Editors 1 by a5Z45O14

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									FEUERBACH 2008
Tossups by Editors (Matt Weiner, Andrew Alexander) #1 of 4

1. The ritual killing of a hippopotamus at Edfu symbolized the triumph of this god. He took the form of Harmakhis
as patron of the rising sun, and in that guise his symbol was often found on amulets signifying resurrection. The
“name” known as that of this god was the first royal title taken by a new Pharaoh, and the wedjat represented the
eye of this god, which was partially restored, and explained the phases of the moon. The reconciliation between
himself and Seth was the mythical reflection of the union of Upper and Lower Egypt. For 10 points, name this god
who fought Seth to avenge his father Osiris and had a falcon’s head.
ANSWER: Horus

2. In one episode from this novel, a pedophilic soldier is hit on the head with a glass jug after meeting a girl at the
Blue Moon. Near the end, Camden Brown is imprisoned for trying to hold up a drugstore with a razor blade. A boy
who later dies of meningitis, John Henry West, is obsessed with the glass eye belonging to the cook Berenice, who
works for a jeweler in Georgia and is helping to prepare the army corporal Jarvis for a honeymoon with Janice. For
10 points, name this novel in which Frankie Addams, a twelve-year-old tomboy, attempts to involve herself in the
nuptials of her brother, written by Carson McCullers.
ANSWER: The Member of the Wedding

3. A basic strategy in this game is to create an “eye,” which leaves particular spaces open but automatically
disadvantageous for the other player to occupy. The beginning of this game involves picking up some of the
playing pieces and guessing whether the number in the hand is odd or even, a procedure known as nigiri. 361
intersections of lines create the playing surface, on which 180 white pieces and 181 black pieces are placed. The
object is to create boundaries with connections between stones. For 10 points, name this board game with large
spectator followings in China and Japan.
ANSWER: go

4. Its Western variety became the basis of such tongues as Palmyrene and Nabataean, while its Eastern dialects
include Mandaean and Syriac. The Targums are copies of the Old Testament in this language. The official language
of the pre-Hellenistic Persian Empire, this tongue was the second language of the Assyrian empire and overtook
Akkadian as the common tongue of the Middle East. For 10 points, name this language, which was used to write
the Talmud and which was spoken by ordinary Jews in Palestine during the time of the New Testament, leading
many to claim it as the native tongue of Jesus.
ANSWER: Aramaic

5. They are divided into taxonomic classes C, S, and M based on spectral reflectance and albedo. Their three largest
families are Eos, Koronis, and Themis. NEAR Shoemaker was the first spacecraft to orbit one of these objects and
their existence at points in the solution to the circular, restricted three-body problem was predicted by Lagrange.
Mean-motion resonances of Jupiter’s orbital period produce depletions in these objects called Kirkwood gaps and
ones named after Patroclus, Hector, and Achilles and are known as the Trojans. For 10 points, what are these
astronomical objects such as Ceres and Vesta that are primarily located in a belt between the orbits of Mars and
Jupiter?
ANSWER: asteroids [or minor planets; or planetoids; accept meteorites before “Eos” is read]

6. Sharing its name with the Connecticut town where Nathan Hale was born, this West Midlands city is the site of
the University of Warwick. This onetime center of the English silk and bicycle industries is home to such modern
buildings as the Lanchester Library and Basil Spence's St. Michael's Cathedral. The former St. Michael’s, along
with Greyfriars Church, was destroyed along with most of this city’s buildings in April 1941 air raids. For 10
points, name this English city that is also where the legendary incident of Lady Godiva and Peeping Tom occurred.
ANSWER: Coventry
7. The three works which first brought him attention were a symphony in C major, an overture to the Corneille play
Polyeucte, and the cantata Velleda. From 1912 until his 1935 death, this man published only two original works,
the Sonnet de Ronsard and a piano tribute on the death of Claude Debussy consisting on variations from Afternoon
of a Faun. He used a whole-tone scale in his opera Ariane and Bluebeard, and Goethe's poem “Zauberlehrling”
inspired his most noted piece, a tone poem about a mischievous magical novice. For 10 points, name this
composer of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice.
ANSWER: Paul Dukas

8. Xenophon describes a group of this people as attacking the Ten Thousand near Zakhu in 401 BCE; more
recently, they were the target of Operation Spoils. This group was omitted from the Treaty of Lausanne, effectively
negating the promise of independence given to them three years earlier in the Treaty of Sevres. This group ruled
the ephemeral Soviet satellite state called the Republic of Mahabad, and later, their namesake Workers Party was
founded by Abdullah Öcalan . This ethnic group was also the source of the Ayyubid Dynasty, and that house’s
member Saladin. For 10 points, name this group found in Iran, Iraq, and Turkey, which has long agitated for an
autonomous state.
ANSWER: Kurds

9. Retinoic acid modulates interleukin-5 receptor expression, which selectively inhibits differentiation of progenitor
cells in this process. During fetal development, the extramedullary type of this process begins as yolk sac cells
migrate to the liver, and growth factors that mediate this process include the colony stimulating factors filgrastim,
sargramostim, and erythropoietin. Pluripotent stem cells are the progenitors of the myeloid and lymphoid lines
while a third pathway results in the creation of megakaryocytes. In adults this process predominately occurs in the
thymus and the red bone marrow. For 10 points, what is this set of processes and pathways that results in the
terminal differentiation of progenitor cells into platelets, erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and other blood cells?
ANSWER: hematopoiesis

10. The protagonist of this novel laments that encounters with his usual sexual partner are like punching a hole in a
season ticket. That man is told the meaning of the motto “Love Your Home” and is beaten up by a woman in the
street after asking her to have sex with him in public in order to fulfill a promise of freedom from an old man. The
title character became widowed during a typhoon and occasionally reaches the outside world through a rope ladder
that extends to the bottom of her pit. For 10 points, the entomologist Niki Jumpei becomes trapped by a village that
exports sand in what novel by Kobo Abe?
ANSWER: The Woman in the Dunes or Suna no onna

11. It can be studied at zero temperature on a Bethe lattice, and theoretical approaches to it involve calculations
based on the Preisach model. It can be represented via the Landau-Lifshitz equation, and the thermodynamic type
is intrinsic in superelastic deformation. It is characteristic of first-order phase transitions, and supercooling
generates a thermal curve of this type. Demonstrated in a random-field Ising model, in this phemonenon, ,motion
in domain walls generates Barkhausen noise, which is represented as small jumps in loops of this type, and the
energy loss due to reversing the magnetization is proportional to the area of loop. For 10 points, what is this
phenomenon where the magnetization of a ferromagnetic material remains after the external magnetic field is
removed?
ANSWER: hysteresis loop

12. This event was described in the Mournful Letter of Isidore of Kiev, who believed that, had it not happened, he
would have succeeded in ending the Great Schism. The Cannon Gate marks the spot where this event became
inevitable. It was made possible by the construction of the Rumeli Hisari and the carrying of a fleet overland into
the Golden Horn. Genoese mercenaries and the forces of Emperor Constantine XI attempted to prevent this event,
which led to the conversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque. For 10 points, name this 1453 event in which the
Byzantine Empire’s capital was overrun by a Turkish army.
ANSWER: Fall of Constantinople [or Ottoman conquest of Constantinople, etc; do not accept “siege of
Constantinople”]
13. For the case of 1,3-dienes, homogenous palladium can be used in conjunction with the primary catalyst in this
reaction to produce N-substituted imides. An alternative workup for this procedure involves Ing-Manske hydrolysis
instead of base catalyzed cleavage and the final step includes a nucleophilic acyl substitution. It begins when
potassium hydroxide deprotonates the imide proton of a phthalimide to produce a nucleophile that undergoes an
SN2 reaction with an alkyl halide. The resulting N-alkyl phthalimide can be cleaved using hydrazine to produce a
dicarboxylic acid. For 10 points, what is this organic reaction used to synthesis primary amines from alkyl halides?
ANSWER: Gabriel synthesis

14. The cultural evangelism of Benjamin Hawkins was one cause of this conflict, and Peter McQueen and William
Weatherford were some of the more militant leaders who spurred it on. It included an attack on Talladega, and it
began when a group called the Red Sticks invaded the Lake Tensaw area, perpetrating the Fort Mims Massacre.
Ended by the Treaty of Fort Jackson, it was stirred up by the travelling preaching of Tecumseh and culminated in
the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. For 10 points, name this 1813 to 1814 clash between federal troops under Andrew
Jackson and the namesake Indians in Georgia and Alabama.
ANSWER: the Creek War

15. At the beginning of Gwendolyn Brooks’s Maud Martha, the title character has a nightmare about one of these.
Walker Percy’s The Thanatos Syndrome includes an episode where Van Dorn is made to communicate with one.
Enoch Emery steals a costume of one from a movie set and uses it to escape the law at the end of Wise Blood. In
Derek Walcott’s “A Far Cry from Africa,” one of these is described as “wrestling with the superman.” In a play, a
man who is angry at Mildred Rogers frees one of these animals from a cage, only to be killed by it. For 10 points,
name this primate, which causes the death of Yank in Eugene O’Neill’s The Hairy Ape.
ANSWER: gorilla [prompt on ape, I guess; don’t accept other stuff]

16. A namesake “catechism” and “assembly” of this place involved Puritan attempts to overhaul the Church of
England. The laws known as "Concerning conditional gifts" and "Because sellers of lands," which barred
subinfeudation, are known by this place name. A later law known by this place name modified sections of the
Merchant Shipping Act and Colonial Courts of Admiralty Act in order to give de facto independence to the
dominion territories, including Canada, Australia, and South Africa. In addition to those “Statutes,” this place name
is attached to a building constructed by Edward the Confessor, where British coronations take place and where
Poets Corner is just one of the many clusters of notable graves. For 10 points, name this London borough which
designates a famous Abbey.
ANSWER: Westminster

17. This man’s work entitled Decisive Treatise on the Agreement Between Religious Law and Philosophy claimed
that that metaphysicians using syllogisms were the only people capable of arriving at truth. He was commissioned
by Abu Yaqub Yasuf, a caliph of the Almohads, to write his commentaries on the Republic and the works of
Aristotle. Those exercised such influence on Christians that a group advocating “double truth” at the University of
Paris took this man’s name. Al-Ghazali’s attack on non-theological philosophy, entitled The Incoherence of the
Philosophers, inspired him to strike back with The Incoherence of the Incoherence. For 10 points, name this
Cordoban, often called the greatest expositor of Islamic philosophy.
ANSWER: Averroes [or Ibn Rushd]

18. This man created the altar panels showing the Passion of Christ and the martyrdom of St. Sebastian in the
Church of St. Florian at Linz. His 1510 St. George and the Dragon devotes most of its attention to a forest,
presaging his role, along with Lucas Cranach the Elder, as one of the leading members of the Danube School. His
Regensburg Landscapes became the first nature paintings without human figures created in 1500 years. In another
painting by this creator of Landscape With a Footbridge, rays of light emerge from a vortex at the right and
lavishly rendered clouds, islands, mountains, and lakes fill the top of the canvas, behind a sign with five lines of
text on it and above two enormous armies. For 10 points, name this painter of The Battle of Alexander at Issus.
ANSWER: Albrecht Altdorfer
19. A man named after a telescope visits the Cheese Museum and creates fictitious explanations for the meaning of
Mexican ruins in his novel Mr. Palomar, and the boy Zefferino tries to amuse Signorina de Magistris by catching
an octopus in this author's story "Big Fish, Little Fish." In another of this writer’s books, the armor and voice are all
the remain of the title character, Agilulf. He described Pin’s attempt to impress Red Wolf by stealing a Nazi
officer’s gun in another novel. This author of The Nonexistent Knight and The Path to the Nest of Spiders also
wrote about the confusion of such books as Learning from the Steep Slope with the book sought by Ludmilla and
Lotaria, who meet the narrator while trying to exchange a misprinted copy of the volume at a bookstore. For 10
points, name this author of If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler.
ANSWER: Italo Calvino

20. Buildings at this site in pyramid form include the Bayon, Baphuon, and Phimeanakas. Several hundred aspara
statues adorn one of the projects here, and its five central temples are in the form of quincunx. This site was
constructed around a hill that was taken to represent the mythical Mount Meru. The Thom complex here was added
several decades after the temples that were intended as a site for posthumous unificiation with Vishnu and
patronized on the Phnom Bakheng hill by Suryavarman II. For 10 points, name this ancient temple city, the center of
the Khmer empire, home to several architectural wonders including its namesake Wat.
ANSWER: Angkor [do not accept Angkor Wat, since most of the clues apply to other things at Angkor]

21. This man’s only collection of short fiction claims to be a review of a book that will “appear in the Autumn of
2018.” In one of this man’s poems the speaker cries “hoot toot” four times after declaring himself to be the titular
muse of epic poetry, while the title character repeatedly claims that “Spring came on forever” in another of his
children’s poems, “The Chinese Nightingale.” Another poem repeatedly warns that “Mumbo-Jumbo will hoo-doo
you,” referencing the “god” of the titular African region. A better-known work asks, “Who may bring white peace,”
so the titular itinerant figure won’t have to “sleep on his hill again,” while another repeatedly asks, “Are you washed
in the blood of the lamb?” For 10 points, name this author of “Congo,” “Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight,” and
“General William Booth Enters into Heaven.”
ANSWER: Vachel Lindsay
FEUERBACH 2008
Bonuses by Editors (Matt Weiner, Andrew Alexander) #1 of 4

1. It begins with a man called The Dreamer reading the story of Alcyone and Ceyx. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this poetic allegory in which The Dreamer encounters Octavian on a hunt and hears about lost love from
The Black Knight.
ANSWER: The Book of the Duchess
[10] The Book of the Duchess was a work by this author of Parliament of Fowls and The Legend of Good Women,
who also created such figures as The Nun's Priest and The Wife of Bath in the Canterbury Tales.
ANSWER: Geoffrey Chaucer
[10] The first book of this Chaucer poem recapitulates the plot of the Aeneid, and in the second, the poet is carried
to heaven and the title place by an eagle.
ANSWER: The House of Fame

2. Victorine Meurent was the model for his Olympia. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this painter of A Bar at the Folies Bergeres and Luncheon on the Grass.
ANSWER: Édouard Manet
[10] Luncheon on the Grass was exhibited in 1863 at this show, containing pieces deemed unsuitable for the
official Salon.
ANSWER: Salon des Refusés
[10] At the urging of Charles Baudelaire, Manet painted this work, which shows a crowd at the title performance
including men in black top hats and women in blue bonnets with big white dresses, as well as some ornate chairs
on the right.
ANSWER: Concert In The Tuileries Gardens

3. They were the most radical faction of the Convenanters, who had come together in 1638 to keep Charles I of
England from interfering in the Presbyterian Church of Scotland. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this group which became embroiled in the English Civil War as part of a scheme to convert Charles II to
Presbyterianism and spread their religion to the whole of Britain.
ANSWER: Kirk Party
[10] This derogatory term for Presbyterians in Scotland became applied to religious nonconformists in general, and
to their eighteenth-century political sympathizers, led by Robert Walpole and later Charles Fox, who opposed the
Tories.
ANSWER: Whigs
[10] With support from the Scots, the Young Pretender defeated John Cope at this September 1745 battle in the
environs of Edinburgh, marking the high point of Jacobitism.
ANSWER: Prestonpans

4. It can react with the guanidine group of arginine, the amide group of asparagine, and the indole ring of
tryptophan. In the presence of ammonia, this molecule and a reduced derivative can react to form a purple product.
For 10 points each:
[10] Name this hydrated, bicyclic molecule containing two keto groups and a geminal diol that is used in the Kaiser
test to quantify and detect amino acids.
ANSWER: ninhydrin or triketohydrindene hydrate
[10] Ninhydrin was first isolated by the English chemist who lends his name to this purple product that forms when
ninhydrin reacts with an alpha amino acid.
ANSWER: Ruhemann’s purple
[10] Ninhydrin turns bright yellow when in the presence of this amino acid, which has an imino functional group in
the place of the usual primary amine functional group found in amino acids.
ANSWER: proline or hydroxyproline
5. Prohibited by the 1919 Peace of St. Germain, this action was facilitated by the assassination of Engelbert
Dollfuss four years earlier. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this 1938 union of Germany and Austria.
ANSWER: the anschluss
[10] This member of the Christian Social Party formed the Fatherland Front and was engineering an anti-German
plebiscite as the sitting Austrian chancellor, which the Nazis prevented by deposing him in the anschluss.
ANSWER: Kurt von Schuschnigg
[10] This Austrian agent of the Nazis became chancellor after the anschluss, but it was for his later role as
coordinator of the deportation to Auschwitz of Dutch Jews that he was executed at Nürnberg.
ANSWER: Arthur Seyss-Inquart

6. The first book about this place was labeled "a study in contemporary American culture," while the followup saw
it "in transition" as a result of the Depression. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this fictionalized version of Muncie, Indiana, which was studied using anthropological methods in the
1920s and 30s.
ANSWER: Middletown
[10] The Middletown studies were performed the husband-and-wife team of Robert and Helen, of this last name.
ANSWER: Lynd
[10] The Lynds claimed that the Middletown studies documented frequent cases of poorer households choosing to
buy luxury goods over necessities, vindicating the “conspicuous consumption” theory put forth by this man in The
Theory of the Leisure Class.
ANSWER: Thorstein Veblen

7. Its sections include "Delirium I" and "Alchemy of the Word," which includes the "Sonnet of the Vowels." For 10
points each:
[10] Name this 1873 poetry collection, whose first poem is a confession written in the voice of the poet’s lover Paul
Verlaine.
ANSWER: A Season in Hell [or Une Saison en enfer]
[10] This author of “First Communions” and “Blackcurrant River,” who penned all his poetry between ages sixteen
and twenty, wrote A Season in Hell.
ANSWER: Arthur Rimbaud
[10] The title conveyance sinks to the bottom of the ocean at the end of this Rimbaud poem, that uses the breaking
away from moorings to represent a libertine lifestyle.
ANSWER: “The Drunken Boat” [or “Le Bateau ivre”]

8. Name these keyboard instruments, for 10 points each.
[10] Invented by Auguste Musel, this modified metallophone uses the keyboard to make hammers strike metal
bars. A similar instrument, the typophone, replaces the bars with tuning forks. Bartok wrote “music for strings,
percussion,” and this.
ANSWER: celesta
[10] Coming in fretted and unfretted, or gebunden and bundfrei, types, this instrument for which CPE Bach
composed some sonatas consists of metal strings struck by metal tangents.
ANSWER: clavichord
[10] The oldest harpsichord-like instrument, it is named for the wooden rods that attach the plucker to the keys. It is
the only harpsichord relative with strings that run parallel to the keyboard, and often came in a “pair” variety with a
smaller model inside the larger one.
ANSWER: virginal
9. The second section of this novel begins with the arrival of the Maggiore quartet to London. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this story of Michael Holme's rekindled romance with Julia McNicholl, a pianist who is losing her
hearing.
ANSWER: An Equal Music
[10] This Indian-born author of Arion and the Dolphin and The Golden Gate wrote An Equal Music, which at 400
pages is short by his standards.
ANSWER: Vikram Seth
[10] This 1500-page Vikram Seth novel describes the attempt to find a proper Hindu instance of the title figure for
Lata Mehra, who causes friction with her family by falling in love with a Muslim.
ANSWER: A Suitable Boy

10. The main character is told to treat his fellow inmates better by Rodion before being executed by Pierre. For 10
points each:
[10] Name this novel, in which Cincinnatus C. is sentenced to death for “gnostical turpitude.”
ANSWER: Invitation to a Beheading [or Priglashenie na kazn]
[10] Invitation to a Beheading was written by this author of The Real Life of Sebastian Knight, Pale Fire, and
Lolita.
ANSWER: Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov
[10] Nabokov’s first work of nonfiction was a biography of this writer, whose works include Taras Bulba and “Old
World Landowners.”
ANSWER: Nikolai Vasilyevich Gogol

11. Name these Bolivian cities, for 10 points each.
[10] This judicial capital of the country is found about two hundred miles northwest of La Paz.
ANSWER: Sucre
[10] Fifty miles to the southwest of Sucre, this city on the foothills of Cerro Rico was the largest city in the
Western Hemisphere from 1545 to the mid-seventeenth century, thanks to Spanish exploitation of its silver mines.
ANSWER: Potosí
[10] In the north central of the country, it is found on the Moxos Plains and shares its name with the Caribbean
island that is only seven miles across the Gulf of Paria from the Venezuelan mainland.
ANSWER: Trinidad

12. It involves the formation of a virtual state upon excitation of a molecule in the ground vibrational state and the
re-emittion of a photon. For 10 points each:
[10] What is this type of spectroscopy that can either produce Stokes or anti-Stokes scattering depending on
whether inelastic scattering is of a higher or lower energy of excitation radiation?
ANSWER: Raman spectroscopy
[10] This other type of scattering observed in Raman spectroscopy occurs due to elastic scattering and occurs
between Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks.
ANSWER: Rayleigh scattering
[10] This modification of a Raman spectrometer utilizes a Michelson interferometer and a continuous wave Nd-
YAG laser and is named after the mathematical operation used to translate the interferogram into a spectrum.
ANSWER: Fourier Transform Raman Spectrometer or FT-Raman

13. Some of the supporting cast members on this show, which debuted in fall 2008, include August Richards,
Teddy Sears, and Currie Graham. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this Steven Bochco-created TNT lawyer show, starring Mark-Paul Gosselaar and his hair.
ANSWER: Raising the Bar
[10] The female lead on Raising the Bar is this actress, who plays Judge Trudy Kessler, after six years as Lois on
Malcolm in the Middle.
ANSWER: Jane Kaczmarek
[10] Kaczmarek has appeared seven times in this similar role on The Simpsons. This character fills in when the
lenient Judge Snyder is on vacation and gives much harsher sentences to Homer and Bart.
ANSWER: Judge Constance Harm
14. It posited that nothing immoral according to the laws of nature could possibly come from God, extending a
Kantian test to the title method of imparting knowledge. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this 1792 text on religious truth, which was for a time falsely attributed to Kant after its author page and
preface were mistakenly omitted by the printer.
ANSWER: An Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation [or Versuch einer Kritik aller Offenbarung]
[10] An Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation was actually written by this philosopher, whose later works, such as
Foundations of Natural Right, extended his system of the “science of knowledge.”
ANSWER: Johann Gottlieb Fichte
[10] Later, this dialectic-loving author of Philosophy of Right and Science of Logic encouraged philosophical
historians to regard Fichte as a transitional figure in order to play up his own importance.
ANSWER: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

15. The Kronecker decomposition theorem states a manner in which all of a certain type of these can be written.
For 10 points each:
[10] All cyclic groups belong to what type of group where all the elements commute?
ANSWER: Abelian group
[10] Often credited with connecting group theory and field theory, his theorem states that an algebraic equation is
algebraically solvable if and only if its group is soluble.
ANSWER: Évariste Galois
[10] Classification theory states that simple groups with this property can be classified into one of five types. They
are defined by the nature of their group order and include modulo, multiplication, point groups, and symmetric
groups.
ANSWER: finite groups

16. A marble Roman copy of this work is known as the Varvakeion. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this statue, made from forty-four talents of gold, which depicted a goddess wearing a belt made of
snakes in front of the middle of five interior columns, holding a shield that depicts Pericles and the artist.
ANSWER: Athena Parthenos [or Athena the Virgin; or “the statue of Athena inside the Parthenon”; or
anything that mentions Athena and something to do with either virginity or a word beginning with “parth”]
[10] This sculptor of the Athena Parthenos also showed the goddess in the bronze Promachos and the Lemnian
Athena, and created other works, such as the Elgin Marbles.
ANSWER: Phidias
[10] This seated figure sculpted by Phidias holds Nike in one hand and a scepter with an eagle on it in the other.
This lost forty-foot statue was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world.
ANSWER: Statue of Zeus at Olympia [accept clear equivalents]

17. His birthday is observed as Teachers' Day every September 28 in Taiwan. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this Chinese teacher. whose aphorisms are collected in the Analects, and whose ideas were codified by
Mencius.
ANSWER: Confucius [or Kongfuzi; or Kongzi]
[10] Confucius taught that this action, the reform of language to properly refer to persons and things, was the first
step to take towards improving society.
ANSWER: rectifying names
[10] A competing school to Confucianism was promulgated by this fifth-century BCE philosopher, who preached
the “fourfold standard” and universal love.
ANSWER: Mozu [or Mo Ti; or Motse]
18. He emigrated from Jamaica to the United States and started the newspaper The Negro World. For 10 points
each:
[10] Name this black separatist leader, the founder of the Universal Negro Improvement Association.
ANSWER: Marcus Garvey
[10] Marcus Garvey was imprisoned for mail fraud after selling stock in this basically fictitious shipping company,
which was allegedly intended to facilitate commerce among the world’s black communities.
ANSWER: The Black Star Line
[10] In 1920, the UNIA provisionally elected Garvey to this spurious office, from which he was to supervise the
emigration of American blacks.
ANSWER: President of Africa

19. Although it did not rely on Euler’s equation of ideal fluid flow, it resulted from the deviation of idealized
inviscid fluid motion from physical reality. For 10 points each:
[10] What is this paradox of fluid mechanics which states that the irrotational flow of a nonviscous fluid around an
object produces no drag on the object.
ANSWER: D’Alembert’s paradox
 [10] For the case of two dimensions and a non inviscid gas, circulation may exist around a body, which leads to this
non-zero force perpendicular to the direction of motion. It is infamous in quizbowl circles for its supposed ability to
produce curveballs.
ANSWER: Magnus effect
[10] For very small particles and non-turbulent flow, the drag force on a spherical object can be given by this law,
which can be equated to Newton’s resistance law to yield the drag coefficient.
ANSWER: Stokes’ law [do not accept Navier-Stokes equations]

20. The French Third Republic was best by a series of political scandals in the late nineteenth century. For 10
points each:
[10] Though this man successfully wrangled Egyptian concessions and planned the building of the Suez Canal, his
involvement in Panama was a debacle which ended with his conviction for defrauding investors and bribing
politicians.
ANSWER: Ferdinand Marie, Vicomte de Lesseps
[10] Georges Picquart, Emile Zola, and Georges Clemenceau were among those who pointed out that Major
Esterhazy, not this Jewish captain, was responsible for selling military secrets to the Germans in 1894.
ANSWER: Alfred Dreyfus
[10] The Panama Scandal, the picaresque intrigues of George Boulanger, and labor unrest all raged during the 1887
to 1894 presidency of this man, whose last indignity was his assassination by the anarchist Sante Caserio.
ANSWER: Marie François Sadi Carnot

21. Name these Latin American countries which suffered civil strife during the Cold War, for 10 points each.
[10] Jacobo Arbenz Guzman's attempt to expropriate the land of the United Fruit Company led the CIA to back a
1954 coup by Carlos Castillo Armas in this country.
ANSWER: Guatemala
[10] This country, which previously fought the Soccer War with El Salvador, became a haven for Contras fighting
against the government of Nicaragua during the 1980s rule of Roberto Suazo Córdova.
ANSWER: Honduras
[10] Actions against this country's flag by American high school students in 1964 caused it to break diplomatic
relations with the U.S. Later, Omar Torrijos and Manuel Noriega took power in coups here.
ANSWER: Panama
22. He collected sixty-eight brief descriptions of buildings in Places Where I’ve Done Time. For 10 points each:
[10] Name this Californian author of The Human Comedy, whose works often dealt with the Armenian community
in Fresno.
ANSWER: William Saroyan
[10] “Sleep” and “Wakefulness” are the two sections of this short story by William Saroyan, which describes a
writer who is dying of starvation as he attempts to finish “An Application for Permission to Live.”
ANSWER: “The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze”
[10] The policeman Blick attempts to arrest the prostitute Kitty at Nick's bar, but Joe and Tom intervene in this
Saroyan play, which features a mysterious Arab and Kit Carson as background characters.
ANSWER: The Time of Your Life

23. Also known as Agdistis or Dindymene, this figure became identified with the Roman cult of Magna Mater. For
10 points each:
[10] Name this Phyrgian deity who was attended by the Galli and the Corybantes and honored in the Day of Blood,
recalling the autocastration of her lover Attis.
ANSWER: Cybele
[10] This sister and wife of Cronos, who substituted a stone for her son Zeus, was syncretized with Cybele by the
Greeks.
ANSWER: Rhea
[10] The hiding of Zeus from Cronos took place in a cave on this Cretan mountain.
ANSWER: Mount Ida [or Mount Dicte]

								
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