Poetry Terms - Download as PowerPoint by OHjTmM1

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									Poetry Terms

   English
           Alliteration

• The close repetition of initial
  consonants in poetry or
  prose.

Example:
Peter Piper picked a pack of pickeled
               peppers.
             Assonance
• The repetition of vowel sounds, without
  repetition of consonants.

Example:
   “The agate lamp within thy hand”
          Edgar Allan Poe
               Couplet
• Two lines of verse grouped together as
  a stanza, or because they share a
  common rhyme scheme or metrical
  form. The lines of a couplet usually
  form a complete thought.
Example:
       A sweet disorder in the dress
     Kindles in clothes a wantonness
        End-stopped line
• A line whose literal end coincides with
  the ending of its sense and grammar.

Example:
I will arise and go now and go to Innisfree
             William Butler Yeats
              Enjambment
• The flow of sense, as in ordinary prose,
  between the end of one line of poetry
  and the beginning of the next.

Example:
     That’s my last dutchess painted on the wall,
     Looking as if she were alive. I call
     That piece a wonder now: Fra Pandolf’s hands
     Worked busily a day, and there she stands.
                  Epic
• A long, narrative poem that focuses on
  a large, serious subject and depicts a
  heroic figure who may embody national,
  cultural, or religious ideals. The actions
  of the hero usually determine the fate of
  his people, history, or eternal human
  problems.
           Free Verse
• Generally unrhymed verse free form
  metrical structures.
             Hyperbole
• Exceptional exaggeration for comic or
  dramatic effect.

Example:
   I am so hungry I could eat a cow.
                 Iamb
• Metrical unit of foot in which the first
  syllable is unstressed and the second is
  stressed.

Example:
        The sea is calm tonight
    Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach”
      Iambic Pentameter
• Line of poetry with five iambs, a
  common metrical form in English verse.

Example:

A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse
               Imagery
• In poetry, the expression of an idea,
  object, or action by creating an actual or
  symbolic sensation. To paint a picture
  for the reader through words.
              Metaphor
• Figure of speech that substitutes on
  object for another. A is B.

Example:

 I am a red balloon, a balloon tied to an
                  anchor.
                  Meter
• In poetry, a system for measuring the number
  of feet of a certain rhythm and organizing
  them into lines.

Types:
Monometer (1)               Pentameter   (5)
Dimeter    (2)              Hexameter    (6)
Trimeter (3)                Heptameter   (7)
Tetrameter (4)              Octameter    (8)
                Mood
• The emotion that is evoked in the
  reader by the poem.

• Moods: Sad, happy, angry, etc.
           Onomatopoeia
• The use of words whose sounds
  suggest the sense.

Example:
           Pow, buzz, hiss, etc.
             Oxymoron
Self-contradiction in words, as when an
 adjective does not go with a noun.

Example:
              Brute Beauty
               Paradox
• A statement that appears self-
  contradictory but actually has a basis in
  truth.

Example:
    Stone walls do not a prison make,
    Nor iron bars a cage.
         Personification
• Treating nonhuman things as if they are
  human.

Example:
 The windows were closed so tight they
          could hardly breath.
       Refrain/Repetition
• A stanza, line, or phrase that is
  repeated regularly or irregularly
  throughout a work. It can be used to
  emphasize thematic, rhythmic, or
  stylistic qualities.
      Rhetorical Question
• Something in the form of a question that
  really makes a statement, usually
  negative. Tone of voice is a tip-off.
  Said in one way, “Who cares” may be a
  genuine question from someone who
  wants to know who is concerned. In the
  usual sounding, however, “Who cares?”
  amounts to “Nobody Cares.”
                Rhyme
• Rhyme is the recurrence of identical or
  similar sounds which, in poetry, can
  occur at the end, beginning, or middle of
  a line; end rhyme is the most common
  in poetry.
        Rhyme continued…
• End Rhyme- The words at the end of lines
  rhyme (creates a rhyme scheme)
• Internal Rhyme- Rhymes or near-rhymes
  occur in the middle of lines. Like in this line
  where the “o” sound is internally repeated.
  [“eyes closed, mouth open, raw hot wind/
  blowing sand…]
• Rhyme Scheme- the fixed pattern of rhyme
  for the whole poem [abab, cdcd, efef, gg]
               Rhythm
• The sense of movement caused by
  patterning of stressed and unstressed
  syllables.
                 Simile
• Figure of speech that compares two
  objects by using the words “as,” “as if,”
  or “like.” A is like B
                Sonnet
• Poem of Fourteen lines, usually in
  iambic pentameter, that is restricted to a
  definite rhyme scheme.
              Speaker
• The narrator of a poem
                  Stanza
• In poetry, a regular, rhymed, recurrent pattern
  of lines. The counterpart of a paragraph in
  prose, except that it is regulated by form
  (numbers of lines, rhyme scheme, meter, and
  so on), and customarily divided from other
  stanzas by spaces.
Types:
           Couplet (rhymed)
           Tercet (unrhymed)
           Triplet (rhymed)
           Quatrain (rhymed/unrhymed)
                 Tone
• The speaker’s attitude that is revealed
  in the poem.

								
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