ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW CRITERIA by hLuYC1X

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									       ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW GUIDELINES
                                   Departmental Section

                                    Department: Nursing

NOTE: Departments with multiple programs undergoing academic program review in the
same year should complete sections I through IV only once. Sections V and VI should be
completed for each program undergoing review.

Names of Individuals Preparing the Report:       Dr. Donna Blackburn, Dr. Susan Jones,

                                                Dr. Beverly Siegrist, Dr. Deborah Williams

I. Departmental Context

The Department of Nursing offers both baccalaureate (BSN) and graduate (MSN) programs.

Undergraduate students seeking the BSN degree are admitted into one of two tracks:
   1.    The Prelicensure program (reference 586) is designed to prepare the student to write
         the National Council Licensure Exam to become a registered nurse (RN). The
         program consists of 8 semesters of course work in sciences, general education and
         nursing totaling 130 credit hours. Admission into this program is limited and based on
         selection of the most qualified applicants who meet all admission requirements.
   2.    The PostRN program (reference 596) is designed for RNs wishing to complete their
         baccalaureate education in nursing. The student admitted to this program has either an
         associate degree in nursing or is a diploma graduate. The curriculum requirements
         include completion of a minimum of 31 lower division nursing credits, University
         general education credits, 36 credit hours in upper division nursing courses and a 3-
         hour statistics course.

The MSN program (reference 149) builds upon the first professional degree, the BSN. The
purpose of the program is to develop expertise in advanced nursing practice that demands
increased accountability, proficiency, and leadership. Graduate students seeking the MSN degree
are admitted into one of four (4) tracks:
    1.     The Primary Care Practitioner option prepares graduates to sit for certification as
           an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, specifically a primary care or family
           nurse practitioner.
    2.     The Nurse Educator option combines advanced practice nursing with the functional
           area of teaching in schools of nursing.
    3.     The Nurse Administrator option prepares graduates to sit for certification as
           advanced practice nurse administrators after completion of clinical practice
           requirements.
    4.     The Occupational Health Nurse option prepares graduates for advance practice in
           work place settings and to sit for certification as an Occupational Health Nurse or
           Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist.
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II. Departmental Enrollment, Faculty, and Resource Data (With the exception of the table
under letter C, the departmental data below are provided by Institutional Research for the most
recent five-year period. Discuss significant characteristics of the department as revealed by the
data, paying particular attention to trends. For example, what trends in student credit hour
production, average class size, or reliance on part-time faculty are apparent, and how do you
account for them? Has Please address each data element separately in your discussion.)

   A. Total Student Credit Hours Produced (SCHP) by Full-time & Part-time Faculty
      On- & Off-Campus:
                             Fall 2001    Fall 2002    Fall 2003     Fall 2004
      Full-time                   1769         1994         2499          3144
      On Campus                   1327         1733         2356          2842
      Extended Campus              442          183           51           137
      Distance Learning              0           78           92           135
      Part-time                      0          200          225            81
      On Campus                      0          132          225            66
      Extended Campus                0           68            0            15
      Distance Learning              0            0            0             0
      Total                       1769         2194         2724          3195
      On Campus                   1327         1865         2581          2908
      Extended Campus              442          251           51           152
      Distance Learning              0           78           92           135
       SCHP is calculated by multiplying the number of students enrolled in a course by the credit hours
       offered for the course. (e.g., 30 students enrolled in a three-credit hour course would be equivalent
       to 90 SCHP.) On-Campus includes courses taught at WKU’s main and south campuses. Extended
       Campus includes courses taught in Glasgow, Elizabethtown, and Owensboro. Distance Learning
       includes all other courses, including correspondence, Web, KVU, SPAN courses
       and courses taught at special locations.

       These data represent a trend of increasing student credit hour production consistent
       with enrollment growth and program expansion within the Department. Part-
       time faculty members are primarily employed for clinical instruction which is not
       reflected in these data. In the fall 2002 and 2003 semesters, a part-time lecturer was
       hired to teach the didactic component of Maternal-newborn nursing. In fall 2004,
       the SCHP by PT faculty decreased since we were able to hire a full-time Nurse
       Midwife with expertise in this content area.

   B. Average Class Size for Lower Division, Upper Division, and Graduate Courses:

       Division                       Fall 2001          Fall 2002          Fall 2003          Fall 2004
       Lower                                N/A                N/A                N/A                N/A
       Upper                                 12                 18                 21                 22
       Graduate                               6                 14                 13                  8
       Lower division consists of 0-299 level courses, upper division consists of 300-499 level courses, and
       graduate courses consist of 500+ level courses. All 400G course counts are rolled up under their
       respective master 400-level section. Excludes applied music, coop, independent study, internship,
       correspondence, research, and maintaining matriculation courses.
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       The average class size in the table under letter B reflects an increase consistent
       with enrollment growth and program expansion within the Department.

C.     Number of Faculty Holding Rank in the Department (budgeted lines and faculty who
       teach.

       Budgeted FTE                Fall 2000        Fall 2001       Fall 2002        Fall 2003        Fall 2004
       Faculty Positions
       Budgeted FTE                        15               15               15               16            18
       Sources: WKU Salary Lists 2000/01 through 2004/05. Includes vacant positions. Does not include
       temporary full-time positions or regular full-time positions not yet budgeted.
       Full-time                   Fall 2001        Fall 2002       Fall 2003        Fall 2004
       Teaching Faculty
       by Rank
       Professor                             0               2                3                3
       Assoc. Professor                      7               3                2                2
       Asst. Professor                       5               6                9               10
       Instructor                            1               1                2                3
       No Rank                               0               0                0                0
       Total Full-time                      13              12               16               18
       Data are taken from Workload and include only full-time faculty who taught in the fall semester.

Using the table below, provide a list of all current departmental faculty and an indication of
which faculty provide primary instructional support to each program. Add rows as necessary.
    Faculty Member           Primary Program(s) Supported Other Program(s) Supported
Cathy Abell                  BSN - PostRN                          BSB - Prelicensure
Sheila Atwell                BSN - Prelicensure                    BSN - PostRN
Donna Blackburn              MSN
Kim Botner                   BSN - Prelicensure
Crista Briggs                BSN - Prelicensure
Linda Coakley                MSN
Audrey Cornell               BSN - Prelicensure
Freda Embry                  BSN – Prelicensure
Rhonda Helm                  BSN - Prelicensure                    BSN - PostRN
Terry Jepson                 BSN – PostRN                          MSN
Susan Jones                  BSN – PostRN                          BSN – Prelicensure
Rachel Kinder                BSN - Prelicensure
Mary Kovar                   BSN - Prelicensure
Leigh Lindsey                BSN - Prelicensure
Sherry Lovan                 BSN – Prelicensure
Eve Main                     MSN
Beverly Siegrist             MSN
Liz Sturgeon                 BSN – Prelicensure
Deborah Williams             BSN - Prelicensure
Shala Wilson                 MSN                                   BSN - Prelicensure
                                                                                                              3
   The tables under letter C reflect budgeted FTE faculty positions as well as FT teaching
   faculty by rank. As evidenced by these data, the number of departmental faculty
   increased significantly as a result of growth in both the BSN and MSN programs as
   described below...

   Prelicensure Program: Prior to fall 2002, 40 students were admitted into the
   program once a year. In fall 2002, 50 students were admitted to the program, and in both
   the fall of 2003 and 2004, 60 students were admitted. As the nursing shortage continues,
   there has been an increased interest in nursing careers; thus more applicants to the
   program. In response to constituents’ need for increased enrollment and the
   national nursing shortage, the Department of Nursing implemented a plan to accept
   students into the BSN program in both fall and spring semesters. The fall class of 2005
   included 40 students with an additional 40 students accepted for spring 2006. Thus,
   enrollment has doubled (from 40 to 80) over the last 3 years.

   PostRN Program: This program has demonstrated a significant growth due to
   accessibility of the program, flexibility in scheduling, diverse methods of delivery, and
   planned recruitment efforts. The Post RN program is accessible through interactive video
   systems (IVS) and on-line courses for the working RNs. Accessibility and flexibility in
   scheduling are demonstrated by offering IVS classes one day/week from Bowling Green
   to the following sites: Glasgow, Elizabethtown, and Owensboro as well as other sites
   (Clinton, Green, Russell, and Taylor counties) when there is a cohort of students desiring
   the program. Since the majority of the students are place bound and working full time,
   this method of delivery makes the program attractive to many nurses who wish to
   continue their education.

   MSN program: This program has witnessed a significant growth in enrollment of greater
   than 100% in the past five years. In comparison with the five Kentucky public
   universities offering graduate nursing programs, WKU’s MSN program shows the most
   growth in enrollment in the previous five years.



D. Student Credit Hours per Full Time Equivalent Faculty:

                               Fall 2000        Fall 2001        Fall 2002        Fall 2003        Fall 2004
   SCHP/FTEF                       145.1            119.9            233.0            340.5            286.1
   SCHP is calculated by multiplying the number of students enrolled in a course by the credit hours offered
   for the course. (e.g., 30 students enrolled in a three-credit hour course would be equivalent to 90 SCHP.)
   FTEF is calculated according to WORKLOAD definitions: 1 FTEF= 9 credit hours per semester for
   GFCOB, 15 credit hours per semester for CC and 12 credit hours per semester for all others.


   The student credit hours per full time equivalent faculty in the table under letter D
   above reflect an increase consistent with enrollment growth and program
   expansion within the Department.

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E. FTE Part-time Faculty:

                               Fall 2000        Fall 2001        Fall 2002        Fall 2003        Fall 2004
   Part-time FTEF                     2.0              0.0              1.7              0.8              0.8
   FTEF is calculated according to WORKLOAD definitions: 1 FTEF= 9 credit hours per semester for
   GFCOB, 15 credit hours per semester for CC and 12 credit hours per semester for all others.

   Although we employ part-time faculty for clinical instruction, these data do not
   reflect those individuals due to the 0.0 credit for clinical courses (which are linked to
   the didactic course). The use of part-time faculty to deliver lecture/didactic content
   is minimal since we strive to maintain continuity between didactic and clinical
   content achieved by full-time faculty.

F. Student/Faculty Ratio:

                               Fall 2000        Fall 2001        Fall 2002        Fall 2003        Fall 2004
   Student/Faculty                  10:1              8:1             15:1             23:1             19:1
   Ratio
   Student/Faculty Ratio is calculated as FTES/FTEF. 1 FTES= Undergraduate SCHP/16 or Graduate
   SCHP/12. FTEF is calculated according to WORKLOAD definitions: 1 FTEF= 9 credit hours per semester
   for GFCOB, 15 credit hours per semester for CC and 12 credit hours per semester for all others.

   The student/faculty ratio has increased over time, which is consistent with
   enrollment growth and program expansion within the Department.

G. Total Budget and Expenditure Total:

                               Fall 2000        Fall 2001        Fall 2002        Fall 2003       Fall 2004*
   Budget                      1,055,004        1,080,832        1,133,132        1,251,252        1,344,545
   Expenditures                  969,923        1,129,180        1,021,690        1,200,003        1,406,884
   Sources: University Budget Books for 1999-00 through 2003-04 budget; FRS Data for 2000-01 expenses;
   Banner data for 2001-02 through 2004-05 expenses; Expenditures include encumbrances.
   *Preliminary

   These data reflect an increase consistent with enrollment growth and program
   expansion within the Department.

H. Ratio of Total Expenditures/Student Credit Hour:

                                 2000-01          2001-02          2002-03          2003-04        2004-05*
   Expenditures/                    $288             $317             $235             $235            $235
   SCHP
   Total expenditures are for the fiscal year, while SCHP are for the fall and spring semesters combined.
   *Preliminary

   These data have been consistent over the previous 3 years.

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   I. Total Student Credit Hours Produced in Winter and Summer Terms:

       Summer                   Summer         Summer          Summer          Summer
       Production                  2001           2002            2003            2004
       SCHP                         157            238             251             388

      These data reflect an increase in the total SCHP consistent with enrollment growth
      and an increase in the number of summer courses offered.


III. Qualifications and Credentials of Departmental Faculty

   A. Rank of Full-time Faculty:

       Professors                   4
       Associate Professor          0
       Assistant Professors        12
       Instructors                  4
       TOTAL                       20


   B. Number and Overall Percentage of Full-time Faculty with Terminal Degrees in the
      Discipline They are Teaching:

      There are 5 full-time faculty (25%) with terminal degrees, 2 of which have a PhD in
      in Nursing and 3 have the EdD degree.


   C. List Faculty Holding Rank in the Department who have Non-teaching Assignments
      (e.g. Research, Administrative, Grants) and Provide an Indication of the Nature of
      the Alternate Assignment:

      Donna Blackburn – Department Head with administrative responsibilities
      Susan Jones – BSN PostRN Program Coordinator (50% Administrative) and grant
                     activity (25%)
      Beverly Siegrist – MSN Program Coordinator (50% Administrative)
      Deborah Williams – BSN Prelicensure Program Coordinator (50% Administrative)


   D. Participation of Faculty in Multiple Programs within the Department or Other
      Departments:

      Six faculty members (30%) teach in more than 1 program within the department and
      one faculty teaches an interdisciplinary course with faculty from Agriculture and Public
      Health.
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   E. Number/Utilization of Part-time Faculty:

      The department relies upon qualified part-time faculty as instructors in the clinical
      area. Due to requirements imposed by our accrediting bodies, we adhere to a 10:1
      student/faculty ratio in the BSN program and a 6:1 student/faculty ratio in the MSN
      program; thus additional faculty are needed. During the fall 2005, we utilized 6 part-time
      faculty members (which is similar each semester).


   F. Other Indicators of Faculty Quality:

      All faculty (100%) maintain RN licensure in Kentucky; some have RN and/or ARNP
      (advanced registered nurse practitioner) licensure in Tennessee (35%) required for
      clinical placement of students in health care facilities in TN. Faculty (30%) hold national
      certification in the following specialty areas: Family Nurse Practitioner (3), Adult Nurse
      Practitioner (1), Nurse Midwife (1), Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (1) and Nurse
      Educator (1).


   G. Special Qualifications of any Faculty Member (Full or Part Time) Whose
      Credentials do not Meet SACS Guidelines for the Level and Discipline They are
      Teaching

      The nurse practitioner (NP) faculty (Linda Coakley, Terry Jepson, Eve Main and Shala
      Wilson) who teach in the MSN program do not meet SACS guidelines. However, they
      possess clinical expertise that is essential for teaching NP students. Each of them is
      licensed as an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner and holds national certification.

      The Department of Nursing adheres to the Kentucky Board of Nursing regulations that
      stipulate that “the educational preparation of the clinical instructor shall at least equal the
      level of the appointing program” (KAR 20:310). During the current semester, we hired
      two part-time clinical instructors (Sandy Dismon and Sandy Stahl) who are BSN-
      prepared. Both instructors have clinical expertise as follows: Ms. Stahl has 35 years of
      acute-care nursing experience and Ms. Dismon has psychiatric expertise needed to
      supervise students in this specialty area.


IV. Departmental Faculty Productivity:
      2004-05:
          A. Scholarship

             Eve Main received an Academic Excellence Scholarship from the University of
              Kentucky for the 2004-05 AY.

             Susan Jones received the Outstanding Researcher Award from the Kappa Theta
                                                                                                    7
                  Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, International Nursing Honor Society
                 Faculty was productive as evidenced by 11 publications and 32 presentations at
                  local, state, national and international meetings. Representative examples include

                      o Blackburn, D. (2004). Transatlantic nursing education: Developing
                        intercultural competence in a multicultural workforce. Paper presentation
                        at the 15th International Nursing Research Congress, Sigma Theta Tau:
                        Dublin, Ireland.
                      o Embry, F. (2005). Home Care. In APIC Text of Infection Control and
                        Epidemiology (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Association for Professionals in
                        Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.
                      o Jones, M.S., Coffey, D. & Dunn, D. (2004). Strengthening the nursing
                        curriculum: An interdisciplinary course addressing agricultural health and
                        safety. American Association of Occupational Health Nursing, 52(9), 397-
                        400.
                      o Kinder, R.A. (2005). Psychological hardiness in women with paraplegia.
                        Rehabilitation Nursing, 30(2), 68-72.
                      o Koskinen, L., Jokinen, P., Blackburn, D., Gilmer, M., & McGill, J. (2004).
                        Learning intercultural competence in a transatlantic nurse education
                        project. Diversity in Health and Social Care (1), 99-106.
                      o Siegrist, B.C. (2004). Partnering with Public Health: A model for
                        Baccalaureate Nursing Education. Family & Community Health,
                        Education and Practice, 27(4), 316-325.

                 Seven (7) faculty members are making excellent progress toward their doctorate
                     o Cathy Abell, PhD candidate, U of L/WKU cooperative program
                     o Linda Coakley completed chapters 2-3 of dissertation, Trevecca
                         University
                     o Audrey Cornell enrolled in the U of L/WKU cooperative program
                     o Rhonda Helm, PhD candidate, U of L/WKU cooperative program
                     o Rachel Kinder completed course work, Vanderbilt University
                     o Sherry Lovan enrolled in the U of L/WKU cooperative program
                     o Eva Main enrolled in doctoral program, University of Kentucky

                 Five faculty members maintain national certification as nurse practitioners and
                  have a clinical practice to maintain their skills and expertise.
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         2003-04:

                 Faculty was productive as evidenced by 23 publications / presentations at local,
                  state and national meetings. Representative examples include

                           o Developing cultural competence in nursing students (2003, July).
                             Presented at the 14th International Nursing Research Congress, St.
                             Thomas, US Virgin Islands.
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                      o Innovations in practice with underserved populations: A mobile health
                        program (2004, May). Presented at the Community-based Primary
                        Care in Underserved Population Conference, Hilton Head.
                      o The Significance of the Soul. Book submitted for publication by
                        Writer’s Edge.
                      o Mobilizing students and community partners to enhance the health of
                        the rural elderly. Kentucky Nurse, 51 (4), 11.
                      o Strengthening the nursing curriculum: An interdisciplinary course
                        addressing agricultural health and safety. American Association of
                        Occupational Health Nursing (in press).
                      o Exploration of mental health issues among tobacco farmers (2003,
                        July). Paper presented at the National Association for Rural Mental
                        Health’s 29th Annual Conference, Orlando, FL.
                      o Partnering with public health: A model for BSN education. Journal of
                        Family & Community Health (in press).

            Susan Jones completed her PhD at the University of Cincinnati and graduated
             June 11, 2004.

            Four (4) faculty members are making excellent progress toward their doctorate
                o Rhonda Helm, PhD candidate, U of L/WKU cooperative program
                o Rachel Kinder completing course work this year, Vanderbilt University
                o Linda Coakley completed 1st year, Trevecca University
                o Cathy Abell completed 1st year, U of L/WKU cooperative program

             Two additional faculty (Eve Main and Freda Embry) have been accepted into the
             doctoral program at UK beginning in the fall 04

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2002-03:

            Faculty has been productive in research and creative activity as evidenced by 19
             publications and paper/poster presentations. Representative examples include:
                o Community based nursing education: Health promotion for farm families,
                    presented at the 3rd International Congress of Rural Nursing, Binghamton,
                    NY, October (2002).
                o Developing cultural competence in nursing students, presented at the 14th
                    International Nursing Research Congress, July (2003), St. Thomas, US
                    Virgin Islands.
                o A partnership model for farm family health, poster presented at the SREB
                    Council on Collegiate Nursing Education, Nov 2002, Atlanta, GA.
                o Activities of the Institute for Rural Health Development and Research,
                    poster presentation at the 2002 Annual Rural Outreach Grantees meeting,
                    Oct 2002, Washington, DC.

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                 Three faculty members are making excellent progress towards their doctoral
                  degree and 2 others have been accepted for doctoral study in the fall 2003.

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2001-02:

                 Faculty has been productive in research and creative activity as evidenced by
                  publications and paper/poster presentations.

                 Three faculty members are making excellent progress towards their doctoral
                  degree.

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             B. Grant and Contract Activity
                  2004-05:

                 During 2004-05, the department was successful in attracting and implementing
                  externally-funded projects:
                       U.S. Department of Education grant to support the Nursing Faculty
                         Accelerated Development Project ($397,640)
                       Federal Nurse Traineeship award for MSN students ($39,727).
                       Rural Elderly Project funded by the Office of Rural Health Policy, DHHS
                         ($290,000)

                 The department was also successful in attracting internal funding:
                        Action agenda funds for 4 initiatives
                        Instructional equipment funds from CHHS to purchase state-of-the-art
                           software, Mega Code Kelly simulation manikin, IV training arms with CD
                           Rom
                        Unit productivity award ($7,500)
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         2003-04:

                 During 2003-04, the department was successful in attracting external funding:
                      U.S. Department of Education grant to support the Nursing Faculty
                         Accelerated Development Project ($397,640)
                      Federal Nurse Traineeship award for MSN students ($33,059)

                 The department was also successful in attracting internal funding:
                      Action agenda funds for 4 initiatives ($6,304)
                      Equipment funds from CHHS ($13,200)
                      Unit productivity award ($4,500)
                                                                                                                  10
         2002-03:

                 The department was successful in attracting internally/externally funded grants
                  (8), totaling $335,704 including

                      o Rural health project: Empowering the elderly in the use of the health care
                        system, HRSA-Office of Rural Health Policy, amount funded: $290,250.
                      o Professional Nurse Traineeship Award, amount funded: $38,000.

                 Nursing faculty shortage: Solution to a critical situation, proposal was submitted
                  to develop an accelerated nurse educator program; $500,000 requested.


         2001-02:

                 Through a 3-year FIPSE grant, international education initiatives are on going
                  with 2 U.S. (Vanderbilt University) and 3 European universities (Bournemouth
                  University, England; Uppsala University, Sweden and Pohjois Polytechnic,
                  Finland.

                 The department was successful in attracting internally/externally funded grants
                  (7), totaling $834,862.


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             C. Service

                 See attached listing of each faculty’s service to the public/university and
                  professional development/organizations. The departmental faculty’s overall
                  activities are commendable and demonstrate a commitment to service.




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