Freshman Orientation � �Aliens in the Library� by ZWjNJ5QI

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									              Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

English I Classes; Teaching Team: Jeri Calcote, Librarian; Jane Shulsen, English Teacher

Introductions: Introduce myself, position and library. We’ve come up with the theme
“Aliens in the Library” for your orientation to the library media center. We have some
fun activities to introduce you to what we have to offer here. There won’t be any tests,
but I may ask you some questions and give out some prizes each day. At the end, I will
ask you to evaluate your activities here in the library to see if they’ve helped you.

Purpose: You may feel like an alien in the library, but after our orientation, we hope you
feel like an earthling. We’re teaching Information Literacy, which means you may not
know everything, but you know where to find the best resources to give you the answers.
Assessment – What are we doing in the library? Why are you here? What are you going
to learn?

Definition - The Computer Catalog
The Computer Catalog is what you use to look up print and video resources in this library
media center. It is installed on all of the library’s computers so you can search from any
of them. The three computers in the center of the library are dedicated for Computer
Catalog Use ONLY. That’s why there are no chairs for them.

The computer catalog doesn’t search the Internet; it only searches what resources we
have here in the media center. Did you know that 95 percent of what is in these books is
NOT on the Internet? Did you know that 95 percent of the information on the Internet is
incorrect? There is no quality control. In the library, there is quality control. We want to
make sure you have high quality research and reading materials available and we’re
working to add to it everyday.

Assessment – What are these three computers for? Can you use them for Internet? Where
else can you access the computer catalog? Why books instead of Internet?

Library Arrangement
Point out Biography, Fiction, Dewey and Reference sections. Note newspapers available
each day and where. Librarian can help you if you don’t remember where things are.
Difference between Dewey, Fiction and Biography? What is reference? Can reference be
checked out?

How to Use the Card Catalog

Double Click on the Spectrum Icon, it’s a multicolored 5. The Catalog opens and you can
begin your search. You can search by keyword or subject, title or author. Have them give
me an example of a search. Show results, how to read what’s on the screen: Call number,
what different call numbers mean (AV, VC, FIC, 123, etc.) title, location,

Instead of me explaining this, we’re going to do a hands-on project by teams. Your group
will be give an envelope of items to find using the card catalog. Look it up on the catalog
and then find it on the shelf. Return to your table with all of your items.
       Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

Team #1

Search by Subject: Baseball Choose one of the
items and go find it on the shelf. Take it to your
team’s table.

Search by Title: Gone with the Wind Find it on the
shelf and take it to your team’s table.

Search by Author: King, Stephen Find one of his
titles and take it to your team’s table.

Find a Dictionary from the reference section and
bring it to your team’s table.

Search by Keyword or Author: Johnny Bench Find
the book and bring it to your team’s table.

Find a newspaper
Find a magazine
       Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

Team #2

Search by Subject: Skateboard Choose one of the
items and go find it on the shelf. Take it to your
team’s table.

Search by Title: Holes Find it on the shelf and
take it to your team’s table.

Search by Author: Avi Find one of his titles and
take it to your team’s table.

Find an Encyclopedia from the reference section
and bring it to your team’s table.

Search by Keyword: Marilyn Monroe Find the book
and bring it to your team’s table.

Find a newspaper

Find a magazine
       Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

Team #3

Search by Subject: Fishing Choose one of the
items and go find it on the shelf. Take it to your
team’s table.

Search by Title: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
Find it on the shelf and take it to your team’s
table.

Search by Author: Flagg, Fannie Find one of her
titles and take it to your team’s table.

Fine an Atlas in the reference section and bring it
to your team’s table.

Search by Keyword: Aliens Find the book and
bring it to your team’s table.

Find a newspaper

Find a magazine
       Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

Team #4

Search by Subject: Holocaust Choose a book from
the list that comes up. Find it on the shelf and
take it to your team’s table.

Search by Title: Headless Ghost Find it on the
shelf and take it to your team’s table.

Search by Author: West, Michael Find one of her
titles and take it to your team’s table.

Find a book about careers in the reference section
and bring it to your team’s table.

Search by Keyword: Jesse James Find the book
and bring it to your team’s table.

Find a newspaper

Find a magazine
              Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

Assessment: Each person at the table take one or two of the items you found on your
search, match it with the search request slip and be ready to explain to the rest of the class
your search, the item it matches and where you found it in the library. What helped you
find the book you needed? What parts of the book – spine title, cover, spine label

Wrap Up: Who in the library is best qualified to help you find what your need? What
resource should you check first?


       TEKS Covered for English I:

       b) Knowledge and Skills

       4) Writing/inquiry/research. The student uses writing as a tool for learning. The
       student is expected to:

               (C) compile information from primary and secondary sources in
               systematic ways using available technology;

       6) Reading/word identification/vocabulary development. The student uses a
       variety of strategies to read unfamiliar words and to build vocabulary. The student
       is expected to:

               (A) expand vocabulary through wide reading, listening, and discussing;

               (B) rely on context to determine meanings of words and phrases such as
               figurative language, idioms, multiple meaning words, and technical
               vocabulary;

               (C) apply meanings of prefixes, roots, and suffixes in order to
               comprehend;

               (E) use reference material such as glossary, dictionary, thesaurus, and
               available technology to determine precise meanings and usage;

       7) Reading/comprehension. The student comprehends selections using a variety
       of strategies. The student is expected to:

               (A) establish a purpose for reading such as to discover, interpret, and
               enjoy;

               (B) draw upon his/her own background to provide connection to texts;

       (12) Reading/analysis/evaluation. The student reads critically to evaluate texts.
       The student is expected to:
      Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

       (B) evaluate the credibility of information sources and determine the
       writer's motives;

(13) Reading/inquiry/research. The student reads in order to research self-
selected and assigned topics. The student is expected to:

       (B) locate appropriate print and non-print information using texts and
       technical resources, periodicals and book indices, including databases and
       the Internet;

       (D) adapt researched material for presentation to different audiences and
       for different purposes, and cite sources completely; and

       (E) draw conclusions from information gathered.

(14) Listening/speaking/critical listening. The student listens attentively for a
variety of purposes. The student is expected to:

       (A) focus attention on the speaker's message;

       (B) use knowledge of language and develop vocabulary to interpret
       accurately the speaker's message;

       (C) monitor speaker's message for clarity and understanding such as
       asking relevant questions to clarify understanding; and

       (D) formulate and provide effective verbal and nonverbal feedback.

(15) Listening/speaking/evaluation. The student listens to analyze, appreciate,
and evaluate oral performances and presentations. The student is expected to:

       (A) listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of
       peers or published works such as original essays or narratives,
       interpretations of poetry, or individual or group performances of scripts;

       (C) evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public
       figures, and media presentations;

       (E) use audience feedback to evaluate his/her own effectiveness and set
       goals for future presentations.

(16) Listening/speaking/purposes. The student speaks clearly and effectively for
a variety of purposes and audiences. The student is expected to:

       (A) use the conventions of oral language effectively;
               Freshman Orientation – “Aliens in the Library”

                 (B) use informal, standard, and technical language effectively to meet the
                 needs of purpose, audience, occasion, and task;

                 (C) prepare, organize, and present a variety of informative messages
                 effectively;

                 (D) use effective verbal and nonverbal strategies in presenting oral
                 messages;

                 (E) ask clear questions for a variety of purposes and respond
                 appropriately to the questions of others; and

                 (F) make relevant contributions in conversations and discussions.

        (19) Viewing/representing/interpretation. The student understands and interprets
        visual representations. The student is expected to:

                 (B) analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various
                 media; and

                 (C) distinguish the purposes of various media forms such as informative
                 texts, entertaining texts, and advertisements.

        (20) Viewing/representing/analysis. The student analyzes and critiques the
        significance of visual representations. The student is expected to:

                 (A) investigate the source of a media presentation or production such as
                 who made it and why it was made;

                 (B) deconstruct media to get the main idea of the message's content;




Attached is something we've used in the past with freshmen. We divide each class into four
groups and after a little explanation, we have them use the online catalog and find the items on
their group's list. For this one, we used an "Aliens in the Library" theme and hung spaceships
from the ceiling and had "aliens" sitting in a couple of chairs. Feel free to adapt the group lists for
use in your library with your particular online catalog.


                 Jeri Calcote
                 District Library Media Specialist
                 Poolville (Texas) I.S.D.

								
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