NSERC REVIEW University of Saskatchewan

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					                                                                   NSERC Discovery Grant
                                                                     Application Guide 2007

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

APPLICATION PROCEDURES .......................................................................................................................... 1
SIGNATURES – REVIEW – APPROVAL ............................................................................................................ 2
NSERC REVIEW .............................................................................................................................................. 2
GENERAL PRESENTATION ............................................................................................................................. 3
SUMMARY OF PROPOSAL ............................................................................................................................. 3
BUDGET ......................................................................................................................................................... 4
OVERHEAD .................................................................................................................................................... 7
RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER SUPPORT ............................................................................................................. 7
PROPOSAL ..................................................................................................................................................... 7
REFERENCES .................................................................................................................................................. 9
LETTERS OF SUPPORT ................................................................................................................................. 10
SAMPLES OF RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS .................................................................................................. 10
FORM 100 ................................................................................................................................................... 10
HUMAN ETHICS – ANIMAL CARE – BIOSAFETY ........................................................................................... 12
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ........................................................................................................................... 13
RESEARCH FACILITATION ............................................................................................................................ 13




APPLICATION PROCEDURES:
Deadline: November 1, 2007

 Forms Required: Personal Data Form (Form 100) plus Application for a Grant (Form 101)

 Full instructions to complete the forms and on-line submission details are found on the NSERC site:
http://www.nserc.ca/forms/instructions/101/e.asp?prog=dg.

 Please remember that your samples of research contributions (and paper application, if
submitting by paper) must be received at NSERC by 4:30 pm EST on November 1, 2007. No late
submissions will be accepted.


                                                                         Page 1 of 13
Grant Circulation Form:
 To assist Research Services with the administration of your grant application, you will be requested to
complete the Grant Circulation Form (Word / PDF) upon submission of your grant to the office for review
and signature. Particularly, if someone else will be dropping off your grant for signature at Research
Services, it is most helpful if you can complete this form to accompany your grant.

Process for Submission:
   1. Paper: Two complete, signed applications must be provided to Research Services for
       institutional signature. One copy will be returned to you (to make copies for NSERC) and
       Research Services will keep the other copy on file.
        Number of copies (including original) for applications submitted by paper to NSERC = 8

    2. Electronic: One complete, signed application must be provided to Research Services for
       institutional signature. Research Services will make a copy of the signature page for you and
       keep the hard copy of the application on file. Do not e-submit the application until your
       application has been approved by Research Services.
        To save paper, use double sided printed for your application

 If you have any questions about your NSERC application or the submission process, please
contact either Amanda Plante, Grants Officer (amanda.plante@usask.ca or 966-2207) or Tom
Porter, Research Facilitator (tom.porter@usask.ca or 966-1317).

 For your interest (upon request), Research Services has copies of successful applications (Forms 101
and 100) that can be provided as example discovery grant proposals.


SIGNATURES – REVIEW – APPROVAL:
Required Signatures:
 All applications require the following signatures, signifying their review and approval:
    Principal Investigator
    Co-investigators (for group grants)
    Department Head (or Director)*
    Dean*
    University Representative (Director of Research Services or another authorized Designate)
    If applicable, Appendix B – signed by Principal Investigator and Department Head
        * The signatures of the co-investigators’ Department Head and Dean are required if they are not
        the same as the Principal Investigator;

Submitting a Completed Application:

 You will need to “complete” and “verify” your discovery grant application, before the NSERC system
will provide a “submit” button. When you verify your application, the system will prompt you as a reminder
to send in your “Contributions”.

 Your application should be reviewed by your Department Head and Dean and a hard copy
reviewed/approval by Research Services before you click the “submit” button.

 Once Research Services gives you the “go-ahead”, please e-submit your application when you are
ready. Your application is then routed electronically to Research Services who will forward your
application to NSERC, once the hard copy has been signed by David Harris, Associate Director or Bryan
Schreiner, Director of Research Services.


NSERC REVIEW:
NSERC notes that applications will be reviewed according to:

    1. Excellence of the Researcher (Form 100)
                                                Page 2 of 13
    2. Merit of the Proposal (form 101)
    3. Contribution to the Training of Highly Qualified Personnel (Forms 100 and 101)
    4. The Need for Funds (Forms 100 and 101)

NSERC provides excellent detail about how applications should be submitted and how applications will
be reviewed. The best NSERC links are:

       Applicant Guide: http://www.nserc.gc.ca/professors_e.asp?nav=profnav&lbi=winprop
       Application Instructions: http://www.nserc.gc.ca/forms/instructions/101/e.asp?prog=dg
       Peer Review Manual: http://www.nserc.gc.ca/commit/prm2006/table_e.htm
        (specifically follow the link for Chapter 6: Review of Discovery Grant Applications)


FORM 101:

GENERAL PRESENTATION:
Follow these guidelines when you prepare your application, supporting materials and
attachments:
     Print must be in black ink and of letter quality.
     Text must be single-spaced, with no more than six lines per inch.
     The accepted font is Times New Roman regular 12 pts, or any comparable font – nothing smaller.
     Condensed font, and applications completed strictly in italics, are not acceptable.
Attachments – free form (formerly Part II):
     Use white paper, 8 1/2 x 11 inches (21.5 cm x 28 cm), portrait format, with a single column,
         unless specified otherwise.
     Set margins at 3/4 of an inch (1.9 cm) (minimum) all around.
     Enter your name and PIN at the top of every page, outside the set margins.
     For multi-page attachments, number your pages sequentially.
     Print on one side of the page only.
     The maximum number of pages allowed is indicated in the instructions for the appropriate
         program.
Note – All text, including references, must conform to these standards. Incomplete applications and/or
applications that do not meet the presentation standards may be rejected or be at a disadvantage in
comparison with those that are complete and respect the presentation standards.
Avoid using acronyms and abbreviations or explain them fully.
Colour images submitted in the application will not be duplicated in colour for the peer reviewers.

 For each attachment, as part of the header (in addition to your name and PIN), or as the title for the
page, it is also useful to indicate what section you are detailing (budget justification, relationship to other
support, proposal, references) so anyone looking at the page immediately knows what information it will
provide.

 While the merit of the proposal – its originality and innovation, quality, clarity and scope of objectives –
will ultimately carry the weight of the proposal, effective formatting and editing will serve to fine-tune and
enhance the proposal. For example, text outside of the margins will be cut off since all applications are
hole-punch and bound as a book for GSC members. You may have an excellent proposal but if a
reviewer becomes frustrated while reading it because of the font size, lack of organizations (headings), or
other such errors, it is likely that the review will not be as positive as it could be. It is difficult for a
reviewer to be enthusiastic about an application, if they have trouble reading the content through all the
formatting errors.


SUMMARY OF PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELEASE:
As per the NSERC Guidelines: The summary is intended to explain the proposal in language that the
public can understand. Using simple terms, briefly describe the nature of the work to be done. Indicate
why and to whom the research is important, the anticipated outcomes, and how your field and Canada will
                                                   Page 3 of 13
benefit. If you wish, you may also provide a summary in the second official language in the text box
identified for that purpose.

This is easily the most overlooked part of the research application. This Summary is the best way to
communicate your research program to the entire Grant Selection Committee. The summary is not for
the general public, it is for people who understand science. They will need to know your hypothesis,
method, and overall research program. Two Committee members will review your application in detail,
but the entire Committee makes the award decision. The Plain Language Summary is the best means
to ensure the entire Committee understands and financially supports your research.


BUDGET:
 To assist with your budget preparation, please consult the NSERC site: Financial Administration –
Use of Funds which lists eligible and non-eligible research expenses and also provides information about
the regulations governing the use of grant funds.

BUDGET JUSTIFICATION:
 Provide a detailed explanation and justification for each budget item identified in the Proposed
Expenditures section. Provide sufficient information to allow reviewers to assess whether the resources
requested are appropriate. Provide a five-year budget. If your request is for a shorter duration, explain
why in the Budget Justification section.

 As a new faculty member or researcher in a term position, you should always prepare a 5 year
budget. The GSC may decide to fund you for less, to evaluate your progress in a few years time, but they
will make that decision. You want to show that you have a long term vision for your research program
and it will be best illustrated by coming up with a 5 year program detailed in your budget and proposal.

 Organize this section using the headings provided on the proposed expenditure page (salaries and
benefits, equipment or facility, materials and supplies, travel, dissemination, and other) – it is easier for a
reviewer to quickly note the request and refer back to the actual budget page to cross-reference the
details provided.

 There are no page limits for the budget justification so you have the opportunity to provide as much
information as necessary – Just keep in mind the 100s of grants GSC members review and be sure to be
detailed yet concise!

 Ensure that your budget is reasonable. GSC members will raise an eyebrow if costs are too low
indicating that you have not properly recognized your research expenses. Similarly, if your costs are too
high or appear inflated, it will flag your application for question. If you have any unusually high research
expenses, these need to be clearly justified.

Salaries and Benefits:
As per the NSERC guidelines:
Give the names (if known), categories of employment and proposed salaries (including non-discretionary
benefits) of students, postdoctoral fellows, and research staff. Briefly describe the responsibilities for
each position and indicate the percentage of time they will be spending on this project over its
time-span. Do not include salaries of faculty in project costs. Refer to Form 100 for information regarding
obtaining consent to name individuals in your proposal.

 GSC members/reviews especially like to see how graduate students and other HQP are incorporated
into the research program. Provide sufficient details with regards to the specific research project in which
your students (even if they are as yet unidentified) will be involved.

 The Committee wants to see past support for graduate students (not PDFs) and current support in
your proposal. Adjunct Professors are typically not supported in their research program, but can be very
competitive if the entirety of the budget is to support graduate student research (stipends and travel
costs). Please see the NSERC site: http://www.nserc.gc.ca/professors_e.asp?nav=profnav&lbi=11a1


                                                  Page 4 of 13
 NSERC allows student stipends of $16,500/year for MSc. and $19,000/year for PhD students
plus non-discretionary benefits.

 If you plan to hire a graduate student for hourly work on a project (outside of their graduate
program), the College of Graduate Studies & Research sets the rate at $16.21/hour and suggests a
maximum of 12 hours of work per week.

 GSC members have indicated they usually expect that a researcher will be able to cover at least one
student stipend (or a portion of a stipend) from other University sources (e.g. scholarship from the
Department/College or a teaching assistantship). Depending on your budget request, it may be useful to
indicate the availability of (or lack of) such funds to help justify your request for a full student stipend(s) in
your proposal. Consider what is “normal” in the research culture of your field.

 In general, carefully consider the request for students. Since discovery grants support on-going
research programs, you should strategically incorporate PhD and MSc students into your program.

 For example, if you initially include one PhD for the first 4 years of the program, you should consider
introducing either a new PhD or MSc student in year 3, to begin to investigate new questions that are
surely to develop from the studies of your first student.

 It would also be beneficial to consider including a summer student and/or research technician for each
year to assist your graduate student(s) and the overall program.

 Especially for new faculty members, as your program becomes established, you will likely discover the
need for additional students. It may be advisable from the onset to develop a program in which at least
two students (perhaps one MSc and one PhD) are concurrently involved in your research program.

 Of course with the inclusion of additional students, you must always be able to justify their involvement
in your research program. So long as the request is appropriate, the reviewers/GCS members will
consider the request.

 Unfortunately, while NSERC is not likely to fund your total request, it is always best to ask for what
you need, and not to ‘short-change’ yourself on your budget request.

Non-Discretionary Benefits:
 Mandatory Federal benefits should always be included with your stipend/salary budget request – even
if you are providing a partial salary/stipend – for all of your students technical assistants and other
research personnel (except PDFs). You will be required to pay these benefits (as a federal requirement)
when you set up their Job Information Form (JIF). These benefits will be deducted from your research
Fund even if they were not part of your budget.

 There are two ways to approach the benefits (rates effective as of January 1, 2007):
Scenario 1: Assuming that your students/technicians are 'paid out' for holidays (i.e. take no
holidays), the benefit multiplier is 13.83%.
   Canada Pension Plan          4.95%
   Worker's Compensation        0.59%
   Employment Insurance         2.52%
   3/52 Vacation Pay            5.769% (Saskatchewan labour standard)
* CPP, WC and EI are calculated based on Total Gross Employment Income + Total Vacation Pay
For example, using the NSERC stipend rates, the amount in your budget for students would be:
MSc = $18,859 [($16,500 * 5.769%) * 8.06%]
PhD = $21,716 [($19,000 * 5.769%) * 8.06%]
OR
Scenario 2: Assuming that you allow your students/technicians to take 3 weeks paid vacation per
year (SK labour standard), the benefit multiplier is 8.06%.
   Canada Pension Plan          4.95%
   Worker's Compensation        0.59%
   Employment Insurance         2.52%
For example, using the NSERC stipend rates, the amount in your budget for students would be:
MSc = $17,830 ($16,500 * 8.06%)
                                                    Page 5 of 13
PhD = $20,531 ($19,000 * 8.06%)

Discretionary Benefits:
 While some agencies allow for the payment of discretionary benefits (i.e. life insurance; medical and
dental care; disability; pension) from grants/contracts, discretionary benefits must NOT be included in
your NSERC budget since they cannot be charged against tri-council funding support because
they are considered to be ineligible expenses.

Postdocs:
 The approval of postdocs on campus is coordinated through the College of Graduate Studies and
Research. If you have any questions about hiring a PDF, please contact Ron Borowsky, Associate Dean,
CGSR, at 966-1932 or ron.borowsky@usask.ca . Please note - the minimum allowable salary at the
University of Saskatchewan for a PDF is $31,500/year, providing agency guidelines do not require
a higher salary (NSERC minimum is $25,000/year).

 If you request any funding for a postdoc, ensure that you clarify the timeline for which these individuals
will be hired over the course of your grant, and that you follow the NSERC Use of Grant Funds guidelines,
      Salaries to postdoctoral fellows are limited to two years' support from the Agency.
         Three years' support is acceptable, when justified, to attract exceptional foreign candidates. The
         three-year appointment must be offered up front and reported to the Agency with a written
         justification within one month of an offer being accepted.

Equipment or facility – Materials and Supplies:
As per the NSERC guidelines:
 Give a breakdown of the items requested. Provide details on models, manufacturers, prices, and
applicable taxes.
 Items costing more than $7,000 should be requested separately in a Research Tools and Instruments
grant application.
 Fees to be paid for the use of equipment or a facility should be described (e.g., hours and rate).
 Also report the need for beam time or other special facilities, and if time has been allocated for these.

 Tax is payable for all of the equipment and/or materials and supplies being purchased for your project.
A tax rate of 6.98% should be used for budget purposes. If taxes are not included, they will still be
assessed when you actually purchase the items and as a result you will have less will money available for
your other research expenses.
                 Provincial Tax (PST)                    5.0%
                 GST (after rebates)                     1.98%
                 Total Tax Rate for Budget Purposes      6.98%

 Do you require any funds for the rental of a research vehicle for you and/or your students to travel to
any field sites? If you use a departmental vehicle, are you required to pay for any maintenance costs? If
so, these expenses should be noted in your budget.

 Do you and/or your Department/College have sufficient computers and other equipment available for
your graduate students? If not, you should consider including a request any required equipment for the
students’ projects? In setting up a new lab, it is justifiable to request ~$2500 for a computer/student.

 If you have numerous materials and supplies it is recommended to present your budget request in the
form of a table using headings of: Item, Number, Cost per Item, Total Cost – or something to that effect.
It increases readability for reviewers, if budget totals are provided in a column format rather than in
paragraph form. It will also help reviewers to cross-check your amounts requested.

Travel:
 Are you interested in attending any conferences during this time? As new investigator it is especially
important to share your findings and also network with other researchers.

 It is also recommended to help your graduate students attend conferences.

 You should include details in this section such as: who is expected to go to the conferences, which
conference(s), and what is the estimated cost per person?
                                                Page 6 of 13
Dissemination:
 Anticipating that you and your students will publish results of the research conducted, you should
include a request for publication costs. Provide details as to what journal(s) do you expect to submit to,
and what are the typical costs per paper?

 Usually in either this section or under “Other”, a request ranging from $200-1000 (depending on the
nature of the program) for the cost of miscellaneous items such as photocopying, faxing, printing, toner
cartridges, etc. is included in the budget.


OVERHEAD:
 Do not include any overhead in your discovery grant budget. For your interest – There is no
overhead assessed on grants received form NSERC, SSHRC or CIHR, including funds received through
NCE funded networks. Similarly, there is no overhead assessed on Tri-Council grants transferred to the
UofS from another institution. Indirect cost payments are provided by the federal government to the UofS
on an annual basis, based on a formula directly related to the total amount of annual grant funding
received from the Tri-Council agencies.


RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER SUPPORT:
 You should include the following details for all of your grants/contracts, currently held or
applied for, as per the NSERC guidelines:
Any relationship and/or overlap, conceptual or financial, with work supported by NSERC or other funding
sources must be explained.
Use additional pages to provide the following information:
      Clear and concise information on the conceptual and budgetary relationship or difference
         between this application and all other support (currently held or applied for). Also explain
         perceived duplication in funding or, if applicable, indicate how the NSERC application
         complements research funded by other sources.
      For each grant currently held or applied for, clearly describe the main objective, and provide a
         brief outline of the methodology, budget details, and details on the support of highly qualified
         personnel. In addition, the relationships to the NSERC application must be explained. Such
         information may be provided, for example, in the form of a brief summary of the necessary details
         for each grant.
      If you need to provide a summary and budget page from other proposals or projects, use the
         Other Documents section.
      Other sources of support include grants and contributions from funding agencies, organizations,
         private sector, university start-up funds, research Chairs, the primary place of employment (for
         adjunct professors), and other institutional research support.
The onus is on the applicant to provide sufficient information to enable the reviewers to evaluate the
relationship with other sources of support and to recommend the appropriate NSERC funding level. The
consequence of not providing adequate information to assess the relationship to other research support is
that the reviewers may recommend reduced or no funding.

 As a final check, confirm that all of the research support noted in your Form 100 is referenced
in this section (start-up funds, RTI, etc)

 “No funding overlap” is generally viewed as a poor description. It is understood by GSC members that
there is bound to be some overlap between your discovery grant program and other support you hold. It
is important to give a fair and honest description of the relationship that exists.


PROPOSAL:
 For NSERC discovery grants, ensure you focus the application on a research program rather than a
project (as opposed to CIHR or ADF applications, for example).
                                                 Page 7 of 13
 Hypothesis Driven: This is in the opinion of the Grant Selection Committee – Disciplines and sub-
disciplines develop specific practices and expectations about “developing and answering research
questions”. The important item for your research program is to pose a clear research question as
opposed to an interesting unknown area of study. The Committee may or may not have researchers
who are familiar with your specific field of research, and the obligation is on the applicant to
communicate the research question. This problem is most evident in the applied life sciences that is
experiencing rapid growth in “omics” fields.

 If you were unsuccessful last year: Be upfront and describe how the application has been changed
and how the GSC Committee comments/issues have been addressed. Provide sufficient information as
to what you have done in the past year and what you have changed in the program. The NSERC
Program Officer has comments readily available to provide to the current Committee, so it is important to
provide a rebuttal from last year’s review (likely 2/3 of the Committee remains the same each year).

 For renewal applications: Remember a discovery grant funds an ongoing program of research. You
are not promising deliverables, as in a contract or other project-funded research. You do not have to
accomplish all that you identified in your previous grant. At the time of renewal, it will be your opportunity
to identify what you have achieved. This will largely depend also on where you are in your career. For
example, for first time renewals, the Committee will be assessing what you have accomplished since the
first grant was awarded and you need to prove that you are a good investment for the NSERC funding.
For first time applicants, you need to clearly demonstrate your potential and it is also important to show
how in the short and long term you plan to develop your research program.

 As per the NSERC guidelines:
Using the headings below and in a maximum of five (5) single-sided pages, describe the research
to be supported. Provide details on:
     your recent progress in research activities related to the proposal and, in addition for
        renewals, the progress attributable to your previous Discovery Grant;
     the objectives of your research program – both short- and long-term;
     literature pertinent to the proposal;
     methods and proposed approach;
     anticipated significance of the work; and
     training to take place through the proposal (if none, explain why).
Images and graphics are included in the above-mentioned page limitations.

NOTE:
  1. The onus is on the applicant to provide a sufficient description of the past contributions and
      proposed research plan as described above. Should it be determined (in consultation with the
      selection committee chair) that the information provided is insufficient, NSERC reserves the right
      to take appropriate action, such as not soliciting reports from external referees or withdrawing
      applications from the competition;
  2. If your research is interdisciplinary, you may wish to consult the NSERC Guidelines for the
      Preparation and Review of Applications in Interdisciplinary Research.

In addition,
     All applications from groups must:
             o describe the pertinent expertise and the expected role and contributions of team
               members;
             o discuss collaboration among team members; and
             o provide details of the management structure and team management.
     For SAP Project Grants:
             o provide the name of the facility and, if applicable, the experiment number given by the
               facility;
             o provide a three-year projection of activities; and
             o provide details on the time to be committed to the project by personnel.




                                                  Page 8 of 13
 It is always recommended to use the headings provided by NSERC and the suggested order –
it makes it much easier for a reviewer/committee member to go through the application, find the
required details within the highlighted sections and evaluate it.

 At a minimum, highlight in italics or bold these key headings within the text of your proposal so a
reviewer can quickly identify the details

 Remember – you are only allowed 5 pages for the proposal – any additional pages will be
removed from your proposal. If you are running short on space, make sure your margins are set to 3/4 of
an inch (1.9 cm) (minimum) all around. If your proposal is 6 pages, an NSERC program officer will
                         th
physically remove the 6 page and “Pages Removed” will be stamped on page 5 of your proposal –
neither the external reviews nor the GSC members will see the removed pages.

 Selection Criteria: As a checklist, also remember to address the selection criteria listed below in
your application.
Applications are judged according to the following criteria. The onus is on applicants to address these
explicitly in their proposal.
     Scientific or Engineering Excellence of the Researcher(s) (see Policy and Guidelines on
          the Assessment of Contributions to Research and Training)
               o Knowledge, expertise and experience
               o Quality of past or potential contributions to, and impact on, the proposed and other areas
                    of research
               o Importance of contributions to, and use by, other researchers and end-users
               o Complementarity of expertise of the members of the group and synergy (where
                    applicable)
     Merit of the Proposal
               o Originality and innovation
               o Significance and expected contributions to research
               o Clarity and scope of objectives
               o Clarity and appropriateness of methodology
               o Feasibility
               o Extent to which the scope of the proposal addresses all relevant issues, including the
                    need for varied expertise within or across disciplines
     Contribution to the Training of Highly Qualified Personnel (see Policy and Guidelines on
          the Assessment of Contributions to Research and Training)
               o Quality and extent of past and potential contributions to the training of highly qualified
                    personnel (e.g., postdoctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students, technicians)
               o Appropriateness of the proposal for the training of highly qualified personnel
               o Enhancement of training arising from a collaborative or interdisciplinary environment
                    (where applicable)
     Need for Funds
               o Appropriateness of, and justification for, the budget
               o Availability of other sources of funding and their relationship to the current proposal
               o Special needs related to the nature of collaborative activities or infrastructure costs such
                    as user fees

 Need for Funds: Applied researchers have access to other funds and basic researchers often only
have access to Discovery Grant funds. If you are an applied researcher, then you must make the case
for funding of your long term program that will not be supported out of other short term projects. For basic
researchers, this may be your only chance to secure sufficient funding to achieve the anticipated
outcomes. NSERC has limited funds and researchers with access (or the Committee’s perception
of access) to other research funds will typically receive relatively less support (unless well
justified) than basic researchers with full-time academic appointments.


REFERENCES:
As per the NSERC guidelines:
                                                 Page 9 of 13
       Use this section if you need to provide a list of literature references. Your list of references
        must not exceed one (1) page on the printed copy.
       Do not refer readers to Web sites for additional information on your proposal.
       Do not introduce hyperlinks in your list of references.

 Footnotes are not allowed as a way to carryover information from your proposal into the references as
a way of “getting around” the 5 page proposal limit.


LETTERS OF SUPPORT:
As per the NSERC guidelines: Additional documents such as letters of support must not be submitted and
will be removed. The exception to this rule is letters from users attesting to the nature and the significance
of confidential technical and internal reports described in your Personal Data Form (Form 100). For
additional information, refer to the Guidelines for the Review and Preparation of Applications in
Engineering and the Applied Sciences.


SAMPLES OF RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS:
 You can provide up to 4 samples of research contributions such as reprints, preprints and/or
manuscripts, excerpts from your thesis, technical reports, etc. that will be used by reviewers to assess the
quality of your work. These documents should be chosen to represent your most significant recent
contributions, or those most relevant to the proposed work in the last 6 years (for applicants with research
backgrounds in non-university settings, these documents may include contributions over the last ten
years).

Please see the NSERC instructions (http://www.nserc.ca/forms/instructions/101/e.asp?prog=dg) to
determine the number of sets and Maximum Number of Contributions Per Set that you are allowed to
send to NSERC.

Package each set of contributions in a separate envelope marked "contributions" and clearly indicate the
name and initials, PIN, department and university of the applicant in the upper-left corner of each
envelope. The material will not be forwarded to reviewers if it is not packaged properly.

You also need to include a list of research contributions provided (one original copy only – do not
photocopy). This list should be included with the package of all your sets of contributions that is sent to
NSERC. If you have verified your application, this page will automatically be generated for you.

Please remember that these contributions must be received at NSERC (350 Albert Street, Ottawa,
ON K1A 1H5) by 4:30 pm EST on November 1, 2007. No late submissions will be accepted. If you
need a phone number for the courier use (613) 995-5829 which is the NSERC general inquiries number
as well as the general number for the discover grants program.


FORM 100:
 If applicable (e.g. Adjuncts) Appendices B and C must be completed and Appendix B must signed by
yourself and your Department Head

Research Support (currently held or applied for):
As per the NSERC guidelines:
 For group grants, be sure to include the family name and initials of the principal applicant and the
number of co-applicants, if applicable (e.g. John X. Doe and 3 others)
 Also - for group grants, the percentage of the funding directly applicable to your research should be
indicated.

As noted in the NSERC guidelines for the ‘free-form’ sections:
     Set margins at 3/4 of an inch (1.9 cm) (minimum) all around.
                                                 Page 10 of 13
       Number consecutively following the last page of Part I.
         Page numbering should therefore start at page 5
       Enter your name and PIN at the top of every page, within the set margins.

 You are only allowed 5 pages for research contributions – please follow these guidelines – Pages in
excess of the number permitted will be removed.

Contributions:
Using the headings below and a maximum of five (5) pages single-sided pages, describe your
contributions to research, industrial R&D and highly qualified personnel training over the last six (6)
years up to the deadline date for the submission of the current application.
        1. Most Significant Contributions to Research and/or to Practical Applications
        2. Research Contributions and Practical Applications
        3. Other Evidence of Impact and Contributions
        4. Delays in Research Activity
        5. Contributions to the Training of Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP)

 For more information, please see the details provided in the NSERC guidelines for Form 100.

1. Most Significant Contributions to Research and/or to Practical Applications
As per the NSERC guidelines:
List up to five (5) of your most significant contributions to research and/or to practical applications over the
last six (6) years. Contributions made more than six (6) years ago but for which the impact is being felt
now (e.g., exploitation of patent, inclusion in a code, etc.) may be included in this section. For each,
describe the significance in terms of influence on the direction of thought and activity in the target
community and in terms of significance to, and use by, other researchers and end users. For collaborative
contributions, describe your role.
A contribution does not have to be a single publication or report. For example, a group of publications on
a specific subject could be discussed as one contribution.

 This is the area where you need to demonstrate your excellence. The purpose of this section will
be to demonstrate your ability to conduct the research program that you promise in your
proposal. Many research publications have multiple authors, and frequently the same set of multiple
authors. Especially if you are a new researcher, you will need to state your unique contributions. Also, a
research contribution does not have to be a single paper. Rather the contribution should be about a
research idea (that may be in several papers) or a body of closely related work.

2. Research Contributions and Practical Applications
As per the NSERC guidelines:
 Use boldface to indicate students who are co-authors on the contributions listed.
         Some GSC members have noted that in addition to bolding your students listed in the research
        contributions, it also helps if you either underline or otherwise highlight your name to quickly
        identify you in the list among other authors.
 List the source of funding for each contribution and use parentheses to indicate the primary source of
funding for each contribution.
 List research contributions and practical applications over the last six (6) years. Begin with your most
recent, and start each entry on a new line. Do not repeat the contributions listed in the previous section.
              Only publications from 2001 to 2007 should be listed

 If you list a contribution as “submitted or in press” be advised that the GSC members will check to
confirm articles have been published. At the meetings in February, Committee members all bring laptops
and have access to the internet to verify any information you provide in your proposal.

3. Other Evidence of Impact and Contributions
As per the NSERC guidelines:
List other activities that may show the impact of your work. These may include:
      awards;
      prestigious invited lectures;
      research fellowships;
                                                  Page 11 of 13
       journal editorships;
       membership on committees, boards, or policy-making bodies;
       consulting activities;
       public awareness/education; and
       any other activities or information that will help committees to evaluate your contributions to and
        impact on science and engineering, including interdisciplinary research.

5. Contributions to the Training of Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP)
As per the NSERC guidelines:
In this part of your Form 100, you may clarify your contributions to training of HQP (i.e., your most
important contributions to training, such as, aggregate data on a particular group of trainees), discussion
of training in particularly important or challenging areas of research, specialized methodologies and
techniques, interdisciplinary or industrial collaborations, as well as your role in co-supervision of some of
your HQP, the lack of recent contribution to training, etc.

 For new faculty members – You may wish to include some details about the graduate students you
expect to employ within the next year (especially if you have any recruited or currently investigating your
program), given the hopeful success of your discovery grant application.

Appendix D: Consent from HQP Information:
 Please remember to use this appendix and obtain the consent (signature) if you list an individual by
name as a trained HQP. This consent must be kept in your files or in your department's files and is valid
for up to 6 years. Otherwise list a qualified person's accomplishments but "withhold" their name as in the
example provided in Appendix D.

When submitting electronically, please note – If you are going to make changes to your Form 100 (CV
Module) please ensure that you UNLINK the form from your application (Form 101) prior to revising.
NSERC does not maintain a dynamic linkage between the documents. Once you have revised your Form
100, RELINK the form to your Form 101 (the proposal). This ensures that the most up-to-date version of
your Form 100 will be included with your application.


GENERAL REMINDERS:

HUMAN ETHICS – ANIMAL CARE – BIOSAFETY:
 If your research project will require ethics approval, an up-to-date protocol/permit will need to be in
place before any research can be done and/or a research fund can be authorized for your award.

 If you would like assistance in obtaining approval or have specific human ethics/animal care/biosafety
questions please contact:

Human Ethics
Beryl Radcliffe
Administrative Officer – general inquiries
966-1854

Bonnie Korthuis                                            Curtis Chapman
Ethics Officer (Biomedical)                        Ethics Officer (Behavioural)
966-4053                                           966-2084

Animal Care and Use Program
Colleen Myers (Animal Resource Centre)
966-4126

Biosafety
Corrine Harris
Biosafety Manager, DHS&E
966-8496
                                                 Page 12 of 13
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY:
Industry Liaison Office (ILO):
The ILO helps UofS researchers, faculty, staff, and students identify inventions arising from their research
and works with them to protect and commercialize promising new technology. ILO also works with
faculty, staff and students to understand the commercial potential of their research; to provide advice on
the technology transfer process and related university policies; and to encourage disclosure to the ILO of
new inventions. In addition, ILO works proactively with the business community to raise awareness of
research investment and partnership opportunities at the University of Saskatchewan.

If you have any questions about the intellectual property and/or potential commercialization relating to
your Discovery Grant application, please contact the ILO at 966-1465. More information can also be
found on the ILO website.


RESEARCH FACILITATION:
 Research Facilitation: VP Research and many of the Colleges have Research Facilitators who
provide assistance with proposal development. The facilitators also help by implementing support
systems such as workshops, information sessions and individual consultations, as well as coordinating
networks of researchers for large strategic projects. Please see the attached document with a list of the
various research facilitators on campus and their contact information.

Tom Porter is the Research Facilitator who can best assist with your NSERC application – he can be
reached at 966-1317 or tom.porter@usask.ca.

 Grant Writers/Editors: For future applications, Research Services maintains a short list of external
grant writers/editors that are available on a fee for service basis to assist proposal development. Please
contact one of the VPR Research Facilitators for this information.

 Research Acceleration Program Awards provide proposal development assistance. Applications
are due January 1, May 1 or September 15 and can be downloaded from:
http://www.usask.ca/research/files/index.php?id=99.

 Workshops and Other Resource Material – please see the Research Services website for details
regarding upcoming and past workshops, plus further tips regarding grant proposals:
http://www.usask.ca/research/research_services/workshops.php.




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