Freshmen Summer Reading Notebook by kqm6E5

VIEWS: 2 PAGES: 5

									Freshmen Summer Reading
Notebook
This notebook is due on the 1st day of school. It will NOT be accepted late.

Purpose of summer reading and summer reading project: To create life-long learners who
value literacy and critical thinking.

Directions: This assignment must be submitted in handwritten form only. It must be compiled
in one spiral notebook. Students taking honors will need a 2-subject notebook and students
taking comprehensive will need a 1-subject notebook. Students will turn in the notebook to
their English teacher on the first day of school.

*Honors students are required to read and analyze two novels: Lord of the Flies and The Book
Thief. Honors students are expected to complete the project for EACH novel, one project for
Lord of the Flies and one project for The Book Thief. Both projects will be handwritten in your
spiral notebook

*Comprehensive students are required to turn in one Reading Notebook. (One project for The
Book Thief)

*There will be a test over the books on the first day of school as well. An essay will follow later
that week.




               The Book Thief – Comprehensive & Honors

               *This book is divided into ten parts. Your project should also be divided into ten
               parts in your notebook (one section for each part in the book). For each part
               you must have the following in the assigned order:


       1. Write a summary of the part, stating the key points and highlights that have taken
          place in regard to plot, characters and etc.

       2. Identify and define five words that are unfamiliar to you. These should be words
          that hinder your comprehension of the text. Record the page number where you
          found the word and write the sentence that uses the word.
                                                     Freshmen Summer Reading Notebook

3. Identify five significant quotes. Explain why each quote is significant in one
   paragraph. Things to consider when choosing your quote: Does it develop the
   plot? Develop a character? Develop the moral of the story?

4. List the major characters. Describe these characters by identifying 3 of their
   character traits. For each character trait, record an event from the story
   that exemplifies the character trait.
   EX: Tom: friendly, hard-working and funny
   Friendly- On page 12, Tom tutors his younger brother in math and then helps his
   parents cook dinner.
   Hard-working- On page 101, Tom puts 110% in football practice by running extra
   laps to build his endurance for Friday's game.
       Funny- On page 78, Tom makes Ellen laugh by telling a knock-knock joke.

5. Make Real World Connections. Make one of the following connections: Text to
   World connection (how the text relates to the world) or a Text to Text connection
   (how the text relates to another printed text, i.e. newspaper article, book, magazine
   article – give title) or a Text to Self connection (How the text relates to you
   personally). This should be at least one paragraph.



       The Lord of the Flies – Honors

       *This book is divided into chapters. Your project in your notebook should also be
       divided into chapters (one section for each chapter in the book). For each
       chapter you must have the following in the assigned order:


1. Write a summary of the chapter, stating the key points and highlights that have
   taken place in regard to plot, characters and etc.

2. Identify and define five words that are unfamiliar to you. These should be words
   that hinder your comprehension of the text. Record the page number where you
   found the word and write the sentence that uses the word.

3. Identify five significant quotes. Explain why each quote is significant in one
   paragraph. Things to consider when choosing your quote: Does it develop the
   plot? Develop a character? Develop the moral of the story?


                                        page 2
                                                     Freshmen Summer Reading Notebook

4. List the major characters. Describe these characters by identifying 3 of their
   character traits (Do not include physical character traits). For each character
   trait, record an event from the story that exemplifies the character trait.
   EX: Tom: friendly, hard-working and funny
   Friendly- On page 12, Tom tutors his younger brother in math and then helps his
   parents cook dinner.
   Hard-working- On page 101, Tom puts 110% in football practice by running extra
   laps to build his endurance for Friday's game.
       Funny- On page 78, Tom makes Ellen laugh by telling a knock-knock joke.

5. Make Real World Connections. Make one of the following connections: Text to
   World connection (how the text relates to the world) or a Text to Text connection
   (how the text relates to another printed text, i.e. newspaper article, book,
   magazine article – give title) or a Text to Self connection (How the text relates to
   you personally). This should be at least one paragraph.




                                     page 3
                                                                Freshmen Summer Reading Notebook



Example Page – Must be Handwritten


                                             Act One

Summary:

There is a long lasting feud between the Montague’s and the Capulet’s. They are two families
that do not like each other at all. In the beginning a street breaks out in the streets of Verona
and the Prince intervenes and warns that if the two families ever disturb the streets of Verona
again someone will pay for it with their life. Romeo, a Montague, is sad because he has just
broken up with his girlfriend Rosaline. Benvolio tries to cheer him up by taking him to the
Capulet’s ball, which they learn about from a servant who can’t read the guest list. At the ball
Romeo sees Juliet and instantly falls in love. They kiss and then they discover that they are one
another’s mortal enemy. . . . . . . .

Five words:

   1.   remnants (page 833) - what is left over; remainders
        The remnants of the house still stood after the fire.

   2.   penury (page 838) - extreme poverty
        His choice was either to find some kind of work or to live in penury.

   3.   haughty (page 837) - arrogant
        He acts haughty onstage, but humble offstage.

   4.   ambiguities (page 838) - statements or events whose meanings are unclear
        Voters were confused by the ambiguities in the candidate’s speech.

   5.   scourge (page 839) - instrument for inflicting punishment
        Longer practices were the scourge that the coach used to punish the players for their
        laziness.


List the major characters

The Nurse's primary character traits show that she is warm-hearted, pragmatic, and vulgar.

Warm hearted: The Nurse's emotional monologue on page 40 includes her memories of raising
Juliet like her own daughter and grieving the loss of her only child, Susan. Her warm-hearted
nature is a contrast to Lady Capulet's cool demeanor.
                                              page 4
                                                              Freshmen Summer Reading Notebook


Practical: As Juliet's confidante, the Nurse ultimately gives her very practical advice when
urging her to marry a better-looking Paris, who is regarded favorably by her parents and who
does not have the criminal record that Romeo now holds (p. 204). This advice to "just move
on" proves to be very damaging to the Nurse and Juliet's relationship.

Vulgar: Throughout the play, the Nurse speaks too freely and inappropriately. When
confronted with the juvenile antics of Romeo's friends, she nearly explodes when complaining
to Romeo about her public humiliation. She resorts to name-calling and making threats to
cover her embarrassment. "I am none of his flirt-gills. I am none of his skains-mates," she
says (p. 118).


Significant quotes:

Juliet: “Tell me not, friar, that thou hearest of this,
Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it.
Do thou but call my resolution wise
And with this knife I’ll help it presently.” Page 810

In these lines, Juliet asks Friar Lawrence for a way to avoid the marriage that her father has
arranged. The friar is also in a dilemma because he has already secretly married her to Romeo.
Expressing how desperate she is to avoid a marriage to Paris, she reveals a knife and the desire
to end her life if she can’t be with Romeo. This foreshadows the end of the play when after
finding Romeo dead, she uses Romeo’s knife to kill herself. Obviously, she is not a mature adult
for she doesn’t think rationally here. This echoes the moral of the play because the feud is
destroying her chance at happiness. It will also destroy the family’s happiness. Hate is an evil,
destructive force.

Real World Connections:

Text to world: Romeo's and Juliet's families (Montagues and Capulets) have been feuding for
years, so Romeo and Juliet cannot date. This relates to the famous feuding families of Kentucky:
the Hatfields and the McCoy's. They began feuding in the 1750's because each family belonged
to opposing sides (Confederacy and Union) in the American Civil War. The feud escalated when
a McCoy wanted to date a Hatfield. The feud was carried through generations until 1891.

Text-to-self: When Romeo and Juliet see each other for the first time, they both fall in love with
each others' appearance, proving that this could be a case of lust, not love. This reminds me of
a time when I first saw my crush in the hallway. I liked the way he\she looked, but I took the
time to get to know his\her personality too.

Text-to-text: Romeo attends the Capulet party dressed in costume so no one can identify him.
This relates to scene in the TV show "Scrubs" when the characters dress up for Halloween and
no one can identify JD.
                                                page 5

								
To top