required for             Walmart Superstore
contractual agreement plans as                          vary, but start prepay plans.                         1665 N. Atherton Pl.
well.                                                   around $39.99                                         237-8401
                                Sprint/Nextel Wireless (www.sprint.com) and (www.boostmobile.com)
Boost —You buy $20, $30, and            1 year             They vary        Driver’s license, or state        2901 E. College
$50 cards. Nights and weekends          manufacture        depending on     issued ID, and a SSN for a        Nittany Mall
are free on select plans. There are warranty. Radio options such as         credit check for contract         867-7010
contractual agreement plans as          Shack offers a 1 a camera on        plans. If you have little or no
well. Nights and weekends are           year in-store      the phone, but   credit (or no SSN), a deposit     Radio Shack
free if you choose at least the         replacement        typically range  may be required. For Boost        1621 N Atherton St.
$50.00 a month payment.                 ranging from       from $79.99-     mobile phones, no ID              235-6169
                                        $9.99-$24.99       $149.99          needed.
                                                     TracFone (www.TracFone.com)
TracFone— You buy a $19.99 to           1 year             Starts as low at No requirements to purchase       Walmart Superstore
$139.99 card which lasts 90 to          manufacture        $14.99           a phone. No Social Security       1665 N. Atherton Pl.
365 days. Same low rate per             warranty from                       Card needed. No credit            237-8401
minute for all your calls:              the time of                         check. No activation fee.
international (to over 60               activation.
destinations), long distance
nationwide, roaming and local.
                                                      Net10 (www.Net10.com)
Net 10— You buy a $20 to $400         1 year              Starts as low at    No requirements to purchase     Walmart Superstore
card which lasts 30 to 730 days.      manufacture         $19.99.             a phone. No Social Security     1665 N. Atherton Pl.
No extra charge for international     warranty                                Card needed. No credit          237-8401
calls (to over 60 destinations).                                              check. No activation fee.

                                         Using PC for Voice Calls
If you use a PC (with a headset if necessary) and web connection, you can have a number of voice call services, which can
be very reasonable tools for communication with someone at a distance, including those in foreign countries. Some services
not only provide PC-to-PC calls, but also PC-to-Phone calls. Among the popular services of this kind, you may be
interested in MSN Live Messenger (see http://get.live.com/messenger/overview), Skype (see www.skype.com/), and
Yahoo Messenger with Voice (see http://messenger.yahoo.com/).

                                                  Calling Cards
There are many calling cards available. www.worldphonecard.com provides a lot of information about many calling
cards, including best rates from the U.S to your home city. The International Student Organization offers a calling card in
which the rates vary with each country but stay the same all day long, meaning that there is no change in prices
throughout the day. Purchase these cards at http://www.isoa.org/other_services_calling_card.aspx.
Also you can find very inexpensive world-wide calling cards at the Krishan Indian Grocery Store on West College Ave.
                                           SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                     PAGE 45
                         Bicycle Regulations on Campus
The following regulations for bicycles and mopeds apply to all persons operating any such mode of
transportation on University property. These regulations were taken from the Penn State Police
Services Web site: http://www.psu.edu/dept/police/
Registration
Bicycles must be registered and display a current Centre Region permit. Permits can either be mailed to your local
address or you can choose to pick it up in the Parking Office in the Eisenhower Parking Deck. Upon expiration of
the two-year permit, the bicycle must be reregistered.

Registration is free online at http://www.transportation.psu.edu/bicycles/registration.shtml

The permit issued on the University Park campus is identical to the one issued by the Borough of State College. Bicycles
registered by the Borough of State College are valid on the University Park campus, and those registered at University
Park are valid in the Borough of State College. Registrations and/or permits are not transferable. In the event of the sale
of a bicycle, or transfer of ownership, the new owner must register the vehicle in his or her name.
Requirements for Registration
Each bicycle, in order to be registered and issued a permit, must be in a safe mechanical operating condition and be
equipped as follows:
1.  A red reflector on the rear, visible for a distance of up to 500 feet 
2.  A headlamp is required if the bicycle is operated at night. The headlamp must be visible for a distance of 500 feet. 
An amber reflector on each side of the bicycle
3. The permit must be affixed to the middle of the seat tube or be visible on the seat post (if it is a racing bicycle), and
    the permit must face the front of the bicycle. The post or seat tube must be clean and dry for the permit to adhere
properly.
Rules and Regulations
    Bicycles may be ridden on bicycle routes and automobile thoroughfares only. Riders must walk their bicycles at all
      other places. Bicycles shall not be ridden on pedestrian paths, walkways, malls or on any other pedestrian-used
      way.
    Bicycles must be parked on campus at places clearly designated by the presence of bicycle racks. Specifically, a
      bicycle must not be parked in automobile parking spaces; on lawn areas; in shrubs or flower beds; in streets; in
      driveways; or in any building. This also includes sidewalks, entranceways to buildings, or places that hinder pedes-
      trian travel. In the event a bicycle rack is full, the bicycle may be parked upright in the general vicinity, provided it
      does not impede pedestrian traffic.
    Bicycles must be parked on campus at places clearly designated by the presence of bicycle racks. Specifically, a
      bicycle must not be parked in automobile parking spaces; on lawn areas; in shrubs or flower beds; in streets; in
      driveways; or in any building. This also includes sidewalks, entranceways to buildings, or places that hinder pedes-
      trian travel. In the event a bicycle rack is full, the bicycle may be parked upright in the general vicinity, provided it
      does not impede pedestrian traffic.
    Any bicycle parked at any Penn State campus shall be parked at the risk of the owner, and should be locked when
      unattended. A copy of the bicycle/moped regulations may be obtained at the Parking Office, at University Police, or
      at the Kiosk Information Booths located throughout campus.
Penalties
Violations of these regulations shall subject the violator to penalties as follows:
    All moving violations - $15.00 per violation (excessive speed, riding on pedestrian ways, stop sign violations, wrong way
      on a one-way street, passing on the right of traffic, etc.)
    Failure to properly register a bicycle/moped - $5.00 violation
    Parked or affixed to handrails, handicap ramps, wheelchair curb cuts, etc. - $50.00 per violation

                                                       Safe Riding Tips
Obey all traffic control devices & routing signs. Stop       Be courteous and fair to pedestrians, other bicyclists, and
  at all red lights & stop signs.                                automobiles.
Yield to pedestrians.                                        Avoid traveling too fast down hills or on rough/slippery roads.
Maintain a safe stopping distance behind moving              Always wear a helmet when riding.
  cars.

     PAGE 46                                SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                                Fire Safety Information

 In the United States more than 4000 people die each year in fires, and approximately 25,000 are injured. Many of these
 fires could have been prevented and many lives could have been saved if individuals would have been aware of some fire
 prevention measures.
 The following fire prevention tips will help you not only prevent a fire but also assist you if you ever experience a fire.

                      FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS                                        IF YOU HAVE A GREASE OR OTHER COOKING
Fire alarm systems are installed and designed to alert you of a smoke or                      RELATED FIRE:
fire emergency in your building before conditions prevent you from safely    • NEVER try to move or carry a pan that is on fire. (It is a common
leaving.                                                                     reaction to move or throw a burning pan into a sink. This often results in
Fire alarm systems include not only smoke detectors but also manual pull     serious burns to individuals and can spread the fire)
stations and horn/strobe units.                                              •Carefully turn the heat off and place a cover over the pan. Do not
• NEVER remove batteries from smoke detectors.                               remove the lid until the pan has cooled down
• NEVER disconnect, cover or tamper with any fire alarm device.              •Never use water on a grease fire. It will cause the fire to spread.
• Tampering with a smoke detector or other fire alarm device not only        •If possible use an approved portable fire extinguisher to extinguish the
jeopardizes your safety and the safety of others it is against the law!      fire.
• When a fire alarm system sounds leave the building immediately.            •Know how to correctly use your fire extinguisher
                                                                             • Call 911 to report a fire emergency
   EXIT PLANNING (HOME, APARTMENT, OFFICE)
In the event of a fire, remember every second counts. Escape plans help                          IF YOU ARE TRAVELING
you get out of the building quickly. Smoke and fire can quickly block your   • Always stay at a hotel, motel or other lodging facility that has
escape routes.                                                               functioning smoke detectors.
• Be familiar with at least two ways out from all areas.                     • If possible stay at facilities that are also protected by automatic fire
• Never open doors that are hot to the touch                                 sprinkler systems. (These facilities can be located at www.usfa.fema.gov)
• Designate a meeting place outside.                                         • You may want to consider taking your own battery operated smoke
• Once outside – stay out of the building                                    detector.
• Conduct a fire drill in your home.                                         • Locate at least two exits from your room.
                                                                             • Leave the building immediately upon hearing the fire alarm.
                    HOW TO REPORT A FIRE
• Call 911 from a safe location                                                         OPEN FLAMES (CANDLES, INCENSE)
• Identify yourself and your location                                        The presence or use of candles, incense burners, and other open flame
• Provide information about fire                                             items is not permitted in University buildings. This includes all apartments,
                                                                             residence halls, offices and research areas.
                     COOKING FIRE SAFETY                                     If you use an open flame item in a non-University building the following
YOU can help prevent fires and fire alarm activations caused by              fire prevention measures should be followed.
cooking by following these fire safety prevention tips.                      • NEVER leave a candle or other open flame item burning when you
                                                                             leave the room.
                                                                             • Always extinguish open flames before going to bed.
         NEVER LEAVE COOKING UNATTENDED                                      • Always locate candles and other open flame devices away from
• If you have to leave the stove, microwave, or other cooking appliance      combustible items (curtains, cloth materials, paper, plastic etc.)
for any reason, turn the appliance off.
• Turn handles to the center of the stove to prevent accidental spills.
• Have a lid close by to place on the pan if a fire starts in the pan.                                     SMOKING
• Use approved pot holders, not aprons or towels.                            The use of smoking materials is not permitted in any University building.
• Always turn on the stove exhaust fan.                                      • Insure smoking materials are totally extinguished before discarding.
• Avoid grease buildup on appliances and surrounding surfaces.
• Clean appliances regularly. Watch for grease overflows that can start               ELECTRICAL CORDS AND APPLIANCES
fires.                                                                       • Never place electrical cords under rugs or furniture or in areas where
• Don’t place towels, napkins or other paper products around the stove       it could be damaged by people or equipment.
surface.                                                                     • Extension cords are designed for temporary use only.
• Don’t wear loose clothing or clothing with floppy sleeves while cooking.   • Repair or replace all damaged electrical cords and appliances.
• Be familiar with the operation of all your cooking appliances.             • Do not overload electrical outlets by using multiple plug strips.

                                                                             For Additional information contact:
                                                                             Steven G. Triebold
                                                                             Manager – Fire Prevention and Protection Programs
                                                                             Environmental Health and Safety
                                                                             Penn State University
                                                                             University Park, PA. 16802
                                                                             814-865-6391
                                                                             sgt4@psu.edu




                                                  SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                                               PAGE 47
                                   Penn State Judicial Affairs
                                 As a member of the Penn State Community, you are called upon and expected
    “…May no                     to follow the Code of Conduct (http://www.sa.psu.edu/ja/conduct.shtml) and
                                 the Penn State Principles (http://www.psu.edu/ur/principles.html). The Code of
    act of ours                  Conduct outlines 16 behaviors that you should avoid as a Penn State student,
                                 while the Penn State Principles seek to describe the values of the Penn State
       bring                     community.

     shame…”                  As an international student, you may be challenged by University policies and
                              procedures that are different from what you are used to. Nonetheless, as a
                              student, you are expected to abide by these policies and procedures as are all
                              your fellow students. During your time at Penn State, you are going to be called
upon to make many decisions, and it is these decisions that are going to define you and your experience at
Penn State University.

The following policies are ones that are especially important for you to be aware of as they may be different
from what you are accustomed to:

Off Campus Misconduct Policy
Along with being a Penn State student you are also considered a member of the local community of State
College. As such, Penn State expects you to follow the Code of Conduct both on- and off-campus. If you are
involved in a situation that is a violation of the Code of Conduct, and it is reported to our office then the
situation will be reviewed by the University. Upon review of the situation, if a student is found to be in violation
of the Code of Conduct, regardless of where the incident happened, sanctions may be applied.

Academic Integrity Policy (Faculty Senate Police 49-20)
Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity in an open, honest and responsible manner. In the United
States these is a strong value placed on the rights and responsibilities of the individual. There are also
appropriate and inappropriate times to share ideas, thoughts, and knowledge. Examples of academic
dishonesty include, but are not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, fabrication of information or citations, facilitation
of acts of academic dishonesty by others, unauthorized possession of examinations, submitting work of another
person or work previously used without informing the instructor, and tampering with the academic work of other
students.

Computer or Software Misuse and/or Abuse (Policy AD 20)
Using your computer, computer or network access, or software to download or share copyrighted material such
as music files, videos, and software is a direct violation of University Policy. Copyright laws in the United States
protect the ideas, programs, writings, or other works created by a person. The University regards copyright
offenses very seriously. System users must remove any copyrighted materials that they do not have the
copyright holder's specific permission to possess.

Possession, Use, and Distribution of Alcoholic Beverages (Policy AD 18)
According to the Code of Conduct, you must be 21 years old or older to consume or possess alcoholic
beverages (i.e. beer, wine, mixed drinks). If you are under the age of 21 it is a violation of the code of conduct
to possess or consume alcoholic beverages. If you are 21 or older, you may possess and/or consume alcoholic
beverages according to University Policy and state law. It is important to know that even if you are 21or older,
it is still a violation of the Code of Conduct to purchase and/or provide alcohol to someone who is under the
age of 21.




  PAGE 48                              SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                           Penn State Judicial Affairs (continued)
Possession, Use, Manufacture, and Distribution of Illegal Drugs (Policy AD 33)
The possession, use manufacture, distribution, or dispensation of a controlled substance - such as marijuana,
cocaine, heroine, ecstasy, etc., on University property or University functions is violation of the Code of Conduct.
This policy also covers the possession, use, and distribution of prescription drugs without a valid prescription for
the drug.

Sexual Misconduct and Abuse (Policy AD 41)
In the United States, attitudes toward sex differ based on the individual. Both parties must give their consent to
sex and other sexual activities. In other words, both people involved must agree to what is happening or about
to happen. It is also important to know that even if you are in a relationship with someone or if both of you
have consented to sex or sexual activities in the past, both people must consent every time you engage in sex or
sexual activities. Sexual misconduct and abuse is nonconsensual physical contact of a sexual nature, and can
occur between acquaintances or parties unknown to each other. This includes the touching of an unwilling
person’s intimate parts (defined as genitalia, groin, breast, or buttock, or clothing covering them), or forcing an
unwilling person to touch another’s intimate parts. Sexual misconduct includes, but is not limited to rape, forcible
sodomy or sexual penetration with an inanimate object, intercourse without consent, under conditions of force,
threat of force, fear or when a person is unable to give consent because of substance abuse (including
intoxication), captivity, sleep, or disability.

Romantic and/or sexual relationships between faculty and students, staff and students or supervisors and
subordinate employees are strongly discouraged. Such relationships have the potential for adverse
consequences, including the filing of charges of sexual harassment.

Harassment/Stalking (Policy Statement 7)
Harassment is a form of discrimination consisting of physical or verbal conduct that (1) is directed at an
individual because of the individual's age, ancestry, color, disability or handicap, national origin, race, religious
creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or veteran status; and (2) is sufficiently severe or pervasive so
as to substantially interfere with the individual's employment, education or access to University programs,
activities and opportunities.

Stalking is considered a form of harassment. An example of stalking would be repeatedly following or
contacting someone, whether it is a stranger, friend, or romantic interest.

The Office of Judicial Affairs interprets and enforces the Code of Conduct. The Judicial Affairs Staff are
responsible for sustaining a system that is just, equitable, and expeditious; promotes student growth through
individual responsibility; and aims to increase civility through its educational endeavors. The Office of Judicial
Affairs also serves as a resource for students to hold other student’s accountable for their actions. If you are the
victim of another student’s inappropriate actions, please do not hesitate to contact us. A staff member will meet
with you to discuss the specifics of the incident and review your options with you.

As a student there are many opportunities for you to get involved with or learn more about the Office of
Judicial Affairs. The Student Judiciary provides the experience of participating in University hearings, as well as
serving as a peer educator promoting civility, integrity, and community values. Please feel free to contact the
Office of Judicial Affairs at AskJA@sa.psu.edu or(814) 863-0342, stop by the office located in 135 Boucke
Building, or check out the Web-site at www.sa.psu.edu/ja for more information.


                            We wish you well in your career at Penn State!

                                      SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010                           PAGE 49
               Campus Map




PAGE 50   SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
                                                                                                          Wartik Lab
                                                       Library (Pattee & Paterno)
                                                                                                                        Campus Map




                                                                                         HUB

                                                                                                               Boucke




SPRING 2010 ORIENTATION 4-9 JANUARY 2010
PAGE 51
                                           http://www.campusmaps.psu.edu/print/pdf/main_color.pdf
                                                                                                    Days Inn
                                                                 Orientation Summary Schedule

                                        New International Student
                                        Orientation Spring 2010
                                        For a more detailed schedule, please see pages 7 - 11.


                                                                      January 2010
     Sun                  Mon                           Tue                       Wed                          Thu                        Fri                  Sat

3                4                            5                           6                          7                            8           9
                        Arrival                    Mandatory                  Information                Information              Information Residence
                                                   Document                     Sessions                   Sessions                 Sessions  Halls open
                  Free Van Service                  Check-In
                      Begins at                    410 Boucke                                                                                               FTCAP
                     10:00 am                     1:00 - 4:00 pm                                                                                            Advising




10               11                           12                          13                         14                           15                     16
                 Classes Begin




This publication is available in alternative media on request.

The Pennsylvania State University is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to programs, facilities, admission, and employment without
regard to personal characteristics not related to ability, performance, or qualifications as determined by University policy or by state and federal authorities. The
Pennsylvania State University does not discriminate against any person because of age, ancestry, color, disability or handicap, national origin, race, religious
creed, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status. Direct all affirmative action inquiries to the Affirmative Action Office, The Pennsylvania State University, 328
Boucke Building, University Park, PA 16802-5901.
The Pennsylvania State University encourages qualified persons with disabilities to participate in its programs and activities. If you anticipate needing any type of
accommodation or have questions about the physical access provided, please contact the University Office of Global Programs at (814) 865-7681 in advance of
your participation or visit.                                                                           U.Ed.OGP .09-.02 07/09

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:17
posted:9/14/2012
language:English
pages:56